27th Oct 1917. Ladies’ War Services

LADIES’ WAR SERVICES.
LOCAL HONOURS.

A list has just been published by the War Office of ladies who have been mentioned for valuable services during the War, and following are among the local names :—

NEWNHAM PADDOX HOSPITAL.—Sister Corley (in charge), Lady Clare Feilding and Miss G K Little (nurses).

“ TE HIRA,” RUGBY.—Mrs D Wharton (quartermaster), Miss A W Sargant, Mrs M K Thomas (sister-in-charge).

PAILTON.—Mrs Morris (Commandant).

BILTON HALL.—Mrs E Conington, Miss B Hackforth.

CLARENDON HOSPITAL, KINETON.—Mrs Peirson-Webber (Quartermaster), the Hon Miss Verney (Quartermaster), Mrs A Woodfield (Acting Quatermaster).

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut Arthur J Dukes, of the Welsh Regiment, B.E.F, son of Mr A J Dukes of Rugby has been gazetted First-Lieutenant, dated July 1, 1917.

Lieut H D W Sitwell, R.F.A, son of Mr. Hervey Sitwell, of Leamington Hastings, has been awarded the Military Cross. Lieut Sitwell received his commission on leaving Woolwich Military Academy in September, 1914.

Corpl W R Clark, aged 20, son of Mr R Clark, 35 Manor Road, has been awarded the Military Medal. He was an old Elborow boy, has been in the R.F.A over three years. Previously he was in the Howitzer Battery when mobilised. He was employed in the L & N-W Loco Shop.

Capt P W Nichalls, the well-known polo player, has received his majority in the Yeomanry.

Capt H H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C, has been transferred to another battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers as second in command, with the acting rank of major.

Cadet W H Packwood, H.A.C (Infantry), son of Mr J C Packwood, has been given a commission and posted to the 6th Royal Warwicks.

Mrs Claridge, of 9 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, has received news that her husband, Pte A J Claridge, has been admitted into hospital in France suffering from wounds in the leg. Mrs W Claridge has also heard that her husband, Pte W S Claridge, is in hospital in France suffering from serious illness. They are the only sons of Mr John Claridge, of 53 New Street, New Bilton.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR LONG LAWFORD MAN.

Pte W J Boyce, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiments, who has been twice mentioned in dispatches, has been awarded the Military Medal for distinguished conduct in the field. He is a son of Mr J Boyce, a member of the Long Lawford Parish Council.

THE AVENUE ON THE LONDON ROAD.
PROMPT ACTION BY THE COUNTY COUNCIL.

The decision by the Duke of Buccleuch—announced in the Advertiser last week—to cut down all the elm trees forming Dunchurch Avenue was discussed at Wednesday’s meeting of the Warwickshire County Council at Warwick, with the result that the Council appointed a committee to act with a view to securing the preservation of the trees.

The matter was raised by the County Roads and Bridges Committee, who expressed their regret to learn the Dukes decision ; and Councillor James Johnson, who represents the Dunchurch division, was the first contributor to the discussion upon it.

Mr Johnson said that the news that the avenue was to be destroyed came as quite a shock to the residents of the neighbourhood, who looked upon it as rather an historical feature of the countryside. It would be a great calamity if the trees were cut down, and he wondered if the Council could take some steps that would have the effect of preserving them.

Councillor J J McKinnell supported this on behalf of the town of Rugby. He remarked that Rugby people would be grievously distressed if the avenue were cut down. There would undoubtedly be a great deal of feeling in the town if such a disaster could not be averted.

