16th Jan 1917. Rugby Officer gains the Military Cross

RUGBY OFFICER GAINS THE MILITARY CROSS.

Capt H H Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, elder son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, “ Langdal,” Murray Road, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross for bravery in the fighting on the Somme during July last. Capt Neeves was at the same time promoted to his present rank. In the early days of the War the gallant young officer, who had been on the staff at Rugby Post Office, went out to the Dardanelles as a corporal in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. He was afterwards invalided home, suffering from the effects of dysentery ; and then, securing a commission, he was attached as a second lieutenant to the Northumberland Fusiliers, and went out to France in June. The gratification at his quick promotion and the honour he has won will be shared by his many friends and acquaintances in Rugby and district.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Sergt A E Dodd, Leicestershire Regiment, one of the earliest recruits from the B.T.H Works, is in hospital at Ipswich suffering from wounds. Sergt Dodd has been wounded three times—at Monchy, Guillemont, and Combles, The last time he received four different wounds at once, and has undergone 14 operations. Before the War he was employed in the B.T.H Wiring Department.

DR RELTON’S SON WOUNDED.

Dr and Mrs Relton, of Rugby, have received intimation that their son, Second-Lieut B C Relton, of the Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded. Before the War he showed promise as a footballer, he having played half-back both for Rugby School and the Town Club. As a cricketer, too, he gained his colours in the School XI., and later on assisted the Rugby Club, being a very useful fast bowler.

BRETFORD.

DEATH OF PTE TIMMS.—Mr Wm Timms, of Bretford, has received the sad news that his brother has succumbed to wounds in Rouen Hospital. He was injured rather dangerously in France, but it was thought at one time he would recover. He belonged to the Middlesex Regiment. Before joining the Colours he was employed on the railway dining cars. Mr Timms has another brother in the 2nd Leinsters, who has been on foreign service for a long time. Much sympathy is felt for the relatives.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut Wilfred H Parker, son of the Hon E W Parker, Westfeild House, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished service in the field.

From “ London Gazette ” of Monday, January 1st :—Gordon Highlanders, Sec Lt F Hunter resigns his commission on account of ill-health contracted on active service.

Capt R N O’Connor, of the Scottish Rifles, son of Mrs O’Connor, Overslade Manor, Rugby, has been mentioned in despatches by Sir Douglas Haig. This is the third time Capt O’Connor, who has already gained the Military Cross, has been mentioned in despatches, and he has recently been gazetted Brevet-Major.

The parcels sent this week on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to the local men in prison camps in Germany contained: ½-lb sugar, ½-lb milk, 1 tin herrings, ½-lb dripping in tin, ½ lb biscuits, 1 tin oxo cubes, 2ozs tobacco, pepper, salt, mustard, ½-lb cooked ham in tin, ¼-lb tin of cocoa, 1 tin sausages.

COUNTY COUNCIL CLERK’S SON HONOURED.

In Tuesday’s honours list is the name of Second-Lieut (temp Lieut) Edward Hubert Field, R.F.A, who has been awarded the Military Cross. He is the son of Mr Edward Field, clerk of the Peace for Warwickshire and clerk to the County Council.

MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In special lists connected with his recent descriptive despatches on the operations on the Somme, General Sir Douglas Haig mentions :

Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel H J Nutt, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who commands a Coventry Territorial Battalion, and has been associated with the Territorial Force for many years.

Temporary Major A Welch, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has already been decorated for his services as a Volunteer officer. He is serving with a Territorial Battalion, and was promoted to the rank of Major in October, 1914.

NEW RED CROSS HOSPITAL OPENED AT RUGBY.

The new Red Cross Hospital at the Rugby Union Infirmary was opened on Monday, when thirty wounded soldiers arrived from the First Southern Hospital, Birmingham. There was no formal opening, but on Friday the hospital and staff were inspected by General Quayle Jones, the Countess of Denbigh, and Mr E K Little, County Director of the Warwickshire British Red Cross. General satisfaction was expressed at the admirable equipment, etc. Mrs Brooke Michell, Vice-President of the Rugby V.A.D, was also present at the inspection.

The building, which was built for an infirmary, is a very commodious one, and admirably adapted for its present uses. It has accommodation for sixty men. There are three large wards, each capable of containing 18 beds, and two smaller ones. There is a surgical room, but not an operating theatre, and minor operations are performed in the wards. There is also a spacious day and recreation room. The staff is provided by Warwick 40 and Warwick 66 V.A.D, and the principals are :—Mrs H P Burdekin, commandant ; Miss M Townsend, assistant commandant ; Mrs C O Wharton, quartermaster ; Miss Townsend, assistant quartermaster. Mrs Thomas, who has worked at Te Hira for the past twelve months, is the matron, and the trained sister is Sister Gordon. Dr Crooks and Dr Wardrop comprise the medical staff.

The hospital staff is receiving instructions in fire drill, in order that they may be prepared for any eventuality. Visitors desirous of visiting the Hospital will be welcomed on Wednesday afternoons.

CHANGED TIMES.

Some of the many social changes which have been foreshadowed during the last few weeks came into operation with the New Year. The most noticeable changes were those affecting railway travel. Monday was the first day of the new order resulting in fewer and slower trains and a general increase of 50 per cent, in fares. The baking of standard bread also became general in accordance with the new Order. A separate Food Production Department has been set up at the Board of Agriculture to organise schemes for increasing the home-grown food supplies. It is understood rather under 10,000 German prisoners are available for work on the land. There is still too much evasion of the drink control regulations in some quarters, and the need of more stringent penalties for offences is under discussion. An Order was issued on Tuesday making it illegal to sell spirits unless reduced to 30 per cent. under proof, and a further reduction to 50 per cent. under proof is permissible.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Friday (Dec 29) at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry. Present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), H W Wale, S J Dicksee, and K Rotherham. Military representative : Mr M E T Wratislaw. Agricultural representative : Mr F W Channing.

WELCOME TO RUGBY REPRESENTATIVE.

Before taking the Rugby cases the Chairman welcomed Mr Dicksee on behalf of the Tribunal. He said they felt from the first they were very much handicapped with the Rugby cases because they had no Rugby representative. It was not the fault of the Tribunal, because they strove very hard to get a Rugby representative, but could not find anybody to act ; but when the numbers were extended they asked for one, and were very pleased to have Mr Dicksee with them.—Mr Harold Eaden also offered a welcome to Mr Dicksee, and said he was sure his assistance would be of value to the Tribunal.

ALLEGED “ NOTORIOUS POACHER ” AS A SUBSTITUTE.

