16th Dec 1916. Dr Hoskyn Recommended for the Albert Medal

DR. HOSKYN RECOMMENDED FOR THE ALBERT MEDAL.

Capt C R Hoskyn, R.A.M.C, of Rugby, has been recommended for the Albert Medal of the First Class—the highest medal for saving life outside the fighting line. The act for which Dr Hoskyn has been recommended was on the occasion of a serious railway accident at Gezaincourt on the 24th November, 1916, and it is referred to in the general orders issued to the Fifth Army by the General commanding in the following terms :—

Capt C R, Hoskyn, R.A.M.C.—In addition to other plucky acts he crawled under some burning debris at great risk and commenced to amputate the leg of a man who was pinned down. In doing so he loosened the man’s body, and he was got out alive.

The Commanding Officer wishes to express his appreciation of the gallantry and initiative displayed by the officers and N.C.O.’s mentioned in the report.

The Director-General of Medical Services, British Armies in France, also mentions Dr Hoskyn and others in his orders, and adds : “ I wish to express to you the greatest admiration which I feel for your splendid conduct under conditions calculated to try the courage of the bravest. You all showed courage, resource, and coolness, and I consider that your behaviour is an honour to yourselves and a credit to your Corps.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr F Turner, of 6 West Street, has this week received official news that his son, Pte J L Turner, who has been posted as missing since September 25th last year, was killed in action on that date. Before the war Pte Turner was in the Machine Shop at the B.T.H., and was only 19 years of age.

Corpl Harold Orchard, youngest son of the late Councillor Joseph Orchard, formerly of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field. He was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch of April 30, 1916. Corpl Orchard enlisted in the Royal Engineers in December, 1914.

Major J L Baird, M.P, C.M.G, D.S.O, has been appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Air Board in the new Ministry, and Mr Steel Maitland, M.P, a former Unionist candidate for the Rugby Division, is to be Under-Secretary for the Colonies.

The war is now costing the country upwards of 5½ millions per day.

THE parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : 1 tin fruit, 1 tin salmon. ½lb ration biscuits, 1 tin syrup, ½lb tin cafe au lait, 1 tin beef, 3 soup squares, 1 tin prunes, ¼lb chocolate, ½lb figs. ½lb margarine.

STRETTON-UNDER-FOSSE.
DEATH OF A SOLDIER HERO.—Deep sympathy is extended toward the parents of Pte Fergus Benson, of the 7th Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action last week. Pte Benson went out to France with the second draft of the 7th Warwicks, and was very popular with his fellow-soldiers.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.
CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR THE TROOPS.—At a meeting held recently the Whist Committee decided to arrange a house-to-house collection to provide funds for sending a Christmas parcel to each of the thirty-five soldiers from the parish. The following school girls—Lizzie Hickman, Lily Isom, Edith Davenport, Evelyn Thompson, Nancy Lane, Edith Neal, Olive Gamble, Kate Lane, and Maggie Ritch—acted as collectors. The sum collected, with the balance from the last whist drive, amounted to £5 1s 11d, and this was expended on the parcels and postage (£1 4s 3d). The parcels contained oxo cubes, cocoa and milk tablets, chocolate and cigarettes or tobacco, with a note of good wishes from the parishioners.

BRANDON.
PTE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward have received news, that their son, Pte J. Ward 4th Worcesters, has been wounded in the eye and thigh rather severely, and is now in hospital in France. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, as it is only recently that they lost their son, Charles Ward. They also have another son in the Army.

CATTHORPE.
In order to provide parcels for the men who have joined H.M Forces, two whist drives have lately been promoted for that purpose, and have been very successful. The proceeds were further augmented by gifts, and altogether £5 10s was collected for providing the 25 parcels which have been sent off this week.

CHURCHOVER.
A SUCCESSFUL whist drive and dance was held in the School to raise money to provide Christmas parcels for Churchover soldiers. Twenty-four tables were occupied. Mrs Arthur James and Col Forkus came down from Coton House, and took part in the drive. Mr E W Berrington was M.C. The prize-winners were :—Ladies : 1 Miss L Grundy (148), 2 Miss D Davis (145), 3 Miss A Skeet (142). Gentlemen : 1 Mr F Leatherland (144), 2 Mr C Whitehead (143), 3 Mr F Gibbs (143). Messrs Whitehead and Gibbs cut for second prize. Mrs James gave the prizes away, and said that Mr James had asked her to tell them how sorry he was that he could not be with them. He sent £1, and hoped the effort would be a success. About 150 then commenced dancing to the strains of Mr Ash’s band. Mr W W Mathews and Mr W Sutton were the M.C’s. The arrangements were admirably carried out by the following committee :— Mrs B Berrington, Mrs Semple, Mrs Rimmington, Miss M Beesley, Rev L G Berrington, Mr E Berrington (hon secretary and treasurer), Mr W W Mathews, Mr W Sutton, and Mr A Daynes. The sum of £22 12s 6d was cleared, so that each soldier will be able to have a nice parcel.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR BRAVE SOLDIERS.—Pte Arthur Priest, Coldstream Guards, who was wounded on September 8th is now in the King George’s Hospital, Stamford Street, London. His wounds consist of a bad fracture of the right leg and flesh wounds in the left leg, hip and side. His parents, who have visited him, found him in good spirits.—This week-end Pte Tom Hunt has paid a visit home. He and his brother Richard are both in the Rifle Brigade. They are sons of the Kandahar veteran, Mr Richard Hunt.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains 159 names of local soldiers. Of these ten have given their lives for their country, one is missing, one is a prisoner of war, and over thirty have been wounded.

DUNCHURCH.
P.C Cox, who was formerly stationed at this village, and who is now in the Army, paid a visit to Dunchurch, on Tuesday, and was warmly welcomed by the villagers, amongst whom he was always very popular.

