4th Aug 1917. A Trade Union Protest

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
RUGBY URBAN TRIBUNAL.

Of the nineteen cases for decision on Thursday evening in last week fourteen concerned local butchers. Mr J J McKinnell presided, and there were also present Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, L Loverock, W H Linnell, and H Yates. Mr H P Highton was the Military representative.

A TRADE UNION PROTEST.

A letter was read from the Rugby Branch of the National Union of Clerks drawing attention to the fact that during the last few months several military units who had been given exemption to find work of national importance had been sent by the officials of the Labour Exchange to fill clerical positions at a local factory, and several were so employed at present. The Union considered this practice reprehensible, unfair, and against the national interest. The case cited a coachbuilder who had been sent by the Labour Exchange to fill a position as material list clerk in the main drawing office of a local factory. This man was of military age, and was thought to a B1 man. This being so, the Union considered it unfair to the other clerks employed in the office that, whereas fully trained clerks in the lowest all medical categories were called to the Colours, they should be asked to train a man from an outside trade as a technical clerk on material list work. The N.U.C failed understand how a coach-builder could become sufficiently proficient under at least twelve months’ training to be of national importance as a clerk, while men of far greater clerical experience were declared to be non-essential. Then, too, if a B1 man (with no experience) was national importance as a clerk, why were trained clerks of all categories being called the Colours ? The clerks doing this particular class of work claimed to be specially trained as the result of experience and hard work, and if they were to train unskilled men sent to them they asked that these men should be ineligible for the Army. In conclusion, the writer said, in justice to themselves and those dependent upon them it was necessary to safeguard the conditions under which and by which they earned their living.—Mr Highton said in the case in question the man was sent to the works as a labourer, but was subsequently transferred to the offices because the other workmen made it “ too hot ” for him.—Mr Wise expressed the opinion that there was a great deal of justice in the complaint, and the Chairman concurred ; but it was pointed out that this matter was not within the purview of the Tribunal, and the Clerk was instructed to reply accordingly.

The case of the Secretary to the Rugby Trades and labour Council was again up for decision.-It was stated that this man had received exemption for a month to enable him to obtain work of national importance, and the Superintendent of the Labour Exchange had suggested that he should undertake the supervision of the structural alterations at the Trades Hall. The Tribunal had Agreed to this ; but the Advisory Committee were of opinion that the work was not of sufficient importance to justify exemption.—Temporary exemption till September was given for work of national importance to obtained.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL AT RUGBY.

The first sitting of the Coventry Munitions Tribunal at Rugby was held at the Court House on Friday in last week. Mr E G M Carmichael presided, and the assessors present were : Mr T W Smith (employers), Mrs Griffiths (women), and Mr W H Dexter (men).

Ernest Albert Eyres Riley, Newbold Road, Rugby, applied for a leaving certificate. He stated that he was a night driver on the power and lighting plant. On one occasion he pointed out to a day charge-hand a fault on the engine, and this man accused him of neglecting his work. This was the only time that the charge-hand had complained to him, and he contended that he was not to blame, rather that the fault lay with the chargehand. Applicant had since left the firm, but they had refused to give him a leaving certificate.—The representative of the firm pointed out that the man worked nearly six weeks after the incident referred to ; but in reply to Mr Morris (General Workers’ Union), applicant stated that he only allowed one week to elapse before giving notice.—Refused.

Walter John Farn, borer, 19 Sun Street, also asked for a leaving certificate. He stated that was wounded at Mons, and had since been discharged from the Army as medically unfit. He had been taken from the machine he was accustomed to work and put on another one, which was obsolete and too hard for him.—The representative of the firm stated that the man’s average weekly earnings were £3 7a.-Farn asked that the machine should inspected by a member of the Tribunal.—Mr Carmichael said thought this was a case in which every consideration should be shown to the man.—The firm’s representative pointed out that the difficulty was that Farn refused to give the machine a trial. It was no harder to work than his present machine.—Sent to medical referee, and ordered to give the machine trial.

For failing to work on several dates, W J Price, 9 Holbrook Avenue, was fined £2.—It was slated that this was a case persistent bad time-keeping, but the respondent contended that on a number of occasions there was no work to in the shop.—Mr Carmichael pointed out that had he had no right to leave work without permission.—The representative of the firm stated that there was no shortage in the department where respondent was employed. If the men were temporarily out of a job they were paid day work rates.

H W Jarvis, 60 Victoria Street, who had been fined on three previous occasions for losing time, was fined for a similar offence.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has come to hand that Major Cecil Nickalls, Hillmorton, has been wounded in the face and arm. The injuries are, fortunately, not very serious.

Sergt E H Rixom, Suffolk Yeomanry, eldest son of Mrs Rixom, Claremont Road, Rugby, has been gazetted second-lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Bombardier C W Packwood. Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr C J Packwood. of 10 St Matthew’s Street, has been wounded in the chest in two places during the recent fighting.

Second-Lieut R L Cowley, Northants Regiment, son of Mr John Cowley, of Brackley, and formerly of Kilsby, has been missing since the historic Battle of the Dunes, and great anxiety is felt his parents, who will be glad of any news respecting him.

Bombardier Albert Goode, Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr A Goode, 78 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been severely wounded, and is now in a base hospital in France. Bombardier Goods is an old St Matthew’s boy, and was a member of the Football XV, which first won the Schools Union Football Shield in 1905. He was employed as an engineer at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s.

