6th Jul 1918. Rugby Yeomen on Torpedoed Transport

RUGBY YEOMEN ON TORPEDOED TRANSPORT
There were six Rugby men—Lance-Corpl Cyril White, Troopers Ellis Reeve, Baker, Labraham, Cox, and Carew (R.T.H.), all of the Warwickshire Yeomanry on board the transport, Leasowe Castle, when she was torpedoed in the Mediterranean on May 27th. Lance-Corpl Cyril White, who is the son of Mr & Mrs Albert White, 155 Clifton Road, has this week returned home on leave, after an absence of three years and three months, having passed through many adventures, some very pleasant and others the reverse.
“ It was very early on Sunday morning—the Warwicks’ unlucky day,” he informed a representative of the Advertiser, “ that we were torpedoed. The sea was beautifully calm at the time, and the moon was shining brightly overhead. ‘ In the old days,’ he remarked, humorously, ‘ we often said, “ ‘What a glorious moon,’” “ but I can tell you we cursed it pretty well that morning after the ship was struck. At the time I was lying on the boat deck asleep. The force of the explosion threw me completely out of my bed, and the sudden rush of water swept my life-belt, equipment, &c, overboard. I was in charge of number 6 boat group, and after the explosion I got my crew together, and we managed to get three boats down. The spirit of the men was admirable, and as they were struggling in the water many of them sang, ‘ Swim, Sam, Swim,’ and other popular songs. While the men were being disembarked from the doomed vessel a Japanese destroyer circled round, throwing out a dense smoke screen, and at the moment when the bow of the vessel finally sank beneath the waves, dragging in her wake many brave fellows, the smoke obliterated the light of the moon, and the effect was most uncanny, the deathly stillness being broken only by the last despairing cries of some of the doomed men. The last I saw of our good old Colonel Col Cheape,” continued Corpl White, “ was just before the ship sank, when he was standing on the bridge talking to the Captain as calmly as if on parade. Sergt Viccars, whose wife lives in Wood Street, was unfortunately drowned. Together with another sergeant, he was attempting to carry an injured man to the side of the ship, when the vessel lurched forward, and he was swept away. The injured man and the sergeant were saved, but nothing more was seen or heard of Sergt Viccars, a very gallant N.C.O.—Corpl White added that the rescued men were taken on board a Japanese destroyer and very hospitably entertained. After a rest in Alexandria they embarked for Italy, and travelled overland to France, everywhere being most enthusiastically welcomed. While at Genoa Station he met a Rugby member of the Royal Warwicks, Mr J A Panther, of Little Church Street, who informed him that all the Rugby men in the R.W.R in Italy were quite well.”

FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT.
PILOT’S MIRACULOUS ESCAPE.

The story of a pilot’s miraculous escape from death was told at an inquest held on Monday to enquire into the death of Air Mechanic Richard Smith, R.A.F (23), son of Mrs Smith, 67 Sturgeon Street, Rishton, Lancs, which took place following an accident on Sunday morning last.

The pilot, Lieut John Joseph McDonald, stated that on the previous morning he decided to make a flight in a scout machine, and as the air mechanic in charge said it was working all right he took off straight away. The engine sounded in good condition in all the cylinders. Air Mechanic Smith asked witness to take him up, but he replied that he was not accustomed to taking passengers. Finally, however, he decided to take him. He started to fly towards the west, and when he was about 50 yards up the engine began to splutter. He tried to adjust matters, but as the engine did not pick up he pulled the throttle right off, and started to turn to the left. The machine began to nose dive ; and witness, seeing that a smash was inevitable, stood up in the seat behind Air Mechanic Smith, and caught hold of him with the intention of keeping him from falling forward on to the petrol tank. When the machine struck the ground witness was thrown clear of the machine, and the passenger was thrown against the petrol tank. Had the machine been 500ft up he would have been able to plane down all right, but there was insufficient depth at the time that he attempted to turn.

Second Air Mechanic James McCarron deposed that he examined the engine of the aeroplane before the flight, and it was then working satisfactorily. The aeroplane went up all right, but after she had been in the air a couple of minutes she began to choke and misfire owing to too much petrol passing into the engine. The pilot tried to turn as if he was returning to the Aerodrome, and the machine then crashed to earth.

