24th Aug 1918. Limitation on the Purchase of Jam

LIMITATION ON THE PURCHASE OF JAM.
An official notice in our advertisement columns informs the public that persons must not purchase any jam while they have in their possession any jam made from sugar allotted to them under the Domestic Preserving Order this year.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

Mr H Tarbox (vice-chairman) presided in the absence of Mr T A Wise at a meeting of this committee on Thursday last week, when there were also present : Mrs Townsend, Mrs Dewar, Mrs Peet, Messrs A Appleby, J Cripps, A Humphrey, C Gay, G H Cooke, R Griffin, G H Mellor, and A W Stevenson.

Mr F M Burton (Executive Officer) reported that the Food Controller had sanctioned the increase in the price of milk. He (Mr Burton) had made enquiries as to the retail price of milk per quart in neighbouring towns, and had received replies as under—Coventry, 6½d in August, 7d in September ; Leamington, 6d August, 7d September ; Leicester, 7d August and September ; Northampton, 7d.

It was reported that the Enforcement Officer (Mr B Purchase) had been protected from being called up for military service by the Sub-Committee for Trade Exemptions.

The Executive Officer reported that he had received a request from the Rugby North-West Allotment and Garden Association for permission to sell vegetables at a show in aid of St Dunstan’s Hostel at more than the maximum prices. The Divisional Commissioner was the only person who had power to grant such permission. He had been approached, and had issued a license.

The Superintendent of the B.T.H canteen wrote explaining that, owing to the difficulty the Children’s Ward Committee had experienced in getting a caterer for the Hospital Fete, he had consented to act in that capacity. He had endeavoured to obtain twelve gross of mineral waters, but the manufacturer could only supply one gross. Provided, however, that the Food Committee would allot him an additional 96lbs of sugar, the manufacturer would be prepared to make the extra eleven gross.—The committee considered that this application was on all fours with the unsuccessful request of the Co-operative Education Committee for an additional supply of fat for making cakes for the children’s fete and it was accordingly decided to refuse it.

The Executive Officer read a letter to the effect that a new brand of bacon, which was more suitable for boiling than for frying, would shortly be released. The maximum retail price would be ls 8d per lb, and it would be incumbent upon all registered bacon retailers to stock it.

It was reported that, owing to dissatisfaction with the method of conducting business which obtained at Rugby Market, Mr A Appleby—who represented the Committee on the Allocation Committee—had signified his intention of resigning this position. The Executive Officer had written to the Live Stock Commissioner on the subject, and Mr Wright had replied that he was doing his best to bring Rugby Market more up-to-date. He was far from satisfied with the procedure which had been adopted during the last few weeks, but he trusted that Mr Appleby would not carry out his intention of resigning at present, because he felt sure that things would improve at an early date.

Mr Knightly (the Live Stock Sub-Commissioner) also wrote sympathising with Mr Appleby’s contention, and adding that he trusted that in the future there would not be the same cause for complaint. On the previous Monday the allocation commenced at 12.30, and was completed by about 2.30, and he hoped that they would shortly get through the work still earlier.—Mr Appleby said as matters had now improved, he was willing to continue to serve on the committee, and he accordingly withdraw his resignation.

With regard to the probable milk shortage at Brandon and Wolston, due to a farmer who has received notice to quit his farm threatening to dispose of his milking herd, Mr Appleby reported that the man in question supplied 17 houses in Wolston, 15 at Brandon, and Bluemel’s canteen with milk. Several farmers in these villages, however, kept milking cows, and it was possible that arrangements could be made for them to supply people who were willing to fetch the milk.—The Executive Officer was directed to endeavour to make such arrangements.

Mr Stevenson asked as to the position at the public with regard to Blackberries ?—It was pointed out by the Executive Officer that the public would be liable to prosecution if they went on to certain farms—of which notice would be given—to pick blackberries. If the ditch was on the road side of the hedge the hedge was the property of the landlord and farmer, and would, therefore, be included in the prohibition.—In reply to further questions, he said sugar allotted for preserving home-grown fruit could not be used for making blackberry jam ; but the Ministry had under consideration a proposal to release sugar for this purpose.—Mr Humphrey said the Government would have to decide quickly, or they would be too late ; and the Executive Officer was instructed to write to the Divisional Commissioner on the subject.

The Executive Officer reported that he had received applications from confectioners and bakers for 20cwt 88lbs of fats per week, but the allotment for the whole district was only 11cwt 107lbs, so that he had had to reduce all the allotments proportionately.

