26th May 1917. Rugby & District War Prisoners’ Flag Day

PRISONERS OF WAR.—Owing to the greatly increased cost of the food parcels to the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, the committee are faced with the almost exhaustion of their funds, and to put them on a sound financial basis to meet the expenses of the coming months a special effort is being made on similar to last year. An appeal for donations has been issued, and a flag day will be held throughout the town and all the adjoining villages on Saturday next, June 2nd. It is interesting to note that a similar effort last year resulted in £50 being raised, and the committee are anxious that this year’s effort shall not fall short of that sum, especially as the expenses now, after allowing for guarantees, are no less than £100 per month. The whole of the organisation and arrangements for this effort have been entrusted to the indefatigable secretary, Mr J R Barker, who informs us that there has already been a very gratifying response to the appeal for donations, but a big effort must yet be made by the general public on June 2nd to enable the committee to secure the funds necessary to carry on their work during the next few months. We therefore appeal to the public to give generously when they buy their flags on War Prisoners’ Day.

WAR PRISONERS’ GRATITUDE.

The following are extracts from a few of the many messages received by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee from Rugby and district men interned in prison camps in Germany :-

PTE P J JESSETT (Old Bilton). Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Schneidemuhl. “ I am writing to thank you and the committee and all my kind friends in and around Rugby for the great kindness they have done in sending me food, for which I send my deepest thanks. I am pleased to say I am getting six good parcels a month of very nice eatables.”

PTE W F COLLEDGE (Rugby), Royal Regiment. Interned Dulmen. “ I am receiving your weekly in good condition, which are most acceptable

PTE W BRUCE (Easenhall), South Staffs Regiment. Interned Friedrichsfeld. “ I am receiving your parcels quite safely and in good condition. Thanks for same.”

PTE P J COLLOP (Monks Kirby), Suffolk Regiment. Interned at Friedrichsfeld. “ Just a line to say I am receiving the parcels from you all right, for which I am very grateful, as they are a great benefit.”

CORPL. T McDONAGH, South Staffs Regiment. Interned at Langenaalra. “ I am receiving your parcels safely and in good condition, for which I thank you very much.”

GUNNER T OWEN (Rugby), R.F.A. Interned at Wittenberg. “ I am pleased to say I am receiving parcels in good condition, and the contents quite satisfactory. Thanking you and all concerned for same.”

PTE R IRELAND, Northants Regiment. Interned Merneburg. “ I am writing thanking yourself and subscribers for parcels, which I have received regularly for the last eighteen months from Rugby.”

SERGT W KEMPTON (Rugby), 1st Rifle Brigade. Interned at Dulmen. “ I am receiving your parcels under the new scheme quite good in contents and condition.”

RIFLEMAN L J SMITH (Rugby), Rifle Brigade. Interned at Friedrichafeld. Writes saying he is receiving all parcels, and saying the only change to requires in the contents of the parcels is to send tobacco instead of cigarettes. A further card received from him on May 1st acknowledges receipt of a special tobacco parcel sent from Rugby on November 25th, which he received on 18th March. Over five months elapsed before acknowledgment of the receipt of this particular parcel reached the committee—a frequent occurrence, but a sure proof that no matter what delays there may be the parcels eventually get to the men.”

RIFLEMAN L WOOD (Rugby), Rifle Brigade. Interned at Friedrichafeld. “ I acknowledge receipt of your parcels of provisions, also underclothing, with best thanks.”

PTE W LINES (Bishops Itchington), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Sennelager. “ I wish to express my best thanks to you for the parcels, which I receive quite safely. Yours gratefully.” SERGT B G HITCHCOX (Rugby), Canadians. Interned at Soltan. “ This note is to let you know that the parcels are arriving safely through the Red Cross.”

PTE S C BEARD (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Munster. “ Just a line to let you know I am receiving parcels correct, and to thank one and all very kindly for same.”

SERGT A PHELPS (Rugby), 1st Rifle Brigade. Interned at Zerlist. “ Just a line to say I am getting the parcels for which you are contributing quite all right, and for the same I tender sincere thanks.”