GERMAN PRISONERS TO WORK ON THE LAND.—Warwickshire Chamber of Agriculture at Warwick on Saturday passed a resolution approving the employment of prisoners of war in agriculture. A letter from the officer commanding the Southern Command, which was read to the meeting, stated that only selected men of good character would be sent—with an interpreter. The Government would find rations, and charge the farmers the average rate of wages for the prisoners’ services.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

OTHER CASES.

An appeal was made by Mr F Sharpe, of Bath Street, for John George Bennett, carriage builder and wheel[wright] 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton.—Adjourned for the Military representatives to find out whether the Army is in need of wheelwrights.

On behalf of Mr Chas Wilson, Three Horse Shoes Hotel, Mr Eaden appealed for Bertram Henry Waring (36, married), shepherd and stud groom, 13 Earl Street.—The Military having offered a discharged soldier as a substitute, the Tribunal allowed 28 days for the exchange to be effected.-The appeal of Leonard Page (33, single), butcher and farmer, Wolston, for a long term of exemption was dismissed, but he was given 28 days.-Mr W Howkins, farmer, Hillmorton Grounds, desired to retain the services of Fred Shaw (36, married), cowman, &c.—The Chairman said he would get to April 1st in any event, and an exemption was given to that date.

A letter was read from Joseph Evan Walters, fruiterer and fishmonger, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, asking for his exemption to be extended until his wife had gained her strength.—Mr Wratislaw offered no objection, and he was given 28 days.

With respect to an application by Mr Robt Bucknill, threshing machine proprietor, Marton, for his son, Francis John Bucknill (19, single), described as a stockman and wagoner, Mr. Wratislaw said appellant had refused a substitute to go with his threshing machine because he could not patch a boiler, so he did not deserve any consideration at all.—Mr Bucknill said this statement was not correct.—The Chairman said they could quite see appellant’s attitude—he wanted to keep that boy—and if he was going to take that line there was a very easy way of dealing with him.—Mr Worthington submitted it was a case for substitution, and the case was adjourned till the next meeting for the Military to see what they could do.

Henry James Hopkins (31, married), thatcher and manager of the Co-operative Stores at Broadwell, had been granted an exemption by the local Tribunal, the Military appealing.—Mr Wale said he was a grocer, but he had never heard of a grocer and thatcher.—Mr Worthington : It is rather a peculiar combination.—Adjourned for medical examination.

DEATHS.

GLENN.—On the 7th inst., in France, of asthma and bronchitis, Pte. JOHN GLENN (Warwicks), beloved husband of Nellie Glenn, 35 Rowland Street, aged 40 years.

MAYES.—On December 6th, at Bristol Hospital (died of wounds received in action), Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, of the 3rd Oxford and Bucks L.I., the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Mayes, 28 Abbey Street ; aged 20 years.
“ One less at home, one more in heaven ;
Our Saviour has taken the bloom He has given.
Flowers may wither and die of decay,
But the love of our son will for ever stay.”

IN MEMORIUM.

TURNER.—In affectionate and loving remembrance of our dear son, Pte. Joseph Lewis Turner ; killed in action on September 25, 1915 ; aged 19 years.—From Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters, & Gladys.

Turner, Arthur James. Died 19th Sep 1916

Arthur James Turner was born in 1874 and baptised in Ditchingham in Norfolk on 27th September 1874. His parents were James and Hannah (nee Dodman) who had married in 1868. Hannah died and was buried in Hedenham, Norfolk on 22nd October 1880. She was aged 34 and left a husband and five children. Arthur James was aged only six.

Times must have been hard for the family. James was an agricultural labourer and in 1883 was summoned to the Petty Sessions in Loddon by the School Attendance Officer, for neglecting to send two children to school. He was fined 2s 6d in each case. Perhaps they were need to work in the fields.

We have been unable to find the family in the 1891 census. Arthur James would have been sixteen by this time. Around March 1894 he joined the army. He sent time in India with the Royal Field Artillery and was drafted to England to train recruits during the Boer War. In 1902 he married Lizzie Gertrude Stanley. Their first child, Cyril Arthur Stanley Turner was born in Ireland in 1903 and Leslie Alan followed in 1905 and Vera Evelyn in 1907. The family were living at Bulford Camp, in Wiltshire at the time. Their fourth child, Urban H Turner was born in Rugby in 1912.

Arthur James had been was appointed Battery Sergeant-Major and Instructor in Gunnery to the Rugby Howitzer Battery in March 1910.

According to the report in the Rugby Advertiser 7th Oct 1916

“After the general mobilisation in August 1914, Sergt-Major Turner was appointed to the Divisional Ammunition Column. He finished his term of 22 years in March last, but signed on again for the period of the war, and was transferred to another Division.”

At his death he served in “B” Bty, 95th Bde, Royal Field Artillery (No 3291)

He “was killed in action on September 19th. Mrs Turner has not received official news of her husband’s death, but the Chaplain of the Division to which he was attached has written saying that her husband’s battery had been in action where the fighting was hottest, and he was one of the brave men who had given their lives for his King and country. The Chaplain added that he had read the Burial Service over his grave, near the Battery position. B.S.M. Turner who was 42 years of age, had served 22 years in the R.F.A.

He is buried at Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, west of Longueval, where many of the dead from the Battle of the Somme were buried.

He is also remembered on the Croop Hill War Memorial in Rugby. His widow lived at 64 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton. She died in 1947, aged 76.

 

Turner, Joseph Lewis. Died 25th Sep 1915

Joseph Lewis Turner’s birth was registered in the third quarter of 1896 in Rugby.

