10th Aug 1918. Remembrance Day

REMEMBRANCE DAY.
DRUMHEAD SERVICE.

Sunday last, the fourth anniversary of the declaration of war, was observed by special intercession services throughout the country. At the various churches in Rugby and the villages around the congregations, despite the holiday exodus, were good.

In the afternoon a drumhead service, arranged by the members of the Rugby Branch of the Discharged Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Association, was held in the Lower School held, by permission of the Rev S R Hart, and was attended by several thousand persons.  The members of the association paraded in the Recreation Ground, and, preceded by the B.T.H Band, marched via Hillmorton Road, School Street, Sheep Street, and Church Street to the Lower School field. The service was very brief but impressive, and was conducted by the Rev C M Blagden (rector). The hymns, which were accompanied by the band, were :—“ Hark, my soul, it is the Lord ” ; “ Oft in danger, oft in woe,” and “ Eternal Father, strong to save.”

[Note: many other services were reported around the town]

RUGBY VOLUNTEERS.

“ B ” Company at the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Royal Warwickshire, left their headquarters in good strength on the 4th inst, to join their battalion and the other battalions of the Regiment at a brigade camp in the South of England. In the unavoidable absence at the Commanding Officer and the second in command, Capt C H Fuller is in command of the 2nd Battalion during camp and Second-Lieut Wharton is in command of “ B ” Company. Sunday being Remembrance Day, the Rector of Rugby (Chaplain to the Company) attended at headquarters, and conducted a short service before the company moved off.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

A comprehensive programme, including many unique competitions, diversions, and side-shows, has been arranged for the Grand Red Cross Fete at Clifton Manor on Saturday, August 31st.

In a letter to a friend, Gunner S Walton, R.G.A, who before enlisting was employed in the Advertiser Printing Works, says :—“ We arrived at Hong Kong last Tuesday, and, so far as I can see at present, I rather fancy I shall like the place. Any way, it is a pleasant change from the dusty plains of the Punjaub. . . . I found Will Spraggett (a former member of the Old Rugby Volunteers) at Hong Kong Hospital. He was looking very well. He wasn’t half-surprised to see me, I can tell you. He is a sergeant in a London Regiment.”

Pte W Smith, Northamptonshire Regiment (Rugby), has been reported killed in action, and Pte R L S Healey, Gloucester Regiment (Rugby), has been posted as missing.

Pte W E Howard, Northants Regiment, youngest son of Mr & Mrs S Howard, Long Lawford, is a prisoner in Germany. Before joining up in April, 1917, he was employed at the Rugby Portland Cement Works, and he had been in France almost a month when he was captured on June 27th.—Pte J Isham, Devonshire, son of Mr & Mrs F Isham, Leamington Hastings, is a prisoner at Langensalza, Germany, and Pte Bernard Keates, Wiltshire Regiment (Rugby), is interned at Limburg, and is suffering from wounds in the back and stomach.

The following Rugby men have been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field :—Pte E F Head, R.W.R ; Driver F Calloway, F.R.A ; and Sapper J W Bartlett, R.E.

We are asked to state that Mr Bertram Shepherd, who formerly resided at Rugby, is now a prisoner of war.

MILITARY CROSS FOR CAPT LAKIN.

The Military Cross has been awarded to Captain (Acting Major) M L Lakin, D.S.O, Hussars, Spec. Res., for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in operation whilst commanding a company of Tanks. He led his company across most difficult country, and successfully held up the enemy for ten hours. Later, when fighting on foot a rearguard action with Lewis guns, he remained behind the infantry, who had retired, for eight hours, inflicting severe losses on the enemy. Capt Lakin is the youngest son of Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, of Warwick, and is 37 years of age. He entered the Army in 1900, and served in South Africa. He attained his captaincy in 1908, and retired in 1911 ; but on the outbreak of the War he re-joined his old regiment, the 11th Hussars. He has been twice mentioned in despatches, and won the D.S.O in 1915. Before the War he was well known as a polo player and as a master of foxhounds in Ireland.

NEWS OF CAPTAIN T. A. TOWNSEND.

We are pleased to learn that Mr T S Townsend, of Clifton Manor, has, in response to an appeal he inserted in several daily papers for information as to the whereabouts of his son, Capt T A Townsend, M.C, R.A.M.C, received letters which justify the strongest hope that the missing officer is a prisoner of war, and, although badly wounded, still alive.

Pte M S B Shorrock, of the 1/20th London Regiment, writing from hospital in France under date August 2nd, says :—

“ I have read in the Continental edition of the ‘ Daily Mail,’ dated the 1st inst, your notice in respect of your son, Captain T A Townsend, M.C. R.A.M.C, who was medical officer to the battalion to which I belong, and under whom I have served as a stretcher-bearer on several occasions. The last occasion, however, was from the last day of November to December 6, 1917. Owing to illness, I regret I had not the good fortune to serve him during our engagement of last March. Nevertheless, I feel I am in a position to give you information which may prove of interest to you. A friend of mine, Pte Michael Foley, who, like myself, is a stretcher-bearer, and served your son, Capt Townsend, of whom I received a full account of the March offensive immediately on my return to the battalion, was actually with your son within a few minutes of his having been wounded and taken prisoner. The actual date on which Capt Townsend was taken prisoner on being wounded was on Saturday, March 23rd. and not on Sunday. March 24th, which latter date has apparently been officially reported to you. May I respectfully point out that your son could easily have escaped but for the fact that he was an exceptionally brave man and such a grand example for many. My friend has informed me that from the moment of the onslaught Capt Townsend worked most nobly and brilliantly. On the third day, however, both his corporal (Corpl Kelly, one of my dearest friends) and our Commanding Officer, Col Grimwood, were wounded, Capt Townsend immediately dressed each, and remained with them. Capt Townsend was wounded when the enemy was no considerable distance away. Previously to his having been wounded he was seen to perform a most conspicuous act of gallantry in face of the enemy. I am somewhat dubious of giving you details of this particular act owing to the censorship restrictions. Perhaps I may have an opportunity of communicating these details under somewhat pleasanter circumstances.

“ Now comes an item of extreme interest Corpl Kelly, to whom I have referred, states distinctly in a letter which he has sent through to one of our boys, that ‘There are here with me (in hospital) the M.O, Capt Townsend ; Pte Smith, ‘ B ‘ Company ; and Drummers (reserve stretcher bearers) Bridger and Roberts. We are all getting on slowly but surely !’

“ I am afraid that no one knows exactly whereabouts your son was wounded, but, however that may be, so it may not have proved possible for him to unite you.”

After promising to endeavour to obtain further information, the writer adds —

“ Your son proved himself marvellous in ‘ Bourion Wood,’ when he worked unceasingly under awful conditions. I never was able to understand however he managed to escape being gassed. No greater man ever attended the wounded and dying as did he on that never-to-be-forgotten occasion.

“ I fear there is nothing else I can add at present. I will again write you so soon as is possible. Meanwhile may you soon hear from your brave son.”

This statement is substantially confirmed by another letter Mr T S Townsend has received from Capt W T Cave, who was captured on the same day by the Germans, and who reports that Capt Townsend was in hospital at Cambrai on March 27th and 28th, badly wounded.

BILTON.
DEATH OF PTE. FRED BARNWELL.

GENERAL regret is felt in this village at the death of Pte Fred Barnwell, of the Marines, which took place in hospital last week-end. Pte Barnwell, who was 31 years of age, worked for many years at Bawnmore, and afterwards for Messrs Willans & Robinson, till he was called up about nine months ago He went out to France about the middle of July, and had only been there a few days when he was returned to England with serious heart trouble. Other complications set in, his friends were sent for, death taking place not long after their arrival. He was the main support of his widowed mother, Mrs Barnwell, of Lawford Road, Bilton, and was a great favourite in the village, being a member of the Working Men’s Club, the Cricket and Football Clubs, and for many years a chorister at the Parish Church. At village entertainments Fred Barnwell’s songs were usually a feature and very popular, and he was always ready to lend a helping hand to any useful work. The sympathy of the whole parish is extended to his mother and his fiancée, who was making preparations for their future marriage.

The remains were brought home for internment, and the funeral took place at the parish church on Thursday. The coffin, covered with many beautiful floral tributes, was borne by six members of the Bilton Brass Band, of which deceased was formerly a member. The Burial Service was read by the Rector, the Rev W O Assheton, R. D, and hymns were sung by the choir in the church and at the graveside.

Representatives of the various village institutions, to which the deceased belonged, followed the relatives in the cortege, and the church was filled with parishioners and friends anxious to show their sympathy and respect. Blinds were drawn at most of the houses. In the evening a muffled peal was rung on the bells, deceased having been one of the band of ringers.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PRISONER OF WAR.—Mrs R Collins has received news that her husband, Rifleman R Collins, 2nd Battalion, rifle Brigade, who has been missing since May 27th, is a prisoner of war at Frankfort.

WOLSTON.
LIEUT WILFRED COLEMAN WOUNDED.—Mr & Mrs T P Coleman, of Marston Hall, have been notified that their son, Lieut Wilfred Coleman, has been wounded again. When war was declared he was a member of the 3rd Troop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and was called up at once. He went out to the Dardanelles in April, 1915, where he was wounded. His next active service was in Egypt, where he soon met with promotion, and afterwards rose to sergeant. Here he saw much fighting. For his good work he was offered a commission, and after training in Egypt went to Palestine, where again he helped to rout the enemy on numerous occasions. His parents were looking forward to his home-coming, but he was sent to France, although he had been fighting for so long. He is now in hospital in France, wounded in the hand, head and neck, but is making good progress.

BRANDON.
PTE G BOSTOCK.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock have received news from the War Office that their son, Pte G Bostock, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been killed. It is now nine months since his parents were notified that he was missing. He joined the Army more than three years ago, and saw a lot of fighting in France, where he was previously wounded. Deceased was a finely built young man, and before joining the Army was a respected employee of Mrs W Eales, grocer, of Coventry. Much sympathy is felt for his parents, who are respected inhabitants, and have resided in the parish for many years.

STOCKTON.
AEROPLANE DESCENDS.—The landing of an aeroplane in the parish on Wednesday afternoon caused considerable excitement, hundreds of people rushing to the spot. Fortunately the pilot was unharmed, though Dr Ormerod was quickly on the scene in case his services were needed. The machine; which sustained little damage, was guarded by volunteers until it could be got away again.

FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.
NEW PARCEL SCHEME.

The limit of weight for parcels for prisoners of war has been raised from 10lbs to 15lbs each. The Rugby Prisoners of War Help committee are now despatching to all Rugby and district men through the Regimental Care Committees of each man’s unit one 15lbs parcel per week, instead at three 10lb parcels every fortnight The weight of food will, therefore, remain the same, but there will be a considerable saving in the cost of parking materials as well as labour. The usual bread parcels will be maintained.

The cost of the new parcels will 15s each, or £3 every four weeks, and an additional 7s 6d per mouth for bread ; thus the cost to provide for each man is now £3 7s 6d every four weeks, or £3 13s per calendar month. The total cost of the food parcels for all the men on the Rugby Committee’s list now exceeds £400 a month, all of which has to be raised by voluntary subscriptions.

This week’s parcel contains : 2lbs of beef, ½-lb vegetables, 1lb tin rations, ½lb tea, 1lb tin milk, ½-lb dripping or margarine, 1lb tin jam, 1½lbs biscuits, 1 packet Quaker oats, grape nuts or milk pudding, 50 cigarettes, 1 tin sardines, 1 tablet soap, 1lb tin herring, 1lb beans, ¼lb cocoa, ½-lb bacon.

Next week’s parcel will consist of : 1½lbs biscuits, ½-lb cocoa, 1lb milk, 1lb Lyle’s syrup, 1lb rice or dates, 1 small potted meat, 1 tablet soap, 1lb tin rations, 1lb tin sausages, 1lb sugar, 1lb suet pudding, ¼-lb chocolate, ½-lb tin veal, ham or beef, 1 packet Quaker oats, grape nuts or milk pudding, 2ozs tobacco, 1lb cured beef.

Relatives and friends who would like a parcel sent in their own names to local prisoners of war should send the cost of same, i.e. 15s, to the Hon Organising Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby, who has undertaken this special service in the hope of maintaining the “ home-touch ” with the prisoners.

Correspondents should in every case quote the regimental number, rank and battalion of the prisoner in whom they are interested.

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

At a meeting of this committee, held on Thursday in last week, there were present : Messrs T A Wise (chairman), H Tarbox (vice-chairman), Mrs Dewar, Mrs Shelley, Mrs Townsend, Messrs A Appleby, J Cripps, G Cooke, T Ewart, R Griffin, A Humphrey, C Gay, W A Stevenson, and A T Watson.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) intimated that the butchers had decided to take all imported meat for the week ended August 10th, and all English meat for the following three weeks.—Mr Cooke : I admire their decision. Everybody will be away next week.

The Executive Officer reported that the work in connection with the new ration books had now been completed, and the committee passed a vote of thanks to Mr J T Clarke and the ladies who had rendered voluntary assistance.

It was reported that the Housewives’ Committee had distributed the cheese handed over to them by the committee.—The Executive Officer stated that the Housewives’ Committee had been accused of making a profit out of the cheese by charging 8½d per lb for it, but that was the price they paid to the Food Control Committee. These accusations had been made, not by the people who had received the cheese, but by those who wanted to buy some and had been unable to do so.—Mrs Shelley said members of the Housewives’ Committee had been insulted by many people, who had said they were liable to be prosecuted for charging the extra ½d per lb.—The Executive Officer : It is not Government cheese.

It was decided to grant facilities to the committee arranging the Rugby Hospital Fete to obtain supplies for refreshments; and the Executive Officer was directed to make the necessary arrangements.

The Education Committee of the Co-operative Society wrote stating that the annual children’s treat was to be held on August 10th, and requesting the committee to allot 40lbs of fat to the Confectionery Department of the Society to make 2,000 small cakes for the children, and also to allow them ½-lb of tea.—The Executive Officer pointed out that all the fat was allotted, so that the committee could not allow the society an extra supply.—A member suggested that dripping should be used ; but the Executive Officer replied that coupons were required for this ; 1lb of dripping could be obtained for one coupon.—Mrs Shelley said the usual tea now had to be dispensed with ; but the committee wished to give each child a small cake, otherwise they would get very hungry.—The Chairman said the New Bilton children had their annual treat in his field the previous day, and he was very much struck by the fact that they all brought their tea with them ; even the smallest infant brought a small parcel.—It was decided that no additional fat could be allotted for this purpose ; but the committee agreed to offer the promoters permission to obtain sufficient tea for each child.

Permission was given to the committee of the Hillmorton Show and Sports to purchase 3lbs of tea for supplying refreshments.