The Finance Committee reported that they had received advances of £111 and £78 from the Rugby Urban and Rugby Rural Councils respectively.

It was decided to hold the meetings of the committee fortnightly instead of weekly in future.

THE HARVEST.

During the past fortnight the weather has been most favourable for the harvest, and the work of cutting the crops has been almost completed, while many have been carried in splendid condition.

The crops this year are said to be the best since 1868, and with the increased acreage under corn, the yield, it is estimated, will to equal to about 40 weeks’ national supply.

In this district very heavy crops are the rule, especially oats on the ploughed-up grass land.

During the week brilliant sunshine and high shade temperature have been experienced, 83 and 84 degrees in the shade being registered on some days. Favoured with this weather, the work of carrying has been pushed on as rigorously as the supply of labour would permit.

While the dry weather has been all that could be desired for the corn, it having a marked effect upon the potato plant, which is being forced to early maturity, and the weight of the tubers when lifted may not, perhaps, turn out so large as the vigorous growth of the haulm at one time seemed to indicate.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

HIGH HONOURS FOR RUGBY LADIES.
We understand that the King of the Belgians has conferred the Order of Queen Elizabeth upon Mrs H C Bradby, of Schoolfield, and Mrs F E Hands.

MAJOR R W BARNETT KILLED WHILST RECONNOITRING.
Major Reginald Walter Barnett, M.C and bar, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of Bilton Hall, was killed by a sniper in an advanced post early in the morning of August 12th. He was 26 years of age. Educated at Winchester and Pembroke College, Cambridge, he was gazetted to the 11th Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, in September, 1914 ; went to France in June, 1915 ; became Adjutant in November, 1915 ; Brigade-Major, 189th Division, November, 1916 ; and at the time of his death was Acting G.S.O, II, 6th Division.

BILTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—News came to hand last week-end that two more Biltonians had lost their lives in the service of their country. The first intimation was that Major R W Barnett, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of The Hall, was shot by a sniper on August 12th. On Monday Mrs Sparkes received notification from the Officer in Command of the Company that her husband, Pte F W Sparkes, Royal Warwicks, was killed on August 11th by a shell. Before joining up in June, 1916, he had worked for many years for Messrs Linnell & Son. He had served in France about two years, and passed through a lot of hard fighting without a wound. He was 41 years of age, and leaves a widow and three little girls.

WOLSTON.
A TRIBUTE TO THE DEPARTED.—Miss Emily Matthews, daughter of Mr Charles Matthews, Brook Street, who is taking her holidays in London, placed a bouquet of flowers on the war shrine in Hyde Park, with the following inscription :—“ In loving remembrance of our Wolston (Coventry) boys, who nobly laid down their lives for King and country.”

DUNCHURCH.

MR & MRS BROWN, Windmill House, have received news that their son, Pte W Brown, who was a prisoner of war, is dead. Mr & Mrs Brown have three sons in the army, two of them prisoners of war.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
ON FURLOUGH.—Lance-Corpl John Askew (Grenadier Guards), Pte Arthur Russell (R.W.R) and Anthony Russell (15th Hussars) is on furlough. Lance-Corpl Askew has seen four years’ service in France. He has passed through many thrilling experiences, and has been awarded the Military Medal.

JOHN BENNETT WOUNDED.—News has been received by Mr & Mr. John Bennett, Station Cottages, that their eldest son, Pte John Bennett (R.W.R), has been wounded by the explosion of a shell. Pte Bennett’s last visit home was at Christmas, 1917. Before he joined up he was porter at Long Itchington Station (L & N-W), where his genial and helpful disposition gained him a host of friends.

STOCKTON.
Several of our lads from the front have been back in the village lately. It is not easy to get the boys to tell much of what they have experienced ; they seem to like to leave all thoughts of the way behind ; but the little one can glean leaves one full of admiration and gratitude for all they have gone through. George Bicknell landed in France on August 15, 1914, and went through the retreat from Mons with the 1st Cavalry Division ; he has since been to Malta and Salonica, and is now on sick leave. Tom Harker, who got severely wounded in Mesopotamia, being shot through the chest and then hit by a bomb in the back, and finally shot in the leg, has been back from a hospital at Bristol. Donald Fern is here to tell the tale of a torpedoed troopship, from which he has a marvellous escape.

NATIONAL SERVICE PROSECUTION.
CASE AGAINST A BRANDON WIDOW DISMISSED.