In 1901 Joseph is shown on the census with his maternal grandparents at 174 Cambridge Street, Rugby.

In 1911 the family were living at 6 West Street and Joseph was shown as being a  Brass Worker in an Electric Works and father Joseph William, was a Blacksmith Striker. His father had been born in Sheffield and his mother Sarah (née Colledge) was born in Long Lawford. They had been married in the first quarter of 1894 in St Matthew’s Church Rugby.

Joseph L Turner enlisted with the 2nd Battalion of the Ox and Bucks Light Infantry and his regimental number was 11090. The 2nd Battalion had been stationed in Aldershot from 4 August 1914 as part of the 5th Brigade of the 2nd Division. On 14 August they had been mobilised and landed at Boulogne. The various actions the Battalion had been engaged in were in 1914 The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, and the first Battle of Ypres.  In the Winter Operations 1914-15, they were engaged in the Battle of Festubert and the Battle of Loos.

Joseph Turner was killed in action on 25 September 1915 – at the Battle of Loos.

Source https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/units/279/oxfordshire-and-buckinghamshire-light-infantry/

An article in The Rugby Advertiser on 16 December 1916 included the following:

Mr F Turner of 6 West Street has this week received official news that his son Pte J L Turner, who has been posted as missing since September 25th last year, was killed in action on that date.   Before the war Pte Turner was in the Machine Shop at the BTH and was only 19 years of age.

And in the In Memoriam section of the newspaper:

Turner – In affectionate and loving remembrance of our dear son, Pte Joseph Lewis Turner; killed in action on September 25, 1915; aged 19 years. From Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters, & Gladys.

Private J L Turner 11090 and Private P Woodhouse 11091 who must, from their regimental numbers, have joined up together, and probably died together, are both remembered on Panel 83 to 85 of the Loos Memorial.

Joseph Turner is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gate and is listed in the BTH War Memorial Unveiling and Dedication War Book dated 29 October 1921.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

31st Jul 1915. Shirts, Socks and Wild Thyme

WILD THYME NEEDED FOR WAR PURPOSES.

AN OPPORTUNITY FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN.

Many people are anxious to help their country in the present crisis, and children will be interested to learn that there is a way in which they can assist. Wild thyme, which grows plentifully in certain localities—and also the cultivated variety for the matter of that—forms the basis of an important disinfectant, of which there is just now a great shortage.

At Rugby School Chemical Laboratory arrangements have been made in connection with some work asked for by the War Office, by which large quantities of thyme can be dealt with.

Here is a splendid opportunity for school children to render valuable aid, and an appeal is made to boys and girls of the district to collect as much thyme as they possibly can during the next six weeks, and forward the same to Mr B B Dickinson, 5 Barby Road, Rugby.

Of course, it is expected that this will be done voluntarily, as there is no fund from which payment can be made ; but no doubt many children will be glad during their holidays to gather the thyme growing wild in the locality near their homes, and if in each village community one or two leading residents will interest themselves in the scheme, and see that the thyme when collected is duly despatched to Mr Dickinson, their assistance will be much appreciated.

In most large gardens, too, there is sure to be a certain quantity of the cultivated thyme in the portion allotted to herbs, and this will also prove most acceptable. Anyone willing to contribute or help in any way is invited to communicate with Mr Dickinson, who will be glad to give further information.

SHIRTS AND SOCKS WANTED FOR “ E ” COMPANY.

Mrs Spencer, 17 High Street, Rugby appeals to the people of Rugby on behalf of the Rugby boys of the old “ E ” Company, serving in France, for shirts and socks, or subscriptions for purchasing same. The boys are badly in need of both shirts and socks, and Mrs Spencer will be pleased to receive same at her residence to forward to them. Some have already been sent out, but many more are needed, as there are between 60 and 70 boys of the old “ E ” Company serving in France.

APPRECIATION OF RUGBY LANDLADIES’ MESSAGE.

To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—Seeing in a copy of your excellent paper a message for “ the boys from the landladies,” I now take the opportunity on behalf of my comrades of letting you know how much the letter, or rather message, was appreciated,

I myself received the paper while in the Red Cross Hospital at Giza, Cairo, Egypt, where I am recovering from wounds received in Gallipoli, and after perusing its columns I blue-pencilled the message and re-posted this good old Advertiser to my chum on the Peninsula. A few days afterwards I received a letter telling how the paper was passed from hand to hand along the trenches of my regiment (the Inniskillings), and how the message brought memories back and gave the battalion something to talk about—for landladies were the sole topic in the trenches for the next week, and all were saying how they would enjoy themselves in Rugby when they had completed the job on hand, viz, dealing out to their “ Oriental friends ” a very-much-needed lesson.

Well, I will close now, wishing you and your paper the best of luck. Hoping I am not intruding on your valuable time, and at the same time thanking the people who inserted the message,—I am, sir, yours truly,

C BEST (Bandsman),
Inniskillings,
Red Cross Hospital, Giza, Cairo, Egypt.
July 15th, 1915.

NEW BILTON GUARDSMAN’S EXPERIENCES.

Pte George Walden, of the 2nd Coldstream Guards, who went out to the front with the original Expeditionary Force, is visiting his patents at 20 Campbell Street, New Bilton, on sick leave, having been wounded in the wrist at La Bassee on June 15th. During the ten months that he was at the front Pte Walden took part in the big engagements in which the British were concerned, vis, the Retreat from Mons, the Battle of the Aisne, the first attempt on Ypres, and the glorious charge in the La Bassee brickfield. In his opinion the worst engagement, however was the rearguard action in the retreat from Mons, when the British covered 186 miles in eight days. Personally, Pte Walden has been very lucky, for although practically the whole of the original battalion to which he belongs has been wiped out, it was ten months before he was hit, although on more than one occasion he has had narrow escapes. On one occasion during the fighting round Ypres he had an exceedingly close shave. Being a staunch teetotaller, he refused tea with rum in it, and went out to fetch some water. The Germans caught sight of him, however, and opened fire with a machine gun. Realising his danger, he fell on to his stomach, and crawled the remainder of the way. On his return he was again fired upon, but luckily reached the lines safely. Our representative then asked Pte Walden what was his opinion of the personnel of the German army, and whether the stories to the effect that it was not so good now as at the beginning of the war were true ? In reply, he stated that there was little doubt but that the flower of the German Army had been destroyed, but the present troops were quite as good as their predecessors in trench warfare. It was in advances and retirements, however, that the difference was apparent, and in these directions the German troops of to-day were vastly inferior to those Germans who faced the British in the early days of the campaign. The original Prussian Guards were a fine body of fighters, but by the Kaiser’s orders they were pitted against the British Brigade of Guards, who completely wiped them out. Pte Walden paid a tribute to the marksmanship of the German troops and to their effective use of the hand-bombs. In conclusion, he wished to remind readers through the medium of this paper that the most acceptable gift at the front is “ Woodbine ” cigarettes, which are in greater request than any other brand.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—A party of nineteen wounded soldiers from the “ Ashlawn ” Hospital, Rugby, were very kindly entertained on Tuesday last week, by Mr and Mrs Wilcox, of “ The Knob,” Stretton-on-Dunsmore. The party, in charge of a nurse, arrived about three o’clock by break, which Mr Wilcox had sent for them, and various amusements, including whist, were indulged in till four o’clock, when tea was provided indoors, as, owing to the uncertain weather, it was not thought advisable to sit outside. After tea the party spent the time strolling round the garden. A start was made for home about six o’clock. The wounded men were very hearty in their thanks, and were loudly cheered by the villagers when they left. On the kind invitation of Mr and Mrs Wilcox, many of the inhabitants assembled to meet the soldiers, and were hospitably entertained afterwards. Among the wounded guests were some men who were present with their regiments when the King inspected the famous 9th Division on the London Road, a few days before their departure to the Dardanelles. The drive down the London Road was, therefore, particularly interesting to those men.

STOCKTON.

GRENADE-THROWER WOUNDED.—Recently Messrs F W Neal and Thomas Neal went to London to see their brother Jack, who lies badly wounded in the King George Hospital. Jack Neal was one of 25 picked men who were instructed to throw hand-grenades into the German trenches, which were only about 13 yards away. Before throwing the soldier pulls a piece out of the ball, which leaves him only a few moments before it goes off. Somehow one that Jack Neal was going to throw went off in his hand, which it very badly damaged. The extent he does not yet know. He has part of a finger off and one hanging loose ; he is also badly wounded down the right leg, and it is said it is miraculous that he escaped alive. Jack Neal enlisted in December. The other week he just escaped with his life. His company were asleep in the trenches with someone on watch when his pal (Tibbs, from Napton) shouted to them to get out quick. He had to call several times before the worn-out soldiers heard him, and just as they bolted to safety a shrapnel shell came down where they had been asleep. It killed the fellow who followed Jack Neal when racing from the spot, and smashed up Neal’s rifle.

SAPPER C W WALTON’S LUCKY ESCAPE.

Sapper Charles W Walton, of the Royal Engineers, youngest son of Mr E Walton, 81 Claremont Road, recently had a remarkable escape from death at the front. On July 1st, at Festubert, he was working with a small party, including Sapper Snook, of Rugby, who, as we reported last week, was also wounded, when he was struck by a bullet in the region of his heart. Upon examination it was found that the bullet had struck a pay book and wallet, which were in a pocket immediately over Sapper Waltons heart. These evidently diverted the course of the bullet, and saved the young man’s life. The book and wallet, together with the contents of the latter, were considerably damaged, and at first sight bear the appearance of having been gnawed by a mouse. Sapper Walton joined the Army in August, and is now in the Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, where he is doing well. On Friday last week his photograph appeared in a daily paper in connection with a garden party given for wounded soldiers there.

THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY IN EGYPT.

A Rugby member of the Warwickshire Yeomanry in writing to a friend, states that they are now encamped in one of the best parts of Alexandria, close to the sea, where there is some fine bathing. The regiment has been turned into an army of occupation, so that there is little prospect at present of them seeing any fighting ; and this, the writer says, has given rise to a certain amount of grumbling, the men not liking their inactivity. He states that he receives the Rugby Advertiser each week, and notices that recruiting is still going on, and ventures the opinion that some of those who are hanging back ought to go to Egypt and see some of the wounded Australians, who had been brought back from the Dardanelles. These had not only bullet wounds, but deliberate atrocities had been committed upon them by the Turks. “ If these men could only see such sights as we who are here do Lord Kitchener would have 3,000,000 men.” At present, he says, the Yeomanry are doing routine work, principally training the horses they received to replace those which were on the Wayfarer. They recently experienced a dust storm. The wind blew half a gale, carrying dust and sand with it, and filling everything with fine sand. The temperature was 108 in the shade and 132 in the sun, and the men of the regiment, who were in “ stalls ” at the time, went into the sea and stood with the water up to their chins for two hours. The storm lasted from 9 a.m to 3.30 p.m ; and the men, he facetiously adds, were “ eating ” sand for two days afterwards. He concludes with the opinion that there is no place to beat Warwickshire, with its green fields, even if it is cold and wet. One can have too much sand and sunshine.

BRITISH TROOPS IN A FAVOURABLE POSITION.

RUGBY SOLDIER’S OPINION.