PTE P MACK (Hilmorton), Oxford and Bucks L.I. Interned at Wahn. “ Very pleased to say I am receiving your parcels through the Regimental Care Committee in the best of condition.”

PTE J T GRANT (Napton), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Schneidemuhl. “ Many thanks for your parcels which I am receiving regularly and in good condition.”

PTE A KING (Hillmorton), Royal Scots. Interned at Minden. “ I am getting your parcels through all right and in good condition. Have also received a parcel of clothing.”

LANCE-CORPL A COWLEY (Bishops Itchington), Coldstream Guards. Interned at Dolmen. “ Thank you so much for the nice parcels you have sent to me. I cannot thank you and the other kind people enough for the nice things which I have received.”

GUNNER H CROFTS (Crick), R.F.A. Interned at Friedrichsfeld. “ Many thanks for parcels of food and clothing which I continue to receive from your fund, all in good condition. Give my thanks to all at Rugby.”

PTE M E CLEAVER (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Munster. “ I am pleased to say that I receive the parcels regularly and in good condition. The contents are very well assorted.”

These letters and many hundreds more may be seen at the Hon Secretary’s Office, 9 Regent Street, Rugby.

They show that the food parcels are absolutely essential, and that they get to the men safely.

The Rugby Committer are making a special effort to raise further funds to enable them to meet the increased cost of the parcels, and it is hoped a very generous response will be made by the general public on War Prisoners’ Flag Day, Saturday, June 2nd.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The Local Government Board have considered the question of the release for military service of Dr Gibbons Ward, deputy medical officer of health for the Mid-Warwickshire combined district, as well as medical officer of health for Leamington, and in view of all the offices now held by Dr Ward the Board have told the Central Medical War Committee that he cannot be spared at present.

Corpl W T Merrick, son of Mr T Merrick, Browsover, was wounded in Salonica on April 25th in the neck and left shoulder.

Mr & Mrs Deacon, of Newbold-on-Avon, received official intimation on Thursday that their son, Pte J Deacon, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was wounded in Salonica on May 10th. He is 21 years of age, and was employed at Mr Hunter’s Carriage Works prior to the War.

Mr T H Loveland, monotype mechanic, employed by the “ Advertiser ” Company, has this week joined the Colours. Mr Loveland is a Past Chief Ranger of the Loyal Stephenson A.O.F, and Thursday, before leaving, Mr W J Torrance, on behalf of the officials and members of the Court, presented him with a useful wrist watch as a mark of esteem and appreciation of his services in all the offices has passed through.

A queer experience recently befel Pte W Liggins, of the Army Veterinary Corps, who spent final leave in Rugby this week. One day, when entered the stable at the depot, he recognised one of the horses as one which was commandeered from his mother, Mrs Liggins, of James Street, and when he called the animal by its name it showed unmistakable signs of recognition.

The name of Co-Sergt-Major A C Tomlinson, Rugby, of the old “ E ” Company, R.W.R. was included in the list of officers and men mentioned for distinguished service in Field-Marshal Sir Douglas Haig’s recent despatch. Sergt-Major Tomlinson has now left the Army, but has made application for a commission.

The death has occurred of Pte Colledge, of a Canadian Regiment, son of Mrs Cleaver, and stepson of Mr T Cleaver, signalman, Benn Street, Rugby. Deceased was born at Long Lawford, but came to live at Rugby in his early years. When a young man, he was a prominent Rugby forward, a member of the Rugby Old Boys, and also a member of New Bilton St Oswald’s Football Team. He was also a member of the Britannia Band. Before emigrating to Canada about five years ago, he was employed at the B.T.H as a moulder, and he came back from Canada with a draft of soldiers some little time ago. In a letter from his Commanding officer to the Rev C T Aston, of Rugby, says : “ One of our stretcher-bearers informed me that Colledge went out to dress a friend who was wounded, and lying in the open, and evidently was instantly killed while engaged in this task. He was buried near where fell he fell on the battlefield, and when it is possible a cross will be erected to his memory. A letter of sympathy from the Commanding Officer has also been sent to Mrs Colledge. He leaves widow in Canada.