The Executive .Officer reported that 15 licenses for the sale of meat without coupons were granted on the previous Saturday evening in respect of 274lbs of beef and 325lbs of brawn, suet, &c. This showed a decrease of 276lbs of beef and an increase of 225lbs of other meat.

“ WAR BREAD ” AND ITS EFFECT.—A searching enquiry into the effect of the war bread and flour on the general health of the population in typical industrial areas has been made by the Local Government Board, and the results are now under the consideration of the Minister of Food. The general deduction is the war bread and war flour are to be considered as only among the many factors affecting the health of the community. Other elements, such as the diminished supply of fats, the rationing of meat, and the scarcity and enhanced price of fruit and fresh vegetables enter into the calculation, and all have their effect on the general health. As far as bread and flour are concerned, the worst days are over.

WASPS AND FRUIT.—While there have been no general complaints this year as to the presence of wasps nests, reports have been received from one or two districts, in which it is said that nests appear to be rather numerous. It may be well, therefore, to remind leaders to keep a look-out for nests, and to destroy them by any of the well-known methods. There is so little fruit this year that it would be a pity if that little were to be eaten by wasps ; while, further, wasps’ nests in the harvest fields may at any time lead to serious accidents.

ROAD TRANSPORT.
The date for returns of Registration Forms expired on the 31st ult, but a large number of owners of goods-carrying vehicles have failed to register. Another 14 days has, therefore, been granted, but particular stress is laid on the fact that if any owner fails to register he not only becomes liable to serious penalties, but will probably have his vehicles impounded, licenses cancelled, and petrol removed. All goods-carrying vehicles (except horse-drawn up to 15cwt load capacity) must be registered and permits issued for use thereof.

HOLIDAY BOOKINGS FROM RUGBY.

Not since the critical days of August, 1914, has there been such an exodus of holiday makers from Rugby as was experienced during the week-end. Many people, with a patriotism which is commendable, if hardly wise from a health point of view, have dispensed with their regular holidays since the beginning of the War, but the constant strain and stress of war conditions has been such that in many cases the only alternative to a break down in health has been a complete rest far away from all the worries, anxieties, and petty annoyances of business. This being so, a number of local businesses establishments closed on Saturday evening for the week ; while other traders suspended business until Thursday morning. The large works also closed on Friday for ten days, and this afforded many of the workers an opportunity, of which full advantage was taken, of accompanying their families on holiday.

The bookings at the L & N-W Railway were exceptionally heavy, Blackpool and North Wales, with about 250 each, attracting the largest numbers of visitors. Scottish, Irish, and South Coast resorts were also well patronised. Friday and Saturday were the two busiest days, and on Monday and Tuesday the local bookings were very heavy.

“ The busiest time we have had since the War started ” is the report of an official at the Crest Central Station. All the trains were packed to their utmost capacity, and the rush of passengers was reminiscent of pre-war excursions to Cleethorpes and other popular seaside resorts. Bookings to the West of England, London, Yorkshire, and Cleethorpes were exceptionally heavy ; but all through bookings to Scarborough and the North-East Coast watering places were suspended. Owing to the inclement weather, the number of short-distance tickets issued on Bank Holiday was rather below the average.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—On August 2nd, at the Military Heart Hospital, Colchester, Pte. FREDERIC BARNWELL, 1st Battalion, R.M.L.I., aged 31 years.—“ Peace, perfect peace.”

IN MEMORIUM.

ARIS.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. MARK ARIS, killed in action on August 6, 1915.
“ There is a link Death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Fondly remembered by his loving Sisters and Brothers.

PURTON.—In loving memory of my dear son, Lance-Corpl. G. H. PURTON, late Oxon and Bucks L.I., who died of wounds in France on August 6, 1916 ; aged 24 years. Also of my dear husband, HARRY PURTON, who passed away on December 3, 1912 ; aged 43 years.
“ Can we forget them ?
Ah! no, never,
For memory’s golden chain
Binds us on earth
To them in heaven
Until We meet again.”
—From Mother, Ernest, Rose, and Violet.

REYNOLDS.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. HARRY REYNOLDS, who died of wounds received in action at St. John’s Ambulance Hospital, France, on August 12, 1917.—“ R.I.P.”—Sadly missed by his Wife and Children, Spencer and Eva.

14th Oct 1916. Horses for the Army

HORSES FOR THE ARMY.

COL. MULLINER’S SCHEME.

The two last issues of “ The Field ” contain articles by Col Mulliner, of Clifton Court, in which, he discusses the supply and maintenance of horses for the army after the war. It will be remembered that Col Mulliner was responsible for raising the Howitzer Brigade which was formed at Rugby and Coventry, and he was at once met with the difficulty of supplying it with horses. He, found that hiring, whether for their camps or for the local weekly or bi-weekly trainings, was not merely a waste of money, but that the number of horses which could be hired for Saturday afternoons and certain evenings of the summer months was ridiculously small. The absence of proper stabling was also a serious draw-back. To meet the difficulty, Col Mulliner, after investigating various continental systems, finally instituted the boarding-out system, which is now known as the “ Mulliner Scheme.” The success that attended this scheme in promoting the efficiency of units by which it was adopted, combined with greater economy and convenience, is Col Mulliner’s justification for putting forward a vaster and more comprehensive scheme to deal with all, or nearly all, the army horses of the kingdom.

Col Mulliner points out that it is abundantly proved that the horse still remains an absolute necessity in modern warfare, and he takes it for granted National Service in some form will be continued. He calculates that for permanent use, and for periodical training, manoeuvres, etc, something like 300,000 horses is the fewest number which must always be immediately available for monthly trainings in peace, and for mounting the army in time of war.

As to where this number of horses is to be obtained, Col Mulliner reminds us that at the conclusion of hostilities the Government will be in possession of a large number still serviceable, and instead of selling these off at once, or even gradually, most likely at ridiculous prices, he suggests that they should be retained to inaugurate his scheme, and sent to the “ homes ” which will, if the scheme is adopted, have bean arranged for them.

Probably doubts may be raised as to the ability to provide homes for so large a number of horses, but judging from the great success of the scheme in Warwickshire, and if the whole country and towns are properly worked, it may be found that users of horses willing to receive them and board them will be found in fair numbers.

What we have to consider is that whereas the stock of horses actually possessed by the Army at the outbreak of war was something under 25,000, when the war is at an end probably ten times that number will be required to keep the standing army in a state of efficiency. How is this to be done ? Either the State must maintain some 300,000, more or less, or the sane number (less those required at permanent establishments) should be kept and used by individuals while remaining the property of the State. Col Mulliner urges that if the scheme is adopted, the necessary organisation should be taken in hand at once, and not left till the end of the war.

THE “ EDITH CAVELL ” ENGINE AT RUGBY ERECTING SHOP.

After running on the L & N-W Railway for nearly a year, the passenger engine of the “ Prince of Wales ” type, named in honour of the late Nurse Cavell, was recently brought to Rugby Erecting Shop for repairs. These were completed yesterday (Friday), and before the locomotive left Rugby the idea occurred to Mr J Shaw, the shop foreman, to have it decorated in honour of the brave British lady after whom it was named. The men willingly fell in with the idea, and there was no lack of autumn flowers to adorn the engine. Prominence was given on the side to the motto, “ Lest we forget,” and also to a special wreath subscribed for by those employed in the Erecting Shop. Other wreaths, and also small Union Jacks, were included in the general scheme of decoration, which was carried out in an effective and pleasing manner, the work when finished being greatly admired.

RUGBY NURSE HONOURED.—At the recent investiture held at Buckingham Palace on October 7th, His Majesty the King presented Miss Mabel Allibone, of Charles Street, Rugby, with the Royal Red Cross for valuable services rendered during the war. Miss Allibone, who is a native of Rugby, was called up for nursing services on the outbreak of the war.

LIGHTING RESTRICTIONS & AIR RAIDS.

When notification is received of probable Zeppelin raids police officers and the special constables for Rugby are called out, and it is part of their duty to patrol the streets and roads, and where lights are showing to request people to extinguish them.

It does not seem to be generally understood that in such circumstances all lights are to be extinguished at the request of the responsible Military or Police Authorities., and neglect or refusal may involve the offender in serious penalties.

It is not in such a case a question of whether only a “ dull subdued light ” is being shown ; but, however weak or small the illumination, a request to extinguish it from the Military Police or Special Constables must be instantly complied with.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

R ATHEY, an Old Laurentian, formerly pupil and teacher at the Murray School, who has seen service in the ranks in France, has been gazetted to a second lieutenancy in the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders.

The weekly parcels sent to the 64 local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained tea, tin of milk, large tin of corned beef, large tin of tomatoes, tin of sauce, tablet of soap, ½-lb of margarine, 2lbs of biscuits, and a thick, warm woollen vest.

“ The Rennbahn Church Times ” it the title of a little magazine issued by the British prisoners in the internment camp at Rennbahn. A copy for September has been sent to Mr J R Barker by Pte F A Ward, of the 2nd Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, a Ryton-on-Dunsmore man, who is interned there. It consists of eight small pages, the first of which contains an illustrated line drawing of the interior of the church. The price is 10 pfennigs, about 1d, or 5s for the home country. The September issue is the first anniversary number, but the editor docs not wish to stay there longer than he can help, so he will not express the hope that the journal will have a long run.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs T Howard, 26 Clifton Road, has received a letter from her son, Pte Samuel L Howard, of the R.A.M.C, dated September 16th, saying he has been wounded by a piece of shrapnel through the right knee. He has been operated upon three times, and is now in Hospital at Rouen.—Pte S L Howard joined the R.A.M.C in September, 1915, and was sent to France in April, 1916.

Gunner Joseph Fenton, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr T Fenton, 9 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has been rather seriously wounded in the back and shoulder by a tear shell, while asleep behind the lines, and is at present in the Hospital at Ashton-under-Lyne. Gunner Fenton was before the war a ringer at the Parish Church.—Driver H Hughes, another member of the Battery, living at Paradise Street, Rugby, has also been wounded, and is in a hospital in England.

ANOTHER B.T.H MAN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl L Davies, R.E, has been killed in action. Previous to enlistment Corpl Davies, who is a Welshman, was employed in the Chemical Laboratory at the B.T.H. He was about 26 years of age.

ST MATTHEWS OLD BOYS CASUALTIES.

The casualty list of St Matthew’s School continues to now at a rapid rate. During the last three weeks the following have been notified :— Lieut W D Wroe, Lincolnshire Regiment, a former member of the teaching staff, killed in action ; old boys—Rifleman F J Green, King’s Royal Rifles, died from wounds ; Rifleman G Norman, King’s Royal Rifles, killed in action ; Pte H Hopkins, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, missing ; Rifleman R Coles, London Regiment ; Rifleman W Harris, King’s Royal Rifles ; Lance-Corpl H Thompson, Oxford and Bucks LI ; Pte G Baker, Royal Warwickshire Regiment ; and Pte J W West, Australian I.E.F, wounded.

DUNCHURCH.

The Inhabitants are pleased to hear that Gunner G Redmanyne of the Rugby Howitzer Battery has gained the Military Medal for bravery.

Corpl Walter Ryland, of this village, at present serving with the B.E.F. in the Railway and Canal Troops, has been offered a commission in the Motor Machine Gun Corps, but owing to medical unfitness was unable to accept it.

BILTON.

MEMORIAL SERVICE TO THE LATE LIEUT.-COL. F C B WEST.

A service in memory of the late Lieut-Col F C B West, R.F.A, of “ Bawnmore,” Bilton, who was killed in action on September 29th, was held in St Mark’s Church, Bilton, on Friday afternoon, when despite the inclement weather, the church was filled with friends and neighbours anxious to show their respect for the gallant colonel. The members of the family present were : Mrs F C B West (widow), Mrs Bowen Coulthurst (sister), Mrs West (stepmother), Miss West (half-sister), Mr and Mrs Dewar, Capt Michael Dewar, Miss Dewar, Dr and Mrs Sadler, Mrs Bartholomew, and Miss Bartholomew, of Towcester. Amongst others who attended were Col H H Mulliner, of the Howitzer Brigade, Major Hardisty, representing the Warwickshire County Association, Major Mortimore. D.S.O, once adjutant of the brigade, Major Claude Seabroke, Capt Thomas, Rev G M Hardwich, Mrs C G Steel, Mr H P Burdekin, Mr J J McKinnell, Mr and Mrs W Brooke, Mrs Nickalls, Mr H V Wait, Mr A Adnitt, Mr F E Hands, Mrs Assheton, Mr and Mrs S Robbins, Mr A J Ashew, Mr G Whiteman, Mr F Betts, Mr F Fellows, Miss Scott, etc, and also members of the New Bilton Cheerup Club, of which Mrs West is a prominent supporter. The service, which was of a brief, simple, but impressive character, was conducted by the Rector, Rev W Assheton, R.D. At the commencement the organist, Mr J E Boynton, played “ O rest in the Lord.” Psalm cxxi was chanted, and the special lesson was taken from the third chapter of Solomon. The hymns used were “ The saints of earth and those above,” and “ For all the saints who from their labours rest.” At the conclusion of the service the organist played Beethoven’s “ Marche Funebre.”

POSITION OF FARM WORKERS.

Arising out of the first case on the list—that of Bertram Henry Waring, 13 Earl Street, Rugby, shepherd and stud-groom in the employ of Mr Chas Wilson, Three Horse Shoes Hotel—discussion took place with reference to the letter circulated by the Army Council to recruiting officers that, subject to certain considerations, no more men from among those now employed in agriculture will be called to the colours till January 1st next.—The Tribunal granted a temporary exemption till December 6th, and Mr Channing asked what about what about the new ruling, the man being engaged in agriculture ?— Mr Wale : He must be fully engaged in agriculture.

Mr Eaden said one of his clients had received notice not to attend that day, as he was not to be called up.—The Chairman said the Tribunal had received no instructions whatever about the new Army Order.—The Clerk (Mr Nelson) understood the Military proposed to adjourn the case referred to, which would not affect the decision.—The Chairman understood the position was that although the Tribunal might decide that a man engaged in agriculture should go, the Military would not call him up till January, but that had nothing to do with the Tribunal.—This appellant would be given to December 6th, and it was very doubtful if they would extend that, as they thought it was a case where the man might be replaced.

RUGBY FIRM COMMENDED.

Mr W H Linnell appeared in support of a claim for the exemption of Horace Walter Gilbert (23, single), electrician and wireman, 56 New Street, New Bilton.—He pointed out that the man had only been passed for “ Labour at home.” Before the war they employed about 85 men, and now there were only about 20. This was the only man left in the electrical department, which would have to be closed down if he went.—The Military had appealed against the temporary exemption granted to Mr Linnell, jun, and the Tribunal was informed that he was going into the Army in the following week.—The Chairman : I take it you agree to the Military appeal being upheld ?—Mr Linnell : That it so.—The Chairman : We will give this man to January 1st, as the other has gone. They have done very well, I think.

BIRDINGBURY FARMER’S APPEAL.

Absolute exemption was asked for by Mr Cockerill, of Birdingbury (through Mr Harold Eaden), in respect of his cowman, Wm Bethuel Ingram (30, married).—Given till January 1st.

AN ADDITIONAL REASON.

In appealing on behalf of Capt Henry Boughton-Leigh, R.F.A, Brownsover Hall, for Walter Congreve, estate carpenter, Churchover, Mr Worthington mentioned an additional reason for his exemption. Capt Boughton-Leigh had been requested by the War Office to fell about 50 trees on his Northamptonshire estate, and this work would fall upon Congreve, who was now the only man left, with the exception of an aged gardener.—The Chairman said he thought the army could provide its own tree fellers. The man having been passed for general service, there would be no total exemption in this case.—Given till December 6th, and the Chairman said it was extremely improbable that the time would be extended.

GETTING READY TO JOIN.

“ Please decide my case in my absence, as I am very busy getting ready to join the army,” wrote Frederick Ernest Wm Lowe, grocer, sub-postmaster, etc, 112 Lawford Road, New Bilton. He added : “ As I have rather a large business which I shall have to close down, I cannot waste my time by coming to Coventry.”—The Clerk said appellant only asked for a short time.—The Chairman : Where a man meets as like this, we ought to help him.—Given 21 days.

A NATURALISED HAIRDRESSER.

Temporary exemption to December 1st had been granted by the Local Tribunal to Richard Bruno Meerholz, hairdresser, of 23 High Street, Rugby, who had been passed for labour B, but the Military appealed, Mr Wratislaw stating that there were other hairdressers in Rugby whose businesses had been closed, and who were natural born British subjects, whereas this man was naturalised. In reply to the Chairman, appellant said he had been naturalised eight years.—Given to November 30th, with the intimation that it would not be much use making a further application.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

THURSDAY.—Before T Hunter, Esq.

FAILING TO REPORT HIMSELF.—Percy Douglas Elliott, 80 Bridget Street, Rugby, pleaded not guilty to a charge of being an absentee under the Military Service Act since August 17th.—He called A Corbett, Elliott held a War Service Badge Certificate.—It transpired that defendant left the B.T.H Works on July 26th, and was now employed at the Standard Motor Works, Coventry, but was not yet badged.—The Military representative said defendant offered no explanation why he should not join the Army, and the Magistrate said his proper procedure was to have appealed to the Tribunal. He could only fine him £1, to be deducted from his pay, and hand him over to the Military Authorities.

IN MEMORIAM.

BUSSON.-In loving memory of our dear son, WILLIAM ALFRED BUSSON, who was killed in France on September 26th, 1914 ; aged 31.
“ He gave his life for his country.”

BUSSON.-In loving memory of our dear son, ERNEST CHARLES BUSSON, who was killed in action in France on October 17, 1915 ; aged 23 years.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
—From FATHER, MOTHER, and SISTER.

HAWKINS.—In loving memory of Pte. ALFRED HAWKINS, of Harborough Magna, previously reported wounded and missing, May 10, 1915 ; now reported dead. R.I.P.—“ To live in the hearts of those we leave behind is not to die.”

LANCASTER.-Previously reported to be wounded and missing between May 8 and 11, 1915, now officially presumed to have been killed, Major J. C. LANCASTER, ROYAL Warwickshire Regt., elder son of the late Robert Lancaster, of Allesley, Warwickshire, and of Mrs. R. Lancaster, of The Grange, South Nutfield, Surrey, and grandson of the late John Lancaster, M.P., Bilton Grange, near Rugby.

26th Aug 1916. Buy a Flag on War Prisoners’ Day

BUY A FLAG ON WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2.

By so doing you will assist the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to ensure a continuance of the Weekly Parcels of Food and Clothing to our own men.

The men who have fought for you, and are now experiencing the unspeakable hardships of German Prison Camp Life, look to you to help to keep them from starvation.

Here are some of the Messages received from Local Men this week :—

PTE. P. J. COLLOP (Monks Kirby), Suffolk Regt, interned at Friedrichsfeid

“ I now have the pleasure of writing to thank you and your helpers for your kindness to me, which I very much appreciate. The parcels have arrived up to date regularly, and I find them very satisfactory.”

SERGT. B. G. HITCHCOX (Rugby), 28th Canadians, interned at Dulman.

“ I was very surprised and heartily thankful to receive your welcome parcel, which arrived to-day in very good condition. I warmly appreciate your kindness and trust you will not forget me in the future.”

PTE. W. WILTSHIRE (New Bilton), Wiltshire Regt., interned at Osnabruck.

“ Just a line to let you know I am receiving parcels regularly, and in good condition. Again thanking all concerned for the parcels.”

PTE. A. H. DAVIS (Rugby), 8th Beds, interned at Dulmen.

“ The first issue of bread has arrived, for which I beg to thank you very much.”

PTE. J. SMITH (Stretton-under-Fosse), Royal Warwick Regt, interned at Friedrichfeld.

“ Have just received Dujon bread in good condition, with many thanks.”

PTE. T. DOO (Rugby), Suffolk Regt., interned at Doeberitz.

“ Many thanks for the parcels of food and bread, which I received quite safe and in good condition.”

PTE. P. MACE (Hillmorton), Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, interned at Mannheim.

“ I now have great pleasure in answering your most welcome parcel, which arrived in excellent condition, and, also, the contents were just what one needs in Camp.”

These letters contain an Appeal for Help, to which no British heart can remain unresponsive. The Food Parcels are absolutely essential, and they get there.

PLEASE GIVE LIBERALLY ON SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 2.

Hon. Secretary and Offices :
J. REGINALD BARKER, 9, Regent Street, Rugby. Supply Depot: Benn Buildings.

THE parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men in Germany contained this week ¼ lb tea, tin milk, tin tomatoes, tin pineapple chunks, 1lb sugar, tin cocoa, tablet of soap, tin tongue, tin health salts, and 4-lb loaf of bread.

SOLDIERS’ & SAILORS’ COMFORTS’ COMMITTEE.

A general meeting of this committee was held on Monday.—The Hon Secretary informed the committee that, in reply to the advertisement asking for particulars of men serving, with the date of enlistment, she had only received 150 names of men who had enlisted or been called up between August and December, 1914.—It was resolved to make a start with these 150 names as soon as possible.—After some discussion and the inspection of samples, it was decided to send out to each man a parcel containing a 2-lb tin of best boiled sweets, a pair of socks, and a small packet of boracic powder. Each parcel will also contain a card, bearing the town arms and a suitable couplet, and the name of each man will be written thereon. It is hoped that towards the end of the month the parcels will begin to go out to our splendid men abroad.

 

THE SOLDIER’S LOT COMPARED WITH THAT OF THE MUNITION WORKER.

A correspondent writes :—

In a letter from the front to his father a member of the Warwickshire Regiment remarks :— “ As you say, the news in the paper is good : ‘ Slow, but sure.’ It looks all very well in print, but you want to be in it to understand what a mile or two advance means. I can’t understand the munition people being praised so much for foregoing their Bank Holiday. It proves how much the people of England know what war is. Do they realise that the men out here do seven days every week, and often twenty-four hours a day ? Some have been doing that for two years now. When the munition workers do finish they have a home and a bed to go to, not forgetting that in their spare time they can please themselves what they do.

“ What about this side of the water ? One is lucky to have a barn with a roof on, and if there is any clean straw it is hotel-de-luxe ! They ought to try a 16-mile march with a full pack on. It would do them a lot of good ; and then, when their clothes are saturated with perspiration, let them sleep in the open with only an overcoat to cover them. After that, if they were asked which they preferred—the Army or munition—I wonder which they would prefer ! What annoys me is, they seem to think they are little ‘ tin gods.’”

RUGBY CASES AT THE MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

At Coventry Munitions Tribunal, on Friday last week, Thomas Fishwick, Rugby, asked for a discharge certificate on the ground of his wife’s health, it being necessary, he said, that she should live elsewhere. He also carried on the business of tobacconist, hairdresser, and furniture dealer.—Mr Carmichael : You have your hands full.—Applicant : No, because I have managers. He wished his discharge so that he could then dispose of his businesses.—The Court refused the application.

J Mulhern, Rugby, was said to have lost time and was fined £2.

Mr Carmichael presided at the sitting of Coventry Munitions Tribunal, held on Monday afternoon, and the assessors present were Mrs Givens for the men and women, and Mr A H Niblett for the employers. The list contained 25 cases, 10 being from Rugby.

Miss A Botterill, lamp operative, 94 Bridget Street, was summoned for absenting herself without leave. She sent a letter from Llandudno explaining her reasons for staying away, these being ill-health and the belief that the works were going to close down for the August-holidays. It was said by the firm that she took the holiday, though told she could not have the time. Her absence delayed several thousand lamps per week on a subsequent operation.—The Court imposed a fine of 15s.

A G Hanks, 2 Russell Street, was summoned for being absent from work in the Bank Holiday week. He was fined 10s, the Court taking into account that he was usually a good timekeeper.

S Fisher, 10 Chester Street, was summoned for absenting himself from work on various dates. He said he obtained permission on one day to spend it with his brother ; on the rest of the dates he was ill with his back. He was fined 5s.

F A Clewlow, handyman, 30 Sycamore Grove, was also summoned for being absent from work on one day. He received permission, it was stated, to stay out one day to attend a marriage, and remained out the next day as well. Fined 15s.

H Williams, fitter, Market St., was similarly charged. He said he had been with the firm for 13 years without a break, and sent a letter to the shop explaining his absence. He met with a cycle accident, and was hurt at the works.—The firm’s representative said the man was an old and good employee.—Defendant was fined 15s.—The Chairman said it was not fair to the other workers that certain men should take French leave.

H Page, 17 Essex Street, was similarly summoned. The condition of his health was the reason he gave for staying away.—Fined £1.—Defendant : Don’t stop any next week because I have got a short week.

A Smedley, 3 Market St., summoned for being absent, said he was absent with leave, and went with his wife and family to Old Colwyn.—The firm’s representative said that no holidays were allowed in Bank Holiday week.—Defendant said he had a day and a-half to cancel his arrangements after he had paid £1 on account of his holidays.-The representative said he never had leave, there only having been a preliminary inquiry with regard to holidays throughout the workshops. The man was a good worker and timekeeper.—The Court adjourned the case for a fortnight, as they would like to see the charge-hand and foreman.

W Bott, 22 Newland Street, New Bilton, was summoned for being absent without leave on Monday, August 7th, to Saturday, the 12th, inclusive; and was fined 15s.

G Hardy, turner, 67 Windsor Street, Rugby, was summoned for being absent without leave on August 11th and 12th and the morning of the 14th ; also with absenting himself from August 3rd to August 10th with a doctor’s certificate for diarrhoea. The firm produced written evidence from a fellow-workman, who had seen Hardy very much under the influence of drink on Friday, August 4th.—Another witness said that he stopped Hardy in the Market Place about 8.20 on Monday, the 7th inst, and informed him that he had had “ more than was good for him.” He appealed to his patriotism to go home, and go to work the next morning.—Evidence was also given to the effect that on August 8th, at 11.15 a.m, Hardy was served with drink in a local hotel.—Fined £3, to be paid by weekly instalments of 10s.

AN ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court, on Wednesday, before A E Donkin, Esq, Frank Reilly, 1 Lodge Road, Rugby, pleaded guilty to being absent without leave from the Gloucester Regiment.—Sergt Ghent stated that, as the result of a telegram from the O.C the Battalion, he saw defendant at No. 1 Lodge Road, and he then admitted that he should have returned the previous day.—Remanded in custody to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In an account of the fighting round Thiepval the special correspondent of the “ Morning Post ” lays stress on the achievements of the Warwicks.

Mr F Stimpson, of Rugby, had three nephews serving on the Falmouth, which was sunk in the North Sea at the beginning of the week. Fortunately all of them were saved.

Gunner G Jones, son of Mr and Mrs M Jones, 49 Claremont Road, is progressing slowly but favourably in the Wellington Military Hospital, Liverpool, where he was admitted on August 5th suffering from shock. He had been at the front one year and nine months, having enlisted on August 26, 1914, in the 119th H.M R.G.A., and was drafted to the front in November of the same year.

AWARD FOR GALLANTRY.

The following is an extract from Divisional Orders by Major-General Colin Mackenzie. C.B, commanding the — Division, in which awards of the Military Cross for gallantry were set out :—

“ Captain Evelyn Penn Lucas, 2/4 Battalion Royal Berks Regiment, at Ferme du Bois, on the night 13-14 July, 1916, after careful organisation and training of the raiding party, of which he was in command, for the organisation of which he was solely responsible, proved himself a cool and capable leader ; and though himself wounded early in the attack, led his party up to the enemy wire, and continued to encourage his men to renew their efforts to attain their objective ; he kept communication with his Commanding Officer, and refused to come back to our own lines until he had seen the whole of his men who could be brought in back in safety, he himself being the last to re-enter our lines.”

Capt E P Lucas is son-in-law of the Rev R S Mitchison, of Barby, and this was the attack where Corpl Doyle, of Erankton, lost his life in behaving so gallantly bringing in the wounded.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mr J Brooks, 41 Lawford Road, New Bilton, has received an intimation that his son, Pte J Brooks, of the Royal Warwicks, was wounded on the 1st of August. He was hit in the leg by shrapnel, and sustained a fractured bone. He is at present in hospital at Nottingham, where he is progressing favourably.

RIFLEMAN COLBRAN, of CLIFTON.

The casualty list on Thursday contained the name of Rifleman F Colbran, King’s Royal Rifle Corps, among those killed. Rifleman Colbran, who was about 22 years of age, was employed on Clifton Court Farm, where his father was bailiff, when the War broke out, and he enlisted in the K.R.R towards the end of 1914. He was a quiet young man, and generally respected by those who knew him.

SECOND-LIEUT A E RAINBOW KILLED.

Second-Lieut Albert E Rainbow, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed on July 23rd, was an assistant at St Matthew’s School, Rugby, and afterwards an assistant master at Richmond British School when war broke out. He enlisted in the Royal Fusiliers before receiving his commission. The Commanding Officer, in a letter to his mother, said : “ Lieut Rainbow was with his company advancing through a village under heavy shell fire, and the conditions were trying enough to have caused even the bravest man, however old, to have faltered. But he displayed no hesitation, and his conduct was a fine example and real help to his men.”

LONG LAWFORD.

MR & MRS S Howard, of Long Lawford, have received news that their son, Pte Stephen Howard, died of wounds on August 1st. He was the third son to join the Army, and had only been in France a fortnight. He was 23 years of age.

NEWBOLD-ON-AV)N.

DEATH OF RIFLEMAN ERNEST GRANT.—Mr and Mrs Grant, Newbold, received the sad news on Saturday last that their son, Ernest, was killed on the 12th inst. Rifleman Dick Collins, writing to deceased’s brother, Alfred, who had been serving at the front, but was sent home disabled about twelve months ago, said : “ The company was on night work ; they were spotted, and machine guns and artillery played on them. Ernest received a number of wounds from machine gun fire.” The writer adds: “ Well Alf, it is another terrible blow for you all, and I am sure I myself will miss him. He was my best friend out here, and we always did all we could for one another. All his section liked him, and you can take it from me that he will be missed by all. According to the nature of his wounds, he died an instantaneous death. We were both talking only the night before of what we hoped to do when we got home, and now we are not able to do so. It has upset me, and I feel I cannot write more just now. I know almost the exact place where he was buried, and I know everything that could have been done for him has been carried out. We are in a hot place, and you yourself only too well can understand what it is like. Well, Alf, I hope you will accept mine and all the boys’ deepest sympathy in the death of so good a soldier, and you have one consolation—he died doing his duty.” Corpl Arthur Parks also writes :- “

Dear Mrs Grant,—I expect that by now you have received the bad news that Ernest has passed away while doing his duty to God, King and country. I should not he surprised if he was doing something to protect one of his men, or working in what he new was a dangerous place where he would not let one of the men go. He was always doing that—looking after his men first and last—and not bothering about himself, strong was his faith in God. I know the chaps are very sorry, for he was liked by all. He was a fine fellow in every way.” Rifleman Ernest Grant was 26 years of age, and belonged to the Rifle Brigade. He was employed at the time of his enlistment in Kitchener’s Army on September 3, 1914, at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s. He was a member of the Church Choir and a bell-ringer ; also a playing member of the Newbold Football Club. He had numerous friends, and all who knew him could not help admiring his manly principles. This is the second son Mr and Mrs Grant have lost during the War, and a third has been sent homo disabled. Much sympathy is expressed by all with Mr and Mrs Grant and family in their sad trouble.

BRANDON.

WEST KENTS.—It will be of interest to many people in the district to hear that Pte Horace Watts was amongst the number of the West Kents who, although surrounded, kept the Germans at bay for two days. He had previously been wounded in the War, but had returned to active service. He is the youngest son of Mr and Mrs G Watts, of Brandon Wood.

IN MEMORIAM.

FOREHEAD.—In memory of Lance-Corpl. T. W. Forehead, who died of wounds in Gallipoli on August 24, 1915.—From his loving WIFE, DAUGHTER, FATHER-IN-LAW, MOTHER-IN-LAW, and FAMILY.

GOODMAN.—In loving memory of Pte. W. G. Goodman, 1st Royal Warwicks, killed in action between Cambrai and St. Quentin, August 27,1914, aged 29 years.
“ Father in Thy tender keeping
Leave we there our dear son sleeping.”
—From FATHER & MOTHER.

THE FATAL ACCIDENT TO TWO AVIATORS.

The adjourned inquest on Lieut George P Rogers and Second-Lieut Cyril de Frece, R.F.C who were killed by the collision of two aeroplanes on August 10th, was held on Wednesday.

Second-Lieut W S F Saundby, who stated that he was a qualified pilot, deposed that he went up in a machine with a mechanic, and engaged in manoeuvres—which he described in technical detail—with another and more powerful machine, which was being flown by Lieut Rogers, a skilled pilot, with Lieut de Frece as his passenger. Both machines were in perfect condition, and were flying well. When at a height of about 2,500ft Lieut Rogers was manoeuvring for close formation over the top, and witness dived down about 500ft. Lieut Rogers also came down, and was apparently endeavouring to pass over him to the front. Witness saw that if he continued at the same speed his machine would have caught the undercarriage of the other. To give Lieut Rogers time to get clear in front he reduced the angle of his descent and slackened speed, but his propellor struck the tail or fusilage of Lieut. Rogers’ machine and cut the whole of it off. It then became unmanageable, and dived to the ground. Meanwhile witness spiralled his machine safely down.

In reply to the Foreman of the Jury, witness said the rule of the Aeronautical Society used to be that machines were not to approach within 100 metres of each other, but it was found necessary to repeal it, and there was now no rule as to distance. They had to use their own discretion when in the air.

A senior officer who witnessed the occurrence said it struck him that the machines were flying too close together to be safe, and he intended to mention it when they came down, but there was no regulation as to distance. A pilot had to judge what was a safe distance from the next machine. He thought the actual proximity of Lieut Saundby’s machine must have been obscured for the moment from Lieut Rogers’s view by the wings of the machine he was flying.

The Foreman expressed the sorrow of the Jury at the loss of such a brave pilot as Lieut Rogers was admitted to be, because at such a time the nation required all the skill they could get. The Jury felt the loss of these brave fellows, who risked their lives in the air for the good of their country.

The Coroner concurred, in these sentiments, and extended sympathy to all concerned.

The Jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death,” and added that no blame was attached to anyone.

24th Apr 1915. “ E ” Company at the Front

“ E ” COMPANY AT THE FRONT.

Pte L Stewart, one of the Advertiser employees who volunteered for active service and is with the 7th Warwickshire (Territorial) Battalion at the front, tells us in a letter we have received from him that their Easter Sunday spell in the trenches went off very well, but his Company had two wounded. About the middle of the week they were moved on to a town upon which bombs were dropped by enemy aircraft before they had been in the place half-an-hour, injuring several people. Barring a few colds, the health of the men was A1, and they had done all that had been asked of them. With full kit on, each man carries on average 70lb—the roads were rotten for marching, and their marches had been from eight to ten miles. In a subsequent letter, he writes :—“ Yesterday we made another move, and came across the Rugby Battery. From what they told me they were soon in action, and appear to have been giving a good account of themselves. I spoke to Major Nickalls (Spring Hill). He was quite pleased the old E Company (now C Company ) were so near. The respective headquarters are within a few yards of each other. C Company went into the trenches again last night for four days. You should see the country round here ; everywhere the place has been shelled—it must have been awful. I saw Mr C T Morris Davies (the well-known International hockey player) the other day. It’s really surprising who you meet.”

Another Territorial writes :—“ We are only about 400 yards from the German trenches, and I am writing these few lines in my little dug-out, under fire. We are having a fairly quiet time just now. We get a few German shells occasionally, just to let us know they are still alive. As we are so near the German trenches we have to keep one eye shut for sleep and the other on the alert. We expect to have about four days in and four out. We are all cheerful and in the pink, only for the food, for we have to eat biscuits for nearly every meal and they are as hard as bricks. The next time we come into the trenches I shall have to bring a couple of loaves with me. We get plenty of corned beef and biscuit, but we are getting about sick of these. All the houses round this district are blown to bits. Last week I had a walk round the cemetery to see the graves of our comrades who fell at the beginning of the war. They are buried three deep in ordinary wooden coffins, and a small cross, bearing their name and regiment, is erected over them. We also see small crosses scattered about the fields showing where soldiers are buried. Whilst I am writing this the sun is shining beautifully and the country looks grand. It makes one think of the fields at home. You would laugh to see us in our little dug-outs. They are built of sandbags, about a yard high, so you see we have to duck down and creep in.”

“ I am still in the best of health,” writes other man. “ France is a lot different to what I thought it would be. We are all enjoying being out here as the weather is lovely. The place we are staying at now has been very much shelled ; the Germans shell it now occasionally, but we don’t mind and take no notice at all. We see plenty of aeroplanes out here ; the best sight I have ever seen is the wonderful way in which the aeroplanes avoid the shells which are being constantly fired at them ; they must be piloted by expert airmen for the shells burst all round them. The crucifixes out here are a lovely sight, everywhere you go you see them ; it is a wonderful sight to see a place that has been shelled and the crucifix not touched.”

THE HOWITZERS AT THE FRONT.

Corpl A Sparks, of the 5th Warwickshire R.F.A (Howitzer) Battery, writing to a friend in Rugby, under date of April 14th, graphically describes the passage across the Channel. The Wednesday night after arrival was spent in camp, and next day they entrained for the front. After 20 hours’ travelling in cattle trucks they arrived at their destination—about three miles from the firing line. “ The only indication that a great war was in progress,” he say. “ was the continual booming of the guns and the burning of magnesium flares, which the Germans send up during the night to prevent surprise infantry attacks. Otherwise everything was quite normal. On Easter Sunday morning we had a Church parade and Holy Communion, so that you will see we spent this festival pretty well the same as you did at home. On Easter Monday night, in a pelting rainstorm, we took up our place in the firing line. On Tuesday night, just a week from leaving England, we were in action for the first time, and have been in action every day since. We have done some very good firing;. Major Nickalls has been thanked for the splendid support he has given to the infantry. On Sunday we had some “ Whistling Willies ” over our line and about 40 the next day. Fortunately no one in our battery was hurt, although I am sorry to say there were about ten wounded and five killed in another battery. The only casualty we have had in the brigade is one of the Coventry Battery killed.”

“ You would be astonished at the callousness of the natives round here. Even when firing is progressing it is a common sight to see the farmers doing their ploughing, etc. Even the women and children are walking about quite close to the guns, and apparently they can see no danger.”

TERRITORIALS’ FOOTBALL MATCH.

The Howitzer Battery played their first football match in France on Saturday, April 17th. Teams:— Gunners : A Goode, Major Nickalls, Spicer, Bombardier Jesson, Corpl Watson, Lieut Pridmore, Smith, Alsop, Asher, Laurceston, and Judd. Drivers : Mills, Sergt Dosher, Woolley, Corpl Shelley, Ashworth, Wood, Judd, Turner, Taylor, Dyer, Humphries. Referee: Gunner A Jobey. The match was played just behind the firing line. The Gunners proved to be dead on the target as per usual, leading 2-0 at the interval. The Drivers proved good stayers, pulling level early in the second half. After good all-round play, the Gunners snatched a victory five minutes from time. Scorers :—Lieut Pridmore, Smith and Asher, and Taylor (2).

LOCAL WAR CASUALTIES.

COSFORD: RIFLEMAN E. STEEL.

As mentioned in our last issue, news has been received from the War Office by Mr and Mrs Steel, of Cosford, that their son, Edward Steel, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action at Neuve Chapelle on March 16th. No particulars of his death have come to hand, and the only consolation that his aged father and mother have is that he died bravely fighting for his country. E. Steel, who was 27 years of age, joined Lord Kitchener’s Army on September 2nd, previous to which he was employed by the Midland Railway Company at No. 2 Length, Rugby. He was drafted from Sheerness on February 2nd to go to France with other young men of the villages around. He was much liked, and as he always lived at home with his parents, he will be sadly missed by them, as well as by all who knew him.

RUGBY SOLDIER SEVERELY WOUNDED.

Mrs H Bottrill, of Bridget Street, Rugby, has received news that her son, Pte Frank Henry Bottrill, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was admitted to Boulogne Hospital on Easter Sunday, suffering from a severe bullet wound in the head, and as the result of an operation he has lost the sight of the left eye. Pte Bottrill who was a reservist, and is married and lives at Wellingborough, is an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother-Pte A W Bottrill, of the Coldstream Guards—was badly wounded on November 2nd, and has never really recovered from the effects of the wound. He has ,however, been back to the fighting line ; but the last news that was heard of him was that he was at Havre recuperating, although he expected to be soon drafted back to the trenches.

Mr T Thompson, of Willoughby, has had several interesting letters from his son, who is a member of the Northants Yeomanry. The regiment went out to the front last November, and was one of the earliest of the Territorial forces to go on active service. They have been in several actions, and, as may be supposed have not escaped without their share of casualties. They were in the battle of Neuve Chapelle, and fortunately the quick-firing gun team, to which he was attached, passed through the engagement without mishap. Previous to that they had been nine days in the trenches, and during that time they experienced some very cold weather. Trooper Thompson had one of his feet frost-bitten. He was sent back to the base hospital, where, unfortunately, he developed bronchitis in a somewhat severe form. His latest letters however, state that he is getting better, but it will be some time before he is quite convalescent.

 

WOLSTON.

THE LATE PTE F HOWARD.—A memorial service was held in memory of Pte F Howard, only son of Mr Fred Howard, of Wolston, who lost his life at Neuve Chapelle when fighting with the Worcestershire Regiment, as reported in our issue of the 10th inst. The service was conducted by the Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, and the large edifice was well filled by residents of Brandon and Wolston and the surrounding district ; whilst a number of soldiers home on furlough attended. The Brandon and Wolston Scouts were also present to pay their last respects to their departed comrade. The principal mourners were deceased’s father and sister, Miss Clara Howard. The proceedings were most impressive, and it was quite evident that the majority of the large congregation mourned the loss of so young a life, many of them being visibly affected. The form of memorial service was the one authorised for use in the diocese of Chichester. The hymns were : “ My God, my Father, while I stray,” “ When our heads are bowed with woe,” and “ God of the living in Whose eyes.” Before the service closed the Vicar gave a suitable address, and his remarks were listened to with rapt attention. At the close the organist, Mr W S Lole, played the “ Dead March.”

The casualties in the 7th Warwickshires reported up-to-date are : One killed and 12 wounded.

A non-commissioned officer writes :— “ The Battalion has now come out of the trenches for four days. During the four days the Battalion has lost one killed, a chap from Coventry, and about 12 wounded, although I don’t think any of them are very serious. The 5th Battalion have had three killed. We relieved the Dublin Fusiliers when our Battalion went in, and now the 8th Battalion Royal Warwicks are relieving us. Most of the the firing takes place at night ; there’s not much doing during the day, except artillery fire. The Howitzer Battery are pretty close to us, and it was reported yesterday (April 14th) that they had put three of the German guns out of action. While in the trenches many of the chaps had some very narrow escapes. One of the German shells burst in “ A ” Company’s trenches, also one in “ B ” Company’s, fortunatley without hurting anyone. I think myself the Battalion has been very fortunate at having so few casualties. We are now in ——, so that we have now been in both the countries where the fighting is.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been rather more satisfactory at Rugby during the past week, and twelve have been attested, the majority for the Army Service Corps. Their names are :—A.H C : L Morris, J C Munton, C H Brown, T W Summers, F Summers, J Ingram, P Kimberley, D Jonathan, S New. Remounts : A Penn. K.R.R : M E Goodyer. Army Veterinary Corps : J W Harris.