The substitute offered by the Military to John Smith Cockerill, Pailton, for his son, Thos John Cockerill (20, single), was described by Mr Harold Eaden, representing the farmer in question, as “ a notorious poacher in the district.” He added that on the first two days the man was ill, and when he presented himself on the third day and was called upon to do the ordinary work, for which he was there—that of a cowman and stockman—he could not milk a cow and understood nothing about stock. Mr Cockerill tolerated him for two days, but at the end of the fourth day gave him his week’s money. The Military seemed to have offered a substitute without satisfying themselves that he could do the work- They must send a man who could do the work, and not a man whose principal qualification was poaching.

Mr Wratislaw contradicted the statement that the substitution officer did not satisfy himself as to the man he was sending. Mr Livingston (who had tried the substitute) said he was a most capable man and a very willing worker. Mr John Harrison, of Pailton, described him, as “ a capable farm labourer and willing worker,” adding : “ I have employed him several times, and have always been satisfied with him ” ; whilst Mr Davy, who had also had the man in his employ, said if he had a man of Military age for whom he required a substitute he was exactly the man he would wish for. The man said he did some thatching and milked, and worked out the full week ; and, in the opinion of the local Tribunal, until young Cockerill was taken away his father was not going to have a substitute.

Mr Eadon replied that Mr Cockerill was quite willing to let his son go if a reasonable substitute could be found.-The Chairman : This man does seem to be reasonable.—Mr Cockerill said it took the man half-an-hour to milk a cow, and he sat down on the wrong of the animal to milk her (laughter). He said he had never milked a cow in his life.

Mr Wale said he did not see any reason why an advocate should come into that Court and suggest that a substitute, whatever his previous character had been, was a poacher. He objected to that.—Mr Eaden said the man might be a very good labourer, but he was useless to Mr Cockerill, particularly in the winter.

The Chairman said in a case like this the man ought not to have been dismissed ; the employer should have first communicated with the Military.

Mr Eaden : If the man was no good the Military could not make him any good.—The Chairman : You know the whole point is : These men have got their sons, and do not want to part with them. They will take no substitute if they can help it.

The appeal was dismissed, and Mr Eaden said his client would try and find a substitute independently of the Military Authorities.

Mr Eadon asked for his client to be allowed 28 days, but Mr Wratislaw objected, and it was not granted.

“ CREATING SLAVERY.”

Chas Oakes, Kirby Lane Farm, Monks Kirby, appealed for Edwin Lowe, cowman and farm labourer, Monks Kirby.—Mr Wratislaw stated that conditional exemption was granted to Lowe whilst in the employ of Mr S Hodgetts, but the man left that employ, and the Monks Kirby Tribunal upheld the view that Mr Oakes could not possibly appeal for him.—Mr Wale : certainly he could. He claims as the employer. It does not mean that a man is to be bound for ever to that particular employer. You are creating slavery.—The Chairman said the Tribunal had to decide that the was in order ; and then, according to the new Army Regulations, adjourn the case sine die.—This course was adopted.—The Chairman (to Mr Wratislaw) : You had better pass on the poacher.—Mr Eaden : We do not want him again.

The appeals for John Bryson, stockman and shepherd, Manor Farm, The Grange, Wolston, and Geo Wilson, wagoner. Gate Farm, Bourton, were also adjourned sine die.

APPLICATION FOR LEAVE REFUSED.

Mr Worthington represented Ernest Jinks, grocer, clothier, and beer retailer, 104 Cambridge Street, Rugby, who asked for leave to appeal for an extension of the temporary exemption, to January 1st.-The appeal had been made on the ground of domestic hardship ; and Mr Worthington said the man had four young children.—The Chairman said they knew the position very well. They could not make a practice of granting leave to appeal, or they would have everybody coming back and asking for leave. There must be further facts.-The application was refused.—Appellant : Give me time to clear my stuff off ?—The Chairman : No ; there is no more.

SUBSTITUTION EFFECTED.

With respect to the appeal for Francis John Bucknill farmer and wagoner, Marton, Mr Wratislaw said they had effected a substitute, and Mr Bucknill, sen, expressed himself as satisfied, it transpired that a man from Broadwell, who had been passed in a low category was the substitute, and Mr Bucknill said his son was going into the Army on the following Monday.—The Chairman : I think you ought to be congratulated on the course you have taken.

WHEELWRIGHTS WANTED IN THE ARMY.

The case of John George Bennett, wheelwright, &c, 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, in the employ of Mr F Sharpe, of Rugby, had been adjourned for enquiries to be made to see if the man could still be enlisted in his trade, and Mr Wratislaw said their information was that the Royal Engineers were appealing for wheelwrights.-The employer’s appeal was, therefore, dismissed.

STILL HANDLING SUGAR.

The Home and Colonial Stores, Ltd, appealed for their Rugby manager, Alfred Wm Elsley, 70 King Edward Road, paused for garrison duty abroad.—Mr Wratislaw said the man was not in a certified occupation, because he was not a manager in the strict sense of the word. Whatever he required for the shop was supplied from the head office.—Mr Sharman, who represented the firm, said that point had been decided in their favour by the Central Tribunal.—Mr Wratislaw : You do not handle big sides of bacon, do you ?—Mr Sharman : We have 2½ cwts of sugar to handle.—The Chairman :   You are very lucky.—Given till May 1st.

ANXIOUS TO DO WAR WORK.

An appeal as a skilled man who wished to be placed on war work was made by Wm Thos Scrawley (28, married), general fitter, 15 James Street, Rugby.—The appeal was at first dismissed, the Chairman remarking that the man would be very useful in the Army ; but appellant then produced documentary evidence that he was badged ; and the Chairman remarked that the Military could not touch him ; and Mr Wale advised applicant, in his own interests, to get into a controlled establishment.

BUILDER’S APPEAL FOR AN ELECTRICIAN.

Messrs Linnell & Son, builders, Rugby, appealed (through Mr Worthington) for Horace Walter Gilbert, electrician, 56 New Street, New Bilton.—It was pointed out that this was the only man left in the electrical, department, and his going would mean closing the department, which had taken seven years to build up, and this would be a most serious financial loss to the firm.-Mr Wratislaw said Mr Linnell, jun. had gone into the Army ; and in the circumstances Col Johnstone suggested that Gilbert might remain till March 31st.—This course was approved.

ANOTHER CASE FOR SUBSTITUTION.