The following letter written by Councillor F R Davenport, of Dunchurch, on October 23rd, was read :— “ Notice this week-end in the local paper as to the probable fate of the avenue on the London road between Dunchurch and Coventry was, it appears, the first intimation that this neighbourhood received. It has naturally created much concern, and methods of averting such a loss to the county are already being discussed. I learn to-day that the subject has recently been before the Roads Committee, and that the prospect of the owner changing his decision was not very promising. Notwithstanding this, I beg to submit that this matter should, if possible, be re-considered, and that the Council should appoint a small deputation to approach the Duke of Buccleuch with a view to avoiding what would be a serious loss to the district both from a sentimental and ornamental point of view. I venture to think that some compromise, such as the removal of alternate trees, or that, combined with the lopping of others, might meet the case. I cannot think that war necessities call for such wholesale action as is foreshadowed. I hesitate, as a new member, to engage the Council’s time unduly ; but am convinced from the feeling expressed these last few days that the matter is one of no little, importance, and I am told that the residents of that district will readily petition on the subject if of any service.”

Alderman Oliver Bellasis, Chairman of the Roads and Bridges Committee, said that he did not think the council was in a position to do anything in the way of buying the trees, or anything of that kind. It was for the local authorities to get up a public subscription, or see what else they could do.

Alderman Hunter : What is everybody’s business is no one’s business, and I think that even if the Council has no legal position in the matter if it might give a lead, which would be of very great value, in the interests of the whole county. I came along that avenue this morning. The autumn tints are just turning the trees, and it was a delightful sight. The avenue is one of the amenities of the whole county, and indeed of the whole country ; and I would do anything myself—subscribe or sit on a committee, or approach to Duke, or anything else—rather than see that avenue lost to the county. I really think that if we can get a representative deputation to see the Duke’s agent, or the Duke himself if necessary, and ask on what conditions and terms—monetary or other—he would allow the avenue to remain, we might, perhaps, do something. In the first instance, I believe, the Duke said the trees were a danger. Well, they have been there over a hundred years, and I have never heard of anyone being killed or injured, so I do not think there is much risk. The trees are on the Highway, and are of great beauty ; and I think that, in the interests of the public, we ought not to sit still and do nothing simply because we may have no legal power to buy.

The Chairman (Mr J S Dugdale, K.C) : What is the reason for the decision ?

Alderman Hunter : I think one reason pleaded is that trees are now wanted as timber for the country. But there is any amount in the country without touching an avenue on a main road (hear, hear). Another reason is that the trees are of great value at the present moment, and I think that may be the real reason. I am not blaming the Duke or any other timber owner for cutting down timber now, because its value is three or four times the pre-war value ; but the question is whether it is really necessary or desirable that such an avenue as this should be cut.

The chairman : If what you say is the reason, if it is a very bad reason for a man like the Duke of Buccleuch.

Alderman Hunter : I feel that, too, although I thought I dared not say it (laughter),
and I am glad to hear you say it. I do not want to say anything that might be prejudicial to the object we have in view, and if we could get the Duke to surrender the trees for some nominal sum—and I believe he would if properly approached—it would be better in the interests of all parties. But the trees would have to be transferred to some authority. I do not know what the position would be if a subscription were raised and the trees were bought. They would still remain on the Duke’s land, and if we did buy them I am wondering who would claim them in 20 years’ time.

A member : You would have title.

Alderman Hunter : If we could secure a title to the trees it would be all right ; but the Duke is lord of the manor of several parishes, and some future duke might claim the trees as lord of the manor. There are difficulties of that sort, and I think we ought to have a good committee and try to prevent the disaster of such trees being cut down. I do hope the Council will try to help our district, if they can.

The Chairman said that he knew the road very well, and thought that nothing more dreadful to the neighbourhood than the materialisation of the Duke’s proposal could be scarcely conceived. He felt sure that if a proper representation were made to the Duke he would not think further carrying of carrying out his decision. It would not be a question of money with a man like the Duke. The council did not know what was the real reason, and who was really the promoter of the scheme ; but the Council ought certainly to take some action in the way that had been suggested.

Other members from widely distant parts of the county joined in the assertion that the cutting down of all these fine trees would be loss not only to the county but to the country.

Names were proposed of members who might form a deputation to the Duke or his representative, and Lord Algernon Percy was suggested. He remarked, however, that he would rather not serve. As a matter of fact, he explained, he had approached the Duke privately on the matter, and it did not appear that he had altered his opinion.