At Coventry County Police Court on Friday last week, Ann Mary Archer, a Brandon widow, was summoned on the information of Capt J A Hattrell, Ministry of National Service, Coventry, for having on May 11th and other dates made false and misleading statements with a view to preventing or postponing the calling-up of Walter Harry Archer for military service. The statements complained of were : (1) A false statement to the War Agricultural Committee for Warwickshire of the number of males employed by defendant at her farm at Brandon ; (2) a false or misleading statement in an application for exemption from military service dated May 11th last for Walter Harry Archer, whereby the man was represented to be the only male person employed on the defendants farm ; (3) other oral statements to the Coventry Appeal Tribunal which were misleading, respecting the terms of employment of James Dipper.

Mr F J Green. barrister-at-law, instructed by Capt Wratislaw, appeared to prosecute, and Mr Harold Eaden was for the defendant, who pleaded not guilty.

Mr Green, in the course of his statement. said that Walter H Archer was the nephew of defendant. The War Agricultural Committee and the Appeal Tribunal had to depend largely upon the truthful statements made before them, and any false statements produced a miscarriage of justice. At a time like the present it was a very serious matter to attempt to evade the law by such false statements as he was going to prove to the Court were made. He considered that a deliberate system of lying was indulged in by defendant. Regarding the first allegation set out in the information, the prosecution said that the application that was made was false in a material particular—it did not state that one of her employees, a man named Dipper, was working on the farm at all. His name was omitted altogether. It made a great deal of difference whether there was an extra man working on the farm of this small size— about 163 acres, of which 92 acres were in grass. This concealment from the War Agricultural Committee was a very serious offence in itself. She obtained from the Agricultural Committee a certificate enabling the case to go before the Appeal Tribunal by concealing the name of a man of military age who was working on her farm; and she then went before the Appeal Tribunal in Coventry with a more serious mis-statement still. In that statement before the Appeal Tribunal she referred to her nephew as “the only male person I have,” and he submitted that there could be no more misleading statement than that. Dipper had been specially exempted from military service on the condition that he did full-time agricultural work. For a year and some months Dipper had been working for the defendant. When the exemption granted in respect of Dipper was successfully reviewed defendant had the effrontery to claim for the further exemption of Dipper before the War Agricultural Committee. In the first place, Mrs Archer omitted to mention that Dipper worked for her, then told the Tribunal that she did not consider that Dipper worked for her, and later that the man Dipper had been working for her for a year and nine months.

Evidence for the prosecution was then called. It was stated that the man Archer was 19, Grade A, and single. A horse breeder, Mr Ashburner, in answer to Mr Eaden, stated that Dipper was in the employment of Mrs Archer, but he paid the man’s insurance, and also a regular weekly wage of 10s.

Mr Eaden, in his address for the defence, said that the point as to the statement to the War Agricultural Committee was quickly disposed of. Mrs Archer procured the form of application on which she proposed to apply for this nephew. At the head of the form was printed an instruction that none but full-time workers were to be included. This man Dipper was a part-time man, as was shown by the evidence of Mr Ashburner. That being so, no offence had been committed in regard to the War Agricultural Committee application, for she filled in, as she was asked to do, her full-time labour. With regard to the form of application to the Tribunal, he submitted that, considering the amount of land and the amount of livestock on the farm, the Tribunal could not have been deceived into thinking that only one man could do the work. She had never filled up a Tribunal application before, and instead of getting a friend to help her, filled this up herself. Counsel for the prosecution had read part of the statement, but when the full text of the sentence was read it was as follows :—“ And is the only male person I have, being a widow and no brothers to help on the farm.” From that it would be perfectly clear to the Bench that what she intended to convey was that she was a widow on the farm, and the only responsible person she could rely upon to look after her farm was this nephew. He objected to the language used by the prosecution as to a system of lying and effrontery. When Mrs Archer was before the Tribunal on May 24th on this application for her nephew, the official form D.R 17 was placed before the Court, and showed clearly that this man Dipper was in her employ. The Tribunal could not, in face of the information contained in that form, be deceived as to the labour employed.

Mrs Archer went into the witness-box and gave a denial to the charge made against her, giving evidence in support of her advocate’s statement. Her sister also gave evidence, and swore that before the Tribunal, defendants list of labour was read revealing the employment of Dipper, and there was no endeavour to represent Dipper as a “ negligible quantity.”

The Bench dismissed the case.

DEATHS.