DISTRICTS APPEAL TRIBUNAL.
Held at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, on Friday last week. Present : Messrs K Rotherham (who presided), W Johnson, jun, G A Loveitt, and A Craig. Military representative : Lieut M E T Wratislaw. Agricultural representative : Mr J E Cox.

APPEAL FROM GRANDBOROUGH.
Mr Gilk, of Grandborough, appealed for Harry Rabin (26), carter and shepherd, passed for general service, stating that Rabin was the only man employed on a farm of 295 acres. He said he could not manage with a substitute who knew nothing about the work.—The Chairman : We all have to have substitutes and have to teach them.—Lieut Wratialaw said a substitute had been sent, but Mr Gilks would not take the man until he knew the result of that appeal.—Mr Cox said that, according to the recommendation given the substitute by two farmers, Mr Gilks should give the man a trial.-The Chairman : You have not taken the trouble to try the man. The appeal must certainly be dismissed.

A LONELY SPOT.
Coming to the case of Wm Cox, wagoner, The Ford, Churchover, Lieut Wratislaw said the employer—Mr Towers—had accepted a substitute.—Cox said he had got three children, one of whom was a cripple, and they had to be nearly 1½miles for bread and groceries.—Lieut Wratislaw said there was no obligation on Mrs Cox to remain in her present cottage, but Mr Towers was quite willing for her to stay there so that when the husband returned he would find his family in the cottage, and would be able to resume his employment.—The Chairman told Cox they had many cases which were even harder than his, and it was impossible for the Tribunal to do anything for him.—The appeal of the Military would be allowed, but the Tribunal would ask them to give 28 days, so that some arrangement could be made for the wife and family.

SCAVENGING CONTRACTORS TO JOIN UP.
The Rugby Rural Tribunal had exempted till next Michaelmas Samuel Upton, 30 New Street, New Bilton, on the ground that, with his brother George, he held a scavenging contract under the Rugby Rural District Council.-Lieut Wratislaw said in Upton’s family there were five people on about 35 acres of land, not one of whom was serving.—Mr Worthington said the man and his brother did the scavenging at Hillmorton and Clifton, which took them four days a week. The brothers held 35 acres of land, and the father an additional 37 acres.-Mr J E Cox said if the scavenging took four days a week it was evident the brothers could not devote very much time to the land. If Mr Geo Upton could get someone to assist him with the scavenging it looked as if his brother could be released.—The Chairman : That is the view of the Tribunal.—Mr Cox said if the scavenging could be dropped in one village, it could be dropped in another.—Mr Worthington : I don’t know : there is a good deal of disease in the village.—Mr Cox : There will probably be less if they don’t it.—The Chairman said the Tribunal were unanimously of the opinion that the appeal should be upheld.

MASTER BUTCHER’S MISLEADING STATEMENT.
Being of opinion that the slaughterers Rugby had been reduced to a minimum, the Rugby Urban Tribunal had refused to withdraw the conditional exemption granted to Fredk Wm Burbery (37), master butcher, 123 Abbey Street. Hence the Military appeal.—Lieut Wratislaw said in his original application Burbery stated : “ I have lost my assistant, and do my own killing, dressing, and selling.” He should call evidence to show that the “ assistant ” was only a boy who ran errands, and that at the time the application was filed a man named Robinson was doing the slaughtering.

Mr Highton, Military representative for Rugby, gave evidence of what transpired at the local Tribunal on April 26th, when Burbery stated that he killed a beast, seven sheep, two pigs, and one calf a week.—Mr Harold Eaden : He did not represent that he himself killed the beast ?—Mr Highton : I say most emphatically that he did.—Mr Eaden : Do you know from your knowledge that one man cannot kill a beast by himself ?—A : I know there are certain men called slaughterers, who are always supposed to do the killing.