Eventually the Council passed a resolution expressing its regret that the Duke had decided to cut down the trees, and appointed a committee—consisting of the Chairman of the Roads and Bridges Committee (alderman Oliver Bellasis), Alderman T Hunter, Councillors J Johnson, F R Davenport, and J J   McKinnell, with power to add to their number—to approach the Duke with a view to securing the preservation of the avenue.

Alderman Evans : I take it that this committee will create an atmosphere that will prevent what is proposed from being done.

Colonel Dibley : That’s right—public opinion.

Details of other business at the meeting are held over.

DEATHS.

 

GULLIVER.—In ever-loving memory of Arthur, youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. T. A. Gulliver, Broadwell, killed in action on October 6th ; aged 21.
“ We loved him—oh ! No tongue can tell
How much we loved him, and how well
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

HILL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. ALFRED HILL, who fell in action on October 4, 1917. “ Some day we shall meet again in the Better Land.”—From his sorrowing Parents, Brothers and Sisters.

RUDDLE.—Killed in action in France on September 3rd, Pte. GEORGE RUDDLE, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
We loved you—oh ! So dearly George ;
But God’s ways are always best.
Beside your brother comrades
Sleep on and take your rest.”
—Brother, you are not forgotten, FLO and ARCH.

SEATON.—In loving memory of our dear son, Corpl. W. R. SEATON, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, who was killed in action in Flanders on October 12, 1917.
“ Had we been asked, how well we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow.’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say,
‘Lord, we love him—let him stay.’
He bravely answer duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, Brothers, and Walter.

SEATON.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Corpl. W. R. SEATON, 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, who was killed in action in Flanders on October 12, 1917.
“ He heard the call ; he came not back—
He came not back, but in our hearts he lives.
His name may fade ; his deeds will never die.
His bright, pure flame of sacrifice will give
Fresh inspiration as years go by.
While England stands his high renown shall last,
For he has joined the heroes of the past.”
—From his sorrowing Wife and Children.

TRACY.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. J. TRACY, 1st K.O.S.B., who was killed on October 4th “ somewhere in France.”—Deeply mourned. From Mabel.

29th Sep 1917. Blackberry Picking

BLACKBERRY PICKING.-During the past fortnight the scholars of various schools in Rugby and the neighbouring villages have picked 2 tons of blackberries, to be used to make jam for the Army and Navy.

UTILITY POULTRY KEEPERS’ MEETING.-There was a satisfactory attendance at a meeting held at the Eagle Hotel on Saturday to consider the formation of a branch of the National Utility Poultry Society, which, in conjunction with the Agricultural Organisation Society, is seeking to put the poultry industry on a business footing. Mr Walter Barnett (Bilton) presided, supported by Mrs Barnett, Mr E B Covington, Mr W T Fischer, &c. Mr H Tarbox read letters from a number of interested poultry keepers ; from the Secretary of the N.U.P.S, and from Capt Peirson Webber, the County Council expert, regretting inability to be present that day. After discussion, it was resolved to form a society for Rugby and district, and to convene a further meeting when the experts can tend to give details of the working of similar existing branches.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CANTEENS.

It has been decided to close – at any rate, temporarily – the Food Economy Canteen opened at New Bilton in July last, and meals will not be obtainable there after today (Saturday). Although there is no doubt that if workers had been brought to realise that meals can be obtained there far cheaper than they could be prepared at home, the canteen has not been well patronised, and there has been a weekly loss since it opened. It is gratifying to note, on the other hand, that the Chester Street canteen continues to be a great success, and there are hopes of an extension in the accommodation. Not only is bread conserved, but, thanks to the willing aid of enthusiastic honorary helpers and to the hearty co-operation of an efficient paid staff, the prices as at New Bilton, rule low for very satisfying meals. The place is always full at meal times, and many people purchase cooked food to take home. Working expenses are being met, and a weekly profit, which will go to the liquidation of the debt incurred in setting up the canteen, is being made.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier Reg Covington, R.F.A, son of Mr Richard Covington, has been gassed during the recent fighting.