BARNETT.—Killed whilst reconnoitring, on August 12th Major REGINALD WALTER BARNETT, M.C and Bar, 60th Rifles, Acting G.S.O. II., dearly beloved son of Walter Barnett, Bilton Hall, Rugby ; aged 26.

BROWN.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. J. W. BROWN, 10th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died in hospital at Dulmen, Germany, between July 12th and 18th.
“ Sweet is the memory he left behind
Of a life that was manly, clean and kind.
His fight is fought, he has gained his rest ;
We remember dear Will as one of the best.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife, Mother,
Father, Sisters and Brothers.

SPARKES.—In ever loving and affectionate remembrance of my beloved husband, Pte. FREDERICK WILLIAM SPARKES, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regt, killed in action in France on August 11th, 1918, aged 41 years.
“ We miss the handclasp, miss the loving smile ;
Our hearts are broken, but a little while,
And we shall pass within the Golden Gates.
God comfort us ; God help us while we wait.”
—From his sorrowing wife and children.

IN MEMORIAM.

COCKERILL.—In loving memory of Pte. TOM COCKERILL who died of wounds received in action, August 25. 1915.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of our dear son and soldier brave.
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better Land.”
—From Mother, Sister, Brothers, & Stepfather.

GILLINGS.—In loving memory of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, who died from wounds in France on August 18, 1917.
“ Not dead to us, we love him still ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory still,
And will for evermore.”
—Lovingly remembered by his Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

GILLINGS.—In loving memory of our dear brother Rifleman W. GILLINGS, who died from wounds in France, August 18, 1917.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—From Jack and Nan.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. ALBERT GREEN, killed in action in France on August 26, 1917 ; buried in Aix Noulette Communal Cemetery.
“ To live in the hearts of those they leave behind is not to die.
In loving much he was greatly beloved, and in death deeply mourned.”
—From his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

SMITH.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Bombardier SIDNEY GEORGE Smith, Rugby Howitzer Battery, killed in action in France, August 18, 1917.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He served his King and country,
God knows he did his best,
But now he sleeps in Jesus,
A soldier laid to rest.
Could I have missed your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For us who loved you well.”
—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Father, Sisters, & Brother.

SUMMERFIELD.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. W. E. SUMMERFIELD, who was killed in action in France on August 20, 1917.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in thy foreign grave ;
Your life for your country you nobly gave.
No friends stood near to say ‘ Good-bye,’
Safe in God’s keeping now you lie.”
—From Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

YEOMANS.—In loving memory of Corpl G. YEOMANS, R.W.R., killed in action on August 27, 1917.
“ The moonlight stars are gleaming
On a grave I cannot see ;
Amongst the mist of battle
Lies one most dear to me.”
“ Though death divides, sweet memory lives forever.”
— Ever in the thoughts of Kez.

19th May 1917. A Rugby Lady Honoured

A RUGBY LADY HONOURED.

For good work at Caterham and other places, the Royal Red Cross has been bestowed by the King upon Miss E C Ellis, who for several years before the War commenced had been living in Horton Crescent, Rugby. Miss Ellis went up for investiture last week, and was received by the King and Queen at Buckingham Palace, and subsequently by Queen Alexandra at Marlborough House.

OLD ST MATTHEW BOY HONOURED.—P.C Herbert Archer, of the Metropolitan Police Force, son of Mr T Archer, of 41 York Street, has recently received the King’s Medal in recognition of bravery he displayed in March last year, when he rescued a boy from drowning in a caisson chamber at Rosyth Dockyard. The depth of the water was 40ft, and the constable showed conspicuous heroism in effecting the rescue. It was dark at the time, and he incurred great personal risk in entering the water. He has been presented already with the Royal Humane Society’s Medal and honoured by the Carnegie Hero Fund Trustees. The King’s Police Medal is usually handed to the recipient by his Majesty in person ; but owing to the War the presentation ceremony took place at the Dockyard, and the medal was handed to P.C Archer by the Rear Admiral Superintendent, who pointed out that this medal was not easily gained, but was only bestowed in cases of exceptional gallantry. P.C Archer, who was an old St Matthew’s boy and played in the first team from that school to win the Rugby School Shield in 1904-5, suitably replied.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The name of Sec.Lt. M H House (Rifle Brigade) is amongst the latest published list of officer casualties. At Rugby School he was in Mr G F Bradby’s house and was a prominent member of the 1916 Cricket XI.

Capt and Adjt R M Gotch, Sherwood Foresters, wounded and missing on July 1, 1916, now believed killed, gained his football cap at Rugby School, and during the 1913-14 season played forward for the Harlequin.

Sergt P G Miles, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, for several years a constable in the County Police Force, has been wounded in France. Miles was formerly in the Rugby and Stratford-on-Avon Division.

Capt Percy H Hollick, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is the fifth Coventry solicitor who has died at the front. A son of the late Mr Alfred Hollick, an Allesley farmer, the young officer was articled to his profession in Coventry, and early in the War joined the Honourable Artillery Co., and subsequently obtained his commission. He was wounded more than once.

NEW BILTON MAN KILLED.
Mr J Young, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has received information that his only son, Pte W C Young, of the Worcester Regiment, was killed in action on April 24th. Pte Young, who was about 23 yearn of age, was employed at the B.T H Lamp Factory, and enlisted in March, 1916.

DEATH OF A FORMER B.T.H PUPIL IN FRANCE.
Members of the Rugby Men’s Adult School learnt with sincere regret on Sunday morning of the death of Mr Kenneth Smith, who until the War broke out was actively associated with the school, and was working as a student apprentice at the B.T.H Works. It was decided to ask Mr Herbert Edmundson, the school president, to send a communication to the bereaved relatives, indicating the sense of the loss sustained by the school, and expressing appreciation of the high character of the late Mr Smith.

SERGT-MAJOR CLEAVER DIES OF WOUNDS.
Company-Sergt-Major Cleaver, Royal Warwicks, was wounded in action on May 8th, and died the following day. He was a native of Stockton, and had served upwards of 21 years in the Army, during which period he saw much foreign service. He went all through the South African campaign, and gained the Queen’s Medal and six bars. He was also mentioned in despatches on September 4th, 1901. He had a medal for 19 years’ long service and good conduct. After a serious operation, he was appointed drill instructor to the 7th (T) Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and was two years at Coventry and five years with “ E ” Company at Rugby, residing at the Drill Hall Cottage. He was mobilised with the battalion on the outbreak of War ; and in June, 1915, was promoted warrant officer. Deceased who was 42 years of age, leaves a widow and five children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

Major Claude Seabroke, in a sympathetic letter to the widow, said the news came as a great blow to him, for he felt that he had lost one of his greatest and truest friends. It was difficult to realise all at once all that the regiment owed to her late husband ; but, without doubt, during all those years of devoted and loyal service he gave of this very best ungrudgingly. To all the members of “ E ” Company, whom he had trained and helped, he had left a memory of a splendid example of a zealous soldier, who had passed gloriously, as he would have wished. He was an example to them all of unflagging industry and of the highest integrity, and in all that he did ‘Honour was his guiding star.’

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary, Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Regent Street, Rugby, who will gratefully acknowledge same.

RUGBY AND RUSSIA.

In connection with the recent Russian Flag Day, held in Rugby, the hon organiser, Mr J Reginald Barker, has received the following letter, dated May 11th :-

“ DEAR SIR,—May I, on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Russian Flag Day, express our deep gratitude for your invaluable aid to our Red Cross work ? We feel we owe a deep debt to everyone who has assisted us, to the local authorities for their patronage, to the organisers for their brilliant ability, to the sellers for their generous self-sacrifice, and to the residents for their warm-hearted support. I can assure you that we shall not forget, nor will Russia, what has been done, and in time to some we hope that your efforts will remain a pleasant and gratifying memory to yourselves, so it will be a sources of permanent indebtedness on our part.—Yours faithfully, CHARLES WATNEY, Hon Secretary, the Russian Flag Day.”

THE FOOD PROBLEM IN RUGBY.

There can no longer be any doubt that the food position in this country is serious. If scarcity, amounting to real want, is to be avoided, every class must practice the strictest economy in the consumption of all bread-stuffs. The German submarine campaign, coupled with a short wheat harvest last season throughout the world, has brought our surplus stocks of corn to danger point.

It should be clearly understood that the officials of the Food Ministry are watching carefully from day to day the danger-line below which the stocks of cereals in this country cannot be allowed to fall ; and although preparations are in progress to establish rationing machinery when the point of danger has been reached, it is hoped that the success of the voluntary campaign may avert the necessity for compulsion. The issue really rests with the people.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

WAR CHARITIES ACT.
The Rugby Waste Paper Committee was registered under the above Act.—The Chairman said it would be very interesting to Council to learn that Mr Barker had already collected something like 3 tons of waste paper.—Mr Evers congratulated the General Purposes on the arrangements made.—The Chairman : No thanks are due to the committee. The arrangements were made by Mr Barker and Mrs Blagden.—Mr Yates : Then congratulations are due to the committee for not stopping these people in any way (laughter).

THANKS FROM THE V.T.C.
A letter was read from Captain Fuller, thanking the Council for their kindly recognition of the V.T.C and the promise of financial support voted at the last meet of the Council. He assured them that their help and expression of goodwill would be of great assistance to them. The A and B men of the Battalion had been selected with similar men from one of the other battalions in the regiment to into the front line in the event of any invasion emergency arising, and they looked upon this as a compliment, and hoped it would be the means of more men joining the Corps, whose past excuse had been that them was no use for the force. He hoped the Local Government Board would raise no difficulty to the amount voted being handed over for purpose of Rugby Corps, and he added that he had noticed lately that where similar grant was made by a council the money was refunded by the Territorial Force Association to the Corps in consequence of the intention of the gift being expressed to be for the benefit solely of particular a corps. With reference to the last paragraph, the Council agreed with the Chairman that it was their wish that the grant should be applied solely for the use of the Rugby Corps.—Mr Wise said he was sorry that so few members of the general public were present at the inspection on Sunday. Anyone who was there must have been struck by the smart appearance the Corps made and the wonderfully efficient way in which they did their drill.

IN MEMORIAM.

PORTER.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, GEORGE RUPERT PORTER ; aged 21 years. Killed in action at St. Elia on May 8, 1915.

ROBINSON.-In ever-loving memory of FRED, who gave his life for his country on May 11, 1915.-“ Lost but never forgotten.”-BEATIE.

YOUNG.-In loving memory of PTE WILLIAM COTTERILL YOUNG, who was killed in action with the Forces in Salonika, on April 25th, 1917, the 25th year of his age. Deeply mourned.
Somewhere there is a nameless grave
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.
—From his FATHER and MOTHER and SISTERS, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Rugby.

 

 

20th May 1916. Clocks to be put forward.

THE DAYLIGHT SAVING BILL.

CLOCKS TO BE PUT FORWARDS.

The Summer Time Bill, 1916—the object of which is to reduce the number of hours during which artificial lighting is used, and so save a very large quantity of coal required for war purposes at the present time—received the Royal Assent on Wednesday, and comes into force at 2 a.m on Sunday morning.

At that hour the time at all railway stations will be advanced one hour (that is, the clocks when at 2 o’clock’ will be altered to indicate 3 o’clock instead); the change will also be made in Post Office and other Government clocks, and arrangements are being made for the alteration of public clocks generally, either at that hour or some convenient time on Saturday evening.

The altered time, which will be generally called “summer time,” will remain in force up to and including September 30 next.

During this period “summer time” will be the time for all purposes, except astronomical, meteorological, and navigation. For instance, all trains will run according to “ summer time ”—that is, a train which, according to the time-table is timed to leave, say, at 6 a.m, will leave at 6 a.m summer time, as indicated by the clock. All establishments whose hours are regulated by law will be required to observe the altered time—e.g., factories, shops, public-houses, etc. Thus, factories which work from 6 a.m to 6 p.m will commence and finish at 6 a.m and 6 p.m summer time ; and a shop, if required to close at 8 p.m will close at 8 o’clock summer time. It is suggested that employers should warn their employees before they leave work on Saturday, and advise them to put their clocks and watches forward on Saturday evening.

The public generally are requested by the Government to alter their own clocks and watches in the same way, by putting them forward one hour, during the course of Saturday evening or early on Sunday morning.

It should be noted that the Act does not affect lighting and other Orders which fix a time by reference to sunrise or sunset. In giving effect to these orders, it will be necessary to take the alteration of the clock into consideration. For instance, the sun will set on Sunday, May 21st at 7.51, Greenwich time. Vehicles must light up half an hour afterwards—i.e, 8.21 Greenwich time, which will be represented on your clock or watch (if correctly altered) by 9.21. Similarly, the reduction of lights in houses, etc, will take place an hour and a half after sunset, Greenwich. This will be indicated by the altered clock as 10.21.

