20th Apr 1918. Low-Flying Aeroplanes

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. . . . .LOW-FLYING AEROPLANES.

Mr F E Hands reminded the Council that at an inquest held on an airman killed at Rugby recently the jury protested against the low flying which took place and he thought a similar protest should go from the Council. On the morning before the accident he saw a pony start to run away twice owing to an airman flying so close to the tops of the houses.—Mr Loverock supported, and said he saw the airman in question come down. He was flying very low, and another aeroplane which accompanied him almost struck the top of some cottages in Temple Street. He had also seen an aeroplane fly between two houses at a lower level than the roofs.—Mr Walker corroborated this, and said the incident caused a great deal of alarm amongst some ladies.—It was decided to write to the Commanding Officer on the matter.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.
[Note: these reports were printed on the edge of the page and the reproduction is very feint.]

Lieut the Hon J H P Verney, Lancers, the only son of lord Willoughby de Broke, has been wounded.

Pte Alfred William Elson, Hampshire Regt, son of Mrs Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, died from wounds received in action on April 6th. Prior to the war he was employed in the winding department of the B.T.H.

Corpl T J Smith, of the Royal Field Artillery, who was formerly employed in the Main Drawing Office of the B.T.H, died from wounds on March 22nd.

Pte Douglas Hay, York & Lancashire Regt, son of[?] Mrs Hay, 102 Murray Road, was killed in action March 18th.

Second-Lieut Sidney Torrance, Lancashire [?] son of Mr W J Torrance, Warwick Street, has been severely wounded in the head and ankle during recent heavy fighting.

Sapper E Wagstaffe, Royal Engineers, an [?] in the Tool Room at the B.T.H, was killed on [?] April 6th.

Mr & Mrs J G Wilson, of 52 York Street, have received a telegram from the War Office, saying that their son, R V Wilson (O.L), Second-Lieutenant 2/7[?] Royal Warwicks (late H.A.C), had died of wounds on the April 18th. No further confirmation has yet been received.

News has reached Mr J P Lennon, [?] Rugby, that his eldest son, E P Lennon, [?] in France. He was totally blind for several days, [?] has been sent to a hospital behind the lines. [?] information says that he is now regaining his sight, and is recovering very favourably.

A BELATED COMMISSION.

A letter found in the possession of Sapper W H Linnell, jun, Pioneer Battalion, King’s [?] Regiment, a partner in the firm of Messrs Linnell [?], Rugby, whose death from wounds received in action was recorded last week, has been forwarded to his [?] by the matron of the hospital. This was evidently [?] shortly before he was wounded, and that he [?] on the previous day had been informed [?] Colonel that he was recommending him for a commission as his work had been so very satisfactory. Mr. Linnell, who was an Old Laurentian and Old Rugbian. [?] until he joined the Colours mainly responsible for management of the business. He was vice-chairman of the Rugby Master Builders’ Association and [?] of the Rugby Building Society.

HILLMORTON.
MRS RATHBONE (Hillmorton) received a telegram from the War Office on March 30th, saying that her son, Lieut G P Rathbone, North Staffs Regiment, was reported missing on March 21st, and has not heard any more news of him at present. He has not been officially reported killed, as stated in last week’s edition.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.
PTE HARRY KERRY, of the 2nd Royal Berkshire Regiment, third son of Mr & Mrs Amos Kerby, has been severely wounded in the left forearm, but is progressing favourably. He has served two years in France.

BRANDON.
WOUNDED.—Pte G Saunders, who for several years was manager at the Royal Oak, has been badly wounded. Although much over age, he volunteered for service, and has been in action on many occasions. This is the second time he has been wounded.

WOLSTON.
CORPL T WEBB, son of Mr & Mrs Charles Webb, Wolston, has now returned to Wolston after serving upwards of three year on active service. He joined the 1/7/ Worcesters in 1914, and was sent out to France on January 4, 1915. He went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle in 1915, and in the battle of fleur Beixin May of the same year was wounded in the left arm. He was soon again on active service at the battle of Armentieres in September. His next big battle was at the Somme in 1916, at Contamassion, where, after fighting hard for four days, he had two fingers on his left hand broken, and was sent to England. Regaining convalescence, he again went into the firing line; but at the battle of Passendale ridge was wounded by shrapnel. He had a finger partly blown off and two broken, whilst his hand was also badly smashed. Arriving in England, he was a patient at a Manchester hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the finger. He has now received his discharge, and undoubtedly richly deserves it after the many vicissitudes he has gone through. Corpl Webb was one of the first men in the village to volunteer, and he is somewhat sad at the thought that several of his friends who joined up with him are killed. He says that one of the chief grievances of the men at the front is the single slackers at home in our large towns, who let the married men go out to fight while they hide in munition factories. He believes that we should not worry over our recent reverses, but place our confidence in our soldiers, who fight magnificently, and will eventually get the upper hand. Pte W Webb, a brother of the above, has also been crippled.