The Military appealed against the exemption that had been granted to George Mascord White (22, single), shoeing and general smith, Dunchurch, in the employ of his father.—Mr Wratislaw said they offered as a substitute a man named Loydall, of Long Lawford.—The Chairman informed Mr White, sen, that he could not keep a young man of 22, passed for general service, and told him he had better “ collar on ” to the substitute, and consider himself lucky.—Mr White said he was afraid the substitute named would not suit him, and asked for a month or two to try him, as he had very valuable horses to shoe.—The Chairman said they could not keep a young man of 22 back to shoe valuable horses, and the Military appeal was upheld.

QUITE OPPORTUNE.

“ All the pipes in the parish are burst,” said Mr Eaden, adding that it was an opportune moment for the appeal of Wm Walter Heap, (37, married), builder, plumber, and undertaker, Dunchurch.-The Tribunal offered till March 1st.-Mr Eaden said he should want to ask for further time. Mr Wale : You must pray for the frost to continue.-March 1st.

“ WOULD SOONER PUT KHAKI ON ”

Edwin Edwards, carter, &c, appealed for his son, Wm Edwards (24, married, and passed for general service), 56 Railway Terrace, Rugby, engaged in the delivery of parcels and helping in the business.-Mr Eaden said a substitute was offered, but when he looked at the job he admitted he was not strong enough for it.—Mr Wratislaw said the substitute refused the job because the wages offered were only 25s a week.-Mr Edwards : He said he would sooner put khaki on.—Mr Wale : I should say so. He would be better off.-The Chairman said it could not be suggested that the work was of high national importance.-Appeal dismissed.

A POSITION OF A FOREMAN BAKER.

An appeal by the Military was made with respect to George Brown (37, single), foreman baker, 32 James Street, Rugby, on the ground that, although the man was in a certified occupation, he spent only six hours a day in bread baking, and the other part in confectionery.—The employer said he used five sacks of flour a week for broad, and he was also under a contract to supply cake to the Military.—March 1st.

A CURIOUS CASE.

There were unusual circumstances connected with the case of John Frederick Woodford, slaughterman and butcher, 82 Craven Road, Rugby.—Mr Wratislaw said the Master Butchers met the Advisory Committee extremely fairly, and until they could substitute Woodford they thought he ought to stay ; but the moment they got a substitute the master butcher employing the man offered to release him for general service. They found a substitute, but when the case came before the Rugby Tribunal, who had given a certificate of exemption, they promptly refused to go into the matter, and said they would not interfere with their previous decision.—Mr Nelson (clerk to the Tribunal) said he had a letter from Mr Smith, the man’s employer, stating that he was quite prepared to assent to the question raised by the Military.—Appeal allowed.

INNKEEPER TO JOIN UP.

An application by Ernest Shepherd (38, married), Clifton Inn, Rugby, for a munitions order to enable him to keep his business together was opposed by Mr Wratislaw, who contended that the father, aged 75, who previously held the license, was quite capable of supervision.—Mr Worthington represented appellant, who was given till January 28th.

HORSE TRAINING FOR 23/- A WEEK.

John E Wilkins, horse trainer, Bretford, appealed for Arthur Edwin Taylor (28, married), assistant horse trainer and farm hand, stating that it was necessary in his business to have a young man used to the work, as a good many of the horses sent to be trained were spoilt, and of bad character.—Mr Wratislaw : It is rather a dangerous job.—A : Yes.—Mr Wratislaw : And for that risk and skill you only pay 23s a week, without a cottage ?—Mr Wilkins replied that he paid more than most of the farmers in the neighbourhood, and the man had a garden in which to grow potatoes and other vegetables. He would give him more wages if he stayed. Mr Wale : I do not think 23s a week constitutes indispensability.-Mr Wratislaw : Do you consider for a man to whom you pay that wage it is in the national interest he should be retained ?-Mr Wilkins : I am paying a good deal more than my father used to pay.—Mr Wratislaw : We say it is not in the national interest the man should be retained.—Applicant : Is is not in the national interest that horses should be trained ? Could not you find me a substitute ?—The Chairman : Not at 23s a week. They are not to be had.—Applicant : What wages do you think I ought to pay ?—The Chairman : That is for yourself to decide.-Appeal dismissed.

BIRDINGBURY SMALLHOLDER ALLOWED TIME.

A long letter was put in by Chas Barfoot (33, married), joint smallholder and carrier, Birdingbury, in support of his application.—He was given till March 31st, with the hint that he had better be ready to join up by then.

HELPING A NEIGHBOUR.

On the understanding that he helped a neighbouring farmer, who last week met with an accident, breaking his leg on the ice, Sidney Strong, farmer and wharf manager, Royal Oak Inn, Hillmorton Wharf, was given a temporary exemption till March 31st.

DEATHS.

DONALD.—On December 31, 1916, at Aldershot, of pneumonia, Bombardier CHAS. DONALD, the beloved husband of Alice Donald, 16 Wood Street ; aged 38.—“ Peace, perfect peace.”

29th Apr 1916. Lord Denbigh & Conscientious Objectors

LORD DENBIGH & CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS.

To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

Newnham Paddox, 27/4/16,

SIR,-Since my return from a year’s service in Egypt a few weeks ago, I have been reading in your paper with shame and indignation of the various attempts made by ” conscientious objectors ” and others to evade their duty to their country and save their own skins.

If you have sufficient space, perhaps you will publish the enclosed copy of a letter which I have just sent to a rev gentleman in Lancashire.

I wish he and others like him could visit the front trenches and the ruined towns and villages in France and Belgium, and see what war means. I wish they had been with me the other day when I was able to go to the front trenches on my way back through France.

I was in what before the war was a prosperous, tidy, and well ordered mining village of excellent houses. It is now half in actual ruins and half deserted by the inhabitants, but with most of the houses more or less knocked about by shells, and unbroken panes of glass are rare.

You approach this spot by a long deep communication trench which is frequently shelled, and it goes down the main street where the gutters used to run ; it branches out in various directions and these branches run in tunnels under houses and through cellars until at last one arrives at the firing trench, cunningly worked in amongst ruined walls, made up with sandbags and the various protective traverses and dug-outs.

When I got back to the headquarters, where two shells had gone through the roof the night before, after staying a short while in a telephone exchange in a cellar, while an adjoining square where the field kitchens were was being shelled for half-hour or so in hopes of catching the men coming for their food—a shell had knocked out a party of men there the night before—I found a French soldier in uniform under an escort of two British.

