1st Sep 1917. French Honour English Lady

FRENCH HONOUR ENGLISH LADY.—On Friday afternoon last week, M. Painleve, the French Minister of War, presented the Cross of the Legion of Honour to Dr Frances Ivens (formerly Harborough Parva), who has had charge of the Scottish Women’s Hospital at the Abbaye de Royaumont for nearly three years. Miss Ivens is also associated with Lady Michelham in the charge of the Michelham Foundation Hospital, Hotel Astoria, Paris, which M. Painleve attended to make the presentation.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Rifleman G Lorriman, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr J Lorriman, of 40 Essex Street, Rugby, was wounded in the head on August 19th. This is the second time he has been wounded, the previous occasion being on September, 1916, at Guillemont.

The friends of Sert-Major Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, will be pleased to hear that he has received the D.C.M. Sergt-Major Hopewell has been in the Battery since its formation and went out with it to France three years last March. During the time he has been there the Battery has taken part in a lot of fighting, and recently it has been very severe.

Mr J C Cowley, of Brackley (formerly of Kilsby), Northamptonshire, received on Saturday last a card dated July 15th (written with his left hand), from his son, Second-Lieut R L Cowley. Northampton Regt, who has been missing since the battle of “ The Dunes,” on July 10th. He is in a German hospital wounded in the right arm, and is going on nicely.

Lance-Corpl F H Hadfield, K.R.R, of 4 Charlotte Street, and Pte H A J Barnett, R W.R., of 174 Murray Road, have written home stating that they are prisoners of war in Germany. The news of Pte Barnett’s capture has only just reached his parents although he was taken prisoner on April 28th. Lance-Corpl Hadfield, who was formerly employed by Mr W Flint, wine merchant, was reported as missing five weeks ago.

OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, of the Murray School, has received information that Rifleman Leslie J Ensor, son Mr J C Ensor, Nottingham, formerly of Rugby, was killed in action on July 10th. Rifleman Ensor, who was 21 years age, enlisted in the King’s Royal Rifles with his brother Claude in September, 1914, and they were drafted to France in July, 1915. For eight months they were in the trenches near Ypres. They were in the second battle of Ypres, and were in reserve at the battle Loos. They were engaged in various “ scraps,” the battle of Arras, and also in a good deal of sanguinary fighting on the Somme, their Battalion being specially commended for the capture of Guillemont. In this battle Claude Ensor was severely wounded, and his brother was also slightly wounded twice, the first time near Trones Wood. He was also buried and slightly wounded near Combles, and after spending four months in England returned France in January last. He was at first sent to St Quinten, and was afterwards moved up to the coast, where he fought his last fight with the K.R.R.s and Northamptons at Lombartzyde. Rifleman Leslie Ensor was battalion bomber, and held the instructor’s certificate for Stoke’s Trench Mortars. His brother Claude has now recovered from his wounds but at present has only the partial use of the left arm. He was recently offered a commission, but declined it, as he preferred to go to Hythe for a course of musketry. He was successful in gaining the first-class certificate and was promoted Sergeant-Instructor in musketry. Both lads stood 6ft 2in and weighed 13 stones, and their fine, manly characters made them popular with all who knew them.

FLECKNOE.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another Flecknoe young man, Frederick Cox, lost his life through shell-shock on the 16th of August, in France. In a letter received by the young man’s sister, Miss E Cox, the Colonel of his Regiment—a Battalion of the Royal Warwicks—states that he will be sadly missed by the officers and men. The young man was 24 years of age, and had been in France about 12 months. Before joining the army he was in the employ of Mr Thompson, farmer, of Wolfhampcote Hall, and bore an excellent character.

WOLSTON.

PRIVATE READER MISSING.—Mrs Reader has received news both from the War Office and the Adjutant of his Company, that Private Gerald Reader, her husband, is missing. Before joining the army he was manager for Mr Udal at Wolston. He was one of a body of men who made a successful raid upon the enemy. He joined the 4th Royal Warwicks, but was afterwards transferred to the Welsh Fusiliers. Much sympathy is felt in the district for Mrs Reader, who has four children, several of whom are very delicate. The day on which he was missing was the 12th anniversary of his wedding day.