Lieut Edward James Allman, R.A.F, corroborated this, and said when the pilot had half-turned the aeroplane the engine spluttered out as if it was choked. The aeroplane then spun round and nose dived to ground.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that when he was called to the scene of the accident deceased was sitting in the wrecked aeroplane. He was quite unconscious, and while they were extricating him he had a severe haemorrhage. He was suffering from a fracture of the front of the skull, his right eye was completely destroyed, and his brain injured. He also received other injuries. The cause of death was haemorrhage. Had it not been for this he might have lived for some time, in which case in all probability meningitis would have set in, as it had in other cases investigated locally where the injuries were similar. Death took place an hour and a-half after the accident. Had the pilot been able to hold deceased back as he tried to he would not have received the injuries to the front of his skull. Witness understood that Smith was up for a “ joy ride ” when the accident occurred.

Verdict : “ Accidental death.”

ACCIDENTS IN THE AIR FORCE.—Major Baird (secretary to the Air Ministry), replying to Mr Outhwaite in the House of Commons on Thursday last week, said it was not in the public interest to state how many officers and men of the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force had been killed by accident in this country during the past six months. There was no justification whatever for alarm on the ground that there was an undue number of accidents.

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT RUGBY STATION.

The inquest on the young Australian cadet, Walter Reginald Pick, aged 22, whose dead body (as we reported in our last issue) was found lying on the line at Rugby Station on Friday, June 28th, was conducted by Mr E F Hadow on Monday.

Lieut William Richard Bishop, Australian Flying Corps, deposed that deceased was a cadet in the 6th Officers’ Cadet Battalion, and was stationed at Oxford. He was preparing to take up a commission, and he left Australia in November, 1915.

Fred Percy Clare, 23 Essex Street, carriage shunter, employed by the L & N-W Railway Company, deposed that at about 3.20 a.m. on June 28th, he saw an object which he at first thought was a brown paper parcel, lying across the rails on the up line, but on a closer examination he found it was deceased, lying face downwards, with his head in the 4-foot way. The Preston train had shortly before gone over the rails, and the body could not have been lying there long, or it would have been seen, because a number of people crossed the rails at that spot. He informed the signalman of the discovery, and the train from Carlisle, which was then due, was stopped. With the help of the assistant stationmaster the body was removed. There was no sign of any struggle having taken place. A telephone message was sent through to London, and deceased’s stick and coat were found in a carriage in the Preston train at Euston.

Albert George Whiting, assistant stationmaster, deposed that the platform at Rugby was on the reverse side to that at most stations. After the discovery of the body he sent a message along the line, asking that the train should be searched. The first-class compartments were searched without success at Willesden, and deceased’s possessions were found in a 3rd-class carriage at Euston. No door was found open, and had there been any passengers in the carriage they could have left the train at Willesden. Deceased was travelling in a Caledonian coach, the doors of which shut automatically. There was no means of detecting whether such doors were shut deliberately, or whether they shut through the movement of the train. There was nothing to suggest that deceased fell out of the train ; but from the evidence witness was of opinion that he got out deliberately, and when the train moved off he tried to jump in again, and fell on to the line.

Ernest Wm Lines, 87 Abbey Street, carriage examiner, deposed that he examined the Preston train when it was in Rugby Station, and everything was then in order. No doors were open, and he saw no one outside. From the position of the body, he concluded that three vehicles passed over it.

The Coroner described the accident as a mystery, and said, in his opinion, the theory of Mr Whiting was borne out by the external evidence. It was for the jury to say how the accident occurred, for that it was an accident he thought they were all agreed.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned, the jury adding that there was no evidence to show how he got on to the line.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl C O Meates, Gloucester Regiment, of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte J E Hensman, R.W.R, of Rugby, is reported missing.

Pte A Moore, Leicestershire Regiment, Lutterworth, has been wounded.

Lieut T W Walding, Machine Gun Battalion, son of Mrs Walding, of “ The Limes,” who was recently reported missing, has written stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

Lance-Corpl Cox, of the Military Police, who before joining the Army was stationed at Dunchurch, has been awarded the Military Medal.

Mr J A Phillips, of St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, has received a letter, dated June 1st, from his son, Second-Lieut K Me N Phillips, 3rd Northumberland Fusiliers, attached 1/5 Durham Light Infantry, who was posted as missing on May 27th, stating that he is safe and well, but is a prisoner of war at Limburg, Nassau. He was in the 50th Division at Craonne.