John Henry Robinson said he was a slaughterman in the employ of Mr Dodwell. About two years ago he started killing for Burbery, who was then a foreign meat butcher, and he had an arrangement with him whereby he was paid 2s 6d for each beast and 2d for each sheep killed. He went into Burbery’s employ in April, 1915, and from that time until the 30th of April this year for him. During that time Burbery killed nothing himself to his knowledge. He was not what might be called a slaughterman. On April 30th, when in the ordinary way he went across to do Burbery’s slaughtering, he found the place shut up and the work done.

Mr Eaden : You felt rather aggrieved ?—A : Yes. Q : Your feelings towards Burbery are not the best ?-A : It was not a nice trick to serve me.—Q : You are of military age and a general service man ?—A : Yes.—It is necessary under this arrangement between the Rugby Butchers’ Association and the Tribunal that you should do a certain amount of slaughtering ? Yes.—Not only for Mr Dodwell and others, but formerly for Mr Burbery ? Yes.—In consideration doing all that slaughtering, you are allowed to remain in civil employment ? Yes.—Mr Eaden : If you lost Mr Burbery’s slaughtering it rather imperils your position ?

The Chairman : That is rather for the Military to say.—Mr Eaden : It shows the attitude.—The Chairman : I don’t think you can say so at all.

Mr Eaden : A man who has been in the butchery trade for years, and has a knowledge of meat, might pick it up in two years ?—Witness : He might pick a certain amount up, but I could not say he would pick it all up.—Q : Would you agree he is a second-class slaughterman ?7 —A : No.—Q : You don’t call him slaughterman at all ? : No, sir.—Q : Although he helped you for two years ?—A : Yes.—The Chairman said there did not seem to be a shortage of slaughtermen at Rugby. A butcher seemed able get rid of one slaughterman to get another in.—Mr Eaden said Burbery was passed in B(2)—labour abroad.—The Chairman (to Burbery) : The trouble seems to have been that you said you were killing your own animals, which you were not doing.—Mr Eaden asked Burbery how many sheep he had killed this year without assistance ? and he replied 50 or 60. He had dressed them himself, and got them ready for the shop.

The Chairman thought the man might be used as a substitute.

Lieut Wratislaw said, subject to Mr Reeve passing him as a slaughterman (which he doubted), they might use Burbery as a substitute for a single man.—Military appeal allowed. Substitution order made, the man to report within seven days.

A GUINEA A MINUTE FOR A SUBSTITUTE.
“ told Mr Pearson (the manager of the Labour Exchange) that I would pay a guinea a minute if he would get me a substitute,” said Mr Sam Robbins, who appealed on behalf of William Law, cabinet maker and undertaker, 11 Hunter Street, Rugby.—Lieut Wratislaw said the Military felt that to act as an undertaker did not justify the retention of a category A man.—Mr Worthington said that at the outbreak of war the firm employed between 110 and 120 men, and now they had only seven left. He thought the Tribunal would agree that few firms had been more patriotic.—The Chairman asked how many of the men had gone into the Army ? Mr Robbins replied that the majority had done so, and about 10 per cent. had gone into munitions.—Mr Worthington said Mr Robbins never appealed for a man unless he was the last man left in department. This was the only cabinet-maker now left, whereas prior to the war the firm employed between 20 and 30 cabinet-makers. The Chairman said they quite felt that Mr Robbins had got a difficult job, and had been depleted most tremendously, but that was not what they were there for.—Mr Worthington : The man is 36 years age.—Lieut Wratislaw : And they are going to take up to 50. The only thing against this man is—he is a general service man, and a cabinet-maker is not of such high importance at the present time.—The Chairman said they wanted to help Robbins as much as they could. The Military appeal should be upheld, but they would give till August 8th, and no further application could made without leave, which meant that before the date named Mr Robbins must do all he could to get somebody else.