DUNCHURCH.
PRISONER OF WAR FUND.—There is being a house-to-house collection on behalf of the Prisoners of War Fund in Dunchurch and Thurlaston. Pte G Richardson, Mill Street, Dunchurch, who offered his services to take the envelopes round to all the houses, was once a prisoner of war, but has got his discharge after serving several years in the Army, his eyes being affected. When the envelopes were collected they were found to contain the large sum of £63, and there are several more to come in.

THE POTATO POSITION.
INCREASED ACREAGE PROBABLE THIS YEAR.

Already the appeal which Mr Lloyd George issued three weeks ago to the farmers of Great Britain to largely increase the acreage of potatoes is having its effect in many counties. The latest reports of the Commissioners of the Food Production Department contain numerous evidences of this fact.

The Council of the Central and Associated Chambers of Agriculture have unanimously passed a resolution “ urging on all farmers the paramount necessity of increasing the acreage of potatoes to at least the million acres appealed for by the Prime Minister.” Last year the farmer of England and Wales and Scotland grew no less than 655,704 acres of potatoes—a record planting and an increase of 97,637 acres over the area of 1916, representing an additional supply of 1,400,000 tons of potatoes. These results, achieved despite a shortage of labour and other adverse circumstances, go far to justify the faith of the Prime Minister that the British farmer will once more accomplish the impossible.

So far as can be ascertained at the moment, there already seems likely to be slight increase in the acreage both in England and Wales and in Scotland. Indeed, it may very well turn out that already we have nearly 600,000 acres of potatoes planted this year, or ready for planting, in England and Wales, and almost 170,000 acres in Scotland. But even if this year’s yields are as good as last year’s, it is extremely improbable that this acreage will supply all our requirements for 1918. Accordingly the Government asks the farmer to do his best to add another 230,000 acres, and so reach the million-acre mark which, in combination with other crops, should make the country absolutely safe so far as its food supply is concerned.

The appeal of Mr Lloyd George appeared in the Press on March 18th. It would hardly be surprising if the response of the farmers was not general and immediate. Outside one or two counties potato growing conditions is attended with definite amount of risk ; the yield is very uncertain ; there is the possibility of disease, and proper cultivation entails a good deal of extra labour, whereas labour just now is scarce on the countryside. Moreover, many farmers have had an unfortunate experience with their 1917 potato crop owing to the difficulties of transport and of marketing.

No one knowing all the facts would blame the agriculturist for thinking hard before he planted an additional acreage of potatoes without some sort of guarantee as to their sale when grown, and this guarantee has been given in the fixing of minimum prices.

A WELCOME OFFER.

An unusual request was received by the Rugby Fool Control Committee at their meeting on Thursday, when a lady wrote stating that she had the chance of purchasing a quantity of cheese, but only if she bought about ton, and she asked for permission to buy this. There were 140 members in her household, and if she obtained the cheese and the committee would allow her to retain so much as they thought was fair, she would be prepared to dispose of the remainder to the grocers in the town.—The Chairman : Tons of Cheese ! I have not seen a quarter of a pound for a long time. It seems ridiculous that a private individual should have the chance of buying tons of cheese, when a good many of us have not seen any for some time.—Mr Humphrey did not think it was fair to allow this when other people were only having half-a-pound a month.—Mr Cooke thought if there was so much cheese about Lord Rhondda should take it over, so that it could be distributed more equitably.—Mr Gay suggested that the permit should be given, and that the lady should be allowed to keep enough to last her for a certain period, and that at the end of that time they would appreciate it if she could get them some more (laughter).—The permit given, the lady to surrender 75 per cent. for distribution amongst local retailers.

DEATHS.

BATES.—Killed in Action on March 31st, Lance-Corpl. THOMAS BATES, of 1st Warwicks, only son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Bates, Ryton-on-Dunsmore ; aged 27 years.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching heart can know.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving Mother, Father and Sisters.

CHAMBERS.—Pte. C. CHAMBERS, killed in action on March 21, 1918, aged 31 years, son of William and Amy Chambers, Abbotts Farm, Hillmorton.—“ Thy will be done.”

CHAMBERS.—Sergt. F. CHAMBERS, died of wounds in France on April 4, 1918, aged 24 years, beloved husband of Amy Chambers, Hillmorton Paddox.—“ Thy will be done.”

HARDMAN.—Gunner C. H. HARDMAN, the dearly beloved husband of Mrs. C. H. Hardman, 57 Rugby Road, Leamington, killed in action on March 21, 1918 ; aged 26 years.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—Sadly missed and deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and Children.

HARDMAN.—In loving memory of our son, Gunner C. H. HARDMAN, who was killed in action in France on March 21, 1918.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him ;
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Sisters & Brothers.

HODGES.—Killed in action on March 26th, Sapper SIDNEY J. J. HODGES, of the Royal Engineers, beloved and youngest son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Hodges, of 82 Claremont Road.

MATTHEWS.—Rifleman JOHN MATTHEWS, 3rd Rifle Brigade, died of wounds in hospital in France on March 25th, beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. William Matthews, Churchover, aged 23 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

DRAGE.—In loving memory of Pte. CHARLES HERBERT DRAGE, the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. C. Drage, of Yelvertoft ; killed in action in Egypt, April 19, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ Death can hide him, but not divide ;
Thou art but on Christ’s other side.
Thou with Christ, and Christ with us,
So together still are we.”
—From his ever-loving Mother, Father & Brother.

GUPWELL.—Also our dear brother, Pte. BENJAMIN GUPWELL, who died of wounds in France, April 20th, 1917.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—From his loving Sister and Brother.

 

Advertisements

13th Apr 1918. The New Man Power Proposals

THE NEW MAN POWER PROPOSALS.

By the New Man Power Bill, introduced in the House of Commons on Tuesday by the Prime Minister, it is proposed to raise the age for military service to 50 ; and in certain cases, such as medical men, to 55. Men of 45 to 50 to be taken for home defence, and ministers of religion for non-combatant service.

All exemptions on occupational grounds to be cancelled, and restriction of right of appeal to the medical grounds only.

Substantial combing out from Civil Service, munition works, mines, and a number of occupations. Tribunals to be re-organised.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl T E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks L.I, who has been missing since August 16, 1917, is now reported a having been killed on that date. Prior to joining the Forces he was employed in the B.T.H Controller Factory.

Corpl A Ashmore, youngest son of Mr & Mrs Ashmore, 7 Oliver Street, Rugby, and formerly of Marton, 29th Machine Gun Corps, has been awarded the D.C.M for gallant conduct at Cambrai.

Gunner G H Mann, R.G.A, of 102 Oxford Street, has died in France of gunshot wounds in the right leg. Before he joined up two years ago, he was a painter in the employ of Mr J Young. He was 38 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children.

The news will be received with general regret in this neighbourhood that Capt T A Townsend, M.C, R.A.M.C, is reported as wounded and missing on March 21st. Capt Townsend returned to the Cambrai Sector on March 18th, after a fortnight’s leave. There is, of course, the possibility that he is a prisoner, but no further information is at present obtainable.

HILLMORTON BADLY HIT.

Wednesday was a sad day for Hillmorton, news being received that three soldiers belonging to the village had been killed in action, and another was posted as missing. Those killed are : Lieut Rathbone, Staffordshire Regiment, son of the late Mr W T Rathbone ; Sergt S Chambers and Pte Charles Chambers, sons of Mr W Chambers, farm bailiff. Lieut Rathbone was formerly employed in the London City and Midland Bank, and Sergt S Chambers was in the Rugby Co-operative Society’s Boot Department. Pte J Hart, son of Mr J Hart, Lower Street, is reported missing, and Pte T Griffiths son of Mr T Griffiths, Upper Street, has been gassed.

A SOUTH AFRICAN VETERAN KILLED.

Mrs Chant, 43 Union Street, Rugby, has received news that her husband, Driver George Chant, R.F.A, has been killed by a shell which fell among a group of officers, men, and horses standing near the Brigade Headquarters. In a kind letter conveying information, the Brigadier-General writes :—“ I feel deeply for you and your young family in your great loss. It is a great loss to me also, Chant had been with me since the early days of the War, and I had the greatest confidence in him. He looked after the horses splendidly, and when I was busy with other things I felt I never need worry about them, and that Chant would do everything that was required.” Driver Chant, who was 38 years of age, was employed at the B.T.H when the war broke out. He was the first to volunteer from those Works, and went out at once on August 15, 1914, so that he had been all through the fighting. He previously served in the South African War, and gained two medals.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.

WOUNDED.—On Wednesday morning a letter was received from France, stating that Sergt W Cleaver, of the Hussars, was wounded in both arms during the recent fighting. Sergt Cleaver has seen eight years’ service, and this is the second time he had been wounded.

WOLSTON.

