1st Dec 1917. Presentation to a Howitzer Man

PRESENTATION TO A HOWITZER MAN.

On the occasion of the presentation of medals at Chatham on the 25th inst, Bombardier F A Bosworth R.F.A, was the recipient of medals. The presentation was made by Colonel H R Adair, Commander Royal Artillery, Thames and Medway Garrison, who said : “ The Royal Artillery has no colours. Our colours are the proud traditions of our Regiment, to which we cling, and around which we rally, just as other Corps have rallied round their Banners. It is men like Bombardier Bosworth who not only preserve these traditions, but, who, by their deeds, actually add to and enoble them. I am proud to stand here to-day representing His Majesty the King, who, you will remember is our Colonel-in-Chief, to present to Bombardier Bosworth, on his behalf, two medals, which he has gained by his own brave hands. They are the Military Medal of England and the Military Medal of France.”

“ The records of the deeds for which he has won these read as follows:- Military Medal of England: “Repairing telephone lines and bringing in wounded under heavy shellfire.” Bar to Military Medal of England and Military Medal of France: “Maintaining communications under heavy shell fire.”

“ These medals are a proud possession for himself and splendid heirlooms for his kindred to possess. On behalf of our Country, our Ally of France, our Regiment and its Colonel-In-Chief our King. I shake hands with Bombardier Bosworth and wish him health and happiness and long life the to wear his noble distinctions.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt E Wood, Manchester Regiment, son of Mr T T Wood, The Laurels, Park Road, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Pte W Wilks, Cameron Highlanders, an old Murrayian, has been wounded by shrapnel a second time, near Ypres, and has undergone three operations. He is now in a Military Hospital near Norwich.

The many friends of Mr A Clarke, Spencer House, Crick, will be glad to hear that his eldest son, who was serving in France with the 1st Gordon Highlanders, has been promoted to Captain.

Lord Leigh is gazetted Colonel of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Lieut R W Friend, son of Mr R Friend, of Rugby, who has been serving in Salonika for about two years in the A.S.C, has been promoted to Captain and Adjutant. He was educated at Rugby School, and passed through Sandhurst. After leaving school he was a prominent player of both the Rugby Cricket and Football Clubs.

Gunner Harold Richard Hazlewood, R.F.A, second son of Mr & Mrs Hazlewood, Weedon, has been killed in action. In a sympathetic letter the Chaplain said :—“ He died a soldier’s death at the gun.” The deceased who was 21 years of age, was educated at Weedon Boys’ School, and afterwards at the Town and County School, Northampton. On leaving school he was articled to Mr W J Pearce, auctioneer, Northampton, and joined up in January, 1915, proceeding to France in January, 1916. He was in the Somme push, the Battles of the Vimy Ridge, Beaumont Hamel, &c ; was wounded in March, 1917, and had been recently recommended for his commission on account of meritorious service.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Monday evening at the Benn Buildings, the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, reported that during the past month there had been further charges on the funds of the Committee. An additional prisoner of war had been added to the list—Pte T Bachelor, 5th Royal Berkshire Regt, of Napton, who is interned at Mulheim A/Ruhr. A lady had offered to pay for this man’s food parcels, and the Committee would only have to be responsible for the 26lbs of bread per month. Pte J Pescow, 1st Northants Regt, of Clifton, interned at Konigsmoor bei Tolstedt, who had been on the Rugby list for over two years, but who had been fully “ adopted,” had again become a charge to the Committee, as the guarantee on his behalf were only now 22/6 per month, the Committee, therefore having to provide a difference of 33/- per month. Mr Barker further reported that the subscriptions and donations received during November would cover the cost of the month’s standard parcels and bread.

The Chairman, Mr William Flint, C.C, said that this was indeed satisfactory, especially in view of the many other efforts, and showed there was no lack of support for the prisoners of war. He trusted that this excellent result would continue.

With regard to Christmas dinner table collection for the fund, Mr Barker said he had nearly completed the arrangements.

The scheme involved an immense amount of work, but many ladies had offered their services as helpers, and if a few more would assist every house in the town would have its appointed collector.

The response from the villages was excellent, and there only remained a few districts to fix up. He estimated that between 9,000 and 10,000 houses would be canvassed in the town and villages.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR

The Postmaster-General announces that the German authorities have decided not to admit parcels for prisoners of war in Germany between the 12th and 22nd of December next. Parcels intended for delivery to prisoners of war in Germany for Austo-Hungary by Christmas Day should, therefore, be posted without delay. In accordance with the arrangements made last year parcels reaching the camps in Germany before Christmas will be delivered not earlier than 24th December if they are prominently marked “ Weihnachtspaket.”

AID FOR ALIEN ENEMIES,

The fifth report of the Emergency Committee for the assistance of Germans, Austrians, and Hungarians in Distress has just been issued. The committee was convened in the early days of the war by the Religious Society of Friends, “ to aid innocent ‘ alien enemies ‘ in Great Britain rendered destitute by the war.”

The list of subscriptions from July 1, 1916 to June 30, 1917, totals £13,226 7s 6d. There are 74 amounts, ranging from £60 to one shilling under the heading of “ Anon,” and other subscribers include Messrs Cadbury Bros, £200 ; Mr J B Crosfield £100 ; eight members of the Fry family, and three Rowntrees.

Viscount Haldane sends £25, and the two largest subscribers are F Merttens and Edith M Ellis, and who send £500 each. The report states that in London alone more than 5,000 cases of need have been dealt with.

DR TANGYE’S MILITARY SERVICE.—At the meeting of the Mid-Warwickshire Joints Sanitary Committee on Thursday last week, presided over by Mr P E Shepheard, it was resolved, on the motion of Mr H Hulme, seconded by Mr Lloyd Evans, that the release of Dr C E Tangye for military service extended be extended for the period of the War on the same conditions that were agreed when he was released for a year’s service. Dr Tangye is in Aldershot Command, and is responsible for the sanitation of three large military camps, but may be called upon for foreign service at any time.

POLICE COURT.—At Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before Mr A E Donkin, Pte Fredk Curtis, of the Canadian Forestry Corps, was charged with being an absentee.—P.S Tromans deposed that on the previous evening he saw defendant in the Railway Hotel. He suspected him of being an absentee, and he called him outside and asked to see his pass. Defendant would not produce this, and admitted that he was an absentee. Remanded to await an escort.

ACORNS FOR STOCK.

The Food Production Department again drawn the attention of stockowners to the necessity of making full use of this year’s crop of acorns. In places where these are still lying on the ground collecting parties of children and others should be organized without delay. Landowners are urged to put no unreasonable obstacles in the way.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. H. BARNWELL, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regiment (of Bilton), who died from wounds received in action in France on November 19, 1917 ; aged 27 years.—From his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

ROUND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. W. A. Round, who died of wounds in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ When we last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
He did his best for one and all
And those who loved him well.”
—From his loving Father and Mother.

ROUND.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. W. A. ROUND, who died of wounds in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ In health and strength he left his home,
Not thinking death so near ;
It pleased the Lord to bid him come,
And in His sights appear.”
—From his loving Sisters and brother Fred.

IN MEMORIAM.

DODD..—In memory of Coy.-Sergt-Major DODD, R.W. Regiment, killed in France on December 2, 1915.—Sadly missed, Bill.

EDMANS.—In loving memory of our dear son, FRANK, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.—“ Three years have passed, how much we miss him.”—From Father & Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

EVERSDEN.—On November 12, WILLIAM, youngest son of Joseph Eversden, of Withybrook, who died of wounds in France ; aged 33 years.
“ For days and nights he bore great pain.
We hoped for cure, but hoped in vain.
God saw it, too, and thought it best
To take him to His Home of Rest.”
—From his loving Father, Sister and Brothers.

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