He had been found wandering about the forward trenches, and his movements were rightly regarded as   suspicious, so he was arrested and brought along. His story was as follows :- He had lived and worked in this village before the war, and he gave the number of his house in a certain street, now only semi-existent. He left his wife and two children, also a sister and six children, there on the day of mobilisation. He had been twice wounded himself in Champagne last year, and since his departure twenty months before he had not heard one word of his relations, and he didn’t know where they were nor what happened to them. He had got five days’ leave from his regiment to come and endeavour to obtain news of them, and when arrested he had been trying to find where his home had been. His papers were quite in order, and I believe his story was quite correct, and it is just typical of what has happened to thousands of others in the war area.

This is war as it is known to-day and practised by the Germans. This is what we wish to protect our country from.

I, too, am a ” conscientious objector.” I conscientiously object to being murdered by a Hun, to seeing my house burnt and my family ill-treated, and probably murdered too, by brutal German officers and soldiers ; also to seeing these things happen to the inhabitants of my country, though I confess it would do some of these “objectors” and sham-exemption hunters good if they were made to suffer. I object to those who are for over trying to mislead the people of this country with wrong conceptions of what we are fighting for, and what we shall be reduced to if we do not win this war or if we make an inconclusive and premature peace.

I also object to one section of the population being obliged to go through the dangers and hardships of modern war whilst undue facilities are given to others to shirk and shelter themselves behind the former.— Faithfully yours,            DENBIGH.

[Copy].

To the Rev. Percy Stoll, M.A., B.D., Vicar of St. Peter’s, Halliwell, Bolton.

SIR,—I have received from you a circular addressed to Members of the House of Lords and to which you request a personal reply. Having a few minutes to spare, I have much pleasure in sending you one.

You apparently ask on behalf of your two sons, whom you say are destined for the Ministry, total exemption from all ” complicity in this war,” in which you rightly say England is ” standing forth as the protector of weak nations,” and you say you have ” stood for 25 years for duty to God, State, and Church.” As you truly say, ” War is admittedly a gigantic evil,” but I am not aware that Christ has ever taught that nations or individuals wrongfully attacked are not entitled to make as strenuous a defence as possible.

The matter, therefore, resolves itself thus: We are fighting to defend ourselves against a nation, which knows no creed but that of force and might, and if we are defeated it is well known that we shall be utterly crushed and ruined, as a nation, and that the enemy will strive by every means in his power to land in this country and treat us to exhibitions of ” frightfulness ” of which the horror perpetrated in Belgium and France may safely be regarded as mild samples. You say that you and your sons are so averse to ” harming anyone ” that you ” would not take the sword, even against enemies.”

Let me ask you, therefore, this question : Having regard to the brutalities against inoffensive civilians—especially women and children—which have disgraced the German army in Belgium and France, are you or are you not amongst those unnatural curs who have admitted that if they saw their wives and daughters being insulted by German soldiers, they would not take any violent action to save or rescue them, even if it was in their power to do so, either by themselves or in conjunction with others.

If, owing to your objection to “ taking a sword even against enemies,” you have to admit that you would take no steps for rescue or protection under the above circumstances, I hope the female members of your congregation will take note of the fact. As women generally admire courage in a man, they will probably express their opinion of you in plain terms.

But perhaps you will say you certainly would put up a fight to the best of your ability to protect the honour and the lives of your women folk. In this case, you are no genuine conscientious objector to using violence when you or yours are in danger, and I look upon you as humbugs and hypocrites in your refusal to have any “ complicity ” in this war, which is for the purpose of protecting these islands against the savagery of German invaders.

I take it you are against all ” complicity ” either as combatants or non-combatants. Parliament, in its wisdom, has arranged that those with genuine religious objections to combatant service shall be permitted to help their country as non-combatants, who, in limited numbers, have a useful field of work open to them.

I have some respect for those Quakers, for instance, who object to fight but are ready to perform the often very dangerous duties attaching in these days to stretcher-bearers on the battle-field. I, have no vocabulary capable of expressing my contempt for those who refuse to assist in any capacity or to share the dangers and hardships of those who are so bravely defending them from a hideous fate.

If your sons can show conscientious objections to fighting themselves and taking the lives “ even of their enemies,” they can no doubt be placed in a non-combatant corps.

In this guise, they can rescue and comfort the wounded, fix wire at night time in front of the forward parapets, dig trenches, dug-outs and latrines, and carry stores and sandbags into the trenches, and perform many other useful and innocuous but necessary duties, and so allow those who are fighting for them to obtain a well-earned rest.

Your sons will be all the better ministers for having been brought into close contact with Death, suffering, and manly courage in the trenches, and will, if they are spared—as I hope they may be—come back with perhaps loftier ideas than they now apparently have as to what constitutes their duty to “ God, the State, and the Church.”

Faithfully yours.

DENBIGH,

Colonel Commanding H.A.C.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In memory of Lieut R W Poulton Palmer, the famous Rugby footballer and captain of the English XV, who was killed in action about a year ago, a beautiful marble tablet has been placed in the Parish Church at St Helens, Isle of Wight. It bears the inscription : “ In memory of Ronald, Lieut R W P Palmer, B.A, Rugby and Balliol, 1/4th Royal Berks Regt (T.F), younger son of Edward and Emily Poulton. Killed in the trenches in Belgium, May 5, 1915. Age, 25 years. An athletic leader of rare distinction, he was endowed with even greater gifts of love and joy. ‘God is love.’ ”

P A MORSON WINS WELL-EARNED REWARD.

P A Morson, son of Mr Arthur Morson, the esteemed clerk to the Rugby Council, who has been serving as a private in the Honourable Artillery Company, has been granted a commission in the 11th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Second-Lieut P A Morson was educated at Rugby School, and was one of four chums who sailed from England the same day, the other three being Pepperday and the two brothers Bluemel. Two have laid down their lives for the country, and the second brother Bluemel has been seriously wounded. Lieut Morson went out with 150 volunteers on July 1st of last year. He has been through practically all of the strenuous fighting in which the British troops have been engaged since that date. Second-Lieut Morson came home on short leave on Easter Monday night, and returned to the front last night.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT TO AN OLD LAURENTIAN.

News has been received that Flight Sub-Lieut Warner H Peberdy, son of Mr W W Peberdy, of Albert Street, has been invalided home from the front as the result of a serious aeroplane accidont in Flanders. Sub-Lieut Peberdy is suffering from spinal concussion and severe shock to the nerve centres, and is now taking a rest cure in the South of Ireland under medical supervision, where he is making very favourable progress. He is one of the many Old Laurentians who have come back from far corners of the Empire to do their bit for the Old Country. He came from Canada with the first squadron of aviators. Formerly he was a student engineer in the early days of the B.T.H. at Rugby, and after completing his course there he went to the United States. When the war broke out he travelled in Canada to help to organise the Canadian Curtin Aviation School, at Toronto. He acted as manager during the first three months of the school’s rapid growth to the position of the largest civilian flying school in the Empire.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY IN ACTION.