THE LATE LIEUT O W W H MEREDITH, R.F.A.—When the news reached Wolston that this young officer had lost his life, very sincere regret was expressed on all sides. During the seven years that his father, the Venerable Archdeacon T Meredith, was Vicar of Wolston, Lieut Meredith made scores of friends. His bright and cheerful disposition was shown alike, not only to those in his own social position, but also to the poorest of the inhabitants, and none more than these regret that so fine a young life should have been cut short. The sympathy of the inhabitants is freely expressed for his poor widowed mother, especially as it follows closely upon the death of her husband. Lieut Meredith was educated at Harrow School and Cambridge University. He distinguished himself in all Mechanical Examinations in London and at the Aerodromes of Castle Bromwich and Dartford. He received his wings July, 1917, and went to France in October last. On November 20 he was taking part in the attack on Cambrai. He left the ground at 7 a.m. with others of his Flight to support the advance of the Infantry and Tanks. The work they were engaged on was of the utmost importance, and they succeeded in doing it. Lieut Meredith was last seen shooting at German infantry from low down some five miles the other side of the lines. Owing to the fog and low cloud, nearly all the machines—there were 15 others from the same Squadron alone—got separated. The Commanding Officer of the R.F.C writes : “ It was to a great extent owing to the co-operation of our low-flying aeroplanes that we scored a marked success on the initial day. Lieut Meredith, fully realising the risk, gave his life in helping what was very nearly the biggest victory of the war. He was a gallant officer, an excellent and fearless pilot, very popular, and died a death which cannot but be a source of pride to all who were connected with him.”

RUGBY AND DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE

SUGAR FOR DOMESTIC FRUIT PRESERVING.

OWING to delays in printing of forms application for sugar for home-made jam preserving, the last day for receiving these forms from the public has been extended to Saturday, April 13th. No forms of application can be accepted after that date.

MEAT RATIONING ORDER.

No person may keep any food or meat card which does not belong to him or to some other person for whom he is authorised to buy food. For instance, he must not keep a card belonging to a person who has left the country, or joined H.M. Forces, or died, or gone into hospital or other institution. Anyone who has in his possession a card belonging to person who is no longer entitled to use it as a member of the same household, must return it to the Local Food Office at once, or if the holder of the card is in any institution, must send it to the head of the institution. It is an offence to keep such a card ; it is obviously an offence to try to use it to get an extra ration.

A person may not lend his card to anyone else or sell or give the ration he has bought on it to anyone else. This does not affect the sharing of food by members of the same household or guests or by persons taking common meals.

Rationing covers every kind of meat, including bacon and ham, poultry, game, venison, edible offal, sausages, bones, and all cooked, canned, and preserved meat, etc.

It is an offence to break any of these rules. The buyer as well as the seller is liable to prosecution.

Coupons for the purchase of meat rations must in all cases only be detached by the seller. Coupons detached by the holder of the card are worthless. Butcher’s meat can only be bought from the butcher with whom you are registered.

SUPPLEMENTARY RATIONS for HEAVY WORKERS.

The work of classifying and grading is now proceeding, and due notice will be given of time and place where applicants may receive their cards.

SUPPLEMENTARY RATIONS for ADOLESCENT BOYS.

As from May 5th a supplementary meat ration will be allowed to boys who on March 1st, 1918, were not less than 13 nor more than 18 years of age—i.e., to boys born after February 28th, 1900, but before, March 1st, 1905—except they are already receiving supplementary meat rations as heavy workers. Forms of application may be obtained at the Local Food Office after April 14th.

LICENSING OF DEALERS IN FISH.

A person shall not deal in fish by wholesale either on his own account or on the account of any other person after the 10th of April, 1918, unless he has applied for a license as a wholesale dealer in fish ; or after the 1st of May, 1918, unless he is the holder of a license for the time being in force, granted by the Food Controller authorising him to deal in fish by wholesale. Every application for a license shall be made to the Secretary (Fish Supplies Branch) Ministry of Food, 14, Upper Grosvenor Street, W,1.

A person shall not after the 1st May, 1918, deal in fish by retail except in, about, or in connection with premises in respect of which he is the holder of a certificate of registration as a retail dealer in fish for the time being in force, granted by the Food Committee for the area in which the premises are situate, but this shall not prevent a dealer duly registered from selling from his cart in the ordinary course of business in the area in which such premises are situate.

Forms of application for registration may be obtained from the Local Food Office.

ENQUIRIES may be made at the Local Food Office between the hours of 9.30—12.30 p.m. and 2.15—4.30 p.m. Saturdays—9.30 to 12.30.p.m. Only.
F. M. BURTON, Executive Officer.

GENERAL RATIONING.

From the commencement of this week the country generally has been rationed, and no one will be able to buy meat or a meat meal without producing a card and depositing a coupon. It is desired by the Ministry of Food that people should be reminded that after May 5 bacon may only be bought at a shop where the buyer has previously registered his or her name, and that holders of meat cards who wish to use any coupon for the purpose of buying bacon after that date should immediately register their names at the shop of the retailer with whom they propose to deal. To-day (Sat.) is the last day for such action.

After May 5 only two coupons each person, instead of three per week, will be available for the purchase of butcher’s meat.

Any or all of the coupons will be available for the purchase of bacon or other meats. Increased supplies of bacon will be provided to meet the third coupon, which will no longer be available for butcher’s meat.

This arrangement is being made in order to utilise the additional supplies of bacon now being received from America, and at the same time diminish the call upon home-grown cattle during the months when their weight can be materially increased by fattening on grass.

Although it is too early yet to express an opinion as to the measure of success attending the Rationing Scheme which came into effect this week, the indications are that it is working smoothly. The butchers’ shops have presented almost a normal appearance, the blinds being raised so that the supplies of meat could be seen, and many householders are reaping the benefits of a more equitable distribution.

THE QUANTITY OF TEA ALLOWED PER COUPON.

In the summary of regulations under the new Rationing Scheme published in our last issue the weight of tea allowed for each person weekly was by a typographical error put at 1¼oz. It should have been 1½oz.

THE POTATO PUSH.
URGENT NEED FOR GREATER ACTIVITY.

British farmers as a body have responded admirably to the call of the Government for increased production, and the outlook for our corn crop is extremely encouraging. Unfortunately, the potato prospect is by no means so satisfactory. Up to the present it is doubtful whether as much land has been prepared for potatoes this season as last ; and it is hardly to be expected that the 1918 yield will be as large as that of the 1917 crop, which was well above the average.

The Prime Minister a few weeks ago appealed to farmers to grow more potatoes this year than last year, when, in response to his earlier appeal, the farmer beat all records of potato planting England and Wales. A certain number of large growers have been moved by the Premier’s recent message to arrange for the growing of more potatoes ; but this movement does not seem to be general.

As the Food Production Department points out, the situation is most serious. We need a million acres of potatoes in Great Britain this year to make the food situation safe, and only the farmers can give us this million acres. We want another million and a half tons of potatoes grown this year, apart from the allotment holder and gardeners’ crops and only the farmers can grow them. As things now look, there is reason to fear that we may be as much as 400,000 acres short of our probable requirements in potatoes during 1918. This must be prevented at any cost.

Many farmers have protested against the proposal that they should increase their 1918 acreage under potatoes because they have been unable to sell satisfactorily a large part their 1917 crop. The Ministry of Food has met them in this difficulty. On May 18, 1918, the Food Controller will purchase all sound ware potatoes in the United Kingdom for which the grower cannot otherwise find a market. The Food Controller will pay not less than £7 per ton for 4-ton lots free on rail.

These concessions in relation to the remainder of the 1917 crop should induce many hesitating farmers to increase their 1918 acreage of potatoes. The Ministry of Food has always guaranteed to buy at minimum prices of from £6 to £7 per ton all the crop grown on new land this year, and to pay a generous price for the remainder of the 1918 potato crop—prices for the latter being fixed by a Joint Commission of the Board of Agriculture and the Ministry of Food after visiting each area and taking evidence from the growers as to yields, cost of production, etc.

PERMITS TO PRESERVE EGGS.

In view of the possibility that the preserving of eggs not produced by householders’ own birds might be considered an offence under the Hoarding Order, the Food Controller has issued a general license authorising any person to acquire eggs for the purpose of preserving them for use in his own household, provided that notice of the number eggs to be acquired and preserved is sent to the Food Control Committee for the district in which the person usually resides, and that the number of eggs so acquired does not exceed the number of eggs stated in such notice, or, if objection is taken by the committee to the number stated, the number permitted by the committee. A Food Control Committee has power to reduce the number proposed if they think it necessary, after taking into consideration the size of the household and the quantity of supplies available in their district. Subject this reasonable limitation. Lord Rhondda wishes to encourage the preserving of eggs for use in the household during the winter months.

RESCUED FROM DROWNING.—On Wednesday in last week two Rugby boys—John Bull, son of John Overton, 7 New Street, and Alfred Pickering, of the same address—were playing near the river at Newton, when Bull fell into the water. A soldier belonging to the R.F.C was attracted to the spot by the shouts of Pickering, and he at once jumped into the river and brought Bull to the bank in an unconscious condition. Artificial respiration was successfully applied, and the boy was conveyed to his home in a float lent by Mr S Nicholas, of St Thomas’ Cross.

DEATHS.

BICKNELL.—LANCE-CORPL. A. BICKNELL, killed in action about April 2nd, son of Mr and Mrs Arthur Bicknell, of 123 Oxford, Rugby, aged 30 years.

CLEAVER.—April 9, 1918, CHARLES RICHARD CLEAVER, the beloved husband of Bertha Amy Cleave, of 27 Victoria Street, Bilton, Rugby.

ELSON.—Pte. ALFRED WILLIAM ELSON, 1st Hants. Regiment, died of wounds on April 6th in France, son of Mrs. Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, Bilton.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath a foreign sky,
Far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.
Some day we hope to meet him ;
We know not when.
We shall clasp his hands in the Better Land,
Never to part again.” R.I.P.
—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Wife, Brothers and Sisters.

HAY.—PRIVATE DOUGLAS HAY, of the 1/4th Yorks & Lancs. Regt. son of Mrs Hay, of Murray Rd., Rugby. Killed in action March 18th, 1918.

LINNELL.—On April 8th, 1918, at No. 9 General Hospital, Rouen, of tetanus from wounds received in action, WILLIAM HENRY LINNELL.

IN MEMORIAM.

BURTON.—In loving memory of MONTAGUE (MONT) BURTON, who killed in action on April 10, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Mother and Sister.

In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of Lance- Corpl G. B. COLEMAN, the dearly-beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Coles, Old Lodge Farm, Binley, who was shot by a sniper at France on April 11th, 1917, aged 23 years.
A loving son and faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother,
He bravely answered duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.
Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile,
But they little know the sorrow
Which is hid behind that smile.
He is gone, but not forgotten,
Oh, dear no, not one so dear ;
He is gone safe home to heaven,
And we hope to meet him there.
—From his ever-loving Mother and Father, Brothers and Sisters.

DALE.—In memory of Pte. HARLEY DALE, of the 11th Royal Warwickshire Regt., who was killed in action somewhere in France, April 11th, 1917.
God knows how we all miss him,
And He counts the tears we shed,
And whispers, “ Hush, he only sleeps.
Thy brother is not dead.”
—From his loving Mother and Sister and Brothers at Long Lawford.

HINCKS.—In proud and loving memory of Lance-Corpl. EDWARD WARNER HINKS, Middlesex Regiment, younger son of Mr. & Mrs. Marlow Hincks, The Holts, Southam, killed in action near Arras on April 12, 1917 ; aged 20.—From Father, Mother, Brother & Sisters.

MANSFIELD.—In memory of Lieut. H. Mansfield, 1st Cheshires, who died in France on April 12, 1916.—Not forgotten, “ M. W.”

PRESTIDGE.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOSEPH PRESTIDGE, Barby, aged 21 years ; killed in action in France, April 11, 1915.

PYWELL.—In loving memory of Sergt. F. W. PYWELL, who was killed in action on April 9, 1917.
“ He sleeps, not his native land,
But under foreign skies,
Far from his friends who loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father, Brother and Sisters.

17 Apr 1915. Rugby Territorials Ready For Anything

LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

T Wallace, who is with the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the front, writing to his mother, says they had a lovely passage across the Channel, and then a 24-hours’ journey by rail—after which he made up his mind never to say anything against English railways. He adds : “ We have not seen any Germans yet—only a few prisoners ; but we can hear the guns quite plain. We are in a place where the Germans have been over once and were driven out at the point of the bayonet. . . . I am looking forward to taking my clothes off to-night for the first time since Sunday, and getting some sleep. Don’t forget to send the Advertiser out. There is nothing else I want. We were well served out with clothing before leaving England. We are living in an old chapel—fairly comfortable—for the present. We don’t know how long it will be before our battery has a packet at the Germans—but I don’t think it will be long.”

RUGBY TERRITORIALS READY FOR ANYTHING.

Four old Murrayians attached to the machine gun section of the 1st-7th Royal Warwicks, at present “ somewhere in France,” have written to their old schoolmaster, in which they say :—“ So far we are all feeling fit and ready for anything. After leaving our training quarters in England we had a very pleasant voyage across the water, except for the fact that we were rather overcrowded in the boat. On landing we spent the first night under canvas, and left the following day for some unknown destination. We were 24 hours in the train, which unfortunately was not quite as luxurious as the old L & N-W Railway. They packed us in cattle trucks ; but still, we made it an enjoyable journey. Since leaving the train we have had various billets, such as barns and empty houses, which have plenty of ventilation, thanks to the German shells. During our short stay in one of the base towns we had plenty of trench digging, which served to keep us fit. We had our first spell in the trenches about five days ago, and spent the best part of Easter there. The Germans evidently did not forget that it was Easter, for they sent, us one or two nice eggs over in the shape of shrapnel. At present we are billeted in a town which is used for resting troops, a few miles behind the firing line. Taking it on the whole, under the present conditions we are enjoying ourselves and getting plenty of good food.”

RIFLEMAN DODSON.

Rifleman Dodson, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr Edward Dodson, of Newbold-on-Avon, who, as reported in the Advertiser last week, was killed on March 24th. Deceased, who was 22 years of age, was working at the Cement Works at the time he enlisted in September. He went to France about six weeks ago. He fell in a battle during which a friend from Cosford, who went out with him, was bayonetted and killed. He was a member of the Newbold II football team, of which he was vice-captain for two years, and he sometimes played for the first team.

RUGBY TOWN PLAYER KILLED IN ACTION.
PRIVATE GEORGE RICE.

Followers of Association football in Rugby and district will hear with regret that George Rice, one of the half-backs of the Rugby Town Club, has been killed in action. Pte Rice, who was a reservist in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and who, previous to being called to the colours, was employed as a polisher at the B.T.H, Coventry, was 28 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children. Rice was a popular player, and a clever half-back, and before, signing on for the Rugby Club he did good service for Lord Street Juniors and Longford, and possessed a handsome set at medals, comprising Winners ; Two “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” one Birmingham Junior, four Coventry and Warwickshire League Championship, two Bedworth Nursing Cup, two Rugby Hospital Cup. Runners up: One Coventry and Warwickshire League, two “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” two Foleshill Nursing Cup, and the Coventry Nursing Cup.

RUGBY TERRITORIAL INJURED.

Bombardier A J Vingoe, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has written to his wife, residing at 10 Kimberley Road, Rugby, stating that he has been invalided to England and is now in hospital at Southend, as the result of injuries received “ somewhere in France ” on Easter Monday. Bombardier Vingoe was with the advance party of the battery, which was expecting to go into action on the following day, when he fell down some steps in a barn and fractured his arm. Previous to the war, Bombardier Vingoe, who is believed to be the first local Territorial to sustain injuries, was employed as an instrument maker at the B.T.H.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Rugby Drill Hall during the past week :—Royal Warwick Regiment, J Varney, A Farmer, and V G Paremain ; A.S.C, E H Blinco, E Badby, J Bansfield, H S Pemberton, and C Hart. Butchers and bakers are required for the Army Service Corps, and also men for the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr WHEELER, North Street, Rugby, is serving with the Royal Army Medical Corps, and Dr Grant, of Albert Street, is serving with the Highland Light Infantry.

Harry Douglas, son of Mr and Mrs Douglas, of 87 Cambridge Street, also late of the Rugby Town Fire Brigade, has been invalided home through injuries received while serving in the Royal Field Artillery.

The 9th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, quartered at Blackdown, Surrey, did an exceptionally good performance in the recent musketry course, coming out top of the 13th Division of Lord Kitchener’s New Army. The weather was not conducive to good shooting, and the men had to use the new service rifle, to which they were not well acquainted. In the “ A ” Company of the Battalion, who scored most points in the course, there are a good many Rugbeians.

Pte Clifford, 2nd Grenadier Guards, attached to the 1st Irish Guards, who was serving in the Rugby Police Force when be was recalled to the Colours last August, has been shot through the left hand. Pte Clifford, who has been at the front from the commencement of the war, is the third member of the Rugby Police Force who has been wounded, the others being Pte Higginson, of the 2nd life Guards, and Pte Nicholls, Gloucesters. Pte Clifford, who had resolved to enlist in the army, had only a few days to serve in the Police Force when he was called up.

G P Rathbone, youngest son of Mr W T Rathbone, Hillmorton, who enlisted in the 3rd Birmingham City Battalion in October, has received a commission as second lieutenant in the 11th North Staffordshire Regiment. He is at present undergoing a course of instruction at Leeds University previous to joining the regiment.

NEW BILTON MAN WOUNDED A SECOND TIME.

Mrs H Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, has received news that her son, Pte John Elson, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, was wounded by a bullet in the arm, on April 3rd, in the field, and is at present in hospital at Guildford. Pte Elson, who is a reservist, and was employed by a local builder before the war, has himself written to his mother stating that he is progressing well. This is the second time he has been wounded in this war, the first occasion being several months ago, when he sustained a rather serious gunshot wound in the back and side.

MORE SOLDIERS AND MILITARY WORKERS BADLY NEEDED.

The Chairman of the Urban District Council has received a letter from Colonel Browne, commanding the sixth recruiting area, urging that more men for the Royal Warwickshire Regiment are badly needed, and stating that if we are to carry this war through successfully and quickly every man of eligible age ought either to be under arms, making munitions of war, or serving their country in some capacity.

Colonel Browne appeals through the Chairman of the Urban District Council to the small employers of labour to release every available man, and expresses the opinion that if these employers realised the very critical position of the very existence of their business owing to the war they would co-operate in every way.

Colonel Browne acknowledges how splendidly Rugby has done, but urges that more men are still wanted.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

There are now upwards of 250 members of this organisation in Rugby, and it is hoped that all the other men who are eligible will come forward and join the Corps. The duties the Corps is now asked to undertake, which were outlined in a recent issue, make it extremely urgent in the national interests that a strong and efficient force should be raised. However urgent a man’s private business is it is desirable that all should recognise that the existence of that business depends upon the safety of the country, and that they should be prepared to devote a small portion of their time in assisting to preserve this safety.

RUGBY YEOMEN ON THE WAYFARER.

The “ C ” Squadron of the Warwickshire Yeomanry have left their war station for a foreign destination and sailed last week-end.

The Squadron, which includes the Rugby Troop, passed through Rugby Station on Thursday midnight en route for the port of embarkation.

Amongst those on board the Wayfarer, which is supposed to have been torpedoed or mined when off the Scilly Isles, and was subsequently beached at Queenstown, were at least three members of the Rugby Yeomanry Troop-Troopers Farndon, Ellis Reeve, and Biddle. Mr A H Reeve, butcher, of North Street, had a telegram from his son on Monday to say he was safe.

A Falmouth contemporary states that the Wayfarer left Avonmouth with equipment and some men on board. Interviewing one of the rescued yeomen, a correspondent states that at 2.15 on Sunday afternoon a frightful explosion was heard. Steam and smoke rose to a tremendous height, and there was big smashing of glass. The hay which was on board for the horses was blown everywhere. The men took to the boats—one of which contained nearly 50—and rowed about until they were picked up. The men had to get away from the Vessel in what they stood up in and for the rest all was lost, including in some instances a fair amount of money.

The main body of yeomen sailed on another vessel.

SWINFORD YEOMAN REPORTED DROWNED.

A report has reached Swinford that Trooper E R I Powell, son of the Rev J G Powell, vicar of Swinford, has been drowned. It is stated that the boat in which he and others were making their escape from the Wayfarer after the explosion capsized.

CASUALTIES AMONG L & N-W RAILWAYMEN.

According to the April number of the “ L & N-W Railway Gazette,” there were 1,058 casualties reported among L & N-W Railway men with the Forces between February 19th and March 15th. The list includes the following :—Killed: H R Barwick, East Anglian Engineers (Wolverton). Died from wounds: T C Tooth, Bucks Territorials (Wolverton); C Manning, Northamptonshire Regiment (Rugby). Wounded or sick: J W Windsor, 1st Worcester Regiment (Rugby) : F White; 3rd Worcester Regiment (Northampton) ; C J Houghton, 1st Bedford Regiment (Bletchley) ; W Rawlins, Duke of Cornwall’s L.I (Northampton) ; J Taylor, Middlesex Regiment (Wolverton) ; C Rose, Royal Field Artillery (Wolverton) ; W J Cooke, Oxford and Bucks L.I (Wolverton) ; J H Busson, Army Service Corps (Rugby).

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

THE DRINK QUESTION.

SIR,—It is gratifying to read in your last issues Mr R Dumas’ opinion that drinking habits have not interfered with the work of the B.T.H Company. I would claim for the Rugby Land Society a large share in bringing about so satisfactory a result. That society in all their conveyances have prohibited any buildings erected on their plots being used as public-houses, with the result that in all the streets they have laid out the residents are freed from the temptations that are so frequent in the central and older part of Rugby,

It is somewhat curious that in the older parts the licensed houses are to be found in groups of three, and here and there two adjoin one another.

The site of the licensed house in Oxford Street was obtained independently of the Land Society.

April 14th.            J W KENNING.

SHOP ASSISTANTS AND THE WAR.

DEAR SIR,—As a shop-assistant (and grocer, too), may I write in defence of myself and assistants generally and try to show to a certain class of people who are never tired of throwing out silly sarcastic remarks, devoid of all humour, as to why we shop-assistants are not supposed to be enlisting in the numbers that we might. Let me refute that statement, for I know grocery firms in Rugby who have sent 20% and over of their employees to the colours. This means a very serious handicap to the carrying on of “ Business as usual.”

No doubt more could be spared, if certain section of the so-called “ patriotic ” public would be patriotic enough to have a little more consideration for the short-handed tradesman, who, and justly too, is obliged to keep up, if possible, a full staff to deal competently with his customers—the patriotic (?) section, who wave flags, and shout “ Enlist! enlist ! ” to the man who calls for orders ; and then telephones three and four times a day for goods to be “ sent at once ! ” or “ I shall go elsewhere ! ” Is it likely that master men are going to release their trained assistants when they are open to such competition as this ? And do these particularity patriotic persons stop to think if they are giving up themselves half so much as they are expecting these shop assistants to give up ?

How many shop-assistants are being dealt with in the same manner as are the recruits from the Works here in Rugby, who, I believe, receive a third pay (or half-pay, if married), and an open place when they return ?

This is a matter purely for the master-men I know, but it make a vast difference in the quality of our patriotism, and it eases the road to the Drill Hall. Not that I maintain that shop-assistants should be treated in the same liberal manner, but it is, just a point in my argument that should not be lost sight of when sneering at shop-assistants for not enlisting.

I and others often get sneered at by the very people who are keeping us here, who spend enough on one dinner of the week to pay a dozen of we assistants a part of our pay while fighting our battles, and their’s.

Let these people help to send us, we are ready and eager to go, ready to give up not only our positions, but, maybe, our lives. Let us go as their “ special ” soldiers, as they cannot go themselves. If this is too much for them to do, if this is too “ real ” a way for them to show their patriotism for our dear old country, then do not sneer at the shop-assistant, if he also puts self first. Give him a little more encouragement, a little more real help, and show him that you are really patriotic, then you will be surprised at the vast number of shop assistants who are willing to join the army and do their “ little bit.”— Believe me, Dear Sir, Yours faithfully,

B. L. H. (THE GROCER’S MAN).