The Rev R W Dugdale (curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church) has been appointed chaplain of the Royal Flying Corps in France, and he is at present the only R.F.C chaplain in the Army.

Mr & Mrs Meadows, Inwood Cottage, near Rugby, have received information that their son, Gunner C H Meadows, was seriously wounded with gun-shot in the back on July 20th, and is lying at a casualty clearing station in France. Before joined up on November 1st, 1915, he was employed in the Telegraph Department at Rugby Station (L & N-W).

CORPL J C CHIRGWIN KILLED.

Unofficial news has been received of the death in France of Corpl J C Chirgwin, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, an assistant master at St Matthew’s School. Corpl Chirgwin was 29 years of age and a native of Cornwall. He came to St.Matthew’s School about seven years ago, soon after leaving college. He attested in the early days of the Derby scheme, and was called up eighteen months ago, and proceeded to the front last Christmas. He had two hairbreadth escapes in the recent fighting, and was killed by a stray shell last week. Corpl Chirgwin, who was shortly taking up a commission, was very popular with the pupils and staff of the school, and the news of his death was received with deep regret.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

On Sunday last a memorial service was held at St Peter’s Church, Bourton, for the late Gunner Thomas Wilson, third son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Wilson, Gate Farm, Bourton, and who was killed in action in France on July 10th. He was a splendid specimen of manhood, and was a general favourite amongst the young people in the neighbourhood. Letters of sympathy have been received by his parents from the officers of the regiment, in which he is highly spoken of as being always cheerful, strong, and ever ready to do his duty, and his death will be a great loss to his regiment. Deep sympathy is felt throughout the village for Mr. & Mrs. Wilson and family.

MARRIAGE OF SECOND-LIEUT. L. J. HUNTER.

The marriage of Second-Lieut L J Hunter, Yeomanry, fourth son of Mr & Mrs T Hunter, Elmhurst, Rugby, to Gwenn, only daughter of Mr & Mrs S H Fraser, Kensington at St Andrew’s, Well Street, London, W, on Tuesday, July 31st. The ceremony was performed by the Rev H H Kemble, the uncle of the bride, assisted by the Rev S K Knight, Vicar of St Andrew’s. The service was fully choral, and the hymns, “ O Father all creating ” and “ O Perfect Love,” were sung. The Rev H H Kemble gave a short address. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a gown of white charmeuse and Georgette, with a ninon train embroidered in silver, and carried a sheaf of lilies. Lieut. J. Mitchell, R.F.C., acted as best man. As the bride and bridegroom left the church Mendelsohn’s “ Wedding March ” was played. few relations and friends returned afterwards to the Langham Hotel.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN.

A communication has been received from Headquarters advising the local Food Economy Campaign Committee to suspend its active stimulation of propaganda for a period ; but in order to avoid misapprehension the urgent necessity which still exists for the strictest economy in food consumption is urgently emphasised. The situation in regard to food supplies is still extremely grave. Meanwhile local committees may vigorously address themselves to their normal function of war savings.

DEATHS.

CRAWFORD.-In loving memory of Pte ERIC CLEMENT CRAWFORD, 18th Canadians, who died of wounds in University College Hospital, London, on July 23rd.-“ Greater love hath no man than that he gave his life for his friends.”-From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brother.

HART-DAVIES.-On July 27, 1917 (aeroplane accident) at Northolt, Middlesex), Lieut IVAN BEAUCLERK DAVIES, R.F.C., Rugby ; son of the late Rev John Hart-Davies and Mrs. Hart-Davies, of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire ; aged 39 years.

SPENCER.-Killed in action in France on July 22nd, Pte JAMES BARTLETT SPENCER, 11th R.W.R., son of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer, 94 Wood Street, Rugby.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for his country gave his all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

DUNCUFF.-In ever-loving memory of ARTHUR FRANCES DUNCUFF, dearly beloved husband of Mildred Grace Duncuff, who died of wounds on Aug. 8, 1916.

DUNCUFF.-In ever-loving memory of our son and brother, who died from wounds received in action in France on August 3, 1916 ; aged 22 years 11 months.
“ Death hides, but it cannot divide ;
Thou are but on Christs’s other side.
Thou with Christ and Christ with me,
And so together still are we.”

GOODMAN.-In loving memory of GUNNER FRED GOODMAN, R.F.A., who died from wounds received in action on August 3, 1916 ; aged 20 years. Also Pte W. G. GOODMAN, brother of the above, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, who was killed in action on August 27, 1914 ; aged 29 years.
“ Farewell, dear sons, in a soldiers grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
-From his loving Mother and Father.

GURNEY.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son, Pte HARRY GURNEY, of Church Lawford, who was killed in action on July 30, 1916 ; aged 21 years.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell.
The grief would not have been so hard
For those who loved him well.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think we could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘
Before he closed his eyes.”
-From Mother and Father, Brothers and Sister.

HOWKINS.-In proud and loving memory of Lieut. MAURICE HOWKINS, W.R., R.H.A., elder son of William Howkins, Hillmorton Grounds, Rugby, who gave his life for his country at the Battle of Romani, Egypt, August 4, 1916 ; aged 22 years. Mentioned in despatches for valuable services in the field, F.C.C. “ A fine soldier. I never wish to see a better officer ” (his C.O.).-“ Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a Crown of Life.”

