23rd Dec 1916. The New Food Regulations

THE NEW FOOD REGULATIONS.

The regulations limiting the number of courses to be served in hotels and restaurants came into force on Monday. Under the regulations breakfast and luncheon are limited to two courses, and dinner in the evening to three courses. Everywhere caterers and consumers showed themselves ready to make the best of the new system, although in some quarters doubts were expressed as to its value from the point of view of economy. Under the new regulations hors d’oeuvre containing no fish or meat is a half course, but if it contains fish or meat it counts as a whole course, as does also soup containing meat in solid form ; fish, meat, poultry, game, and sweet ; soup without solid meat and dessert are half courses. Plain cheese does not count as a course.

At the Grand Hotel, Rugby, the regulations have made very little difference, because, owing to the threatened shortage of food the dinner menu was reduced from five to three courses several weeks ago, when the entrees and savoury were discontinued. Although only three courses are served, the guests have a varied choice for dinner each evening, and no complaint has been received regarding the reduced menu.

At the Royal George, where a 6 or 7 course dinner was the rule, the management have also welcomed the change, and the bill of fare at all meals is as varied as the permit will allow.

THE CHRISTMAS TRAIN SERVICE.

There are very few alterations in the local train service during the Christmas festival this year, and the ordinary trains will be run on Saturday and Sunday on the L & N-W Railway. On Christmas Day the service will be the same as Sunday, and on Boxing Day the ordinary week-day trains, with the exception of the 7.30 to Coventry. There are several alterations on the Great Central line. On Saturday there will be a relief train for Leicester, Loughborough, Nottingham, Sheffield, and Manchester, leaving Rugby at 1.54. On Christmas Day the usual Sunday trains will be run, except that the 11.16 to the South and the 4.39 to Sheffield will be cancelled. On Boxing Day the following trains will be cancelled :—1.35 a.m and the 11.23 a.m to Bristol. The 1.55 to London and the Great Western will only run as far as Woodford, and there will be no G.W connection there. A train will leave Rugby for Leicester at 11.15. In place of the ordinary train due at Rugby at 7.2, a special train will leave Oxford on Tuesday at 5.55, Banbury at 6.30, and reach Rugby at the usual time.

The new railway rules were announced on Wednesday. On and after January 1 the passenger services are to be restricted. Passenger fares will be increased by 50 per cent, but this will not affect workmen’s fares or season tickets for distances not exceeding 40 miles.

NOTICE !

Tuesday next being Boxing-Day, the Mid-week Edition of the Advertiser will be published on WEDNESDAY Afternoon at the usual time.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The number of Old Rugbeians known to be serving with the forces is now 2,661. The total casualties to December 14th are : 361 killed, 544 wounded, 14 prisoners wounded, 17 prisoners unwounded, and 21 missing, making a total of 957. The honours number 692, including two V.C’s, 48 D.S.O, 120 Military Cross, and 444 mentioned in despatches.

The parcels sent to the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, this week contained :— 1 tin marmalade, ½ lb lunch tongue, 1 tin paste, 1 tin baked beans, ¼ lb ham in tin, ¼ lb tea, ½ lb sugar, 3 soup squares, ½ lb biscuits, ½ lb dripping in tin, 50 cigarettes, 1 lb Quaker oats.

Captain Brinkley, Chief Constable of Warwickshire, has issued notices to several men in the county forces, calling them to hold themselves in readiness to go to France for duty in the mounted military police force.

Major and Adjutant L St Cheape, Dragoon Guards, the famous polo player, one of the team who won the International Cup for England in 1914, who was killed in Egypt on April 23rd, left property of the value of £10,608.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

Another employee of the Rugby Advertiser, Mr F J Jones, who attested on December 10, 1915, has now been called up, and joined the Colours on Thursday. Mr Jones, who is 38 years of age and has a wife and three children, has been a compositor and machineman at the Advertiser Office about 26½ years, and the firm, and also his fellow-workman, naturally regret his departure and hope for his speedy and safe return. This feeling will be shared by his fellow-craftsmen in the town, Mr Jones having been vice-president of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Society for two years. Ninety per cent. of the eligible men at the Advertiser Office have now been called up.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

LANCE-CORPL H MAYES DIES OF WOUNDS.

Lance-Corpl Horace Mayes, elder son of Mr D Mayes, of 28 Abbey Street, died from wounds in a hospital at Bristol on December 6th. The unfortunate young man—he was only 20 years of age—enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks L.I. at the commencement of the War, and was seriously wounded in France on September 15th, and remained in hospital there for two months, when he was brought to England. Before the War, Lance-Corpl Mayes was an apprentice at the B.T.H. The body was brought to Rugby, and the funeral took place at the Cemetery last week. A firing party attended from Warwick, and the coffin was draped with the Union Jack. The Rev T J Simcox conducted the service.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

MONDAY.—Before J E Cox, Esq.

NEATLY CAUGHT BY BILTON CONSTABLE.—Fred Pratt pleaded guilty to a charge of being absent without leave from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.—P.C Day, stationed at Bilton, said from prisoner’s appearance he suspected him, and asked him to explain how it was he was absent from his regiment. He said he had been temporarily released from the Army to work under the agricultural scheme. Prisoner added that he had been working for a farmer at Knowle. Witness arrested him on suspicion, and on the way to the Police Station he admitted having left his regiment, stationed at Cheltenham, a month ago.—He was remanded in custody to await escort.—The Magistrate said it was an exceptional case. The constable acted very wisely, and he would be rewarded for it.

 

EMPLOYMENT OF GERMAN PRISONERS.—Warwickshire War Agricultural Committee met on Saturday at Warwick, when the question of the employment of German prisoners on the land was under consideration. Captain Fellows explained the Government proposals. One speaker offered the suggestion that threshing machines should be manned by German labour, and a resolution was passed calling upon the Government to provide gangs of German labourers for every threshing machine in the country. A committee was appointed to prepare for the employment of German labour, and it was stated that Messrs Greaves, Bull, and Lakin were prepared to employ about 30 men at their cement works at Harbury.

PAILTON.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS.—A parcel, containing cigarettes, cafe au lait or cocoa, oxo, socks, sweets, stationery, &c, has been sent to the men from Pailton both at the front and at home. Judging by the letters of thanks received, the parcels are much appreciated.

THURLASTON.

A VERY successful sale in aid of funds for the new Recreation Room for the soldiers at Bilton Hall Hospital was held on Friday last week at the Mill House, kindly lent by Mr Stanley. The stalls were laden with provisions, rabbits, poultry, new goods and rummage, and in a short time nearly everything was sold. The sale was organised by Miss Hackforth and Miss Johnson, assisted by Mrs Appleby, Mrs Hopps, Miss Stanley, the Misses Hopps, Miss Roberts, Mrs Pickering, Miss Prestige, Mrs J Shaw, and Miss Burns. The receipts amounted to £27 7s 4d.

WOLSTON.

AWAY BUT NOT FORGOTTEN.—The Directors and employees of Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd, have again this year dispatched Christmas presents to the men who have joined the colours from the Wolston Works, numbering about 90. To those in France, Salonica, Egypt, and India useful boxes have been sent ; and those who are at present in this country in hospital or training have received a postal order for 5s. Besides this, a specially designed Christmas greeting card has been sent to each one, at home or abroad. This design was the work of the Works Manager, Mr W R Glare, and was bountifully done. Its jovial side and the good wishes thereon would undoubtedly cheer the recipients. The _____ lied what should be sent, and the committee carried out their wishes admirably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

ON SATURDAY morning last Mrs S Wells received news that her husband, Pte S Wells, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, had been dangerously wounded in the head, and is now lying in a critical condition in hospital in France. This is the second time he has been wounded, having only recently gone back to the trenches. It is now two years since his brother, Corpl Walter Wells, died from wounds in Ipswich Hospital. Pte S Wells had only recently been transferred to the Royal Warwicks.

NAPTON.

At the Warwickshire Appeal Tribunal on Thursday last week, Mr C Badger, Napton, sought the further exemption of his son, F E Badger (21, single), cowman and wagoner, and said he would be compelled to give up the farm if his son joined the army. Appellant said he was a canal foreman, and therefore could not see to the farm. He had another son, aged 39, who was exempt.—The appeal was dismissed.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS.—Since the War commenced over 100 men have answered their country’s call from the parish of Napton—five of whom have given up their lives, one is a prisoner of war, and one has died. As Christmas approaches the thoughts of those left behind go out to the men who have gone, and the necessary preparations were made for Tommy’s and Jack’s Christmas parcels. The whole parish has subscribed in one way or another generously for this end, and already about 90 parcels have been despatched. The ladies engaged in packing the parcels feel very proud of the parishioners’ gifts. Each parcel cost 6s, and contained a cake, salmon or sardines, tobacco, pipe, cigarettes, oxo, and concentrated tea or coffee. Already several answers have been received from the recipients.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS FOR SOLDIERS.—The members (together with a few friends) of the Heart and Hand Lodge of Oddfellows (M.U) have collected and forwarded through their Secretary, Mr G Leeson, the sum of £1 2s 6d towards a Daily Paper Fund for supplying Christmas plum puddings to the soldiers at the Front.

DEATHS.

EVERTON.—Lance-Corpl. WILLIAM ROBERT EVERTON, who died at Brinklow on November 27, 1916, while home on leave from France ; aged 27 years.—“ Thy will be done.”

LOMAS.—In loving memory of Pte. GEORGE LOMAS, who was killed in action in France on November 22nd, 1916 ; only son of Thomas Lomas, Pailton ; aged 39.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one amid the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call.
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BROWN.—PERCY EDWIN BROWN, 11 York Terrace, Dunchurch Road, killed in action on Sept. 25, 1915.

 

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