1st Jun 1918. Airmen’s Practical Joke

AIRMEN’S PRACTICAL JOKE.

A practical joke was perpetuated on Monday afternoon, when an airman, flying over the town, dropped a dummy man, which fell at the back of some premises in Church Street. The object was recovered and taken away by other airmen, who came along Church Street at the time in a motor-car. It is stated that it bore the inscription: “This man does not wish to be buried at Rugby”—evidently a reference to the controversy between the flying officers and the Urban Council concerning the charge for the burial of an officer recently killed near the town. The falling dummy caused a fright to those who saw it, and many people feared that another fatal accident had occurred. A woman in the Market Place fainted, and had to be conveyed into a neighbouring shop.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Monday evening, the chairman (Mr Wm Flint) presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs J H Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr G W Walton, Mr R P Mason, Mr A E Donkin, J.P., Mr J H Mellor, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker.

The Chairman reminded the committee that at the last meeting the Hon Secretary warned them that there was every reason to expect a big increase in the number of prisoners and in consequence a large increase in the financial burden. His forecast had, unfortunately come true, and they were now faced with a very great expense every month. Thanks to their Hon Secretary and the foresight of the committee in looking ahead in the manner they had done, they were at the moment able to face these additional responsibilities, but it was very necessary that renewed and continued support be given to the fund.

Mr Barker stated that during May the receipts from all sources amounted to £102 16s 9d, whilst the cost of food panels was £218 11s, a deficit for the first time for seven months. The committee would remember that he mentioned at a recent meeting that he was enquiring into the bona-fides of all the prisoners on their list. He found there were a few men, who, whilst they had relatives living in the town, were themselves quite strangers, having lived in other parts of the country before joining up. In one case the man’s wife had only come to Rugby since her husband had been a prisoner. He had proved to the Regimental Care Committees concerned that these men in question, about a dozen in all, had no claim in the Rugby Fund, and they had therefore been transferred to the committees of their own districts. In addition they had been fortunate in having several of their prisoners transferred to Holland or Switzerland, and the numbers were thereby reduced to 60. During the present month, however, 35 men from Rugby and district had become prisoners of war, bringing the total to 95, whilst there were still a number reported missing, some of whom in all probability being prisoners of war. They were now fated with an expenditure of nearly £300 per month, and he regretted to say the Central Committee found it necessary, owing to the increase in the cost of foodstuffs and materials, to raise the price of the standard parcels from 8s to 10s each as from July 11th ; that was six weeks hence, so they had a little breathing space. It would mean that instead of £2 15s 6d per man every four weeks, or £3 per calendar month, they would have to provide £3 7s 6d per man every four weeks, or £3 13s per calendar month. Mr Barker also informed the committee that arrangements had been made to speed up the delivery of the first parcel for newly-captured men. It took at the earliest two months from the time a man was captured until his first parcel reached him from this country, and often as long as three months. In order to bridge over the interval the Central Committee had recently established a large depot in Rotterdam, where a supply is kept of 28,000 emergency parcels, each of which is sufficient to keep two prisoners for a week. The British Help Committees which now exist in all prison camps in Germany, are empowered to draw upon the Rotterdam depot for such parcels as are required for new prisoners until the arrival of the parcels from England.

It was satisfactory to be able to state that although a certain amount of miscarriage was unavoidable, from 80 to 90 per cent of the parcels eventually reached their destination. This, said Mr Barker, was not over-estimated. He kept a careful register of the acknowledgements received from the men on the Rugby list ; the acknowledgements being filed under each men’s initial.

The Chairman said the proof they had that the parcels reached the men would do much to encourage all concerned in their efforts on behalf of their unfortunate townsmen in captivity. With regard to the expense to which they were now committed, he asked the committee to carefully consider the question of additional expense caused by the proposed increase in the price of the standard food parcels.— Mrs Blagden said they had always in the past met the demands and she trusted they would continue to do so without having to ask the Red Cross Society to make good any deficit. She felt sure that Rugby and district would continue its support, and proposed that the committee should, as and when required, provide the funds necessary to maintain in full the value of the parcels.—This was seconded by Mr Walton and unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt P W le Gros, Royal Warwicks, who is reported wounded, was in the Cricket XI and the XV at Rugby. In 1919 he was the most effective bowler in the School and afterwards he played for Buckinghamshire.

Major-General Sir F C Shaw, K.C.B, who commanded the 29th Division during their stay in Warwickshire, has just been appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in Ireland.

Sergt F Turner, 220th Army Troops Company (Rugby Fortress Company), Royal Engineers, has been mentioned in General Allenby’s despatches. He is native of Easenhall.

Rifeman W Griffin, of the Rife Brigade, who before the War was employed in the Illuminating Engineers’ Department at the B.T. H, has been reported killed in action about April 23rd.