NEAL.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, WILLIAM NEAL, of the Berkshire Regt., who was killed in action on his 19th birthday, July 30, 1916.
“ One year has passed away
Since our great sorrow fell ;
Still in our hearts we mourn the loss
Of him we loved so well.”
-From Father and Mother, Sisters and Brother.

PURTON.-In loving memory of HARRY PURTON, be beloved husband of Sarah Purton, who fell asleep on December 3, 1912. Also Lance-Corpl G. H. PURTON, son of the above, who died of wounds in France on August 6, 1916 ; aged 24 years.
“ His country called, he answered with his life ;
Not gone from memory, not gone from love,
But gone to dwell with his dear father
In God’s bright home above.”
-From his loving Mother, Brother and Sisters.

 

5th Aug 1916. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps, Swearing-in Ceremony

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

SWEARING-IN CEREMONY.

An interesting ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, chairman of the Urban District Council, at the Benn Buildings, on Saturday afternoon, when eighty-seven members of the Rugby Company of the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment were sworn in as soldiers under the new regulations. The proceedings took place in the Assembly Room, and the Chairman was supported on the platform by Lieut-Col Johnstone, Major Glover, Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, S B Robbins, R W Barnsdale, T M Wratislaw, H N Sporborg, T Hunter, and F M Davenport. The company, under the command of Mr C H Fuller (Commandant) and Mr L G Haigh, fell in at the Drill Hall, Park Road, and marched to the Benn Buildings.

The Chairman said, in the first place, he wanted on behalf of the Council and of the town, to give them a very hearty welcome. He thought they would all agree that it was most appropriate that that most important ceremony, which was the administering of the oath to a civic force, should take place in the building which was the centre of the management of the town. He had received apologies for absence from Lieut-Col Hood, Col Lewis, Hon E Parker, Brigadier-General Little, Mr A James, and Mr W L Larke. He would now ask them a short question, to which he wished them to answer “ Yes.” It was : “ Do you fully understand all the questions put to you on the official form of enrolment ? ” The men answered “ Yes ” ; whereupon Mr McKinnell requested them to take their hats off and to answer a longer question, which was in effect the declaration : “ Do you solemnly declare that the answers made by you to the questions set out on page 1 of the form of enrolment are true, and that you are willing, to be enrolled as members of the Volunteer Force of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment under the conditions laid down by the Army Council under the regulations for the Volunteer Force framed by them in accordance with the Statute Law relating to that Force ?” An affirmative answer was made, whereupon the Chairman administered the oath as under :-

“ I (–—) do sincerely promise and swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his Majesty King George V, and that I will faithfully serve his Majesty in Great Britain for the defence of the same against all his enemies and opposers whatsoever, according to the conditions of my service.”

This ceremony over, the Chairman said they were now soldiers, and he was proud to be the first one to congratulate them on behalf of their fellow-citizens. They had joined a very gallant and very noble army. The Volunteers had been unrecognised for months and months past, and at last the Government had thought well to take some notice of them, and to allow that, after all, they might possibly be of some use. Personally, he thought that a great mistake was made right at the very beginning in the nervousness and apprehensiveness of the War Office, who feared that if this Force was made too much of recruiting would suffer. He believed that the contrary would have been the effect. They honoured the Volunteers for plugging away (applause). Despite a great deal of very cheap wit on the subject of their age, despite the Government lukewarmness, and despite thousand and one more hindrances, they had gone steadily on making themselves efficient. He had heard what they had been doing, and he believed they put in a great deal of hard work, and he was sure there was not one among them who was not very glad he had done that hard work.

This question of the Volunteer movement was a very deep and vital one, because the men could, when they were fairly well trained, if the need arose, as it might possibly now arise, take the places of members of the Regular Forces, who would then be able to go and fight in France, Flanders, and elsewhere. In all probability things would get very critical before they had won the War. They were going to win, but it might be a bit of a squeeze, and heaven knew what was going to happen to anyone of them during the next twelve months.

Addressing those who had been ordered by the Tribunal, as a condition of exemption, to join that body, the Chairman said they must not think they were different from any other member of that Force. They were honoured just as much as the others. Those on the Tribunal knew, but others did not, all the reasons which stopped them from joining in the past ; and therefore, he did want to impress upon them that there was no distinction between them and other members of the Force (applause). This Force could do a most extraordinary good work in training those men who might have to be sent for soldiers, and who would then be three-parts trained when they went up. The oath they had taken only bound them to fight the enemy in the case of invasion of this country ; and this recognition by the Government ought to put a new life into their ranks. That swearing-in ceremony ought to be the starting point of fresh vigour both in men and efficiency. There ought to be a lot more men in their ranks, not only men of over military age, but the young men of 17 and 18 years who were employed in the town, and he earnestly hoped they would have a large influx of recruits in the near future.

Now they were enrolled as soldiers they must have some sort of uniform, arms, and equipment, and he understood they had certain sums in hand. However he would appeal to the public to support their funds with rather more liberality than they had done in the past. He was told they wanted £600. He hoped they would get it ; he thought they would, because they certainly ought to. They were extremely lucky to have such extraordinarily zealous and efficient officers, who worked very hard and also knew their job, and there was no man whom he would rather see as Commandant than Mr C H Fuller.