The latest list of war honours contains the name of Pte J French (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte George Ruddle, of James Street, Rugby, is reported missing, believed killed. From his comrades it was gathered that he was almost certainly killed. He was in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Sergt L C Cox, elder son of Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth House, Popular Grove, Rugby, after much active service in France with the King’s Royal Rifles, during which time he was wounded four times has passed first class in a special course of instruction and sails for Africa this weekend to join the King’s African Rifles. His younger Brother Albert, also with experience of the fighting in France, being twice mentioned and awarded the Military Medal, has been presented as a second-lieutenant in the King’s Liverpool Regiment.

Official intimation has been received from the War Office, that Bombardier S G Smith, son of Mrs Smith, 28 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, was killed in action in France on August 18th. He was formerly a member of the of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, and was employed by the Rover Company, Coventry when called up. A letter from the officer commanding the battalion speaks in high terms of Bombardier Smith’s performance of his duties.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.

CAPT E G PASSMORE, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr S A Passmore, is in hospital at Dieppe suffering from trench fever.

News has reached the village that Pte Stowe, who was reported missing, is now a prisoner of war. This is the second prisoner of war from this village, Pte Roberts having been wounded in the leg and taken prisoner a few months ago.

BRETFORD.

KILLED IN ACTION.-Mrs Archer College, Hill Farm, Bretford, has been notified that her husband, Pte Archer Colledge, Royal Warwicks, was killed in France on September 3rd. Pte College, who went to the front in June last, lost his life in his first engagement. He was educated at Pailton Church School and was employed at Coventry Ordnance Works until called up in March last. Pte College’s Company Officer, in a letter to Mrs College, writes :- “ Although he had recently joined us, by his cheeriness and courage he soon made himself liked, and his platoon feel his loss keenly, as I do myself.” A comrade of Pte College’s, who has been in continuous action for the last 16 months, writes that the present fighting is the bitterest he has yet experienced. Pte College was 29 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

TO HELP THE PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

AN IMPORTANT EVENT.

To-day (Saturday) an attractive event will take place in Benn’s Field, North Street, Rugby, in aid of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, for which a continuous and increasing flow of money is needed. The effort will consist of a great show and sale of agricultural and horticultural produce, which is being freely given by generous donors in the town and district.

Mr J J McKinnell, C.C, chairman of the Urban District Council, is the chairman of the committee, and, supported by leading residents, will open the affair at 2.30 p.m.

In the horticultural section 26 prizes are offered for competition ; and, of course, contributions of produce merely for sale will be gladly received. Already a large number of sheep, lambs, pig, rabbits, and poultry have been promised for the agricultural department ; and the auctioneers of the town, who will sell the goods, are giving their services gratuitously, as well as all others who are working so energetically to ensure success, and it only remains for the public to give their attendance-and their money-for which there will be plenty of bargains.

A large marquee. which will be lighted by electricity in the evening, will be provided ; and apart from the exhibition and sale, there will be various competitions and side-shows of an attractive nature. These will include a fire brigade competition-always an interesting item-and four brigades from Coventry will be represented in this. There will be dancing also for the young people.

For a small admission fee of 6d the visitor will, therefore, get plenty of money.

The Committee consists of Messrs. A Bell, chairman ; J Cash, hon treasurer ; G Allford, J Reginald Barker, C Cockerel, F Dunkerley, J Harker, G Harrowing, G Henton, J P Lennon, C Mewis, J J   Scrivener, F Starmore, with J R Blyth and H Lovell, joint hon secretaries.

DEATHS.

COLLEDGE.—In ever-loving memory of Private ARCHER COLLEDGE, 20249 Royal Warwickshire Regt., killed in action on 3rd September, 1917, somewhere in France, aged 29 years.
A loving husband, true and kind,
A better father you’d never find ;
But He who orders all things best,
Has given to him eternal rest.
The end was bitter, the shock severe,
To part with one we loved most dear.
We did not see him die or hear him say goodbye ;
We miss him and mourn for him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the days is his young life has seen.
—Deeply mourned by his Wife and Child.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed at the battle of Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915, son of the late James Barnett and Mrs. Sansome, 5 Gas Street. Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Step-father, Brothers, Winnie and May.
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of my pal, Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxford and Bucks, killed in action September 25th, 1915.
Two years had passed, my heart’s still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face
No pal on earth can fill his place.
BILLIE WEBB, somewhere in France.