After taking part in the Gallipoli campaign, the Warwickshire Yeomanry are now fighting in Egypt, and took part in the fighting at Katia on Easter Sunday. Our mounted troops, consisting of the Gloucestershire Hussars, the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and the Worcestershire Yeomanry, who were holding a position in and about the village of Katia, were attacked by a greatly superior Turkish force, before which they fell back, fighting a rearguard action, and inflicting heavy losses on the enemy.

An Objector Sentenced.—Pte Sydney Dodd, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, a conscientious objector to military service, has been sentenced to 21 days’ imprisonment for refusing to do all military duty. Dodd was first ordered by the local Tribunal to do non-combatant service, but as a result of his appeal to the County Tribunal about a month ago he was finally put down for combatant service.

A Rupert Brooke Memorial.—It has been decided to set in Rugby Chapel a memorial of Rupert Brooke. It will take the form of a portrait medallion in marble, based on a photograph by Sherril Schell, which appears as the frontispiece of the 1914 volume of poems. The medallion will be the work of Professor J Havard Thomas. No other memorial of Rupert Brooke is at present in contemplation.

Dodd, Arthur James. Died 1st Dec 1915

Arthur James DODD was born in about 1885 and was baptised at St. Andrew’s, Rugby, on 2 October 1885.

His father was William Dodd, born about 1851 in Rugby, who had married Selina Reeve, at St. Andrew’s, Rugby on 7 November 1881. She was born at Hinton, Gloucestershire in about 1863. In 1891 William was auctioneer’s assistant living at 19 Pinders Lane, Rugby.

In 1901, Arthur was the oldest child, aged 15, and working as ‘Lamp Lighter Gas’. His two younger sisters, [Alice] Elsie and Mabel, were then aged 6 and 4. William Dodd died in 1902, and in about 1905, Selina apparently ‘married’ a mechanic, George Bradley, who came from Leicestershire, although no record has been found,[1] and they lived then at 19 Alexandra Terrace, Pinders Lane, Rugby. By 1911, they had had two children: one, probably George whose birth and death were registered in Q4, 1905; and a daughter, Norah Georgina, born 1907, who was now 3 years old.

Well before the war, and apparently very soon after that 1901 census,[2] Arthur became a soldier and joined the 1st Battalion, the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The two ‘peace-time’ Warwickshire Battalions would alternate between the UK and an overseas posting, and in 1911 Arthur was enumerated with the 1st Battalion in ‘Ceylon and India’. He was 26 and had been promoted to Lance Corporal.

The 1st Battalion sailed from India in December 1912, and arrived back to the UK in early January 1913. They were initially based at Shorncliffe, near Folkestone, with 10th Brigade, 4th Division. On 8 August 1914, amid fears of a German invasion of the East coast, the 4th Division was held back from the original British Expeditionary Force (BEF) and sent by train to Yorkshire in a last minute decision to defend England against a possible German landing. Almost immediately this fear was seen to be unfounded: the fate of the BEF in France and the lack of any move by the enemy to cross the Channel, reversed this decision and they were sent back to join the other units of the 10th Brigade, 4th Division of the BEF at Southampton. There they boarded the SS Caledonian on 22 August 1914 and landed at Boulogne in France the following day, arriving in time to provide infantry reinforcements at the Battle of Le Cateau.[3]

They were subsequently in action at the Battle of the Marne, the Battle of the Aisne and at the Battle of Messines in 1914. In 1915 they fought in the Second Battle of Ypres and later in 1916 they would move south to the Somme.[4]

Arthur did not accompany the Battalion to France in 1914, possibly being held back, as an experienced NCO, to assist with the training of the large numbers of new recruits.   Certainly his Medal Card shows that before later 1915, he had been promoted: first to Sergeant and then to Company Sergeant Major, Warrant Officer Class 2, No. 9393, in the 1st Battalion.

His Medal Card shows that he finally went to France on 2 May 1915. This would have been during the Second Battle of Ypres which was being fought from 22 April to 25 May 1915.

In August 1915, the 1st Warwicks were sent to the Redan Ridge/Mailly Maillet sector, where they took over the French trenches.[5]

On 1 December 1915, Arthur Dodd was shot by mistake by a sentry. The Rugby Advertiser reported:

‘Sergeant Major Dodd reported killed – Mistaken for a German Sniper.

News has just been received through a comrade, that Company Sergt-Major A J Dodd, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, whose home is at Rugby, has been killed at the front through a regrettable mistake. It appears he was leaving a trench, and the sentry, mistaking him for a German sniper, fired and shot him in the groin, with the result that he died from loss of blood before he could be carried to the dressing station.   Sergt-Major Dodd had put in 14 years of service.’

Another note on the 1914-1918.invisionzone forum stated:

On 1 December, CSM Arthur Dodd was killed coming from the trenches when a sentry mistook him for a German sniper. He came from Rugby and had been in the army for 14 years. It seems that the idea of holding the front line ‘by posts’ only because of the conditions was not just a 48th Division idea used by the Warwicks Territorials, as the 1st Battalion did the same from at least 8 December. …’.[6]

Arthur was buried in Grave Reference:III. E. 5. in the Sucrerie Military Cemetery, Colincamps – a village about 16 kilometres north of Albert.

Sucrerie was originally called the ‘10th Brigade Cemetery’ and was near the front line. Indeed, in the period when Warrant Officer Dodd was killed, the great majority of casualties buried there were from the 10th Brigade: from the 1st Bn. Warwickshires and the 2nd Bn. Seaforth Highlanders, as well as the 1st Bn. Royal Irish Rifles. Between August 1915 and the end of the year, 22 men from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment were buried at Sucrerie.

The cemetery was begun by French troops in the early summer of 1915, and extended to the west by British units from July in that year until December 1918.   Until the German retreat in March 1917, it was never more than a 1.6 kilometres from the front line. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.[7]

His family inserted an ‘In Memoriam’ notice in the Rugby Advertiser.

‘Dodd – In loving remembrance of my dear son, Company Sergt.-Major Dodd, who was killed in France, December 2, 1915.[8]

“In a soldier’s lonely grave,
Beneath France’s blood-stained sod,
There lies my dearest son, Resting in peace with God,
Though rolling seas divide us,
And he sleeps on a pitiless shore,
Remembrance is a relic
That shall live for evermore.”

‘- Never forgotten by his loving mother, sisters, and step-father.’

 

He was awarded the British War and Victory Medals and the 1915 Star. He is remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

= = = =

 

This summary was prepared for the Rugby Family History Group by John P H Frearson in November 2015.   Thanks are due to other members of the Group for copying data in the local newspaper.

 

 

 

[1]       This may have been because any ‘pension’ may have been lost if she re-married; or merely that the record of the marriage has not been correctly recorded.

[2]       He was said to have served for 14 years when he was Killed in Action in December 1915.

[3]         http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/allied/battalion.php?pid=7339#sthash.t1U5l8Vp.dpuf

[4]         http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/allied/warwickshirregiment

[5]       http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=145645

[6]       http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=145645

[7]         Commonwealth War Graves Commission, http://www.cwgc.org/

[8]       It seems that there is a discrepancy between the date given to the family and that used by the CWGC.

13th Nov 1915. Letter from old St Matthew’s boys

LETTER FROM OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOYS.

Pte Frank Morley, R.A.M.C, an “old boy” of St Matthew’s School, writing from Gallipoli to Mr R H Myers, the headmaster, say :-

It is always a pleasure to receive the Advertiser and read of the doings of the “ old boys.” St Matthew’s has indeed contributed its quota, and I feel proud to be included amongst the number.

We, in company with the 11th Division, took part in the new landing on the Peninsula. As you are aware, we did not quite achieve our object, but I feel sure that the surprise landing demoralized the Turks, who were anticipating an attack from the Asiatic coast.

It seems to me that people at home are only just beginning to realise the gravity of the situation. The fighting out here is of a different character, and on a different scale to that in France. I think Mr Winston Churchill aptly described the position when he said, “ The armies there are like men fighting on a high and narrow scaffolding above the surface of the earth.” We must indeed be prepared to make great sacrifices before the final goal is reached.

I will not trouble you with details of the new landing. We certainly had an exciting time, and for the first ten days had to work like Trojans, We were generally up at 3.30 a.m, and walked fully three miles to the Regimental Aid Post to collect the wounded. Motor or horse transport was out of the question, as there were no roads, and the ground generally very rough and treacherous. It was a poor sort of “ joy ride ” the patients had, yet I cannot call to mind, a single word of complaint.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry came along a fortnight after the landing was made. They acquitted themselves well in their first engagement, for it was no easy task to cross an open plain with shells bursting thick and furious. They helped to carry out a good piece of work, and all honour due to them.

We have had a splendid opportunity of watching the Navy at work, and can fully appreciate their good work. Without their aid it would be absolutely impossible to land, let alone exist, on the Peninsula.

For the present we have turned our back on the Peninsula, and are now in a different country, where we await orders. Mr Censor will not permit me to disclose our whereabouts, so I must leave you guessing.

Pte Arthur Tacey, A.S.C, another “ Old boy,” writes to Mr Myers from the Dardanelles :- “ We are having a hard time of it out here, strenuous work every day and nothing to eat but biscuits, bully beef, and jam. Still, we are not downhearted, and keep looking for the bright side, which we hope will not be very long in appearing now, though we all feel that we are on a very funny outing. One’s thoughts often turn to the old school and the happy times spent there. In the waits in our dug-outs we often amuse ourselves with making up doggerel rhymes, and I send you my last contribution.”

Summerdown Convalescent Hospital,

E Division, Hut 1, Eastbourne.

5/11/15.

DEAR SIR,—I am writing to ask you if you would kindly be good enough to insert this in your paper, as you see by the above address that I am writing this from a convalescent hospital and pleased to say that I am progressing favourably. I should, however, like the people of Rugby to know how the boys answered the country’s call last August ; as near as I can say about 100 enlisted in the 5th Oxford and Bucks, and I am pleased to say there are still some of them left, although, perhaps, few. We had what they call our baptism of fire on June 16th while waiting in reserve for the 6th Division. Here we lost one officer and 50 N.C.O and men whale taking over the position on June 19th. I might say I unluckily got gassed and somewhat blinded, and was away from my regiment six weeks. When I did rejoin on August 17th I luckily escaped a shell, which burst only a matter of a few feet off ; but on September 25th I was wounded and now I am enjoying my convalescent rest. I tell you it is not really so bad being a soldier, and if this letter should reach the eye of any “ slacker,” I hope it will have some effect in changing his mind, for I can assure them that men are wanted and will be had. So play the game and join.

I am, yours faithfully,

PTE. E. JACKSON.

OUR YOUNGEST TERRITORIAL.

We reproduce a photograph of Alfred Charles Hayward, son of Mr H E and Mrs Hayward, of 38 Winfield Street, Rugby, who is, we understand, the youngest of Rugby’s Territorials. Before the outbreak of war he was attached to E/Company of the 1/7th Warwickshires, and went with them to Rhyl for the annual encampment during the August Bank Holiday week in 1914. He was then within a month of being 14 years of age. As will be remembered, the battalion had scarcely, arrived in camp when they were ordered to mobolise at their war station in the south of England. They were eventually moved by stages to Leighton Buzzard, from whence they had a route march of 135 miles through Dunstable, Hitchin, Ware, Epping, Brentwood, Stock, Chelmsford, and other places to Totham. This occupied 11 days, and the distances covered each day ranged from 3 to 20 miles. On another occasion they went out on a three days’ march. Young Hayward marched with them, and never had to fall out. The sight of such a youngster striding along with the regiment naturally attracted much attention from spectators, and if is said that sympathetic mothers were often moved to mingle tears with admiration. He was medically examined and reported fit, but not old enough for active service, and when the battalion went to France, Bugler Hayward returned to Coventry to act with the reserve lines. He is still there waiting for the time when he can go on active service. It would be interesting to know whether there if a younger territorial in the country.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-corporal Arthur Mason, 6th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who has been spending eight day’s leave at his mother’s resident 40 Rutland Gardens, Hove, returned to Flanders on November 6th.

Mr J Walker, of 58 Lawford Road. Rugby, who went to East Africa with Colonel Driscoll’s Legion of Frontiersmen in April, is now serving as second-lieutenant, the promotion dating from September 8th.

It is reported that six members of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment-the County battalion—have been reported for Distinguished Conduct in the Field : Second-Lieuts Brian Ash and Sherwood ; Pte P W Hancocks (a Warwick man), Lce-Cpl Berry, Sergt Gerrard, and Q-M Shepherd.

A considerable number, of the clerical staff at the London and North-Western Railway Company’s works at Crewe have received permission to join the colours, and their places will be taken temporarily by women. Many of the unmarried men are enlisting under Lord Derby’s group scheme.

Mr H Pratt, of 4 School Street, Rugby, has enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps, and left Rugby for the Farnborough Flying Station yesterday (Friday) morning.