Capt Rudolph Elwes (Coldstream Guards), second son of Mr Gervase and Lady Winefride Elwes, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was recently taken prisoner after taking part in the glorious 48 hours’ stand made by the Coldstreams from April 12th to the 14th. His company was eventually surrounded and cut off. Mr Gervase Elwes has sufficiently recovered from his recent operation to be able to return to Billing Hall.

We have received a letter from Corpl F Joyce, R.F.A, of Bilton, enclosing a copy of the “ Balkan News ” for June 15th, which contains the announcement that : “ An Old Rugbeian dinner will be held at the Officers’ Rest House, Salonica, on July 2nd. Hon Sec, Lieut W F Hawkins.” In his letter Corpl Joyce says he has been a constant reader of the Rugby Advertiser many years, and he always looks forward to it, as it keeps one “ in touch with things going on in the good old town of Rugby.”

Mr & Mrs H Colston, 82 York Street, Rugby, have been notified that their elder son. Pte Ernest H Colston, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on June 19th. Pte Colston, who was only just 19 years of age, had been in France since last December. He was an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School, where he was very popular, and was head boy when he left to enter the L & N-W Railway offices at Coventry. He was a member of the St Matthew’s XV, which won the Schoolsa’ Union Shield in 1913. He had been in St Matthews’s Church Choir for eight years. In a letter of sympathy to his parents his officer speaks of him as a young soldier of the highest promise.

Mr & Mrs Alfred Eyden, “ Denaby,” St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, have been advised that their younger son, Lieut Maurice V Eyden, 2nd Northants Regiment, reported missing on May 27th, is a prisoner of war in Germany and quite well. His only brother (Royal Engineers) was killed in France on May 19, 1918.

Mrs Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received a letter from the Captain of the Company to which her son Leonard, who died from wounds on May 29th, belonged. The writer says : “ He was wounded on the 29th by a machine gun bullet in the right side under the ribs. . . Your son was a splendid fellow, the ‘ life and soul ‘ of my Company, and was always so cheerful and full of good humour under the most trying circumstances. He was a very gallant soldier, and in the heavy fighting we had here for the first three days—April 12, 13 & 14—he did most excellent work for me by taking urgent messages to the Battalion Commander, running through an absolute hell to deliver them. This he volunteered to do when I had lost my Company runners. His were deeds of gallantry I shall never forget.”

IN ENEMY HANDS.—Subscriptions to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund during the past week have shown a marked improvement, £120 being received from all sources. The knowledge that in the absence of local support the men would become a charge on the funds of the British Red Cross Society has, no doubt, stimulated interest. To continue to provide in full for the Rugby and district men in enemy hands £400 per month has now to be raised for this branch of Red Cross work. Fortunately no additional names have been reported to the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee this week. There are now 130 Rugby and district men prisoners of war in Germany.

WAR BONDS.—During the week ended June 29th, Rugby contributed £1,030 to National War Bonds. The weekly quota for the town is £10,870.

ON THURSDAY (Independence Day) the Stars and Stripes were flown from several buildings in the town.

INFLUENZA is now very prevalent in the town, several hundred cases having occurred.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS H WEBB, Coventry Road, has received news from the War Office that her husband, Pte H Webb, of the Warwicks, is missing.—Pte P Grant, Mill Street, has been wounded in the leg, and is at St John’s Hospital, Barby Road, Rugby.

MRS W RICHARDSON, The Banks, has received news that her second son, Sergt L Richardson, of the K.R.R, has been killed. This is the second son Mrs W Richardson has lost. Sergt Richardson was a member of the Dunchurch Brass Band, and one of the best performers. He was very much respected in the village, where the news of his death has caused deep regret

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
MISSING.—Mr F Isham has received official news that his son, Pte David Isham, of the Royal Devons, has been reported missing in France since May 26th. He has been previously reported missing, but proved to be away from his unit.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
GASSED.—Sergt C T Tiff, Royal Shropshire Light Infantry, is in a base hospital suffering from gas poisoning.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
WOUNDED.—Information has been received by Mrs Fell that her husband, Corpl E T Fell, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been wounded severely by a shell in the thigh. He is now progressing favourably in hospital in Italy. It is just twelve months ago since Corpl Fell had a narrow escape and received very bad shell shock in France.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOY LABOUR ON THE LAND.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,—A considerable number of boys of 14 and 15 are anxious to help on farms during the holidays. They are too young for the ordinary camps, but capable of doing very useful work locally. If local farmers will let me know of their requirements I shall be pleased to pick out suitable boys. Only one reply was made to my former letter, and there, I understand, the boys did valuable work.—Yours faithfully,
Lower School. Rugby,
S R HART.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving memory of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died from wounds received in action on June 29, 1915. “Gone, but not forgotten.”—From his sorrowing Mother.

