2nd Jun 1917. Cooking Demonstration at Rugby

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS AT RUGBY.

In connection with the local Food Economy Campaign, cooking demonstration rooms have been opened at a shop in High Street, where many valuable culinary hints are being imparted to visitors by Miss Foster and Mrs Yeomans, the instructors attached to the local cookery centre.

The opening ceremony was performed by Mrs A A David on Monday afternoon, when, despite the glorious weather which have tempted people to spend their time out-of-doors, there was a good attendance of ladies.

Before calling upon Mrs David to open the rooms, Dr David said the time had not yet come for them to express their thanks ; but he could not help recommending to their gratitude Mr J T Clarke and his committee, who had made the arrangements, and whose energy had been quite splendid in brining the scheme to what, at any rate, was a successful beginning. In the second place, he wanted to thank the cookery staff teachers, who were giving up their holidays in such glorious weather to take part in that work. He knew that they had quite sufficient reward in being aware that they were helping on a great, good and urgent cause ; lest they ought to feel particularly grateful to them this week. He was sure there were hundreds of good cooks in Rugby, but he hoped none of them were too proud to take a hint in such matters, especially now, when new, sudden and extra demands were made upon their skill. He hoped the ladies of Rugby would show their gratitude to the staff teachers by coming to learn what they could.

Mrs David then declared the demonstration open, and said she hoped all would try to make it a success by getting their friends to attend.

The instructors afterwards gave demonstrations in making barley bread, oatcakes, maize meal scones, buns without flour, and oatmeal pudding.

MAGISTERIAL.
—At Rugby Police Court on Thursday (before A E Donkin, Esq), Fredk Blythman, no fixed abode, was charged with stealing 12 eggs, the property of some person unknown.—P.C Anderton stated that, in consequence of prisoner’s suspicious behaviour in the Market Place the previous evening, he followed him to Smith’s lodging-house in Gas Street, and heard him offer some eggs for sale. Witness enquired where he got the eggs from, and he replied that he bought them ten miles the other side of Coventry, but he subsequently admitted that he stole them from a nest between Coventry and Birmingham. Prisoner was wearing two gold stripes similar to those issued to wounded soldiers, but he had no discharge papers and no documents to connect him with the Army.—Prisoner now stated that he took the eggs from a hedge near the roadside at Yardley. He was 23 years of age, and had lost several fingers as the result of a wound. He was also wounded in the head and leg, and was consequently discharged. His pension paper had been worn out by constant examination by the police, and his discharge paper was torn up by a lunatic at the London County Asylum, where he was for a time employed as attendant.—As the owner of the eggs could not be traced, prisoner was discharged.-A corporal from the Drill Hall attended the Court, and asked prisoner questions bearing on his military history. He said he was discharged through a nervous breakdown, and was awarded a pension of 5s 3d week. He was at present walking to London to get another “ ring paper.”—He was ordered to be detained pending enquiries.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut H N Salter, 4th Leicestershire Regiment, was one of those mentioned in a list of despatches published on Tuesday.

Sergt George Pegg, Oxford and Bucks L.I, son of Mr C Pegg, New Bilton, has been mentioned by Sir Douglas Haig in one of his recent despatches.

Mr & Mrs Read, of 46 Rokeby Street, Rugby, have received intimation that their eldest son, Rifleman C G Read, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action on December 15, 1916. Deceased, who was an old Murray School boy, was a member of the Church Troop of Boy Scouts, and before joining the Army in January, 1915, was working at the B.T.H Works, and previous to that he was in an office on the L & N-W Railway.

News has been received by Mrs Reeve, of Bourton, near Rugby, that her son, Pte John Vincent Reeve, of the Worcestershire Regiment, was wounded by shrapnel in the wrist and hand on April 30th, and is now in a hospital in France.

Corpl J Hirons, R.F.A, son of Mr James Hirons, 14 Duke Street, Rugby, has been wounded a second time, and on this occasion severely. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. After fighting at Sulva Bay in 1915, he went to France, where he received his first wound. He is now in hospital at Crediton, Devon.

Pte E H Peddlesden, 1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment, who for ten years was an assistant of Mr G A Dean, High Street, has been unofficially reported a prisoner of war in Germany. These facts have been communicated to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, and he has instituted enquiries into Peddlesden’s whereabouts.

Rifleman J Humphries, Rifle Brigade, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges, described some of the outrages perpetuated by the Germans during their retreat, and says : “ I don’t know what we should do if England was served like this . . . and yet we get men who shield themselves behind religion. It is my firm opinion that they are nothing more than a lot of cowards, and if Germany ever won and forced their militarism upon us they would be among the very first to knuckle down to them.”

HOWITZER BATTERY MAN HONOURED.

Bombardier F Bosworth, the R.F.A, has written to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, informing him that he has been awarded a bar to his Military Medal for bravery on the night of April 16th. Another bombardier was awarded the Military Medal for the same deed. He adds that, having been mentioned in despatches and awarded the Military Medal and a bar to same, he so far carries the honours of the Battery.

DR POPE REPORTED MISSING.

Capt Charles Alfred Whiting Pope, Royal Army Medical Corps (officially reported missing, believed drowned, on May 4th), son of Mr Alfred Pope, of Dorchester. For a time he practised in Rugby, his residence being on Clifton Road, and he left the town a year or two ago. He was educated at Charterhouse School, and was a graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge. He took the M.B degree at Cambridge in 1907, and he was an M.R.C.S England and L.R.C.P London, 1903. After graduating at Cambridge, he studied at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, and before practising at St Leonards-on-Sea he held appointments in South Africa and at Plymouth. Capt Pope, who was 39 years of age, married Marion Ruth, daughter of the late Capt J J A Gravener, R.N.

MOTOR ACCIDENT.-Late on Thursday night last week, as a party of Royal Flying   Corps officers were proceeding from Rugby to Lilbourne by motor-car, the car skidded near the Watling Street Road and collided with a tree. The occupants—Capt Foster, Lieut Daniels, and Lieut Campbell—sustained severe bruises and cuts on the head and body. The car was also badly damaged.

SHUCKBURGH.

THE LATE CORPL JONES.—Mr J Jones has received a letter from the Captain of the Company of the Essex Regiment, in which his son, Corpl Jones, was serving when he was killed. He says it is impossible to speak too highly of the deceased, and he was absolutely all that one could wish for and expect from the soldier and brave man that he was. He was always cheerful, smart, and thoroughly reliable. The platoon officer was proceeding to make a reconnaissance, and Corpl Jones volunteered to accompany him. They had competed their work, and were returning across a road in full view of the enemy, when Corpl Jones was hit on the arm. Subsequently, when trying to reach the trench from which they started, and when they had almost accomplished this, he was shot through the heart, and died instantly. He had already been recommended for promotion, and if he had lived would have been farther recommended for gallantry and devotion to duty on the field.

Army Service Corps.
URGENTLY WANTED.
MEN Between the ages of 41 and 60 with experience of Horses are required for Enlistment into Army Service Corps for duty with Remount Depots.
Jockeys, Hunt Servants, Coachmen, Grooms, Strappers & Carters are specially suitable.
For full particulars apply:
Recruiting Office, RUGBY.
F. F. Johnstone, Lt.-Colonel, Sub-Area Commander.
May 25th, 1917.

DEATHS.

BROMWICH.-Killed in action May 8th, somewhere in France, PTE. FREDERICK BROMWICH, aged 37 years.—From his sorrowing wife and children. “ Till the day breaks.”

LINE.—Killed in France May 20th, SIGNALLER ROBERT L. LINE, beloved eldest son of James B. and Lelia H. Line, of Goulbourne, Canada, and grandson of the late William Robert Line, Ivy House, Bilton.

IN MEMORIAM.

CONOPO.-In affectionate remembrance of W. CONOPO, of Kilsby, who lost his life on H.M.S. Queen Mary on May 11, 1916.
“ No anthem-peal flows sweet and loud,
No tablet marks his grave ;
But he soundly sleeps in a coral shroud
To the dirge of the rolling wave.”—R.I.P.
—From his ever-loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS.

GODDARD.—In loving memory of our dear son, CEPHAS GODDARD, of H.M.S. Fortune, killed in battle of Jutland, May 31st, 1916, and beloved husband of Jesse Goddard, of Southsea.-“ Until the day breaks.”—From FATHER, MOTHER, and JESSE.

GOUGH.—In loving memory of JAMES CLEETON GOUGH, killed in action on June 2, 1916.

MASKELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. G. Maskell, who was killed in France May 30th, 1916, age 20.
Where is our soldier boy to-night
Laid in a soldier’s grave ;
Far, far away in a foreign land,
He died like a soldier brave.
Oh, may we meet our boy again,
Far up in that Home above,
Where war and strife will be no more,
But all will be peace and love. R.I.P.

READ.—Sacred to the memory of CHARLES GEORGE READ, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on Dec. 15, 1916, aged 22 years.
We miss the hand-clasp, miss the loving smile.
Our hearts are broken, but a little smile.
And we shall pass within the golden gate.
God will comfort us, God will help us while we wait.

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