ROLL OF HONOUR : MESSRS BLUEMEL’S WORKS LIST.—The above firm has given another proof of its sincere regard for men who have left their works to uphold the honour of their country. Through the instrumentality of Mr W R Glare, the genial works’ manager, who has continually had before him the welfare of not only the men but their dependants, two beautiful and expensive designs have been purchased. These have been mounted and placed in oak frames. The two rolls contain the names of 104 men from the works who have entered the Navy or Army. The records show that 16 have been killed, 27 wounded, two died from the effects of the war, three missing, whilst one is a prisoner of war and one is suffering from shell-shock. All the names have been beautifully inscribed on the two lists, and these are surrounded by artistic illuminations. Although they are not yet placed in a permanent position, a number of residents have viewed them and greatly admired their appearance. It is hoped by several who have had this privilege that it will be an incentive to the surrounding parishes to provide similar rolls of honour. There still remains plenty of space for the names of others who may yet join the forces.

BRANDON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Blackman has received news that her husband has been wounded in the head, shoulder, and right hand. He has been out at the front for nearly nine months. He belongs to the Hertfordshire Regiment, and is well known at Brandon, having been in the employ of Colonel R J Beech a few years ago. Although very deaf from the result of his wound, he is progressing favourably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs T Nicholas, Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their third son, Stewart, who was wounded and missing on September 29th, 1916, is now reported to have been killed on that date.

ACCEPTANCE OF LETTER BY THE POST OFFICE FOR URGENT CENSORSHIP.—The sender of a specially urgent letter for Portugal, Russia, the United States of America, or any neutral country in Europe or America, may secure its specially expeditious treatment by the Post Office and by the Military Censors, by posting it at the counter the Rugby Office, with a special fee of half-a-crown in stamps in addition to the full ordinary postage. No responsibility is taken for delay, but in general letters posted under the special conditions will be despatched appreciably sooner than those posted in the ordinary way.

SERIOUS HARVEST OUTLOOK.

The harvest prospects, which month ago were of a hopeful character all round, have gradually become less and less satisfactory owing to unfavourable weather conditions, and this week the situation has assumed a more serious aspect, in consequence of the exceptionally severe storms for the time of year. Reports from all parts of the country indicate that very boisterous, stormy weather became general in the course of Monday evening and night, the wind rising to the strength of a gale, accompanied by violent squalls in many districts—apparently the most widespread gale experienced for a long time past. In the Rugby district rain fell with little intermission from Sunday evening till Wednesday midday, and there were heavy downfalls on Thursday.

NO SUGAR FOR MARROW JAM.—The Ministry of Food has officially advised the Liverpool Corporation that vegetable marrows are not fruit within the meaning of the Sugar Domestic Preserving Order (1917) and people are not entitled to use sugar for making jam from marrows.

DEATHS.

GILLINGS.—In loving remembrance of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, R.B., of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action August 18th, 1917.—Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear.—From Annie.—Rest nobly won.

HOLLAND.—Fred (2nd Lieut. Sherwood Foresters), son of Supt. W HOLLAND, Lutterworth, died of wounds at the Liverpool Merchants’ Hospital, Etaples, France, on August, 22nd, 1917, aged 22 years.

IN MEMORIAM

OLDS.—In fond memory of Pte. G. Olds, R.W.R, of Gaydon, killed in action in France, Aug. 30, 1916.
“ There are two things death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—An Old Friend.

OLDS.—In loving memory of Pte. G. OLDS, Gaydon, killed in action Aug. 30, 1916. Never forgotten by his Mother, Father, Brothers, and Sister.

MASON.— In dearest, proudest memory of my darling husband, Sergt. ARTHUR MASON, Oxon & Bucks, killed in action August 31st, 1916.—Until we meet.

WHITEMAN.—In glorious remembrance of Lance-Corpl. T. WHITEMAN, R.W.R., killed in action in France, September 3rd, 1916.—From his loving wife, Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

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11th Aug 1917. War Anniversary Commemoration.

WAR ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION.

At the places of worship throughout the United Kingdom on Saturday and Sunday services of intercession for the victory of our arms this world tragedy were held.