BLAND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. C. BLAND, killed in action on July 1, 1916.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes.
But never from our hearts.”
—From his loving Mother and Father, Brothers and Sisters.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. H. E. COLLINS, who was killed in action in France on July 3, 1916.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow.
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters & Brother, of 45 New Street, New Bilton.

COOPER.—9178 Sergt, JOHN COOPER, Yorks & Lancs. Regt., killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From Mother, Sister and Brother.

EADON.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. GEORGE EADON, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Some where abroad our dear one sleeps,
A hero laid to rest.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters and Brother.

SEENEY.—In loving memory of Signaller BILLY SEENEY, killed in action on July 2, 1916 ; aged 18.
“ Sleep on, dear one, in your foreign grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We shall remember thee.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Sisters and Brother.

WATSON.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR JAMES (JIM), dearly beloved son of Thomas and the late Harriett Watson, 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was killed in action on July 2, 1916.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.”
—From his Father, Brothers and Sisters.

WHITE.—In loving memory of ALBERT JAMES, dearly beloved husband of Ethel Maud White, and eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. James White, of 70 Murray Road, who gave his life for his country on June 30, 1917.

Advertisements

23rd Feb 1918. Local Elections Postponed

LOCAL ELECTIONS POSTPONED.
A HINT ON THE SAVING OF PAPER.

A memorandum issued by the Local Government Board to local authorities points out that the Parliament and Local Elections (No. 2) Act which received the Royal Assent last November, provides that the next statutory elections of county and borough councillors, district councillors, guardians, and parish councillors, which would ordinarily take place in March and April, shall be postponed, or in the case of elections already postponed under previous Acts further postponed for a year, and that accordingly the term of office of the existing councillors and guardians shall be extended by one year.

Having regard to the importance of economy in paper, it is desirable that local authorities in any notices, &c, which are issued by them should use as little paper as possible by, for instance, having the matter printed on both sides of a sheet and in as small a type as is convenient. Small envelopes should also be used whenever practicable.

THE DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS PRODUCE.—A Fruit and Vegetable Collecting Society has recently been formed in the county for assisting small growers to dispose of their surplus garden produce. In connection with this local branches or depots will be formed in various parts of the county, and it is hoped that a branch will be started for the Rugby Rural District. Each branch depot will have to employ a local manager, whose duty will be to collect, pack, market, and consign the produce, and a minimum profit of 15 per cent. will be aimed at in all transactions. The nett profits will be used first to pay dividend on the share capital of the society and a bonus will be paid to the members in proportion to the amount of business done through the society. A general manager will be appointed by the County Society to assist local branches with advice or by finding markets for produce.

THE TEMPORARY MARGARINE RATIONING SCHEME.
EXTENSION DECIDED UPON.

At a meeting of the Joint Urban and Rural Food Control Committees, on Monday, Mrs Dewar asked if the period of the temporary margarine rationing scheme would be extended ?—Mr F M Burton replied that when they fixed the period of the temporary scheme at four weeks they had hoped that by the end of that time the permanent scheme would be in operation. Unfortunately, however, this would not be the case, and he had discussed the matter with Mr Fellows, as a result of which asked for power to have a further supply of coupons printed. These would be sent round to the tradesmen, who would issue them to the people when they lodged their last coupons with them. He thought it would take a month or six weeks to get the scheme in force.—This was agreed to.

SUGAR FOR JAM.
SAVING IS NOT HOARDING.

The Director of Sugar Distribution, on behalf of the Food Controller, wishes it to be understood that sugar proved to have been saved from weekly rations will not be regarded as hoarded, and that if the purpose of this saving is for jam-making it is immaterial whether the fruit to be preserved is grown or purchased by the preserver.

COVENTRY’S TANK TOTAL.—The official return of Coventry Tank Week is £1,370,236, representing £10 10s 9d per head of the census population of 130,000. A feature of the week’s subscription is the huge issue of 15s 6d certificates through the Post Office. There were 155,907 transactions, representing £120,827. The Bank of England section of the Tank took £775,265.

HUNTING SEASON TO CLOSE EARLY.