SEEDSMAN’S EXEMPTION OPPOSED.
Conditional exemption whilst in his present occupation as a seedsman, &c, had been granted to Albert Edwd Townsend, 229 Regent Street ; but the Military appealed against this.—Lieut Wratislaw stated that Mr Townsend was 34 years of age, and had been passed for general service. They said it was a useful business, but it was not in the national interest that a man passed for general service should remain in it. Mr Townsend wife and assistant could manage the shop during his absence.—Mr Eaden argued that the business in seeds carried on by Mr Townsend was at the present time of high national importance. Ninety per cent. of Townsend’s turnover was for vegetable and farm seeds.—Final exemption to July 8th granted.

CONCERT.-An excellent concert was given at the Infirmary V.A.D Hospital on Thursday evening last week. All the artists, who displayed remarkable talent, are at present patients in the hospital, and the programme was highly appreciated by their fellow patients and the hospital staff. Songs were rendered by Ptes Head, Orange, Pinnell, Astridge, Heath, and Ord. Several of the wounded boys gave monologues and turns during the second half of the entertainment. They included Pte Green, ventriloquist ; Rifleman Pinnell, who was very funny as a Cockney girl at the theatre ; and two knockabout comedians, Whitwell and Wilson, both of whom deserve a wider range of popularity.

SALE OF WASTE PAPER CONTROLLED.

Under an Order issued by the Minister of Munitions no person shall offer to purchase or take delivery of any waste paper except under and in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the Royal Commission on paper, and no person shall offer to sell, supply, or deliver any waste paper except to the holders of such licences, and in accordance with the terms of such permits to purchase or take delivery as aforesaid.

Every holder of a permit under this Order shall furnish such return as to his purchases, sales, and deliveries of waste paper as shall be required by the Royal Commission on Paper.

Mr J R Barker, who is taking the paper collected by the Rugby Waste Paper Committee, sorting and baling same, and sending to the paper mills to re-pulped, has been granted the necessary permit.

PRIVILEGED NO LONGER.-The rooks which have for generations built their nests and reared their young in the topmost boughs of the stately elms in the School Close have always enjoyed a privilege extended to very few others of their species. The hand of the destroyer may have been set against rooks in the countryside, but so long as the fledglings of the School Close remained within the sacred precincts of their elms seater[?] they belonged to a race apart from the ordinary rook, and no shot gun or rook rifle has ever been aimed at them. But with the need to conserve our food supply comes also the need to protect it from the ravages of voracious rooks, and so during the last week, on quiet evenings when the birds have been taking an airing on the side of their nests or on the boughs in the immediate vicinity, a gentleman with a steady eye and trusty rook rifle has been taking heavy toll of them.

DEATHS.

BROWN.—In loving memory of Pte WILIE BROWN, King’s Own Scottish Borderers, son of Mrs. Brown, 15 Sandradice Street, Dundee. At rest.
—SAM and DORIS.

HARRATT.—On April 23rd (killed in action in Mesopotamia), Corpl. T. HARRATT. Also on May 3rd (killed in action in France), Pte. JOSEPH HARRATT, both late Monks Kirby.

JONES.—On April 29th, Corpl. DAVID JOHN JONES (Jack), Essex Regiment, who was killed in France, the beloved third son of John and Mary Jones, the Red House, Shuckburgh ; aged 28.
“ We love him—oh ! no tongue can tell
How much we love him and how well ;
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldier’s grave.”

LEESON.—Killed in action on March 20th, ALBERT WILFRED (BERT). Sergeant in Northampton Regiment, dearly beloved third son of Mr. and Mrs. Leeson, Leicester, and dearly beloved grandson and nephew of Mr. and Mrs Leeson, Newbold-on-Avon ; aged 21 years and 11 months.
“ Not gone from memory.
Not gone from love ;
But waiting for with his brother
In our Father’s home above.”

IN MEMORIAM.

HUNT.—In loving memory husband, ALBERT JOHN HUNT, Warrant Officer of the 15th Brigade, R.H.A., of the immortal 29th Division, killed in action in Gallipoli on May 27, 1916.
“ They whom Thy love hath guarded long.
They whom Thy care hath rendered strong.
In love and faith.
Their heart strings round Thy heart entwine.
They are and ever will be Thine :
In life, in death.”

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