At the churches in St Andrew’s parish, Rugby, on Saturday there were celebrations of the Holy Communion and a cycle of prayer throughout the day until Evensong.

On Sunday the form of services authorised by the Archbishops was used, and the charge read at Matins. After a shortened Evensong, the members of the various churches joined in procession in the following order :—Wardens, cross, priest, choir, and congregation. The members of the Parish Church, Holy Trinity, St Phillip’s, and St Andrew’s Mission met near the Hippodrome, and proceeded to the Lower School field, where they were joined by the members of St Peter’s Church. Altogether about 2,000 were in the imposing procession, and there was another 1,000 present at the short intercession service, conducted by the Rector (the Rev C M Blagden). On the platform were the clergy of the churches mentioned and Dr David. The massed choirs were conducted by Mr Hidden (Parish Church organist).

At St. Matthew’s Church on Sunday services were held in commemoration of the War anniversary. The Rev. T. Watson gave an address at early morning prayer meeting, and preached during the day. The collections amounted to nearly £50, and are to start a fund of about £140, which is being raised for a memorial window and tablet to those from the parish who have fallen in the War.

On Sunday last the Rev E Wyman conducted services at Cambridge Street Wesleyan Church in the morning, and at the Market Place Wesleyan Church in the evening. The special form of intercession was used at both places. Mr Wyman gave discourses on “ The Secret of Sustained Strength.” He said with every new problem came a feeling of uneasiness and a growing feeling of pessimism. Our enemies, knowing that anything like panic was impossible, had striven to create a feeling of uneasiness and depression that would reflect upon our Army abroad. But that endeavour had not been successful, as the morale of the British nation at home or abroad was unaffected. The time of waiting would prove a greater strength upon the nation. They needed a lofty vision, for the future spelt freedom. Their source of strength was waiting upon God, Who revealed the secret of strength and of radiant optimism.

Special reference was made to the third anniversary of the War at the Primitive Methodist Church, Railway Terrace, on Sunday evening. The Rev W Vaughan conducted the service. Taking for his text the “ Parable of the loaves,” he dealt with the unifying work of the Divine Spirit. From the process of transforming the separate grains of meal, which represented self centred individuals, into one mass of dough, he illustrated the work of God in the human race as bringing about a brotherhood not only of people within a nation, but a universal brotherhood, including all the nations of the earth, and referred to the progress of the War as a breaking down of the spirit of tyrannical rule as represented by the dynasties based on the so-called Divine right of kings. They looked forward to the triumph of the principles of brotherhood and freedom as the governing principles of the nations of the earth. This, and this only, would be a right ending of the War which, though not yet, was becoming more and more certain.

At the Congregational Church a special service was held in the morning, and was conducted by the Rev Peter Morrison, Kenilworth. There was a good congregation, and the form of service arranged by the National Free Church Council was used. The congregation stood during the reading of the roll of honour, containing the names of Church members who have joined the Army or Navy, and this was very impressive, especially when reference was made to those who have fallen. The sermon was most appropriate the occasion.

There was a good attendance at the open meeting of the Brotherhood, held in the Co-operative Hall on Sunday afternoon. The speaker was the Rev W Vaughan, who stepped into the breach at very short notice. His address was of a wartime character, and the subject was “ Freedom and Independence v Force and Tyranny.” Two solos, “ Just to-day ” and “ Nearer my God to Thee,” were nicely sung by Miss Phyllis Foxon.

At the Baptist Church on Sunday evening the Rev J H Lees (pastor) gave an address on “ The War,” and the American National Anthem was sung.

SUGAR CARDS TO BE ISSUED.

Lord Rhondda has asked the local authorities—namely, the Municipal Borough Councils and the Urban and Rural District Councils—to appoint Food Committees for administering a new scheme of sugar distribution, and later for dealing with other foodstuffs, including bread and meat. For all important foodstuffs the Food Controller will fix a general scale of prices based at each stage on the reasonable profits of traders. The committees will be entrusted with the enforcement of this scale, and will be asked to advise on any necessary modifications of it in their districts. The committees will consist of not more than twelve members ; some members may be co-opted. Each committee must include at least one woman and one representative of labour. The cost, including a special staff, will be a charge on the Exchequer. It will be the first duty of the committees to safeguard the interests of consumers. Immediately the local committees are constituted they will register grocers and other retailers of sugar, and after October 1st no retailer who remains unregistered will be allowed to deal in sugar.