At a largely attended meeting of the M.F.H Association, held at Tattersall’s, Knightsbridge, London, on Thursday, February 14th, it was unanimously resolved :— “ That owing to the short supply of cereals and to assist in economising the stock of provender in the country, this meeting of the Masters of Foxhounds’ Association has voluntarily agreed to stop hunting on Saturday, March 2nd, for this season.”

SUMMER TIME TO BE FIVE WEEKS LONGER.

Summer-time (putting the clock on an hour) is to begin on Sunday, March 24, a fortnight earlier than last year, and to end on September 29, three weeks later than last year.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The parents of Rifleman Leonard Thompson, Rifle Brigade, who reside at 12 Union Street, have received official intimation that their son, who has been missing since May 3rd last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was only 19 years of age, and was an old St Matthew’s boy.

Mr R E Driver, 137 Newbold Road, has received official notice from the War Office that his son, J C Driver, Air Mechanic, Royal Flying Corps, who has been missing since December 31st, is now believed drowned on the occasion of the sinking of the Osmanieh in the Eastern Mediterranean. Before joining up he was employed in the L & N-W Railway Loco Department, and was a general favourite with his shopmates. He was an old Elborow boy.

BRANDON.

PTE F BLACKMAN WINS MILITARY MEDAL.—Pte F Blackman (of the 29th Division, Essex Regiment) has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the field on the 20th-22nd November, 1917. His name and deeds have been entered in the records of the 29th Division. Pte Blackman is a son-in-law of Mr Horace Amos, of Brandon, and for several years was in the gardens at Brandon Hall. He was wounded twice and gassed once in 1917. He won his present distinction for running with messages through streets infested with snipers, and nor giving in until absolutely exhausted, and thereby greatly assisting the advance. His wife and son are still residing at Brandon.

NORTH KILWORTH.
GERMAN PRISONERS.—About 40 German prisoners arrived here on Tuesday night, and were located in commodious premises in the village secured for the purpose. They are to be utilised in ploughing and agriculture, having been specially selected. They are a small type of men, and comprise Germans, Prussians, and Bavarians. Mr H B Finch (Lutterworth) is in control of the agricultural arrangements for the breaking up of the land and supply of the horses, &c.

CHURCHOVER.
A MEMORIAL SERVICE was held at the Parish Church on Thursday evening, February 14th, for Sergt John Webb, R.B, who died in German East Africa from enteric fever. The service was conducted by the Rev L G Berrington, and there was a good congregation. Hymns 537 and 716 were sung. On Sunday evening the Rector preached a very impressive sermon, in which he referred to Sergt Webb. Mr & Mrs W Webb have received the usual telegram from the Secretary of State expressing the sympathy of his Majesty and the Queen.

IN MEMORIAM

PHILLIPS.—In loving memory of ERIC SUTHERLAND PHILLIPS, Captain, 8th Battalion Border Regiment, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Phillips, St. Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, who died of wounds received in action in France on February 21, 1917 ; aged 22.
“ There laid the world away ; poured out the red
Sweet wine of youth ; gave up on the years to be
Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene,
That men call age ; and those that would have been,
Their sons, they gave, their immortality.”

 

3rd Mar 1917. Kilsby Soldier Decorated with the Albert Medal.

KILSBY SOLDIER DECORATED WITH THE ALBERT MEDAL.

Pte Joseph Thomas Laurence, second son of Mr and Mrs J Laurence, of Kilsby, has recently been decorated by the King with the Albert Medal for saving life on land. Pte Laurence is in the Army Serviced Corps, and has been out in France just two years. While a German 21-centimetre shell, in which several holes had been bored, was being ” steamed ” in a laboratory for the purpose of investigation, the box of shaving in which it was packed caught fire. The officer in charge of the laboratory at once sent for help to the nearest Army Service Corps fire station, ordered all persons to leave the building, and warned the inhabitants of the neighbouring houses that a serious explosion was imminent. On receipt of the request for help Pte Laurence was one of those who at once collected fire extinguishers and proceeded by motor to the laboratory. They entered the building, played on the fire, which had spread considerably, and after about two minutes were able to reach the burning shell, which they dragged into the yard and extinguished. At any moment after the fire broke out the shell might have exploded with disastrous results. Pte Laurence has just been on a visit to his home at Kilsby.

PROMOTION FOR MAJOR VISCOUNT FEILDING, D.S.O.