Pte H W Fallen, Wiltshire Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Fallen, 7 Adam Street, and Pte Horace Horsley, Manchester Regiment, son of Mrs McKie, 33 Albert Street, are reported missing. Pte Horsley is a B.T.H employee.

Rifleman Albert Walters, Post Office Rifles, London Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs R Walters, 12 Bennett Street, has written to his friends stating that he has been wounded and taken prisoner. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before joining the Army he was employed as a postman at Rugby.

News has been received that Pte E Martin, R M.L.I, son of Mr & Mrs Martin, 103 Wood Street, was killed in action on May 8th. He was formerly employed by Messrs Linnell & Son. He joined the Army two and a half years ago, and had been in France two years. He leaves a widow and two children.

Lieut C W Peyton, formerly of the B.T.H Test Department, has been promoted Captain.

Corpl Joseph Branston, Marine Division, fourth son of Mr & Mrs F Branston, 38 Chester Street, has been severely wounded in the arm and thigh by shrapnel, but is progressing well. He has been in the forces for 9 ½ years, and this is the second time he has been wounded.

Corpl Clarence A Eyden, Royal Engineers, elder son of Mr Alfred Eyden, acting district goods manager, L & N-W Railway, Northampton, was killed in France (where he had been on active service for over three years) on Whit-Sunday. Corpl Eyden was educated at Rugby, where his parents were well-known residents for some years ; and at the time of his enlistment, shortly after the outbreak of war, he occupied the position of private clerk to the present Acting General Manager of the L & N-W Railway. He was 27 years of age, and his great musical abilities, always so readily given in aid of charitable movements, will be long remembered in this town. His brother, Lieut Maurice Eyden, of the 2nd Northants Regiment, is actively engaged with his regiment abroad.

The record of casualties among Old Rugbians in the War up to May 4th was as follows :—Killed 542, wounded 872, prisoners 62, missing 22—total, 1,498.

The following local men, some of whom have already been reported missing, are now known to be prisoners of war :—Pte J C Harris, Royal Scots, son of Mr Samuel Harris, 18 Adam Street, New Bilton. He presented himself for enlistment at the Drill Hall in the early days of the War, and as he was only 16 years of age, he was claimed by his father. He subsequently walked to Coventry, and enlisted in the R.W.R. Before he was 17 years of age he was wounded and claimed by his mother, being transferred to the Reserves. He joined up again on his 18th birthday. His father, Lance Corpl Harris, is serving in Italy.—Pte F Lenton, Oxon and Bucks L.I, 64 Wood Street, Rugby, employed in the Assembly Department at the B.T.H.— Pte W A Bland, Somersetshire L.I, 1 Pinders Lane.—Pte J W Wood, Oxon and Bucks L.I, 28 Chester Street, an employee in the B.T.H Tool Room.—Lance Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs G H Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road.—Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, The Green, Hillmorton, formerly employed by Mr S Robbins.—Pte A G Shilvock, Gloucester Regiment, 42 Abbey Street.

SECOND-LIEUT F MOLONEY.

Second-Lieut F Moloney, whose parents live at Kilsby was killed in action on April 9th in Egypt. He was employed in the Winding Department at the BT.H, and joined Kitchener’s Army as a private in 1914 at the age of 17, and by his excellent work he soon earned promotion, and was eventually granted a commission. His father, although over military age and recently discharged, joined the Army to be with his son, and Lieut Moloney for a time enjoyed the somewhat unique position of being his father’s sergeant in France. He possessed to a marked degree the typical British traits of restraint and determination, and was described by his Commanding Officer as one of the steadiest and most reliable of his junior officers. He was killed by a high explosive shell while returning from clearing out enemy nests in a captured village. He had previously been wounded in France, where his father is still serving.

DUNCHURCH.
MR & MRS J BROWN, of the Windmill Houses, Dunchurch, have received news that their eldest son, Pte W Brown, of the Warwicks, is a prisoner of war. Mr & Mrs A Gillings, The Heath, Dunchurch, have also been notified that their second son, Pte C Gillings, is a prisoner.—Another son of Mr W D Barnwell, farmer, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, was called up on Thursday. This makes the fourth son Mr Barnwell has in the Army.

BRAUNSTON.
MISSING.—Pte R G Green, Cheshire Regt, has been officially reported missing on April 16th. He is the second son of Sergeant and Mrs Green, Yeomanry House, Braunston. He joined the Northants Yeomanry at the age of 17, in the spring of 1915 ; then transferred to the R.F.C., and went to France, where he remained for over two years. He was then sent to England, transferred to the infantry early this year and returned to France a few months ago.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
MISSING.—Official information is to hand that Pte Arthur Whitehead (R.W.R.) to missing. He is only son of the late Mr and Mrs William Whitehead.

CHURCH LAWFORD.
MR & MRS BEERS, whose only son, Pte C Beers, was reported missing on April 11th, have since heard that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

A DESERTER.—At the Rugby Police Court on Monday—before Mr J E Cox—Pte John Nolan pleaded guilty to being a deserter from the 1st Border Regiment since March 11th, and was remanded to await an escort.

