7th Jul 1917. Baby Week at Rugby

BABY WEEK AT RUGBY.

The War has led to a quickening of the public conscience in many directions ; and several much-needed reforms, which have long been advocated, but which only three years ago seemed almost unattainable, have already been elected ; while others are daily becoming inevitable. Few subjects have of late met with more sympathetic consideration than that of the welfare of the children ; and in order to seize the favourable opportunity for securing the adoption of measures to arrest the terrible rate of infant mortality which has occasioned so much concern to all thinking people, the past week has been observed throughout the kingdom as a propaganda week for “ baby,” and lectures and demonstrations emphasising the importance of the proper care of the babies have been given in most towns. Rugby has not been behind in the good work, and for some weeks past a committee of ladies has been arranging a local campaign, which opened on Sunday, when sermons bearing on the subject were preached at most of the places of worship.

On Wednesday afternoon a meeting for mothers was held in the Empire. There was a large attendance, and many of the mothers were accompanied by “ His Majesty the Baby ” ; and, despite the infantile accompaniment which was maintained by a number of the little guests, they were heartily welcomed.

Dr A A David presided, and he was supported by Mrs Nevinson (London), Rev R 8 & Mrs Mitchison, Mrs A A David, Mr & Mrs J J. McKinnell, Dr & Mrs Crookes, Mrs F Merttens (President) and Mrs Waddy (secretary of the movement).

The Chairman who addressed the audience as “ Ladies, gentlemen, and babies,” after a few remarks in a lighter vein, said they were there not only to think about their own babies but to be moved to a sense of responsibility about other people’s babies. Every child born in England belonged to the nation. If it grew up into a strong and healthy life the nation was the richer and the stronger, but if it was sickly the nation had to suffer with it, and if it died when it need not have died, then England had lost something which nothing on earth could ever replace. They were told that every year 50,000 babies died in England who need not die. It was not inevitable. He was always suspicious of that word “ inevitable.” Things happened, and people thought they must happen, whereas if they bestirred themselves they need not happen. This week had been set apart to set in motion forces to remedy this state of affairs. When every man and woman in England knew about these things they would care, and when they cared they would find the time would not be long distant when this grievous waste of life and health would be stopped. Then would come a day of new happiness for England, and also of new strength—strength not only for war—if the need ever arose again, which God forbid—but strength also for peace.

[Full report continues in original newspaper]

PROPAGANDA BY CINEMA.

The great value of the moving pictures as an educational force is well illustrated at the Empire this week, where two excellent propaganda films are being screened. The first, entitled “ Motherhood,” is shown under the auspices of the National Baby Week Council. The picture is remarkably interesting, especially to women, and the correct and incorrect ways of bringing up children.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.-At Coventry Munition Tribunal on Tuesday, H Boult, fitter, Rugby, employed in a Rugby firm, made an unsuccessful application for a leaving certificate. Boult contended that he could be used to better advantage in national service.

RUGBY BAKING TRADE NOT TO RE DEPLETED.

At the Rugby Urban Tribunal on Thursday evening the exemptions granted to the Rugby bakers, 30 in number, were reviewed at the instance of the Military. After a lengthy hearing, the Tribunal decided to make no change, and all the exemptions were allowed to stand.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte S C Howkins, of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, son of Mr H Howkins, of 9 Manor Road, has been seriously wounded, and as a result his left leg has been amputated. Pte Howkins, who is in a Military Hospital at Newcastle-on-Tyne, is making good progress.

Sapper George Alfred Wright, Royal Engineers, who prior to joining the Army at the beginning of the War was employed in the Controller Department at the B.T.H, was killed in action on June 7th.

News has been received from the War Office that Pte Jack Beech is in hospital with sand fly fever at Amara. He is the son of Mr W G Beech, New Bilton, and has been 3½ years in the Army, which he joined before he was 17 years of age in February, 1914. He has been through the fighting in the Dardanelles, Mesopotamia, and at the capture of Bagdad. In a recent letter from him he writes :—“ We have taken Bagdad, but my pal, Walter Scarlett, of Long Lawford, got killed by my side, poor chap. He died smiling, and I saw him buried.”

ANOTHER OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Pte Arthur William Woods, son of the late Mr Joseph Woods, of 153 Grosvenor Road, was killed in action on June 10th. Pte Woods, who was 21 years of age and an Old Murrayian, enlisted in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry in August, 1914 ; but he afterwards transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. He was invalided home in December, 1916, suffering from septic poisoning, caused by a shrapnel wound, and he returned to France in April.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Two more local men have been taken prisoners of war, and the facts have been communicated to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, who has made arrangements for these men to receive, on behalf of the Rugby Committee, the standard parcels of food and bread. They are : Pte A Brown, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, interned at Dolmen, whose home is at Dunchurch, and Pte W Line. Buffs Regiment, interned at Soltau, whose home is at Napton. This makes the sixth addition to the Rugby list within a fortnight.

WAR SHRINE.-A war shrine has recently been unveiled at St. Andrew’s Mission Church. The ceremony was performed by the Rector, the Rev C M Blagden, who delivered a brief but inspiring address. This is the first of the shrines to be erected in Rugby.

BRANDON.

DEATH OF PTE ELLOITT G HALFORD.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford, who for about 20 years were in employ of Mr Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, have received news of the death of their fourth son, Elliott, of the Cheshire Regiment, who fell in action. He had only been out at the front for seven weeks. Two of his elder brothers—Pte Sidney and Corpl Thomas Halford—have been on service for a long time, but nothing has been heard of Sidney for nearly 12 months, and he is reported missing. Deep sympathy is felt for the parents. In a long letter to the parents Elliot Halford’s Platoon Commander say :— “ He was killed about eight o’clock on the morning of the 7th. We had just turned the enemy out of one of our strongholds, and captured one of the highest points of the ridge. Halford was in the foremost line of our attacking troops, and was conducting himself, as he has done all along with the utmost bravery and devotion. A piece of bursting shrapnel overhead caught him, and the only consolation was that he suffered no pain—it was so sudden. . . . He was an exceptionally nice, good fellow. During the short time he was with us your son showed proof of those good qualities of courage, energy, endurance, and good comradeship which would have made him one of the best.”

WOLSTON.

RIFLEMAN W FLOWERS.-Mr & Mrs John Flowers, of Brook Street, Wolston, have received news of the death of their son, William. He joined up in September, 1914, and was on service in France for about 18 months, being attached to the 10th Rifle Brigade. He fought at Ypres in May, 1915, and in the Battle of Guillemont, and had been missing since September 3, 1916. His parents were thinking that he might be a prisoner of war until a letter came from the War Office announcing his death. Deceased was well known in local cricket and football circles. For the Brandon and Wolston Cricket Club he was a tower of strength in the field, and a daring football player and very popular.

BRINKLOW.

RED CROSS ACTIVITIES.—The Brinklow Branch of the British Red Cross Society has recently been making requisites for the wounded, and the following articles have been sent to the Central Depot in London :—104 comfort bags, 27 mufflers, 22 pairs day socks, 14 shirts, one vest, five pyjamas, seven pairs bed socks, and one feather pillow. Ninety-six of the comfort bags were made by the school children, the mothers giving the material for 23 ; 24 of the mufflers and 14 of the day socks were also made by the children.

DEATHS.

PARKINSON.—On 1st inst., at the Military Hospital, Cambridge, of wounds received in action in France, Second-Lieut. HORACE J. A. PARKINSON, the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. S. Parkinson, of the Old Bank House, Southam.

SANDS.—On June 17th, in Egypt, of diphtheria, Pte. HARRY SANDS, dearly beloved husband of Jennie Sands ; aged 34.—Deeply mourned.

WOOD.-On June 10th (killed in action in France), Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, Machine Gun Corps, son of the late Joseph Wood, 153 Grosvenor Road ; aged 21 years.—
From his loving Brother and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

BLAND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. C BLAND who was killed in action July 1st, 1916, aged 18 years.
Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.
From his loving Mother & Father, Sisters & Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of FREDERICK ROBERT, youngest son of the late Reuben & Mrs. Cashmore, of Hillmorton, who died from wounds in France on July 5, 1916. “ The love that lingers round his name is more than fame.”—From his sorrowing MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS, and his brother JACK in France.

FACER.—In loving memory of my dear husband Lance-Corpl. FREDERICK FACER, who was killed in action on July 3,1916.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—From his loving WIFE and CHILD.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. H. E. COLLINS, who was killed in action in the Battle of Labosal on July 3, 1916, in France ; aged 25. Gloucestershire Regiment.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS, New Street, New Bilton.

EADON.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother GEORGE, of the R.W.R., who was killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Our home has never been the same
Since thy voice has silent been ;
Nor is the world the same to us
Since death has come between.”
—Never forgotten by his loving PARENTS, SISTERS and BROTHER.

HAMMOND.—In loving memory of PTE. ARTHUR HENRY HAMMOND, Church Lawford, 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Peace, perfect Peace.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

SEENEY.-In loving memory of SIGNALLER W. SEENEY who was killed in France July 2nd, 1916.
Where is our soldier boy to-night ?
Laid in a soldiers grave,
Far, far away in a foreign land
He died like a soldier brave.
Oh, may we meet our boy again
Far up in that home above,
Where war and strife will be no more,
But all will be peace and love.
—From his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of GEORGE BERRY, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thompson, Braunston, who fell in action on July 1st, 1916, aged 21, years.—From Father, Mother, and Brother Sid.— “ They miss him most who loved him best.”

WATSON.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR JAMES WATSON, jun., son of Thomas and the late Harriet Watson, of 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Killed in  action in France on July 2, 1916 ; aged 19 years.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file—he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—From his FATHER & BROTHERS & SISTERS.

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