Bombardier Turner, of the Royal Field Artillery, whose home is at 21 Plowman Street, and who has been at the front since the commencement of the war, visited his home for a few days this week. This is the second time Bombardier Turner has been home on leave, the first occasion being in January last. Although he took part in the retreat from Mons, and has been in most of the great fights since then, he has, fortunately, so far escaped injury. Nevertheless, he has had many narrow escapes. He is now attached to the grenade section with the Royal Engineers, and his duty consists in keeping the infantry men well supplied with hand grenades and operating the trench mortars. In his opinion, the British force is now in a better position than it has been in since the commencement of the war-in fact, had they been as strong last August the retreat from Mons would never have taken place. They now had plenty of ammunition, good serviceable guns and men, and, he added : “ If Mr Lloyd George will only keep on giving us ammunition like he is now doing we shall be all right.” Life at the front is evidently not all hard work, although there is plenty of that and to spare, for Bombardier Turner informed our representative that the trenches have now been made very comfortable, with arrangements for pumping out water in case of floods, and facilities for games are provided. Sports of various kinds are arranged in the rest camps, and recently a horse-jumping competition for a small gold cup, presented by King Albert, took place between the British and the Belgians, ending in a win for the latter. In an international football match the British Cavalry Division defeated the Belgians, and secured the medals given by the King of Belgium. Cricket and other games are also indulged in, and Bombardier Turner, who left on Thursday for the front, volunteered the information that the troops were quite cheerful and only waiting to “ slash it across the Germans.”

RUGBY MEN WIN THE D.C.M.

News has just been received in Rugby that one of the first volunteers to enlist from the B.T.H Works has been decorated with the Distinguished Conduct Medal. This decoration has been awarded to Pte A Hotz, of the 1st East Surrey Regiment, for conspicuous gallantry on Hill 60, where he placed himself in front of a communication trench occupied by the enemy, and on the enemy advancing attacked them with hand grenades and dispersed them. Pte Hotz was employed in the construction department at the B.T.H Works, and the members of the staff are naturally very pleased that this award for gallantry has been received by one of their number.

Lce-Corpl P V Stent, of the 5th Service Batt Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, whose parents live at 28 Worcester Street, Rugby, has received the D.C.M for valour in the trenches, He was a bomb-thrower, and succeeded in taking a trench almost entirely by himself. He brought back with him an explosive mine and showed it to his Colonel. Lce-Corpl Stent was for seven years in “ E ” Company, Rugby, and when he enlisted at the beginning of the war was employed as a moulder at Willans & Robinsons.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been recruited at Rugby Drill Hall during the past week :-H Smith, R.W.R ; J Ryan, Scottish Rifles ; J Clowes, R H Lucas, R S Hirons, H R Hirons, and H Matthews, East Kent Regiment ; E Humphries Webb, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; E J Dalzel, J Welch, and H Lines. R.A.M.C ; C A Goodman, R.F.A ; J Andrews, R.G.A.

More recruits are still wanted, and arrangements have been made for each town to raise its own Company, to be drilled together. At present those who are willing to join are asked to send in their names to the Recruiting Officer, Drill Hall, Rugby. When sufficient men have been obtained to start training they will be called up.

 

24th Jul 1915. Rugby Man Arrested by Sentry

PHOTOGRAPHY IN WAR TIME.

RUGBY MAN ARRESTED BY SENTRY.

At Bangor, on Saturday, Frank James Hawkins, 59 Regent Street, Rugby, electrical engineer, a visitor to Llandudno, was charged under the Defence of the Realm Act (a) with taking a photograph in the neighbourhood of Menai Bridge without authority or sanction of a competent military officer, with intent to assist the enemy, and (b) with being in possession of photographic instruments in the shape of a hand camera, etc.

Accused pleaded not guilty to the first charge, but admitted the second.

Private Jones, a sentry at the Carnarvonshire end of the Menai Suspension Bridge, said he saw the accused on top of a wall, apparently taking a photograph of the opposite side of the Straits, which included a view of the Anglesey end of the suspension bridge.

Hawkins said he was totally ignorant of the regulations on this subject. He was staying at Llandudno, and on the day in question went on a motor-cycle through the Pass of Llanberis, and came to Carnarvon, and thence towards Bangor, and seeing a road marked “ To Menai Bridge,” he took that road, as he wished to see the bridge. He got on a wall and saw a nice view of the village, and he thought he would photograph it.

The Bench expressed themselves quite satisfied that defendant had acted in ignorance imposed a light fine of 20s.

FROM AN INTERNMENT CAMP IN GERMANY.

“ TAFFY, THE CRANE DRIVER,” A PRISONER OF WAR.

The Rev F Potter, of St Marie’s College, Rugby, has received an interesting communication from Pte Wm Turner, of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, who formerly worked as a crane-driver at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Works, and is now a prisoner in Germany. He says :-

“ I am going on quite well, hoping you and all the old country are the same. I am interned in a camp composed of Irishmen and Roman Catholics. Our camp is situated on a hill in the beautiful valley of the Rhine overlooking the city of Limburg on the Lahn. The treatment and the accommodation is all that can or could be desired in this camp. There are also Russian and French prisoners interned here, but separated by barbed wire from us. We do a little light work daily as exercise. You may probably be aware of the object in having all Irishmen together ; we are in the Catholic district.

“ I should like my friends and workmates of Messrs Willans & Robinson to know that I am still alive and well, after ten months on the Continent, but am now, unfortunately, guest of the German Government. They are sure to remember ‘Taffy, the crane-driver,’ as I was known at the Victoria Works. Probably you may have amongst your congregation in or around Rugby some good Samaritan who would like to help the prisoners here by sending a few little comforts, such as cigarettes, tobacco, or food-stuffs, as we depend chiefly on our good peopled for such luxuries. I ask nothing for myself, as my wife, who as you know lives at Ashby, sends me all I require, but for those who have neither relatives or friends. Should any be sent through me, I shall be only too pleased to distribute them amongst the most deserving causes, and will acknowledge all gifts to the best of my ability. We receive a little occasionally from ladies in England, but as the number of men is great (about 2,000), and by far exceed the supply received, the individual quantity is very infinitesimal. I trust that men from Rugby and district now serving at the front are quite well. My prayers and those of my comrades interned here are offered for their safe return to their homes in the near future. I trust you are quite well, and shall be only too pleased to hear from you or anyone wishing to communicate with me. Our treatment is very fair. We have every facility for cleanliness, and the German Authorities supply change of underclothing as required, so we have nothing very much to complain about. Wishing you and all the old country the best of luck and good wishes, and a speedy conclusion to the terrible war. I remain, Rev Sir, Yours very respectfully. No 7242 William Turner, Royal Munster Fusiliers (late crane-driver Victoria Works), Limburg, Lahn.”

The Catholic Chaplain, Father Crotty, Dominican at Limburg, writing to Father Potter about this man, among other things says : “ You may assure Mrs Turner that her husband is being well cared for. Yesterday, with the other prisoners of war, he took part in our grand procession of the Blessed Sacrament through the Irish Quarter of the lager.” This chaplain is an Englishman. Since this above was written, Pte Turner has sent a post-card saying that he has been removed from the above camp.

B.T.H. MAN KILLED.

Mr and Mrs Davenport, of the Home Farm, Lindley Lodge, Nuneaton, have received the sad news that their son, Pte Henry Herbert Davenport, was killed by a German sniper on the morning of June 22nd. At the time he enlisted deceased was working at the B.T.H, and formerly at Churchover, where he was a schoolboy.

The following sympathetic letter from his captain has been received by Mrs Davenport, and we are sure the acquaintances of the young soldier will share the regret expressed by the officer :-“ Dear Madam,—It is with the deepest regret that I have to write and tell you of the death of your son, No 10608, Pte H Davenport. He was shot through the head by a German sniper, and died almost at once. He was buried close to where he fell, just behind the trench, and the spot is marked with a cross. The ground becomes the property of the British Government, and the grave will be well cared for. The Officers and the Company deeply sympathise with you in your great loss, and we all respected your son for his fine character and soldierly qualities. He was killed on the morning of the 22nd.—Yours with deep sympathy, A W T WEBB, Captain.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Bertie Cecil Mander (Rugby), of the 4th Battalion of the Canadian contingent, has been wounded in action in Flanders.

Mr W J Peddell, auctioneer, Rugby,has been gazetted to a second-lieutenant in in the 10th South Staffs Regiment. Lieut Peddell has arranged with Messrs Tait, Sons, & Pallant to carry on his business during his absence.

Lce-Corpl Stanley Hidden son of Mr and Mrs George Hidden, Moultrie Road, Rugby, late of the Leicestershire Yeomanry, has received a commission as second-lieutenant in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

Messrs Hoare, Clench, Jones, West, and Reynolds, all employees of the Co-operative Society, Rugby, presented themselves for enlistment at Coventry this week for the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Unfortunately Clench, Jones, and West were rejected for medical reasons, but have signified their intention of offering their services in the manufacture of munitions.

SAPPER SNOOK WOUNDED.

Mrs Snook, of 40 Lodge Road, has received news from the War Office that her second son, Sapper A E Snook, of the Royal Engineers, has been severely wounded in the scrotum and right thigh, and is now in a hospital in this country. Sapper Snook was with his brother and several friends when the shell which wounded him burst ; and although another Rugby man was wounded at the time, the rest had a marvellous escape. Mrs Snook has three sons with the colours. Two have been to the front, and the youngest is expecting to go shortly. All three enlisted at the commencement of the war, when they were employed at the B.T.H Works.

WOUNDED IN HAND AND FACE.

Pte Ernest Luthwaite, of the 1st Hampshire Regiment, son of Mr J Luthwaite, of 39 Lodge Road, Rugby, has been wounded in the right hand and the face. The news was communicated to Rugby by the Rev T L Bruce, chaplain of No. 1 Canadian General Hospital France, where Pte Luthwaite is under treatment as a patient. He is reported to be progressing favourably and to be comfortable and cheerful. Before he enlisted Pte Luthwaite was a glass blower in the Mazda Lamp Factory at the B.T.H Works. He joined the Army on the outbreak of the war, and has been in France about two months. When in Rugby he became a member of the Park Albions, and played at half-back for that club.

NEW BILTON MEN WOUNDED.

Mr E T Burton, of 35 Avenue Road, New Bilton has received an intimation from the War Office that his son, Pte M Burton, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was wounded (shot wound in right leg) on the 8th inst., “ somewhere in France.” He was taken to the 1st Canadian Hospital at Etaples, and has since been removed to the Military Hospital at Edmonton, Middlesex. Before enlisting in September he was engaged in the core-making department at Willans & Robinson’s Works. We understand that he is progressing favourably.

Mrs C H Wood, of 11 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received intimation from the War Office that her husband, Pte Wood, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was wounded in the thorax by shrapnel on July 8th. Pte Wood, who joined the Army in January, and was previous to that time employed by Messrs Frost as a compositor, has written to his wife stating that he is going on well. He is at present in a General Hospital in France.

LANCE-CORPL. F. H. BOTTERILL WOUNDED.

“ A BULLET STRAIGHT IN THE EYE.”

Capt W F Wood, of the 1st Rugby Company Boys Brigade, has received a letter, dated County Hospital, Huntingdon, July 21st, from Lce-Corpl F H Botterill, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, announcing that he has been wounded, and giving some account of his experiences. We make the following extract from the letter:—“ As an old boy of your Company, I feel I am only doing my duty in writing to my Commanding Officer, and the one who first taught me the duties of a soldier. I have now been connected with the army for 12 years, but there has been far more stirring times this last twelve months than all the other, for I went to France last August. I have been with my old regiment, the 1st Royal Warwickshire, and I am proud to belong to it, for it has seen a lot of service, and we have always done our duty. I have seen very many of my old comrades go never to return, and my life has been spared on several occasions ; but they caught me at last, with a bullet straight in the eye. I am thankful it came out near my ear instead of going through my brain. I have lost my left eye, and it has been very hard to take my food, for I couldn’t open my mouth, but I am pleased to tell you I have had a wonderful recovery. My hearing has got normal also ; I can open my mouth much wider, and can see nicely to write a letter with my sound eye. I have seen a few exciting times, and the work was very hard last August and September. I went through the winter in the trenches, but they gave me a decent “ Easter Egg.” Still, I am very thankful my life has been spared, for the doctors all tell me I must have a “ strong spot,” but I am about “fed up.” This makes the fourth hospital I have been in, and it is rather monotonous after the life I have been leading, for I have never had anything worse than a cold. Still, I mustn’t worry, for I have always been in charge of a section, and I have seen many come and go, and some never to see the dear old home again.”

CAPTAIN OF RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB BUSY IN FRANCE.

George Renshaw, captain of Rugby F.C, has had a busy time since he enlisted seven months ago in the Army Service Corps. He has been in France six months, and is engaged in clerical work. In a communication received by his brother on Thursday he states that he is working daily from 4 a.m till 8 p.m, so has little time for letter-writing. The popular Rugby full back is cheerful and well, in spite of the fact that he has not slept in a bed for several months.

COMMENDATION FOR A B.T.H RECRUIT.

Lance-Corpl F Keeley, 4th Battalion of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps has received commendation from his Commanding Officer and Brigade Commander for his conduct in the field with the British Expeditionary Force. Corpl Keeley enlisted in August at Rugby, where he was working as a pattern-maker for the British Thomson-Houston Company. He gained his promotion to corporal, and was transferred from B Company to C Company for his conduct in the second battle of Ypres.

A REQUEST FOR RAZORS.

Pte H Holmes, 1664 B Company, 1st Royal Warwicks, serving with the British Expeditionary Force, whose home is at 47 Wood Street, Rugby, has written us stating that there are twelve or more men in the regiment to his knowledge without razors, and if any of our readers have old razors that will shave the men referred to would be glad of them. We understand that all men have razors served out to them as part of their equipment, but apparently the men Pte Holmes refers to have lost theirs. Our correspondent informs us that he went out to France on November 11th last year, and has been in hospital twice. He adds:” We are out of the trenches now for a longer rest. Our regiment took part in that affair on July 6th. We were called up on the night we were going to be relieved, but had to stop owing to the Germans keeping on counter-attacking. The Old Warwicks helped to hold them back well.”

CREDITABLE RECORD OF A HILL FAMILY.

For a father, three sons, and a son-in-law to be serving with the colours is a record of which any family might well be proud. The hamlet of Hill, near Leamington Hastings, has a household that claims this distinction. Mr Wm Cleaver, the father, is in the 7th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and is engaged in guarding bridges at Rugby. His eldest son is Sergt W H Cleaver, of the 19th Hussars, who went out to the front last August. He was slightly wounded in the foot, and has been home for a short time, but is now back again at the war. His injury was caused by shrapnel, and another piece of the shell became embedded in his cap. Both bits of metal are being retained as souvenirs. The other two sons, Privates A H Cleaver and B J Cleaver, are in the 3rd Gloucester Regiment, to which they have been transferred from the 19th Hussars. They are expecting to leave for the front this week. The son-in-law, Pte John Prestidge,is serving with the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Dardanelles.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following men have been attested at the Rugby Drill Hall this week :—J A Bryan, Royal Engineers ; Thos Hellier Edward, T H Johnson, and F Proctor, A.S.C ; A Hill and E Brown, A.V.C ; T Stewart, R.A.M.C ; C Denton and T Smith, R.F.A ; M A Adnitt, D Smith, and R Redding, R.W.R ; J Myers, K.O.Y.L.I ; J O’Donnell, 14th Gloucesters (Bantams) ; A Brown, Rifle Brigade.

FURTHER TIDINGS OF THE RUGBY HOWITZERS.

Sergt-Major Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Brigade, has written to Mr W F Wood, of Market Place, Rugby, giving an account of recent fighting, in which the local Howitzers took part. The letter is dated, July 4th. Referring to the Boys’ Brigade, he says:—

“ I think it is a splendid organization, and the large number of men that we have who are past members of your Company show that the patriotic instinct instilled in them in youth grows up with them in after life. We all hope you will have an excellent camp and the very best of weather to enable you to enjoy it to the full.”

He then proceeds: “ I will just briefly relate what has occurred since I wrote to you last. We did our usual amount of firing up till Sunday, June 6th, 1915, when we had a good day’s “ sport,” which commenced by the Engineers exploding two mines under the German trenches. This was a signal for our artillery and machine-guns being turned on the enemy’s position, which was a network of trenches. In the report of the day’s action, which was issued by the General of our Army Corps, our battery was very favourably mentioned. The enemy made three different attacks since them, each preceded by the explosion of a mine, but in every case the saps were short, resulting in the mines exploding between the trenches instead of under our’s, so the damage to our people was practically nil. They sent over 400 shells in one of these spasms in about an hour, and we also had eight rounds in and about our gun position—one coming through a dug-out and another bursting it the edge of a gun platform. Luckily, no one was hurt, as all the men were at the other end of the gun position. We also had several close to the billet, but with nil results, and another farm near by was burnt down by their incendiary shells. Our observing party were shelled out of their station the other day, about 30 falling all round the place in the morning, and one hit the building in the afternoon, but they were all in the dug-out by then, so no harm was done. The village near to where we were also had a bad gruelling for about three weeks, but it didn’t make the civilians clear out, although a good many of them were wounded. The Germans attacked, very heavily for about two hours a week last Thursday night, and some of their infantry got as far as our trenches, but were repulsed, leaving twenty or thirty dead behind them. We have had a little recreation in the form of a ‘smoker’ now and again, and we also played another battalion at footer and beat them 1—0, and another battalion at cricket, and beat them by 11 runs, so you will see it is not all fighting here. We have very little fear from the gases now, as every man is supplied with a new pattern smoke helmet and respirator, and both have been proved very efficient by actual experiment. We moved from our position a week last Saturday for an alleged rest, so had our final hate in the morning by putting 15 rounds into their trenches, and started on trek in the evening, arriving at our present destination Tuesday night. The march was very interesting, as we saw a good deal of the country, marching from about 6 p.m until midnight each day, and having the days to ourselves except for stables and harness cleaning. We are at present staying in a mining village, which is very pretty, as it is so thickly wooded, and has evidently been part of a large estate at some time or other.

24 Oct 1914. News from the Front

HAVE GOT THE GERMANS “ SNOOKERED ”

Corpl A J Harris, son of Mr and Mrs A Harris, Dunchurch Road, has sent another letter home, stating that he is still fit and well. The situation in France is summed up in a phrase that billiard players will-readily understand : “ We have got the Germans ‘snookered’ and they know it.”

HORSE SHOT UNDER HIM.

Sergt W Judge, of the 20th Hussars, paid a surprise visit to his wife at 23 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, on Tuesday in last week, and remained until Saturday morning, when he returned to France. Sergt Judge, who as a reservist was called up on the outbreak of hostilities, was one of the first to be ordered to France, and was recently sent home with one of Field-Marshal Sir John French’s chargers. He took part in the Battle of Mons and the fighting round Arras, and in one engagement he had a very narrow escape, his horse being shot under him. Sergt Judge has only a very poor opinion of the much-vaunted German cavalry, and states that they will not face steady fire unless forced to do so. Their uniform in some cases is very much like that of the British Cavalry, the only distinguishing feature being the brass helmets, of the Prussians. Then, too, the British horses are far superior to any possessed by the enemy. The general contempt of Thomas Atkins for the German riflemen is shared by Sergt Judge, who states that they fire very rapidly, but register many more misses than hits. “ It is most amusing,” he adds, “ to see the British soldiers waiting in the trenches with folded arms in some instances for the Germans 300 yards away to shoot at them. Even under these circumstances it is very rarely that the Germans hit their man. During some of the engagements the Germans have outnumbered the British by 15 to 1 ; and Sergt Judge mentioned an incident which came under his notice, where 50 British completely annihilated 200 Germans. French tobacco does not meet with the sergeant’s approval, and he states that owing to the scarcity of matches the rays of the sun passed through a magnifying lens have had to be utilised for lighting pipes and cigarettes.

LOOTING AND ABUSE OF WHITE FLAG.

Gunner A G Turner, of the Royal Field Artillery, brother of Mr A Turner, newsagent, of Bridget Street, New Bilton, has recently written home ; and in an interesting account of his experiences at the front states that he has been in the thick of the fighting. “ We did our best,” the writer adds, “ and have been congratulated for our coolness, and every time we meet the Lincolns, the Scots, and others of our Brigade, they all say : “ Good old gunners ; let ’em have it.” Our section got into a tight corner, but we managed to get out unhurt. No infantry were near at the time, so we got a good gallop, and then we came into action and checked their advance again and again.” After asking to be supplied with tobacco and cigarettes, and also notepaper and envelopes, Gunner Turner continued : “ I shall never forget what I have seen and done. I have been gun-layer, and if I have seen one German drop from our shrapnel I have seen hundred. We caught them napping in one place, and as they could not get away they put up the white flag, but when our infantry advanced on them they started to open fire, and then we put the shell into them. That day we captured about 500 altogether. My word ! they have been looting the country—smashing doors and windows and taking everything they thought was any good ; but they soon move when we get into them.”

TERRIFYING “ BLACK MARIAS.”

Captain Clifford Aston, of the Royal Engineers, nephew to the Rev C T Aston, vicar of St Matthew’s, Rugby, has been under shell fire several times, and has given a vivid account of his experiences in a letter. He says : “ It is curious how terrifying the ‘Black Marias’ are. After we got out of their zone and into the shrapnel zone one felt comparatively safe, and did not mind much about them. The real reason for this is, I think, because the wounds caused by ‘Black Marias’ are so awful, and those of shrapnel comparatively slight. ‘Black Maria’ is a high explosive shell, made of thick steel from half to one inch thick. It is 8½ins in diameter and 2ft 6ins high. When it lands it bursts with terrific force, and smashes the case into hundreds of jagged splinters. If these hit one they tear great holes and pieces out of one. Pieces as big as the handle of a table knife will go right through a man, and other pieces 12ins by 4ins get thrown about with great force. It is the fear of those wounds that makes the effect, of the ‘Black Maria,’ as she does infinitely less actual damage than shrapnel shell, which only contains bullets that make clean holes.” Capt Aston has visited Rheims since the bombardment, and says that, although the cathedral is badly damaged, it is not the blackened ruin, with no roof and the walls half knocked down, one would expect to find, the structure being entirely undamaged, and stands there a beautiful building.