Since it was drafted to the front in June last, the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, in which many Rugby and district men enlisted, has been continuously engaged in strenuous work in an important position of the British line where fighting had been most desperate, and it has nobly upheld the glorious traditions of this famous regiment. The casualties have been exceptionally heavy, and are as under : Officers killed, 13 ; wounded, 19 ; N.C.O’s and men killed, wounded, and missing, nearly 900.

THE KING’S MESSENGER.

Corpl Fred Clarke, who carried out instructions to summon a doctor to attend his Majesty the King on the occasion of his recent accident in France, has been recognised by Hillmorton people from his portrait in a pictorial paper as a soldier of the same name who at the time he enlisted resided in the village.

ANOTHER LOCAL SOLDIER MISSING.

Pte Percy Woodhams, of the 2nd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, is reported to have been missing since September 25th, the date of the great advance by the Allies in France. At the time Pte Woodhams enlisted, shortly after the outbreak of war, his father resided in Cambridge Street but he has since left the neighbourhood. Pte Woodhams was working at the B.T.H until within a short time of his enlistment.

TWO LOSSES IN TWELVE MONTHS.

Official news was received by Mrs Dodd on Saturday that her son, Corpl E Dodd, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action on October 16th. Corpl Dodd, whose home was at 11 Bennett Street, joined, the regiment when the war broke out. He formerly worked at the Gas Works and subsequently for Mr Young, contractor. He was 37 years of age and single. He became a smart soldiers and five weeks after enlistment was made corporal. Although he joined in August, 1914, he did not go out till October 1st, and he was killed on the 16th. On the 20th October last year his father died from the effects of an accident, so that Mrs Dodd has sustained two heavy losses within the twelve months, and the greatest sympathy will be extended to her.

LORD DERBY’S RECRUITING SCHEME.

CANVASSING COMMENCES LOCALLY,

The great efforts to secure recruits for the Army inaugurated by Lord Derby it now in full swing locally. Sub-canvassing committee rooms have been opened in the various wards, the blue cards were issued on Monday, and canvassing commenced the same evening.

The voluntary system is now on its trial, and only three weeks remain in which to prove whether it will or will not suffice to give up the number of men required to carry the war to a successful issue. To make the scheme a success every eligible man who can be spared should enlist, either for immediate service, or in the reserve, and it therefore behoves everyone to ask themselves whether the reasons which the held to be valid for not enlisting are not, after all, mere excuses.

Rugby has already done remarkably well—few towns have done better-but there are still many young men who could well be spared and who have no legitimate excuse for holding back, who should answer to the call ; and the fact that the single men are to be called on first will doubtless assist many married men, hesitating between two duties, to make a decision.

So far, the result of the canvass has been disappointing, and eligible men have not responded to the call with the readiness which was at one time anticipated. Only a few men have, so far, enlisted under the group system. The only regiments which are open at present are infantry of the line.

The groups in which recruits may place themselves are for single men numbered 1 to 23, for each year of age respectively, from 18 to 40; and for married men the groups are numbered 24 to 46 inclusive for ages respectively 18 to 40.

The following have enlisted during the past week :-W J Timms, G Beck, A Frisby, S H Garlick, B Hardy, T C Manby, E C Long, J R M Cave, R.G.A ; T W Rennison, 13th Batt E Yorks ; L A Fudge, H W Driver, R.H.A ; P Smith, W Nown, W J Dunkley, G Baker, C Allen, G Hollis, R.F.A ; E G Bristow, W G Heighton, H C Robinson, W J Riley, F J Hornby, A Varney, A Richardson, R.W.R ; C P Croft, C T Newcomb, K.R.R ; A Varney, 220 F Co, R.E ; J Masters, Coldstream Guarda ; W Parrett, F C Warren, C W Maycock, G Blundell, R.E ; J O’Brian, and J Webster, R Scots Fusiliers.

14th Aug 1915. Experiences of a Rugby Red Cross Nurse

EXPERIENCES OF A RUGBY RED CROSS NURSE IN A LARGE BASE HOSPITAL.

“ SOMEWHERE IN FRANCE.”

The first intimation that I was to be sent to work abroad was received on Friday, May 7th. The telegram read: “ Wanted for France, Tuesday. Wire if available.” Having replied by a wire in the affirmative, I next day received orders to report myself by noon on Monday at Devonshire House (the headquarters of the British Red Cross Society) previous to proceeding “ somewhere in France ” on the following day.

I left Rugby early Monday morning, and arrived at Devonshire House, and found 29 other V.A.D’s assembled there, all for the same purpose. We then want to 83 Pall Mall, where Lord Onslow issued our Army certificates, brassards, identity discs and numbers ; then a visit to the War Office, where we signed many forms and documents, and received final instructions to be at Victoria Station next morning at 7.30 a.m. On arrival we had to register our luggage and have camp kit served out to us from the War Office.

A special saloon had been reserved on the Folkestone train, and thus on a glorious May day a party of 30 V.A.D’s left London for an unknown destination in charge of a military sister.

Our embarkation at Folkestone and arrival at Boulogne were full of interest. Being “ Army Medical Service,” and not mere civilians, we did not undergo a Customs examination, but were conveyed from the station by motor ambulances to a hotel, where we spent the night. We soon realised that we were in a country where war was raging. A convoy of wounded was being conveyed to a hospital ship in the harbour. Some of the men looked quite cheerful, while others bore unmistakable traces of pain and hardship.

The night was spent in Boulogne—one cannot say in peace. One’s advice to any other nurse contemplating active service is to provide oneself with a supply of Keating’s powder. Indeed, I feel sure that Keating’s Company would be pleased to supply it free of change did they know what a boon it would be !

At Boulogne our party of 30 became divided, some going one way and some another. The part to which I belonged left next morning at 7 a.m, and our destination was reached at 3.30 p.m. You can tell how quickly we had travelled when I tell you that we had only come about 60 miles. At the station we were met by one of the sisters from the hospital and two motor ambulances. Our party again became divided, six of us going to a large hotel converted into a hospital, which stands on the edge of the cliffs overlooking the sea, and the other six to a hospital under canvas.

When shown our quarters, which were large and empty, we set to work and unpacked our camp kit, putting up our chairs and bedstead. I have now learnt to sleep on my bed, which seemed very narrow at first.

Our duties began next moving. The daily programme (including Sundays) is :-Reveille at 6.30 a.m, breakfast at 7 a.m, on duty on the wards 7.30 a.m. The first duty on entering the wards is to tidy the beds and lockers ; then boil the instruments and have everything ready for the medical officer when he appeared at 9 a.m. The dressings are then begun, and these go on all the morning, the V.A.D waiting on the medical officer and sister. Some at the small dressings and fomentations are done by the V.A.D herself, but the extent of this naturally depends on the number of patients in the ward at the time. In the surgical ward where I work there are 101 beds and a staff of two sisters and myself.

When the hospital is very full dressings go on practically all day. In the evening the V.A.D has to make the beds, take the temperatures, make lemonade and beverages, wash the dressing bowls and instruments, while the sister does the dressings.

Dinner is at 8.10 p.m. and lights out at 10.30. When in a heavy ward with serious cases the mental and physical strain is considerable. Sisters out here say that the V.A.D’s have stood the sights remarkably well, and not one of them has fainted at a dressing yet !

One has not time to get tired of any particular dressing, as patients go to England immediately they are fit to stand the journey, unless the wound is slight enough for them to pass on to a convalescent camp en route for the front. It is rather disappointing not seeing the results of an interesting case, but the men are so pleased to be going to “ Blighty ” (as England is called by the Tommies) that one can but rejoice with them.

From what I have heard, on the whole the V.A.D is a success out here. There is so much in the way of cutting dressings, making gowns as well as ward work that can be done just as well by V.A.D as a trained nurse, and relieves a sister for doing the dressings and other important work that only she can do.

A V.A.D signs on for six months’ service abroad, in addition to one month on probation. This can be extended at the expiration of the time. The conditions governing her employment are the same as for the Q.A.I.M.N.S.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl G S Rowbottom, younger son of Mr C H Rowbottom, of Lawford Road, Rugby, has been promoted to acting corporal. He is in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and enlisted in August last year. He has been at the front about three months, and was with the regiment during the heavy bombardment in the neighbourhood of Ypres, so has experienced a good amount of modem warfare.

Lance-Corpl W E Wiggins, of the Northants Yeomanry, son of Mr W Wiggins, of Rochbierie, Hillmorton, Road, has this week visited his home on short leave after nine months in the trenches. Lance-Corpl Wiggins, who returned to the front on Thursday, states that his regiment has been in a number of warm corners, notably, at Neuve Chapelle, but has given a good account of itself ; and, except for the engagement mentioned, has suffered very few casualties.

George College, eldest son of Mr W W College, 48 Church Street, Rugby, enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery in June last, and is with the 3/2nd North Midland Brigade. As he showed great proficiency at mathematics, he was quickly promoted to be corporal, and he has now been made quartermaster-sergeant, and ranks as a warrant officer. Not bad for a recruit of three months’ standing, and he and his parents are to be congratulated on his quick promotion. He is an old Murray School boy.

During the past week a rumour—which has since been found to be baseless—to the effect that Sergt George Fiddler (son of Mr and Mrs F Fiddler, 15 Plowman Street, and brother of Rifleman H Fiddler, whose death we announced recently) had been killed, was freely circulated in the town. Sergt Fiddler, who enlisted in the 7th K.R.R early in the war, has written to his wife stating that he is in hospital suffering from a nervous breakdown, and the report doubtless arose from the fact that a number of letters and parcels had been returned.

SAPPER E R LADBROOK WOUNDED.

Sapper Ernest Roland Ladbrook, of the Royal Engineers, has written to his parents, Mr and Mrs J W Ladbrook, of 377 Clifton Road, Rugby, stating that he was wounded in the right leg and foot during a fierce bombardment on July 30th. An operation was performed on Sunday, August 1st, and the unfortunate young man is now an inmate of the General Hospital, Etaples, France, Sapper Ladbrook, who is 22 years of age, enlisted at the commencement of the war, previous to which he was employed by Messrs Willans & Robinson as a turner and fitter.

ANOTHER BILTON SOLDIER KILLED.

Mr and Mrs J Goadby, Magnet Road, Bilton, received the sad information from an officer of the King’s Royal Rifles that their son, Pte George Goadby, was killed in action on Saturday, August 7th. Pte Goadby, who was a bricklayer by trade and 24 years of age, joined Kitchener’s Army in September, and, with a number of other young men from this neighbourhood, became attached to the K.R.R’s. Much sympathy is felt in the village with Mr and Mrs Goadby and family in their loss.

He was a member of the Club, of which for a time he also acted is secretary ; also the Cricket Club and the Working-Men’s Club, and was generally respected in the village. He went out with his regiment to France a little more than three months ago, and since then he has been invalided and spent a month in hospital at the base, from which he was discharged only a short time before he met his end.

RUGBY FOOTBALLER WOUNDED.

Lance-Corpl Albert Ashworth, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in the knee and sent to an English hospital. His mother, who lives at 355 Clifton Road, Rugby, received a card, posted at Dover on Wednesday, in which he stated he had fine time crossing the Channel, and hoped soon to be all right. According to information supplied by a comrade, the injury was caused by the bursting of a “ Trench mortar,” part of the exploded shell striking the knee, but the relatives have not received any direct information as to the nature of the wounds. Previous to enlisting Lance-Corpl Ashworth played full back for Rugby 2nd XV.

HOME FROM THE TRENCHES.

Sergt W J Bryant, of the Rugby Infantry Company, is at his home in York Street on a few days’ leave. He left the trenches on Sunday, and arrived in Rugby on Tuesday, but has to return almost immediately. He says that the Rugby Territorials are now occupying trenches taken from the Germans by the French, and are contriving to make themselves as comfortable as possible. The men, though almost constantly under fire, are reported to be fit and well. Their trenches are in places 10ft deep, and, in addition, there are dug-outs, which have been made bomb proof, and bear evidence of much time and effort in their preparation.

A UNIQUE ADDRESS.

Mr James Renshaw, of the Black Horse Inn, Castle Street, has recently received a postcard from the front bearing a unique address. The card, which is from an Old Rugbeian, Quarter-Master-Sergeant A J Dodd, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, bears Mr Renshaw’s name, under which is drawn a black horse, followed by the word “ Inn,” and then a “ Castle ” Street ; the last line being taken up by the representation of a Rugby football, across which is written “ Rugby, Warwickshire, England.” The writer states that the address was “ drawn in the trenches under hellish shell fire,” and the ingenious and well-executed design is a remarkable illustration of the way in which the gallant lads at the front relieve the monotony of their long spells in the trenches.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been somewhat slack in Rugby during the past week, and the following have been attested :—R G Webster and C W Kirtland, R.A.M.C ; H T Cross, C Berry, and A E Turner, Rifle Brigade ; F W Reynolds, Northants Regiment ; C W Davenport, Coldstream Guards.