LIGHTING OFFENCES.—George G Stott, manager of a clothing establishment, Hillmorton Paddox; Walter Watts, Club steward, Market Street, Rugby; Alice Readman, lady’s help, 42 Clifton Road; were summoned for not shading windows so that no more than a dull subdued light was visible outside their premises.—Stott admitted the offence, and P.C Lester said he saw a brilliant naked electric light coming from the Grand Clothing Hall, illuminating the church and churchyard. Defendant was sent for and on his arrival he extinguished the lights.—Defendant explained that at 7.15 that evening he sent the boy upstairs to a back room for a pail. It was then quite light, and there was no necessity for him the switch the light on. He had evidently did so on this occasion, and then shut the door.-This was the only light burning in the shop.-Fined £1.—Watts pleaded guilty.—P.S Percival said the light, which was situated it the back of the Rokeby Club, was not shaded. He could see the light shining through the top of the blind. There was also an ordinary street lamp in the yard, which was shaded half-way down with brown paper.—Supt Clarke said this was a very bad light. It was like a great star, and he sent the officer round to it.—Defendant said he had done the best he could.—The Chairman : Not quite; you will be fined £2.—Miss Readman said it was quite an oversight, and the light was turned half down, there being a very subdued light.—P.C Elkington said when in the Lower Hillmorton Road he saw a very bright light from the rear of No 42 Clifton Roan. On going to the house he saw a bright, incandescent gas light in the kitchen, there being no blind drawn.-Defendant admitted her responsibility, and told witness she was very sorry ; she went to bed and forgot to turn out the light.-Margaret Fullorton, called by defendant, said she was mistress of the house. The light in question which she saw after the policeman had been, was half turned down, as it had been during the evening. She had been at considerable trouble and expense to darken all the windows, but on the night in question, being overtired, defendant forgot to turn out the light.—Fined 10s 6d.

NO LIGHT.—Geo Kenney, 30 New Street, New Bilton, was summoned for riding a bicycle without a light at New Bilton on the 4th inst.—Defendant pleaded guilty, and said he did not know what lighting-up time was.—P.C Ruane proved the case, and said it was getting dusk at the time.—Fined 6s.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Thirty-four former scholars of the Baptist Sunday School have joined the Army, and five have been granted commissions. Three of these, 2nd-Lieut J Forbes, Lance-Corpl Geo Barnwell, and Stanley Stebbing, have been killed in action.

Lieut L G Neville, a son of the late Mr J T Neville, Dunchurch, and of Mrs Neville, of 1 Bilton Road, Rugby, who went through the Boer War, the Zulu Campaign, and the German West African Campaign, left England last week for the Mediterranean Force with a Territorial Regiment.

Second-Lieut C.T Morris Davies, of Rugby, the well-known Welsh international hockey player, is now on a short leave from the front, where he has been for fourteen months. Lieutenant P E Banting, of lawn tennis and hockey fame, is also home for a few days.

Lieut C H Ivens, of the 9th Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr J H Ivens, of Hillmorton Road, Rugby, who was wounded in one of the battles in Mesopotamia, has been granted six months’ leave. The wound sustained was from a bullet which, after being deviated in its course by a rupee in his pocket, pierced the left thigh. After having been in hospital at Bombay for a time, he was on his way home, when a relapse necessitated his being landed at Alexandria, from whence he made another start a few days since.

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY WOUNDED.

The parents of Pte W J Payne, R.A.M.C, whose home is at 55 Stephen Street, have just received an intimation that Pte Payne is wounded and suffering from shock, and has been removed from the front to a hospital in England. Pte Payne is an old boy of St Matthew’s School.

MEDAL FOR AN OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY

As announced in a previous issue of the Advertise, Police Constable Herbert Archer, a Rugby man, has been awarded the bronze medal and certificate of the Royal Humane Society for conspicuous bravery in rescuing a young lad from drowning at Rosyth Naval Dockyard. The presentation was formally made to P.C Archer at Rosyth on Wednesday last week by Commodore Harvey Bruce, M.V.O, R.N, in the presence of the Dockyard officials and a contingent of the Metropolitan Police. P.C Archer is an old boy of St Matthew’s School, Rugby, and, like Sergt W Bale, who was recently decorated with the D.C.M, was in 1904-5 a member of the St Matthew’s XV which won the Rugby and District Schools’ Football Union Shield in the first competition.

ANOTHER OF MESSRS FROST’S EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Messrs A Frost & Son have received intimation that another of their employees has been killed in action. Lance-Corpl Henry Hayes, of the 6th City of London Regt was fatally shot through the chest on April 30th. He had been employed by Messrs Frost for several years as a bookbinder, and he enlisted on September 2, 1914. He went to France in March, 1915, and has been through a good deal of fighting, including the battle of Loos. A few months ago he came home on leave to get married. It is interesting to note that prior to the war Lance-Corpl Hayes lodged with Riflemen Negus and Newton, two other employees of Messrs Frost, both of whom have been killed. Thirty-four of Messrs Frost’s employes are serving with the colours, and Lance-Corpl Hayes is the seventh to be killed ; several others have been wounded.