Major Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, is promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel as Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster-General of the 8th Division. Viscount Feilding’s promotion has been very rapid, inasmuch as he re-joined from the Special Reserve as Junior Lieutenant Coldstream Guards.

OLD MURRAYIAN HONOURED.

Corpl Edwin Welsh, of the Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr E Welsh, 23 Oxford Street, has been awarded the Military Medal. Corpl Welsh, who is 21 years of age, was member of the old “ E ” Company, and went to France with them. He was an old Murrayian, and was at one time a member of the School Fifteen.

MURRAY SCHOOL AND THE WAR LOAN.

At the request of Dr David, the scholars attending the Murray School drew and painted nearly one hundred posters, which were distributed in the town for exhibition in shop windows. In addition, a number of attractive posters, which were changed every day, were exhibited outside the School. These were entirely the work of the boys. The Penny Bank and War Savings scheme, which is confined to boys attending the School, showed considerable improvement during the period devoted to the War Loan Campaign.

TWO SONS REPORTED DEAD.

Mrs H Hunt, of 99 Victoria Street, New Bilton, has received official information that her eldest son, Pte Leonard John Hopkins, Royal Marines, was killed in action on February 2nd. Pte Hopkins, who was 19 years of age, enlisted at the commencement of the war, prior to which he was employed at the B.T.H. He was an old St Oswald’s boy. Another son of Mrs Hunt, Pte Harold Hopkins, R.W.R, who had been missing since July 14th, 1916, was last week reported killed on that date.

ANOTHER B.T.H AIRMAN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lieut W E[?] Carse, .F.C, was killed in action while flying on February 18th. Before enlisting at the commencement of the War, Lieut Carse was employed in the Test Department at the B.T.H.

MIDLAND OFFICERS HONOURED.

For valuable services rendered in connection with the war the names of the following officers have, amongst others, been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War : Beech, Lieut-Col R J, Warwickshire Yeomanry : Elton, Lieut-Col A G G, R.W.R ; Fairbrother, Capt W H, R.W.R.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In the recent fighting on the Somme, Pte A Parsons, of the H.A.C,s son of Mr W H W Parsons, of Rugby, was wounded, and is now in Hospital in England.

The many friends of Dr and Mrs Relton will be pleased to hear that their son, Lieut B C Relton, who was dangerously wounded in action on the Tigris, is now making a good recovery. On Monday Dr Relton received a telegram from his son, in which he said he was doing well, and had embarked for Bombay.

Pte W Scarlett, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr H Scarlett, of Long Lawford, has been admitted to the British General Hospital at Sheikle Sard, suffering from severe wounds.

Mr and Mrs J H Phillips, of St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, have received news of the death from wounds received in action in France of their eldest son, Capt E S Phillips, of the Border Regiment. The deceased officer enlisted in the Oxon and Bucks L.I in September, 1914. He was given a commission in the 8th Battalion Border Regiment in November, 1914. He went to France September 1915, and was promoted Lieutenant in November, 1915. After being in several actions on the Somme, he was invalided home September, 1916. He rejoined his regiment on November 30th, 1916, and was promoted to Captain in December. He died on February 21st, aged 22 years. His Colonel writes : “ He was a most excellent young officer, always willing and cheerful. During the time when he was in charge of the Machine Gun Detachment of the Battalion he did very good work. He was very plucky under fire, and a very good leader. We shall all miss a cheery plucky comrade, and a great favourite in the Battalion.”

Lieut A B Crump, South African Heavy Artillery, has been promoted to Captain, R.G.A.

MR C J Packwood, of Warwick Street, has already three sons serving with His Majesty’s Forces. Another son (John N Packwood) is joining up on Monday when he will enter the wireless department of the Royal Naval Reserve.

An interesting occurrence took place at the Training Camp of the 7th Reserve Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment on Wednesday, when three medals, awarded for conspicuous bravery in the field, were presented by Brigadier-General F H Gorges, C.B, D.S.O, commanding South Midland T.F Reserve Brigade. The recipients were : Corpl W Holyoak (Nuneaton), Military Medal ; Pte T Mason (Coventry), Military Medal ; and Pte L G Eaton (Rugby), Distinguished Conduct Medal. During and enemy raid on Messines on May 28, 1915, being in a listening post with one N.C.O and two other men, after being wounded in the head and after losing one of party (killed), Eaton carried on til the raid was successfully passed. This man is also in possession of the Croix de Guerre (French honour).

Driver C E Cox, of the R.F.A, residing in Abbey Street, Rugby, met with an accident in France a few months ago, by which he sustained a fractured skull. He was treated in a hospital at Newcastle and a convalescent home in Northumberland, after which he visited his home in Rugby. On the strength of a medical certificate, he obtained an extension of leave, and returned to his depot on Thursday, February 22nd. His relatives desire to state that there is no truth in the statement which has been made that he was a deserter and was taken to the depot under escort.

PRISONERS OF WAR.

As an outcome of the resolution unanimously passed by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee (reported in another column), by which that body has undertaken to complete the whole cost of six regulation food parcels and 26lbs of bread every month to each of the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, the sujoined letter has been received from headquarters in London :-

THE HON SECRETARY,

Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee,

DEAR SIR,-Sir Starr Jameson and his committee are very pleased to hear that your committee have set before themselves the tack of providing the entire cost of feeding the 67 local men who are prisoners of war in Germany. If this can be done, it speaks very well for the public spirit of a small town like Rugby. We often find that people wonder why the cost of feeding all our prisoners of war is not borne by the British Government. The answer is that there was no unwillingness on the part of our Government to shoulder the burden, but that under the Hague Convention it is the duty of the enemy country to feed and provide clothing for all prisoners of war taken prisoners by that country. The German authorities do not admit that they fail in the duty imposed on them by the Hague Convention in any way, but they are willing to allow gifts to prisoners to any extent. We in England consider that without these “ gifts ” our prisoners would starve.

The entire organisation of sending food and clothing to all our prisoners has now been undertaken by the British Red Cross Society, of which the Central Prisoners of War Committee and its allied associations are a branch. The entire cost of the scheme is estimated to be close upon £1,00 per day, and this is guaranteed by the British Red Cross Society. You will, therefore, see that all local help that can be obtained is as necessary as it is welcome.-Yours faithfully,

P D AGNEW, Managing Director,
Central Prisoners of War Committee,
4 Thurloe Place, London, S.W,
26th February, 1917.

DEATHS.

FRENCH.-In loving and lasting remembrance of Pte. OLIVER FRENCH, Royal War. Regt., youngest son of Mr. R. French, Napton, who died of pneumonia February 10th at a Military Hospital in France ; aged 36 years.

SMITH.-Killed in France, January 29th, GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, Kilsby.

“ Had he ask’d us-well, we know
We should cry, ‘O spare this blow !
Yes, with streaming tears should pray :
Lord, we love him, let him stay.”

Phillips, Eric Sutherland. Died 21st Feb 1917

Eric Sutherland Phillips was born in Stamford Hill, London in 1894. His father was James Alexander Phillips from Glasgow and Elizabeth Sutherland, born in Edinburgh. They married in Greenwich RD, 1892. James was an electrical engineer, in his obituary it states that he installed the electric lighting at Balmoral Castle.

Eric was the eldest of four sons and in 1901 the family were living at 55 Esmond Road, Acton.

In March 1899 James had moved to Rugby to work for the British Thomson-Houston Company. By 1911 the family were living at 22 Bilton Road (Gilshaw Lodge). Eric was aged 16 and an engineering student.

Eric Sutherland Phillips enlisted in the Oxon and Bucks L.I. in September, 1914. He was given a commission in the 8th Battalion Border Regiment in November, 1914. He went to France in September, 1915 and was promoted Lieutenant in November, 1915. After being in several actions on the Somme, he was invalided home in September, 1916.

He rejoined his regiment on November 30th, 1916, and was promoted to Captain in December.

He died on February 21st, aged 22 years.

His Colonel wrote:
“He was a most excellent young officer, always willing and cheerful. During the time when he was in charge of the Machine Gun Detachment of the Battalion he did very good work. He was very plucky under fire, and a very good leader. We shall all miss a cheery plucky comrade, and a great favourite in the Battalion.”
(Rugby Advertiser 3 Mar 1917)

He was buried at Pont-de-Nieppe Cemetery, near Armentières

The following words, requested by his family, were engraved on his headstone:
“These laid the world away / poured out / the red sweet wine of youth”
Unusually, no religious symbol was included.

By this time, the family had moved to York House, Clarendon Place, Leamington Spa. James Alexander Phillips died there on 23rd Sep 1923.

Of his other sons, Capt L K (Leslie Kirkwood) Phillips was wounded twice in the war and Lt K M (Kenneth McNair) Phillips was taken prisoner.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM