17th Nov 1917. The Payment of Wroth Silver

THE PAYMENT OF WROTH SILVER.

This ancient custom was duly observed on Monday morning last before sunrising at the usual spot on Knightlow Hill. Mr John Heap, from the Estate Office, Dunchurch, again attended on behalf of the Duke of Buccleuch, to whom the tribute is payable. He read the charter and received the amounts due from the respective parishes called upon to pay it. In all but a few instances the money was either sent or thrown into the hollow stone by the parish representatives, and the exceptions were made good by the bystanders, numbering between 20 and 30. This small assemblage was strangely in contrast with the large crowds of people who in pre-war years found their way there to witness the proceedings. The falling off was attributable to the exigencies of the War, the petrol restrictions, and so forth, and not lack of interest ; and from the same primary cause the ceremony was shorn of an important adjunct—the breakfast, with its potations of hot milk and rum, which from time immemorial has followed. But ancient custom cannot prevail against licensing regulations and the Food Controller’s restrictions ; and so, instead of adjourning to the neighbouring inn for a substantial repast, the drinking of healths and smoking church warden pipes and tobacco, the visitors were invited by Mr Heap to partake of the Duke’s hospitality to the maximum extent circumstances permitted—to wit, hot coffee, which was provided in Mr Quarterman’s house close by.

Several old faces were to be seen in the modest group, including Mr D Borsley, of Stretton ; Mr Kelcey of Wolston (in khaki) ; Mr R T Simpson, who came from Edinburgh to demonstrate his undiminished interest in the time-honoured custom. Mr David Whiteman, of Church Lawford, woodman on the estate, acted as bailiff.

The ceremony did not last long, and as the company separated speculation was rife whether it would disappear altogether, and whether the magnificent avenue of trees, at the end of which Knightlow Hill is situated, would go with it. The hope was unanimously expressed that both would survive and be passed on to posterity.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.

At Warwick Town Council meeting on Friday last week Ald J C Purser, who represented the authority on the committee which met at Rugby recently to consider measures to be taken with a view to securing the preservation of Dunchurch Avenue, moved a resolution expressing the regret of the Town Council to hear of the proposal to cut down the trees and the hope that arrangement would be made by which the avenue might be preserved. He pointed out that the County Council Committee which was appointed to act in the matter had co-opted the Mayors of Warwick, Coventry, and Leamington, and that he attended the first meeting in the absence abroad of the Mayor and the inability of the Deputy-Mayor to attend. From what he learned at the meeting they were determined that no step should be left untaken to secure the preservation of the avenue. The committee decided to ask the Duke for a personal interview before he took any further step. A point of interest in connection with the preservation of the avenue was that it was contemplated to erect there a memorial to the immortal 29th Division, which were reviewed there by the King before going on active service, and the people of Rugby and Dunchurch felt that if the avenue was destroyed the memorial would be robbed of historic and picturesque surroundings.—Ald Purser’s resolution was carried unanimously.

WASTE PAPER COLLECTION.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—With reference to the waste paper collection which is being made in the town, and which not only helps the nation in supplying the raw material for paper, but also is of very great use in realising money for some of our local charities, I desire to call attention to the fact that these happy results could not be arrived at if it were not for the immense amount of hard work and keenness put into the movement by the boys of the Elementary schools, who do the collecting.

I think it reflects very great credit on these lads, and hope that their parents and the inhabitants of Rugby at large will realise what good work they are doing.

I regret to say that the quantity   collected has fallen off ; and I hope, therefore, that all who have any suitable paper will make a point of immediately advising Mr Simmonds, of Elborow School, or Mr Hodges, of the Murray School, and boys will be sent to collect.—Yours very truly,
J J McKINNELL.
27 Sheep Street, Rugby November 14th.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte F Smith, Royal Warwicks, the second son of Mr J G Smith, Bath Street, has been wounded in both thighs.

Pte Albert Coaton, Machine Gun Company, son of Mr C K Coaton, 42 Grosvenor Road, has been wounded by gunshot in the back.

Lieut R O Gladstone, Royal Engineers, who prior to the War was engaged on the outside construction staff of the B.T.H, was killed in action on November 2nd.

Mr W Eadon, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received information that his son, 2nd-Lieut L W Eadon, R.F.A, who been in France since September, 1916, and has been in most of the recent heavy fighting round Passchendaele, has been injured and is in hospital.

Lance-Corpl J A Maycock, Royal Warwicks, of Rokeby Cottage, Bennett Street, Rugby, son of Mr & Mrs J Maycock, of Market Harborough, who has been twice mentioned in despatches for good work and bringing in wounded under heavy shell fire, has now been awarded the Military Medal. His brother, Quarter-Master-Sergt C Maycock, has also received the Military Medal.

Sergt F Tucker, Rifle Brigade, Rugby, an employee of Messrs Frost & Sons, has been awarded a bar to his Military Medal ; and the following other Rugby soldiers have also gained the Medal :—Lance-Corpl F E Butler, Rifle Brigade ; Pte A Horne, Northumberland Fusiliers ; Bombardier W Vears, R.F.A ; and Gunner S F Painter, R.F.A, who is returned as having enlisted at Rugby.

PTE C B JONES.

News been received that Pte C B Jones, Gloucester Regiment, was killed in action on October 9th. Pte Jones formerly carried on business as a hairdresser in Murray Road, and he was also agent for the Rugby Advertiser. Before joining the Army in January last, however, he was employed in the Lamp Shipping Office at the B.T.H.

DEATHS.

GARDNER.—Died of wounds on October 28, 1917 in France Pte. CHARLES GARDNER, PO2163, 2nd Batt. Royal Marine Light Infantry, only son of Richard and Alice Gardner, Lower Shuckburgh ; aged 21 years.

HOWARD.—In loving memory of our youngest son, HARRY LEE HOWARD, who fell in action on October 26, 1917 ; aged 26.

JONES.—Killed in action on October 9th, “ somewhere in Flanders,” Pte. CHARLES BRADLAUGH JONES, 1/6th Gloucesters, the beloved husband of Ellen D. Jones, 148 Bath Street, Rugby.—“ Thy will be done.”

SARGENT.—Killed in action on October 23rd in France, Pte. ALBERT HARRY, aged 30, youngest son of the late J. H. Sargent and Mrs. Sargent, of Barby.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear.
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain,
But trust in Christ to meet again.”
—Deeply mourned by Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

WILLARD.—In proud and loving memory of KENNETH HUGH WILLARD, 2nd-Lieut, York and Lancaster Regt., attached to R.F.C., killed in action on the Western Front on October 12, 1917 ; second son of T. W. and Tryphena Willard, Rugby ; aged 19 years.

 

 

1 thought on “17th Nov 1917. The Payment of Wroth Silver

  1. Pingback: Maycock, John Arthur. Died 9th Sep 1918 | Rugby Remembers

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s