THE HOUSEHOLDER’S DERBY.

The public will not be called upon to move until towards the end of September, when forms of application for sugar cards will be distributed by the Postal Authorities. These forms must be filled up by householders, and show the names, age, sex, and occupation of all members of their households. They must be posted to the Food Office not later than October 5th. The householder will receive from the Food Office a household sugar card, which must be taken to the tradesman from whom he desires to buy his sugar. The tradesman will retain one part. He will stamp the other part with his name or sign, and it must be kept by the customer, who must be prepared to produce it when making purchases. The grocer’s supplies will be authorised by the local food control office on the basis of the number of customers thus registered by him. The reorganisation of sugar distribution under the new scheme cannot be complete before December 30th. It will be the retailer’s duty, when the allowance is made regular, to see that no customer is supplied twice in one week. He may number the cards deposited with him, and keep them in order in a box ; when the purchase for the week is made he can transfer the card bearing the customer’s number to a second.

RUGBY SCHOOL NOTTING HILL CLUB.-During the past Rugby has been invaded a number of fair “ munitioneers ” from London. The girls, sixty in number, belong to the Notting Hill Club, which is supported by past and present members of Rugby School. Each year a camp is held in connection with the Club at Romney ; but this year, at the last moment, the camping ground was required by the Army, and the organisers were forced to seek “ fresh woods and pastures new.” Happily the School Authorities at once came to their assistance, and a hearty invitation was sent to the members to spend their holiday at Rugby—an offer which was gladly accepted. The spacious gymnasium has been fitted up as a dormitory, and the girls, many whom are engaged in high explosive factories, are thoroughly enjoying the quietude of Rugby and their open-air life under the shadow of the famous School, where the time passes only too quickly in cricket, fives, and other outdoor pastimes. The party is in charge of the Rev C S Donald, the head of the Mission, and the local arrangements were made by Mr C P Evers and Mr H C Bradby. On Saturday sixty boys connected with the Mission will arrive.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier G B Morgan, H.A.C, brother-in-law of Mr J M Squires, Rugby, has received a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.

Mrs Hipwell, 110 Oxford Street, has received official news that her husband, G W Hipwell, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in France on May 3rd. He was previously reported missing.

Sapper A Findlay, R.E, of Mr & Mrs James Findlay, of 171 Clifton Road, Rugby, is in the Essex County Hospital, Colchester, suffering from shell wounds received in action after two years’ service in France.

Corpl F Rixom, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mrs Rixom, Claremont Road, was picked out with others to represent the Training School to which they are attached at an investiture by the King. Subsequently the King went over to inspect the unit, and as he was doing so his Majesty noticed the gold stripes on Corpl Rixom’s arm. He stopped and asked all particulars as to how, where and when the wounds indicated were received, and expressed the hope that he was getting on all right.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of Murray School, has received intimation from Mr John C Ensor, late of Rugby, now of Nottingham, that his son, John Leslie Ensor, was killed in action in a coast battle in Flanders. Deceased and his brother Claude, both Old Murrayians, joined at the outbreak of the War. The latter has recently been wounded. As showing how the boys in the trenches remember their old school, we might state that the Headmaster of Murray School has received a letter from an Old Murrayian congratulating the prize-winners at the recent distribution.

THE LATE LIEUT. HART-DAVIES.

At the inquest on Lieut Hart-Davis, whose death was recorded in our columns last week, evidence was given by officers who saw the accident to the effect that on the Friday evening the deceased was flying over the grounds. When, at a low altitude, he was about to land the machine, he probably turned the ’plane down too sharply, which caused it to give a nose dive, and dashed it to the ground. Lieut Hart-Davies was killed immediately, he being the pilot. It was stated that the machine had been in use during the day, and was in perfect condition to the time of the accident. Dr Hunt, R.A.M.C, who also saw the accident, examined the body, and considered that death was due to shock from the fall.—The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

A brother officer writes :—“ A gallant fellow whom we all liked immensely, and are deeply grieved that he should have been fatally injured when he so much wished to go to France, where, doubtless, he would have won honours.”

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

A BRAVE ELECTRICIAN.—The Officer commanding the unit in which Sergt C H Sylvester is serving—the Scots Fusiliers reports :— “ I beg to recommend Sergt C H Sylvester for an immediate award for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on the night of the —— inst-. When we were about to attack – he laid out a cable line right up to the enemy wire, only withdrawing when hotly fired on by the enemy. During our advance on – he was untiring in his efforts to keep up communication with the result that, no matter how quickly our troops advanced, there was always telephone communication to battalion headquarters. In -, where our lines were constantly under shell fire, he was always showing a marked disregard to personal danger by his example, encouraging others ; and although ill, he remained on duty till the battalion was relieved, doing excellent work. He remained with the incoming battalion till they were quite settled down, when eventually he did leave the signal office he was almost unable to walk, and had to helped to the ambulance.”

DEATHS.

HARRIS.—Killed in action in France on July 27th, Pte. J. Harris, 8th Gloucesters, youngest son of Mr. J. Harris, Harborough Magna. A devoted son and brother.

WILKINS.—On October 12th, 1916, Pte Reginald Gerald Wilkins, R.W.R., killed in action (previously reported missing), age 21 years ; the dearly-loved son of Mrs. Wilkins, 22 Cannon Street, St. Albans (late of 32 Regent Street, Rugby).

IN MEMORIAM.

OGBURN.—In loving memory of Pte H Ogburn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed some where in France, on July 30th, 1916.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those who loved him best,
IN a hero’s grave he lies.”
-From his loving wife and children.

Ensor, John Leslie. Died 12th Jul 1917

John was the son of John Charles and Florence (nee Smith) Ensor, born in Rugby in 1896, and baptised at St Andrews Church on 28 August. The family were living at 29 Charlotte Street, his father was a joiner.   His parents were both born in Rugby and married in Rugby district in 1893, but not in the parish church.

The family continued to live at 29 Charlotte Street in 1901 and 1911. They had four children, Claude Moore born 1894, John Leslie (named as Leslie in 1901), Doris Eileen b 1900 and Horace William b 1902. By 1911 Claude was a builder’s clerk and Leslie an errand boy, the other two children were at school.

The grave register of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission notes that he enlisted at Nottingham in September 1914 and was twice wounded, and that his parents were of St Ann’s Street, Nottingham.   It seems as if the family moved to Nottingham before the outbreak of war. Leslie was wounded twice during his service.

Leslie enlisted at Nottingham in September 1914 and joined the 11th Battalion Kings Royal Rifle Corps (KRRC) as Rifleman number R/3748, later being moved to the 2nd Battalion, probably on being sent to the war zone. He embarked to France on 21 July 1915, and the War Diary on Ancestry.com records that the new draft of 58 men and a corporal arrived on 2 August to join the 2nd Battalion at Vermelles near Loos. There was a strong assault on the German lines on 25 September which included the use of gas, but the wind changed direction and blew the gas back into the soldiers badly affecting them. However they reached their objective and the Germans there surrendered at a cost to the KRRC of 81 killed, 193 wounded, 149 missing and 75 gassed.

The war diary also reports that upon inspection of the German defences after the surrender, they were found to be mostly bluff, although the trenches were clean and in good order. “The wire along the communications trenches was made of thistles planted in two rows which at a short distance looked like strong wire”.

During 1916 the KRRC was involved on the Somme in the Battles of Albert, Bazentin, Pozieres,Fleur Courcelette and Morval.

British units returned to the Nieuport sector of the Western Front in June 1917, when the 32nd Division relieved French troops stationed there in preparation for planned Allied landings on German-held territory along the Belgian coast. German marines launched a pre-emptive attack against the British forces on the river Yser in July and the landings, codenamed ‘Operation Hush’, never took place. Over 260 men commemorated on the Nieuport Memorial, which include Leslie Ensor, were killed or mortally wounded during heavy fighting with units of the German Marine-Korps Flandern on 10 July 1917.

Nieuport Memorial

Leslie was awarded the Victory and British War Medals and the 1915 Star.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM