14th Sep 1918. Rugby Volunteers Complimented

RUGBY VOLUNTEERS COMPLIMENTED.

The Rugby (“ D ”) Company. 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment still continue to make rapid progress, and was warmly complimented by the new District Army Inspecting Officer, Lieut-Col Adrian Wayte. King’s Own Regiment, after an inspection on Sunday. Col Wayte, who was accompanied by the Battalion Commanding Officer, Lieut-Col F F Johnstone, inspected the Company in platoon in the various branches of training, and said he was very pleased with what he had seen. He added that he had never seen a Volunteer unit turned out so well as the Rugby Company, and it would be a great pleasure for him to send in a favourable report with regard to their progress.

Lieut-Col Johnstone distributed three of the silver spoons offered for the six highest individual scorers at the recent Battalion shooting competition at Wedgnock for the Lincoln-Chandler Cup. The recipients were : Sergt Murray, Corpl Seymour (who made a “ possible ” at the 200 yards range), and Pte Edwards. Col Johnstone congratulated the Company on having three such good shots in their ranks, and he expressed the hope that they would win the cup next year.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl George John Plant, M.M, Coldstream Guards, formerly of Pailton, died of wounds on Aug 27.

Sergt F T Gambrell, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, of 174 Cambridge Street, who was taken prisoner during the German offensive in March last, has been repatriated, and is now in hospital in London, where his wounds are being treated. A bullet went in the right side of his hip, and his thigh was broken. Before joining the Army he worked in the Winding Department at the B.T.H.

A commission in the Regular Forces (3rd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) has been obtained by Mr T Eaton-Shore, who has been on active service since June, 1915, and will join his regiment at Dover. He is a son of the late Mr James Eaton-Shore, formerly works manager at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Engineering Works.

Mr H Fretter, of Kilsby Station, has secured a commission in the Regular Forces (King’s Royal Rifles). For two years and three months he was with the Rifle Brigade in France, and was in the Battles of Ypres (1915), Somme (1916), and Cambrai (1917). It was after the last engagement that he was recommended for a commission.

Rifleman Horace Wilson, London Regiment, late of the K.R.R, son of Mrs Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, has been seriously wounded in France. He has lost his right leg and his left arm has been badly fractured. He joined the Army in September, 1914, and has served three years in France. He was formerly employed by the B.T.H.

Pte H E Haddon, Coldstream Guards (39), was killed in action on August 28th. He was a native of New Bilton, where he worked for a time as a bricklayer. His wife and four children reside at Yardley, Birmingham.

Pte Thomas Goodyer, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, a native of Barby, was killed in action on August 31st. He was 19 years of age, and joined the Army twelve months ago, previous to which he was employed as a window cleaner in Rugby. He had been in France five months.

Sapper T H Overton, Welsh Field Company, brother of Mrs R Bubb, Cambridge St., is down with dysentery in Egypt.

Mrs Bax, of 21 Oliver Street, Rugby, has received news that her youngest son, Stanley Bax (29371), 1st Battalion Somerset Light Infantry, has been wounded in the left hand, and is now in hospital at Sheffield.

The names of Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, D.L, J.P. of the Warwickshire Territorial Force Association, and Mr J Hartwell, Remount Depot, Rugby, have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valuable services rendered in connection with the War.

Pte A Backler, R.W.R, and Pte S A Orland, Machine Gun Corps, both of Rugby, have been taken prisoners by the Germans.

Lance-Corpl G Biddels, Yeomanry, Rugby, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for distinguished and gallant services rendered on the occasion of the destruction or damage by enemy action of hospital ships, transports, and storeships.

Several months ago we recorded the fact that Sergt J Webb, 1st Warwicks, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, had been awarded the D.C.M. The official account of the action for which this distinction was awarded has now been published as under :—For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in handling his platoon. While trying to establish posts in a wood, he was twice surrounded, and it was only by his courage and skill that enabled the platoon to fight their way back. Later, during an attack, he again displayed the greatest courage and ability, penetrating far into the enemy’s position, and when forced to withdraw bringing back prisoners.

An intimation has been received by Mr & Mrs Williams, of 1 Market Street, Rugby, from the War Office, stating that their son, Harry Cecil Williams, of the 1st Royal West Kent Regiment, who was reported missing on October 26th last, is now believed to have been killed in action on that date.

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

There were only three Rugby cases before this Tribunal on Wednesday, when there were present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P G Lovett , S J Dicksee. and W Johnson, jun. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

George Francis Harris (41, C3), licensed victualler, Newbold-on-Avon, applied for exemption.—Mr Meredith explained that this case was adjourned at Easter for the man to get work of national importance, but nothing further had been heard of the this.—Applicant stated that he was now working as a semi-skilled mechanic at Willans & Robinson a and a national utility order to cover this work was made for six months.

Arthur John Tapley (28, Grade 3), watchman, 35 King Edward Road, Rugby, appealed against the decision of the Rugby Rural Tribunal to exempt him till October 15th on condition that he engaged in agriculture. He said he was now a watchman at the B.T.H, and when he took up this work he released an ex-soldier for productive work.—The Chairman : Are you a skilled gardener ? Tapley : I am an expert.—The Chairman : Obviously a skilled gardener in this phase of the country’s history cannot be allowed to look after a gate, which in all probability could very well look after itself.—Tapley then save his reasons for objecting to the decision of the Lower Tribunal, and criticised a newspaper report of the proceedings before that body.—The Chairman : Now, do not make any allegations, against the Press. They are very long-suffering people and my experience of the press representatives is that they are uniformly fair. They do not report things which people do not say, neither do they, as some people allege, put inferences into people’s mouths which they do not intend.—A national utility order was made, Tapley’s services to be used for food production in his own trade.

The National Service representative appealed against the Urban Tribunal’s decision in the case of Philip Singer (38), tailor, 199 Railway Terrace.—Mr Meredith said the appeal was against the adjournment of this case on a technical legal point, which, he contended, was not arguable before that Court. Mr Eaden might argue that because his client was born in Ukrania or Lithuania he was not amenable to the Military Service Acts. Ukrania might not be a part of Russia. but that was a point which must be argued before a Court of Summary Jurisdiction. Under the convention made with the Allied States in July, 1917, Russian subjects were given the option of returning to their own country, or coming under the operation of the Military Service Act. Therefore, leaving all legal arguments out, he did not care whether the man came from Lithuania, Ukrania, or the moon ; if he had elected to reside in this country and to accept all the advantages of the country in times at peace, this carried an obligation to defend the country against its enemies in times of war.—Mr Eaden submitted that the duties of that Tribunal laid within limited bounds, and were restricted to the Military Service Acts, and in this case the Allied Countries Convention Act, under which it was contended his client was liable. As a matter of fact, the whole point as to whether this man, in company with 45 or 47 other men, similarly situated, came within this Act, was sub judice, and the test case on which they all depended had been adjourned till after the long vacation. He contended that at present the Ttibunal had no jurisdiction in this matter, but immediately the test case was settled in the High Court they would know how to deal with this case on its merits.—The Tribunal unanimously upheld the contention of Mr Meredith, and refused to sanction an appeal to the Central Tribunal.—Singer was given two months’ calling-up notice to enable him to complete the orders he has on hand.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
CASUALTY.—Mrs J Seymour has received news that her husband, Corpl J Seymour, of the 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, is wounded and lying seriously ill with enteric fever at No. 9 Clearing Station, Italy.

NAPTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs George Alsop received the sad news this week that their only son, Wilfred Alsop, Berks Regt., was killed in France on August 21st. He was only 19, and had just returned to France after being previously wounded. Much sympathy is felt with Mr & Mrs Alsop.—Gunner J Makepeace and Pte W Griffin have both been gassed, and are now in hospital.—Pte Leonard Sheasby is wounded.

STOCKTON.
Wilfred Warner, who is in Italy, has had the unpleasant experience of being buried by a shell, which exploded in the trench. He was dug out after being a few minutes under ground, and was fortunate to escape with no worse injury than a sprained back.—William Bicknell has been awarded the Military Medal for good work in a raid, when about 400 Austrians were captured and a number of mules and horses.—Cyril Sheasby, who has been missing since March 21st, has been posted as killed on that date. He was a well-developed lad of 18 years.

MINISTRY OF FOOD.

NEXT ISSUE OF RATION BOOKS.

The attention of the Public is particularly drawn to the necessity of filling in the Green Reference Leaf at the end of the present Ration Book. Particular attention should be paid to the following five points :—

(1.) That the name and address of the holder and the holder’s signature is duly filled in.

(2.) If the holder is in possession of a Supplementary Ration Book the number must be inserted.

(3.) The serial number given on the front cover of the present Ration Book MUST BE FILLED IN.

(4.) If the holder has changed his or her address since the present book was issued, the space in the bottom left-hand corner of the reference leaf must be filled in and duly signed.

(5.) In the case of children under 18 years of age the date of birth and occupation or school must be inserted.

When the above directions have been complied with the reference leaf may be handed over the counter at the nearest POST OFFICE. If returned by post direct to your Local Food Office, the envelope must hear a 1½d. stamp. ON NO ACCOUNT MUST A REFERENCE LEAF BE PLACED IN A PILLAR BOX OR POST OFFICE LETTER BOX. Unless your local Food Office receive this reference leaf ON OR REFORE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st, there is a grave possibility of your not receiving a New Ration Book, which would mean you would be unable to purchase rationed foods when the present Ration Book expires. In the case of households all reference leaves should be pinned together before handing them in. If in doubt what to do, enquire at your Local Food Office at once.

DIVISIONAL FOOD COMMISSIONER
(North Midland Division),
Westminster Buildings,
Parliament Street, Nottingham.

The Rugby Town V.A.D. Hospital, “ Te-Hira.”
This hospital re-opened on Monday, September 9th, with its full complement of 44 patients. We shall be very grateful for gifts of any kind, and we especially want a gramophone.  The following friends have already sent us welcome presents, for which we thank them :—Mrs Higginbotham, Mrs C Bluemel, Bourton parish, and Leamington Hastings parish.
CAMILE PRIOR (Quartermaster).

DEATHS.

ALSOP.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. WIFRED ALSOP, Royal Berks. Regt. killed in action on August 21, 1918 ; aged 20.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best toward his mother ;
He nobly answered his country’s call,
He gave his young life for one and all.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, and Sisters.

ALSOP.—In loving memory of our dear nephew, Pte. W. E. ALSOP, Napton, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on August 21, 1918 ; aged 20.
“ No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost a loved one
Without saying ‘ Farewell.’
We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand,
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Aunt and Uncle and dear Cousin Will in Italy.

GOODYER.—In ever-loving memory of my dearest and eldest son.,Pte. THOMAS H. GOODYER, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in action “somewhere in France ” on August 31, 1918 ; aged 19 years.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but our aching hearts can tell.”
“ Peace, perfect peace.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

HADDON.—Killed in action on August 28th, Pte. H. E. HADDON, Coldstream Guards, aged 39, the dearly beloved husband of Florence Haddon, Church Road, Yardley.
“ Only those who have lost a loved one
Know the bitterness of ‘ Gone’ ”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and dear Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399 1/24th Queen’s London Regiment, who fell in action in France on September 11, 1916.
“ Not dead to us who love him still,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory still,
And will for evermore.”
—From his loving Wife, Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

COLING.—In loving memory of Gunner JOHN THOMAS COLING, R.F.A., the beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. John Coling, Grandborough, who died of wounds at Rouen on September 10, 1916.
“ Anchored by love, death cannot sever ;
Sadly we miss thee, and will for ever.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”

PEARCE.—In loving memory of Gunner H. C. PEARCE, the beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, Dunchurch, who was killed in action on September 11, 1917.
“ We do not forget him, nor do we intend ;
We think of him daily, and will to the end.
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—Not forgotten by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

VEARS.—Killed in action in France on September 11, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest grandson of Mrs. F. Draper, Long Buckby ; aged 21 years.
“ Not dead to us, we love him still ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory still,
And will for evermore.”
—From Grandma, Aunts and Uncles.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s