Major Glover said he hoped the enthusiasm that had been shown that day would not be allowed to evaporate ; but that they would induce others to follow their example. He thought that in a town of the size of Rugby there should be a large number of eligible men who could come forward. He was now Acting Commandant and Regimental and Battalion Adjutant ; and with regard to the first position, he was acting as a warming-pan for Col Johnstone, who, he knew, had received an invitation from the proper authorities to accept that post. He hoped Col Johnstone would accept that post, and then he (the speaker) would step back into the position that he could fill with greater credit to himself-that of Adjutant to the Battalion. In conclusion, he urged them to form a detachment of 250 in the town, so that they could have a company of their own. Hitherto they had been connected with Southam and Harbury, but it was now proposed to get these detachments affiliated to another corps.

Mr C H Fuller, on behalf of the Company, expressed thanks to the Chairman for the part he had played in that day’s ceremony, and to the other gentlemen who had attended. Their requirements could be expressed in two words, “ men ” and “ money.” He understood that men disqualified from service in the Army, who had to remain at home, had great difficulties to contend with, but they must have a certain amount of spare time, and he felt that in the crisis they were now in it was their duty to spend part of that spare time by joining their Corps. They must remember the men at the Front-that vast number that had given up money and everything. They must remember, also, that vast number who would never return, and that probably those present would live to see the final victory and to enjoy the triumphal peace. They had been given clearly to understand that they must not look upon the question of invasion as impossible even now ; and, therefore, it seemed to him that it behoved every man to do what he could to prepare himself for that event. It would very much strengthen their position ; and he hoped it could come about, if they could form a company of their own. He would ask each of them within the next fortnight to get one man who for some reason was unable to join the Regular Forces to join their Corps. There object would then be attained as regarded numbers ; and with regard to funds, he thought they could rely on the public to assist them if they showed they were willing to assist themselves, but could not do so to the full extent required. Eighty-seven men had taken the oath that day, and forms had been completed for 155 men to enrol who for various reasons were unable to be present. There had been a lamentable amount of apathy in that neighbourhood with regard to the Corps, more than in other places. Those eligible people who said the Force was not wanted were seeking an excuse for not joining, and he begged of everyone who was able to do his bit in this position-and it was a serious position they found themselves in—to do his best and join them and prepare to be ready. If they did that no man who was disqualified for active service would have anything to regret at the end of the War. To those who were preparing themselves he would commend as a motto the well-known lines :—

“ He also serves who only stands and waits.

Lieut-Col Johnstone then addressed the detachment, and said it was a great regret to him that, shortly after raising the second Battalion, he had to give up the command because of the other duties which were placed upon him. He had now been asked to take over the command of it again. After considering the matter, he really found that his duties were so heavy at the present time that, although he took the greatest interest in them, he felt he could not do justice to them. But he was going to his best. He accepted it (applause), and he would be glad to be with them again. all he asked was that they would put their backs into it, because if he found any slackers he would not want them. He wanted men who were going to try to do their work and to become soldiers in earnest. They did not know when they would be required. They might be required at any moment, and they must fit themselves for that moment. He thanked them for the kind manner in which they had received his return to the Company (loud applause).

The Chairman : Col Johnstone must be gratified by the way his return has been received.

Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut B B Salmon, Manchester Regiment, killed, was in the football XV at Rugby School.

The numerous friends of Pte W T Satchell (Kilsby) of the Royal Warwicks, will be sorry to hear that he is lying seriously ill in the Canadian Hospital, near Maidenhead. There are every prospects of a final recovery, but it will be a long time before he regains health and strength completely.

SECOND-LIEUT F HUNTER HAS NARROW ESCAPES.

The name of Second-Lieut F Hunter, of the Gordon Highlanders, son of Mr T Hunter, J.P, Elmhurst, Hillmorton Road, appeared in the list of officers suffering from shell shock. The losses of the Battalion were heavy, and Second-Lieut Hunter had a remarkably narrow escape. A shell dropped at his feet and burst outwards, killing the men on either side of him and blowing him for some yards, but happily he was not touched by any of the fragments. He lost the use of his legs through shell shock, and was brought to London, and afterwards sent home to Rugby. Two days before this Second-Lieut Hunter had another narrow escape. He was standing talking to another officer, when they were espied by a German sniper, who shot the officer dead. Mr Hunter stooped to pick his friend up, and a bullet, evidently intended for him, passed through his pack, smashing his hair brush, &c.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following young mm connected with the Rugby Baptist Church have been wounded in the great offensive : Will Spaggett (Manchester), Frank Burberry (Netley), Percy Harris (Rawtenstall), Bob Mayes (Leeds), and Corpl Horly (Birmingham).

Pte George Clarke, E Co, R.W.R, has written to his parents, who live at 98 Avenue Road, New Bilton, informing them that he is now in hospital suffering from a bullet wound in the left thigh. He adds that the bullet has not yet been extracted, but that he is going on well.

Mrs Rixom, 108 Claremont Road, has received intimation in letters from the War Office and Major C P Nickalls that her son. Bombardier F W Rixom, Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded at the back of the head, with shrapnel on July 29th. He is now in St George’s Hospital, Stockport, and is progressing favourably. This is the second time Bombardier Rixom has been wounded.

Rifleman H G King, of 16 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was wounded by shrapnel in the foot on June 26th, as reported in this paper three weeks ago, and was in hospital in France, has had his leg amputated below the knee, the bones being smashed and also poisoned. He is now in hospital at Liverpool, where he has been visited by his friends, who found him going on very well indeed.