THE GERMAN ATTACK.
To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

Sir,—I shall be greatly obliged if you will spare me a little of your valuable space, in order to place before your readers a few facts with regard to the situation arising from the recent German attacks.

Since March 21st (the date of the first great German advance) it has been apparent to every British subject that the German Army has been enormously augmented by the collapse of Russia. Great Armies of trained German soldiers, and thousands of guns with ammunition, were transferred to the West for use against the Allied armies. The Military situation was immediately altered and the need for men became and is now urgent.

The County of Warwickshire has already sent thousands of young men to the Army and Navy, but still there remains much to be done.

Two thousand men are needed for the month of June from Warwickshire.

To supply this requirement, there must be a revival of the Voluntary spirit. There are many thousands of men who must necessarily be retained to provide munitions of war, there are, however, many young men who can possibly be spared for service in the field. To these young men this communication is principally addressed, and at the same time there is a need for older and less fit men for service behind the line.

One Volunteer at once may easily prove to be worth two “ called up ” men in three mouths hence, and I appeal for the revival of the time when men freely surrendered their exemption and joined up to fight the enemy in the field.

I shall be glad to give information and advice to anyone desiring it. A railway warrant will be sent to a man living at a distance to Coventry who wishes to Volunteer.

Yours truly, J. W. E. TINGLE,
Assistant Director of National Service,
Ministry of National Service, Warwickshire Area, Union Street, Coventry.

RUGBY AND DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.
NATIONAL RATIONING.

Application Forms will shortly be distributed by the Postal Authorities to every Householder to make application for Ration Books, which are to take the place of the Ration Cards which expire on the 13th July next.

The Committee are endeavouring to make arrangements with the School Managers of all the Elementary Schools in the Rugby District for the Schools to be open to the Public, and the Teachers to be available to instruct the Public how to fill up the Forms of Application.

Enquiry must be made locally as to the day and hours the Teachers will be in attendance.

APPLICATION FORMS MUST BE RETURNED TO THE FOOD OFFICE NOT LATER THAN SATURDAY, 15th JUNE NEXT.

F. M. BURTON, Executive Officer.
Local Food Office,
6 Market Place, Rugby.

MARGARINE RATION TO BE INCREASED.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday it was decided to increase the ration of margarine to 5ozs per coupon. The butter ration will remain at 4ozs, as heretofore.

THE SUPPLEMENTARY MEAT RATION.

The work in connection with the supplementary meat rationing scheme locally has now been completed, and practically everyone entitled to the extra ration has received the necessary card. About 6,000 such cards have been distributed, including 300 for women employed on heavy manual labour. The work involved has occupied five weeks, and was very successfully carried out by the Rationing Offier, who received valuable voluntary assistance from a number of ladies.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS VEGETABLES.—At a recent meeting of the Food Economy Committee a proposal was made that a weekly collection of surplus vegetables and garden produce grown in the village should be sold to the Warwickshire Vegetable and Food Collecting Society. This proposal was enthusiastically received by the villagers ; a dumping station was decided upon, and on Wednesday last the first consignment, including spring cabbages, mint, parsley, sage, 416 lbs rhubarb, and eggs were dispatched.

THE PAPER SUPPLY.
No Newspaper Returns.

The effect of a new Order which will come into force early this month will be that no newspapers, &c., may be supplied to newsagents on “ Sale or Return ” ; consequently there will be no copies for sale casually, and only regular customers can be supplied.

Those who desire to have the Rugby Advertiser regularly, and all new subscribers, should therefore place their orders with a newsagent, and when extra copies are required for any purpose, notification should be given in time to enable the Agent to send the order to the head office.

We should like to thank our readers for the loyal and effective help they have given us in meeting the difficulties due to the paper restrictions by adopting our suggestion to pass copies of the Advertiser on to their friends. The result has been that, notwithstanding the necessary reduction in the number of papers printed, the Advertiser is read by as many people as before, and the paper stands pre-eminently the best medium in the district for all classes of advertisements.

DEATHS.

EYDEN.—Killed on active service in France on Whit-Sunday, May 19, 1918, Corpl CLARENCE ALFRED EYDEN, R.E., dearly beloved elder son of Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Eyden, 53 St. Matthew’s Parade, Northampton ; aged 27 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

CONOPO.—In memory of W. D. Conopo, of Kilsby, who lost his life on H.M.S. Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland, May 31, 1916.—At rest.
“ Two years have passed, Oh, how we miss him,
Never will his memory fade ;
Loving thoughts will ever linger
Around his ocean grave.”
Oh ; for a touch of that vanished hand ;
Oh, for a voice that is still.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

MASKELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. G. MASKELL, killed in action in France on May 30, 1916.
“ days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you,
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Sadly missed by all at home.

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