BROWN.—In loving memory of our dear Son & Brother, PERCY EDWIN BROWN, who was killed in action on September 25th, 1915.
Sleep on dear son and brother in your far off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts,
We will remember thee.
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of PRIVATE C. CASHMORE, Oxon & Bucks L.I., who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
Our hero gone, but not forgotten,
Never shall his memory fade ;
Our sad thoughts so often wonder
To that far-off land where he is laid.
Yes, we think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall,
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his photo on the wall.
—From his loving Wife and Children.

EMERY.—In loving memory of ERNEST HARRY EMERY, Bdr. R.F.A., accidentally killed whilst on active service with the Salonica Forces, Oct. 1st, 1916. Interred in Mekes Cemetery.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, FRED, who was killed in France on Sept. 25th, 1915.
From POLLIE AND SARAH.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, JOHN HINKS, of 33 Essex Street, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who fell asleep in action in France on September 25th, 1915.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave,
Of a dear son and soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand,
When we meet again in the better land.”
—Not for granted by his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

STENT.—In loving memory of my dear son, Corpl. P. V. STENT, who was killed in action at Loos, on September 25th, 1915.
“ Two years have passed and friends around us
Think, perhaps, the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow,
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Silently mourned by his loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

STENT.—In loving memory of PERCY VICTOR STENT, who was killed at Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915. “ Death divides, but memory lingers.”—From Mr. and Mrs. HARBAN and family.

STONE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, PTE. C. G. STONE, who was wounded 28th Sept., and died the 1st October, 1915.
“ They miss him most who loved him best.”
—From his loving wife Amy.

WHITBREAD.—2nd Lieut. BASIL, 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Reported missing 22 July, 1916 ; now presumed to have been killed in action on that date.

WEST.—In proud and loving memory of FRANK WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel R.F.A. (T.), who was killed near Pozieres on September 28, 1916 ; aged 33.—“ We have found safety with all things undying.”

Ruddle, George Henry. Died 3rd Sep 1917

George Henry RUDDLE was born in Rugby in mid 1887.  

He was the son of Edwin William Ruiddle [b.c.1857, Burford] and Annie E, née Betteridge, Ruddle [b.c.1857, Churchill].  They seem to have moved to the Chipping Norton area, as their marriage was registered there in 1881, and their first child was born there in 1883.  By 1885 they had moved to Rugby and George’s birth was registered there in Q2, 1887 and he was baptised at St Andrew’s church on 29 July 1887, when the family were living at 26 Gas Street, Rugby, and Edwin was a ‘painter’.

In 1891, the family were still at 26 Gas Street; George was now three years old, with three elder siblings and one younger.  In 1892 the Rugby Almanack[1] showed that Edwin’s occupation was still ‘Painter’.  George’s mother died, aged 40, in later 1897, so in 1901, when George was thirteen, his father was a widower, still a ‘house painter’, and Louisa, the eldest daughter was still living at home and working as a ‘corset maker – stay’.  George now had four younger sisters and the family were living at 20 Pindars Lane, Rugby.  George was educated at the Murray School, Rugby.[2]

By 1911, George’s father had remarried with Kate Higgins and they had moved to live at 30 Rokeby Street, Rugby.  Only one of George’s sisters was still at home, together with seven Higgins step-siblings.  George was in lodgings with the Sedgley family in New Street, New Bilton and working as a ‘Bill Poster’.  He was entered on their census return as 26 years old.

In late 1915, George Ruddle, listing his home with the family at 30 Rokeby Street, Rugby, enlisted at Rugby, under the Group System in connection with Lord Derby’s Recruiting Scheme, Part 2,[3] initially in the 1st Bn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment (RWR), as a Private, No.242389.

The 1st Battalion had been in Shorncliffe in August 1914 as part of 10th Brigade, 4th Division and landed in France on 22 August 1914.  This would have been well before George enlisted and the 1st Bn. in UK would possibly have been a nominal recruiting battalion.

George subsequently served with 2nd/6th Bn. Royal Warwickshire Regiment which was formed in Coventry in October 1914 as a second line battalion.  It became part of the 2nd/1st Warwickshire Brigade, in the 2nd/1st South Midland Division and then moved to Salisbury Plain.  In August 1915 it was re-designated as the 182nd Brigade, 61st (2nd South Midland) Division and mobilised for war, landing in France on 21 May 1916 for service on the Western Front, where the formation became the 143rd Brigade of the 48th Division.[4]

The date when George went to France is not given on his Medal Card, but it would have been after the end of 1915, as he did not receive the 1915 Star.  He probably went to France with his new Battalion in May 1916, or soon afterwards.

During 1916 the 2nd/6th Bn. RWR was involved in the attack at Fromelles, and then during 1917, in the Operations on the Ancre, the German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line.  The Battle of Langemarck started shortly before George’s death.

The Battalion Diary[5] for the 2nd/6th Battalion showed that in August the Battalion had been generally involved in training in Roubrouck, France and then moved to Brandhoek, Belgium and was then ‘in support’ north of Ypres.  The Battalion strength was 39 officers and 953 other ranks.  Then in September …

1 September – ‘Right Support Battalion of 182 Infantry Brigade … work was done in improving accommodation in the old British front lines. … Area slightly shelled at times …’

2 September – ‘… the relief of 2/5 R.War.R in right sub-sector of front line … completed by 12.15am 3.9.17 … except for intermittent shelling … the night 2nd/3rd Sept. was uneventful.’

3 September – ‘Orders had been received … to capture the hostile position on HILL 35 on night 3rd/4th September.  This hostile position was a strong one consisting of 4 gun pits connected by a Trench with concrete and steel M.G. emplacements immediately in rear … connected with IBERIAN … from which strong cross fire could be brought to bear. … Zero was to be 10.0.p.m. … The operation commenced punctually, but the assault was a failure, owing to the intense machine gun fire bought to bear on the Assaulting Troops from 3 sides.  At midnight we re-occupied our original line.’ 

Our casualties were: Officers Killed one, wounded four, ‘… O.R. Killed 3. Wounded. 37.  Missing. 10.’

4 September – ‘A quiet day except for occasional heavy shelling …’.

It would seem to have been an almost suicidal attack, even though there had been a covering ‘protective barrage’.  Sometime during the assault on 3 September 1917, George was ‘Killed in Action’.

His body was either never found or not identified.  He is remembered on one of the Panels 23 to 28 and 163A of the Tyne Cot Memorial.  The Tyne Cot Memorial is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient.  Whereas those who died before 16 August 1917 are remembered on the Menin Gate, the United Kingdom servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot.  George Ruddle is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

The Evening Despatch noted under the heading ‘Rugby’, ‘Private George Ruddle, killed in action, was educated at Murray School’.[6]

On 23 April 1918, George’s father, Edwin received £9-10-2d that was owed to George, and later, on 17 November 1919, his War Gratuity of £6-10-0d.   George was also awarded the British War and Victory Medals.

George’s father Edwin died in Rugby in later 1927, aged 70.

 

[1]      Kenning, Rugby Almanack, 1892.
[2]      The Evening Despatch, Saturday, 20 October 1917.
[3]      Rugby Advertiser, 4 December 1915.
[4]      Whilst now in the 48th Division, the War Diary continued to be kept, and later filed, under the 61st Division.
[5]      The National Archives, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, 61st Division, Piece 3056/2: 2/6 Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment (1915 Sep – 1919 Feb); also available on www.ancestry.co.uk.
[6]      The Evening Despatch, Saturday, 20 October 1917.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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This article on George RUDDLE was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, June 2017.