TWO B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News was received at the B.T.H this week that Pte Arthur Hipwell, Leicestershire Regiment, son of Mr Arthur Hipwell, of Catthorpe, and Corpl Richards, of the R.W.R, have been killed during the recent fighting. Before the War Pte Hipwell was employed in the Turbine Department, and Corpl Richards was a draughtsman in the Drawing Office for several years.

CAPT C E ANDERSON.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson, the Gordon Highlanders, who was killed in action on July 21st, was the second son of the late William Henry Anderson and Mrs Anderson, of Rokeby House, rugby. He was born in December, 1890, and entered the Gordon Highlanders from Sandhurst in October, 1910, getting his first step in promotion in June, 1912, and his captaincy in April, 1915. He was wounded at the first battle of Ypres in October, 1914, and again slightly on July 14th last, but remained on duty, and was killed by a shell on the early morning of July 21st. Captain Anderson was a keen follower to hounds, and when on leave hunted with the Atherstone and North Warwickshire Hounds.
[Captain Anderson is listed on the Rugby Memorial Gates. His biography will be published at a later date]

SERGT J GILBERT, of BILTON.

Another respected member of the Warwickshire Territorials, Sergt John Gilbert, eldest son of Mr T Gilbert, of Bilton, died from wounds in a Brighton hospital on Tuesday. Sergt Gilbert, who was 32 years of age, was wounded while engaged with a Trench mortar battery on or about July 20th ; and in order, probably, to avoid causing alarm to his wife, who only a fortnight ago gave birth to a child, he wrote home minimising his injuries. On July 26th he was brought to England, and sent to a hospital at Brighton. Unfortunately blood poisoning set in, and developed so rapidly that Sergt Gilbert died before his relatives, who had been summoned by telegraph, could reach the hospital. Before the War he was employed by Messrs Hands, china dealers, Sheep Street. He was a member of the Bilton Working Men’s Club and the Bilton Brass Band. He leaves a wife and four children, to whom, and also his parents, much sympathy is extended in their sad loss.

The interment took place at the Parish Church, Bilton, on Thursday afternoon, the remains having been brought from Brighton on the preceding day. A large number of parishioners assembled at the church to show respect to the deceased and his family ; and although it was not possible to arrange for a military funeral, the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital supplied, as far as they could, the honours due to a departed comrade. A detachment of about 35 preceded the cortege from deceased’s former home at Bilton Hill. They lined the path to the church, and additional pathos was imparted to the scene when each one saluted, as well as wounds would permit, the coffin, covered with a Union Jack and the cap, tunic, and belt of the deceased, as it passed by. The Burial Service was read by the Rector, the Rev W O Assheton, R.D. Among those who assembled in the church and at the grave-side were : Mr T A Wise, J.P, Mrs West (Bawnmore, Mrs W Barnett, Mrs Assheton, Mrs F E Hands and Mr J Lee (Rugby), Miss Wilson (Bournemouth), Messrs G Wilson and W Wilson, Mr and Mrs F Betts and Mrs Elsom, Mrs Yates, Mr and Mrs H Freeman. Mrs E Smith, Mr and Mrs Manning, Messrs H J Hughes (representing the Working Men’s Club), G Evans, J Cripps, sen, G Birch, J Burton, and others. A number of beautiful floral tributes were sent by relatives and friends, including the members of the Working Men’s Club ; Mr Bedford’ ; Brass Band, of which deceased was formerly a member ; the Bilton Brass Band ; and the wounded soldiers who had collected flowers and made up a handsome cross, upon which they placed the inscription, “ From Wounded Comrades at Bilton Hall.”

DEATH.

HAYES.—On July 19th (killed in action). Signaller Frank Hinde Hayes, aged 19 years, youngest son of Mrs. Hayes, 86 York Street, Rugby.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried.
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”

BOUCHER.—On the 25th July, in hospital, of wounds received in action on 14th July, Captain Alan Estaeurt Boacher, Leicestershire Regiment, dearly loved younger surviving son of the Rev. Canon and Mrs. Boucher, of Frolesworth Rectory, Lutterworth, aged 21.

DICKEN.—July 20th, died of wounds in France, Lance-Corporal Signaller Sidney Harold Dicken, youngest dearly loved son of St. and Mrs. W. Dicken, Claremont Road, Rugby. Aged 22 years. Deeply mourned.

GILBERT.—Died from wounds received in France, Sergt. John T. Gilbert, the beloved Husband of Edie Gilbert, and eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Gilbert, Bilton. Aged 32 years.

HIPWELL.—On July 23, 1916, Pte. John Henry Hipwell, No. 10,816, 6th Leicester Regt. (died of wounds), eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hipwell, of Lilbourne, aged 23 years.
“ He gravely answered duty’s call,
His-life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his loving father, mother, sister, & brother.