OLD MURRAYIAN AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS.

The many friends of Bomb W K Freeman, R.F.A, son of Mrs Freeman, of 6 Lancaster Road, Rugby, will be pleased to hear that he has been awarded the Military Cross, and has been recommended for the D.C.M. Bomb Freeman is a signaller, and he gained his award by sticking to his post at the telephone under heavy fire. He was wounded in the arm and leg, and is now in the St John’s Brigade Hospital recovering from his injuries. He joined the army at Christmas, 1914, and went to the front in June, 1915. Prior to enlistment he was employed by the L & N.-W Railway in the Goods Manager’s office, Nuneaton. He is an old Murrayian and Laurentian, and brother of Sergt Jack Freeman, of “ E ” Company, 7th R.W.R.

BAND CONCERT.—On Sunday evening the B.T.H Military Band, under the conductorship of Mr H Saxon, gave a concert in the Caldecott Park. There was a large attendance.

ABOUT £10 was realised by the Rugby Branch of the National Union Railwaymen’s effort on behalf of the dependents of members killed at the front, held at Rugby recently.

THE Government have decided to instruct Local Tribunals to grant exemption in cases where, if a man with wife and family dependent were called up, his business would probably close down.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR SENTENCED.—P G Davies, a conscientious objector, lately employed in a Rugby ironmonger’s establishment, and associated with the Congregational Church, has been sentenced by Court Martial at Gosport to two years’ hard labour for refusing to obey military orders. News to this effect has been received by his father, who lives at Stratford-on-Avon.

CONSCRIPTS CHARGED.—George James Costello, dealer, 2 Gas Street, Rugby, was charged on remand with being an absentee under the Military Service Act, 1916, at Rugby on the 10th inst. George E Hart, labourer, 164 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was charged with a like offence.—Costello pleaded guilty, and Det Mighall said when he saw defendant the man admitted that he had received his papers, and that he should have gone up for service in March last. The reason he did not go up was that he was ruptured, and had a weak heart.—Prisoner was asked why he had not been up for medical examination, and he replied that he went to the Drill Hall, but they refused to give him a pass to Warwick because he was a conscript. He then offered to pay his own fare, but was told that this would be no good because he would not be examined.—The Chairman : Why did you not go at the proper time ?—Defendant: Because I thought that I was not eligible.—The Chairman : That is not for you to think. That is for the authorities.—He was fined £2 and remanded to await an escort.

Hart pleaded guilty.— P.S. Brown, who arrested prisoner, said Hart informed him he had received the notice, but he did not trouble any more about it.—The Chairman asked him why he did not go up, and he said he knew nothing about it.—Fined £2, and reminded to await an escort.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

Mr and Mrs Grant, Newbold, have received official intimation from the War Office that their son, Rifleman Harry Grant, of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, was killed in action May, 1915. Rifleman Grant was 24 years of age, and was employed at the time of his enlistment at the B.T.H. He enrolled in Kitchener’s Army in September, 1914, and has been mining since May 9th, 1915. Much sympathy is expressed with his parents. Another son of Mr and Mrs Grant has been sent home disabled, and a third son is at the present time at the front.

VOLUNTEERS’ NEED OF SHOT GUNS.

An appeal is being made by Lord Leigh, in the absence of the Lord-Lieutenant of Warwickshire, for the loan of shot guns for the Volunteer Training Corps. In Warwickshire, he states, many important munition works are guarded by the County Volunteer Regiment. Companies are organised to co-operate with the police in case of air raids, and they are of service in other ways. Only a proportion of the regiment is armed. Now a call has been made for the regiment to undertake, in case of imminent invasion, duties which will entail the employment of a number of Volunteers who are unarmed. The Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief the Home Defences has given instructions that in such cases men of the V.T.C who are unarmed should be provided with shot guns.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVIS.—In Memory of 2nd-Lieut. D. C. G. Davis, R.G.A., who died of wounds, May 15, 1915.
“ We never shall our memories forget,
The friend we found so cordial-hearted.”
-From his old friends of the Electrical Laboratory B.T.H. Co.).

ELLIOTT.—In affectionate remembrance of Gunner S J. Elliott, who was killed in action at Gallipoli, May 17, 1915.
“ There is a link Death cannot sever:
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
-Doll.