SMITH.—Killed in action on July 22nd, 1916, Eric-Arthur Rae Smith, Second Lieutenant, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged twenty-seven years. Youngest son of Arthur E. Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, Middlesex, and late of Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

WHITE.—On the 19th or 20th July, killed in action, Sergt. W. H. White, 2nd 7th Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged 19. Dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. George White, of Dunchurch.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France, July 3, 1916, William Samuel, second son of Thomas and Many Sophie White, of 46 Manor Road, Rugby and grandson of the late Thomas Clarke, of Glencoonera, Irviaestown, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland, who was for 31 years, a well-known member of the Royal Irish Constabulary.
“ No useless coffin endowed his breast,
Nor in sheet nor in shroud they wound him ;
But he lies like a warrior taking his rest,
With no martial cloak around him.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ARIS.—In loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl Mark Aris, killed in action August 6, 1915.
“ Some day we hope to meet him ;
We know not when.
We shall clasp his hands in the Betterland,
Never to part again.”
—Ever in thoughts of his loving SISTERS & BROTHERS, (SID in France).

HOLLIS(Frankton).—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother “ Bert,” who was killed in action at the Battle of Chunuk Bair, August 10, 1915—Sadly missed.
“ For still for him high service waits,
Tho’ earth’s last fight is fought;
God did not give that martial soul
To end at last in nought
That stedfast soldier-heart was not
For this brief life alone;
‘Tis as a soldier he will stand
Before the Great White Throne.”

WOODWARD.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. A. Woodward, 7th S. Stafford Regiment, killed in action at Chocolate Hill, Gallipoli, August 7th, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all,
But the unknown grave it the bitterest blow ;
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving wife ; also father and mother.

Hunter, Wilfred Cleaver. Died 29th Dec 1915

Wilfred Cleaver Hunter was born in Rugby in 1891. He was the third son of Thomas Hunter and his wife Emily Cleaver, who married in 1886. At the time of his birth the family were living at 94 Railway Terrace, Rugby and his father is listed as a Railway Wagon Builder (employer). His grandfather had founded the Thomas Hunter Wagon Works in Mill Road twenty years earlier.

In the 1911 census the family was living at Elmhurst, in Hillmorton Road. Wilfred was aged 20 and described as a Filament Maker, Electric lamp maker.

Wilfred Cleaver Hunter

A report in the  Rugby Advertiser of 8th Jan 1916 gives an account of his life and death:

Second Lieut Wilfred Hunter was 25 years of age, and was the third son of Alderman Hunter. He and three of his brothers enlisted on the outbreak of war, and all four obtained commissions. He was a very bright and promising young man, and many outside the family circle will be grieved to know of his death.

Second Lieut. Wilfred Hunter was educated at Rugby School, and afterwards entered commercial life as secretary to the Rugby Lamp Company, Ltd.

He first enlisted as a gunner in the 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, and after seven months’ service entered the Royal Military Academy at Woolwich.

On October 27th last year he was gazetted to the Royal Garrison Artillery, and left for France on December 10th, being killed in action 20 days later.

Lieut. Hunter spent some days at Havre before going to the front, so must have met with his death very soon after his arrival at the actual scene of the war.

Alderman and Mrs Hunter, of Elmhurst, Hillmorton Road, Rugby received the news of his death on New Year’s Day.

He was killed by a shell which burst in the courtyard of the farm where he was billeted. A fragment struck him in the throat and he died almost at once. He was buried at the Divisional Cemetery at West-Vlaanderen, near Ypres

He is also remembered at his parents grave in Clifton Road Cemetery:
Also of WILFRED the dearly loved son of THOMAS & EMILY HUNTER who was killed at Ypres Dec 29th 1915 aged 24 years.
“Come to me saith one and coming, be at rest.”

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Sources:
Rugby Advertiser
Lawrence Sheriff School and Two World Wars (Editor Davis Howe, published by Lawrence Sheriff School)

 

3rd Jul 1915. Belgians Charged with Theft

BELGIANS CHARGED WITH THEFT.

Yesterday (Friday), at the Occasional Court, before A E Donkin, Esq, two Belgians – Petre John Van Weser, 15 Rowland Street, Rugby, and Gabriel Joseph Peeters, 65 Pinfold Street, New Bilton – were charged with stealing 21lbs weight of metal, of the value of 17s 6d, the property of Messrs Willans & Robinson, Ltd, on July 1st. – Sergt Brown gave evidence of the recovery of the metal and the arrest of prisoners. Weser stating that the brass articles were given them by another man. – Prisoners were remanded in custody till Tuesday.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

SATURDAY:-Before T Hunter & J J McKinnell, Esqrs.

HIS THIRD APPEARANCE.—George Le Clerg, a Belgian labourer, lately lodging in Lower Hillmorton Road, was charged with being drunk and disorderly on June 25th. – P.C Field said at midnight he went in the company of P.C Wakelin to the Lower Hillmorton Road, and there found prisoner very drunk and excited. Witness said the defendant gave more trouble in the town than all the other Belgians put together. On the night in question he had been fighting with his landlord, who had put him into the street, and it was with difficulty the officers got him to the Police Station.-Inspector Lines said this was defendant’s third appearance at the Court for drunkenness this year. – Mr Hunter suggested that prisoner’s employers should be informed of the facts, and asked to get some of the other Belgians to speak to defendant and become responsible for his good behaviour – Defendant was fined 6s, and was warned that if he did not keep himself straight he might be sent back to Belgium.

Mr T. HUNTER’S FOUR OFFICER SONS.

Mr T Hunter, J.P, C.A, of “ Elmhurst,” Hillmorton Road, has four sons serving in his Majesty’s Army.

S A Hunter, the Midland Counties’ footballer, is in the 4th West Riding Howitzer Brigade, and has been promoted from second-lieutenant to lieutenant. He has about completed a month’s gunnery training on Salisbury Plain, and will then take up his duties again at the depot at Otley, Yorkshire.

The next son, Wilfred Hunter, who was in the Rugby Howitzer Brigade, passed the Sandhurst examination in February, and has been transferred to the Royal Military College, Woolwich. After completing his course there, he will be gazetted to the Royal Garrison Artillery.

L J Hunter, who went out to the front with the Northamptonshire Yeomanry in November, was given a commission in April in the Army Service Corps, and is now at a supply depot at Newcastle-on-Tyne.

F Hunter, the youngest son, who is only 18 1/2 years, passed out of Sandhurst on April 17th, and was gazetted second-lieutenant in the Gordon Highlanders. He was attached to the Royal Flying Corps in May, and on June 11th gained his pilot’s certificate.

ELBOROW “OLD BOY ” INJURED BY POISON OAS.

Pte Ernest Jas Jackson, of 18 Old Station Square, Rugby, is in hospital at Havre, suffering from the effects of poison gas. He was on the way to the trenches on June 19th when a gas shell burst quite near him. Two men were killed by it, three were wounded, and Pte Jackson and another were affected by the fumes, which have injured the former’s eyes. He enlisted with other old Elborow boys in the 5th Battalion of the Oxford and Bucks light Infantry on September 1st last year, and after a course of training was sent to the front about six weeks ago. Previous to Joining the Army Pte Jackson was employed at the B.T.H Works.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Thirteen recruits have been accepted at the Drill Hall, Park Road, Rugby, during the past week. Their names are :—W Muddiman and J W King, Northants Regiment ; R Graham, Connaught Rangers ; H E Moon, G Ellerton, W Hobley, 220th (Rugby) Fortress Co, R.E ; C Freeman, 216th (Nuneaton) Fortress Co, R.E ; W J Barrett and G Wallace, A.S.C ; G Fairbrother, J A Richards, J A Cresswell, P G G Rose, Corps of Military Police.

THE WAR LOAN.

WILLANS & ROBINSON SUBSCRIBE FOR £15,000.

The new war loan is being taken up very well indeed locally by small investors through the Post Office. The £5 multiples are the most popular form of investment, the demand for scrips of smaller amounts not being so great as might have been expected. At the Rugby Post Office the staff have done quite a good amount of business in relation to the loan this week, the amount subscribed running into some hundreds of pounds, and quite a substantial sum has been transferred by depositors from the Post Office Savings Bank.

At a meeting on Wednesday the Directors of Willans & Robinson decided to subscribe for £15,000 of war loan, and made application for it following day.

SUGGESTED PRECAUTIONS IN CASE OF AIR RAIDS.

In response to the appeal of Col G M Seabroke (chief officer of the Rugby Fire Brigade), published in our last issue, for six owners of motor-cars to offer the loan of their cars for the conveyance of first-aid appliances in case of an air raid, and for 24 Boy Scouts to volunteer their services in such an eventuality, we are informed that Mr G F Brown, fruiterer, has already offered the loan of his car, and the following members of the 1st Rugby Troop of Scouts have volunteered for duty :-J Andrews, A Anderson, R Smith, C Fenley, W Bailey, A A Cordall, R Hartley, and S Davis.

 

31st Oct 1914. Local War Notes

Sergt Rudlin, of Rugby, has re-joined the Colours, and is now stationed at Border Camp, Aldershot. He served for 23 years in the Royal Field Artillery. He left the service 14 years ago, and has been in the employ of the Leamington Brewery Company at Rugby for the [?].

Pte J Lord (Rugby), of the Rifle Brigade, has been promoted to the rank of corporal, and at a recent examination in marksmanship he was placed first among the N.C.O’s-His brother, Sapper T Lord, of the 4th Royal Engineers, who is stationed at Gillingham, recently gave a lecture to the inmates of the original Borstal Institution on “Building construction.”

Second-Lieutenant S A Hunter, of the 4th West Riding Howitzer brigade, son of Mr and Mrs T Hunter, of Rugby, is now training with his brigade on Doncaster Racecourse.
F Hunter, another son, has passed the September examination admitting to the Royal Military College at Sandhurst, which he entered on Friday last week.

Pte F Timms, 2nd Battalion R.W.R, has written to his parents, living at 33 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, informing them that he has been wounded by a shrapnel shell in the leg and ankle. He is at present in a hospital at Aldershot and states that, the bullets having been extracted, he is getting along quite well.

Col Nutt, commander of the 7th Reserve Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, visited Rugby on Tuesday night, and at one of the places of entertainment made a strong appeal for recruits, stating that although Rugby had done well for Lord Kitchener’s Army, the response in respect to the new reserve battalion had not to the present, been all that could be wished, only 20 having joined from the town.

On Friday last week the local Red Cross nurses, under Commandant Mrs Simey, visited the Great Central Railway Station and handed refreshments to 76 wounded British soldiers, who were passing through the station from Southampton to a northern hospital. The soldiers, several of whom had been badly wounded and had had limbs amputated, were served with tea, coffee, Bovril, beef and ham sandwiches, bananas, cakes, and biscuits. Other people on the platform gave them cigarettes and chocolates. Despite the terrible experiences through which they had passed, the soldiers seemed extremely cheerful, and were very grateful for the kindnesses they received.

INTERESTING LETTER FROM A HILLMORTON SOLDIER.

Corpl J Bush, of the 5th Dragoon Guards, writing to his sister on October 25th, says :-
“ Your letter to hand, and glad to say that I am so far in the best of health and also one of the lucky ones. It is no good swanking, as one never knows, we might be talking and singing and next minute we are dead. One of my troop, poor chap, he had just come from England, had a wash and shave, and wrote to his mother, and told her he had been in the trenches for the first time, when, all of a sudden, a shell came over, killing him and wounding 13 more. But thank God, I was one of the lucky ones, as on my right one was killed and three wounded, and on my left ten were wounded. Me and the boys are all happy. we have just had a good feed of bacon, cabbage, spuds, and turnips, and have just been relieved from the firing line for 48 hours. You need not send me any more fags or tobacco, as we get plenty now from England. This is the time that it makes you think of home and friends – when you get shells bursting all round you – and we say, ‘Thank God, that has gone over us.’ This to one of the worst wars I have been in – as fast as we kill them they keep coming up; but one Englishman is as good as ten of the chicken-hearted Germans.”
Corpl Bush is the youngest son of the late Mr J Bush and Mrs Bush, and, although only 34 years of age, has served 16 years with the Colours, during which period he has seen much active service, and possesses two medals – South Africa, 1901-2 (five bars, Transvaal, Orange Free State, and Cape Colony), and Somaliland 1902-4. Corpl Bush has an older brother who served 21 years in the same regiment as himself.

HILLMORTON MAN WOUNDED.

Mr C Osborne, of Hillmorton, has received intimation that his son, who is a private in the 2nd Warwicks, has badly wounded in the face by shrapnel during one of the recent actions at the front. He has been sent to Southampton Hospital, where he is progressing favourably.

B.T.H. RESERVIST KILLED.

The regrettable news was received on Monday by Mrs Elliott, of 35 Bath Street, Rugby, that her late lodger, William Woods, had been killed in action in France. This information came from deceased’s mother, living at Exning, Newmarket. She had received a brief message to this effect from the War Office, but knew nothing of the circumstances of her son’s death. Only a week earlier Mrs Elliott had a card from Woods then at Marne, stating that he hoped soon to return to Rugby.

Deceased was a reservist in the Royal Field Artillery. He went through the South African War, for which he received a medal, and he was called up on August 5th. Since October last year he had been working as a labourer in the Turbine Department at the B.T.H Works, and, although no communication had been received from him by the firm since the outbreak of the war, he having re-joined the Colours during the August holidays, we understand he was on the list of those to whom the firm was allowing half-pay during their absence from work on active service.-Previous to becoming an employee of the B.T.H Co, Woods was engaged for about two years as a shunter on the L & N.-W Railway at Rugby. He was 31 years of age, and a quiet, amiable man, who made quite a number of friends in the town, by whom his death will be deplored.

[William Woods is remembered on the BTH Memorial]

NEW BILTON SOLDIER REPORTED KILLED.

On Monday Mr and Mrs Hales, of 22 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, received a letter from Corporal Cross of the 1st Battalion R.W.R, to the effect that their son, Pte Harry Hales, was killed in action on Oct 13. Enclosed was a letter which his parents had sent to Pte Hales, but which evidently arrived subsequent to his death ; and the corporal, in his communication, added that some cigarettes, which were also sent, had been divided amongst his comrades. The sympathy of his colleagues was also expressed.

As the family had not heard from the War Office that their son had met with his death, this letter naturally came as a great shock to them, and this was intensified in the evening by the receipt of a cheerful letter from their son, dated October 10th. Pte Hales was 22 years of age next December, and had been in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment two years. He had not been home on furlough since last Christmas. Mr Hales has wired and written to the authorities for confirmation, but so far no further particulars have come to hand.

[Henry Hales is remembered on the Croop Hill Memorial]

INTERESTING LETTER FROM A WOUNDED RUGBY SOLDIER.

Mr C Nash, the cemetery keeper at Rugby, received cheering news from his son, Pte Harry Nash, of the 1st Northamptonshire Regiment, on Monday morning. It was to the effect that he had arrived in England again, after a pleasant voyage, and expected to be home in a few days. Pte Nash re-joined the Northampton Regiment on the outbreak of the war, and went to the front, where he was wounded on September 14th. How this occurred, and what he experienced afterwards at the hands of a brutal German, is described in the following letter:—“ I was knocked over by the explosion of a shell. A piece of the shell took the butt of my rifle off, and knocked me quite 4ft. away. It seemed to knock “ the stufffing ” out of me. I could not move, and while I lay there some of the Germans came by. One of them hit me twice with the butt end of his rifle, his first blow catching me on the left shoulder and the other one the back of my head, knocking eleven teeth out. It was raining heavens hard. I lay for nine hours before I was picked up, so you see it is not all honey. There were about 150 dead Germans lying round where I was. I was told afterwards that the Cavalry came and charged the enemy. I think it is a good job they did, or I don’t know what I should have got on their return journey.” “ You may have this published in the Advertiser,” continues the writer, “ and let Rugby people see that Rugby has got a boy in khaki fighting at the front.” Before Pte Nash re-joined the Army he assisted his father in the cemetery. He was a member of the Elborow School Orchestra, and was of great assistance to Capt W F Wood, of the 1st Rugby Company of the Boys’ Brigade, in instructing the lads in drumming and in other ways.