28th Apr 1917. Eat Less Bread and Avoid Waste

EAT LESS BREAD AND AVOID WASTE.

The wheat crop of 1916 was a failure the world over. How intimately that shortage affects this country is obvious when we remember that before the War we imported four-fifths of our wheat supplies. Indeed of all the food we ate we brought three-fifths across the   seas. To-day we are short of food ships to bring our[?] wheat ; hundreds of the vessels which formerly carried food are plying purely in the interests of our Army, and those of our Allies. The keynote of the campaign must, therefore, be ; CONCENTRATE ON THE SAVING OF BREAD. That, first and foremost, is the necessity of the moment.

The mass of the population must have bread. To the poor it is the chief necessity of life, for it to cheap and needs no cooking. Not only people of means, but those who at present are earning high wages, can afford to buy and cook other foods. Let the cheaper foods—cheap rabbits, the cheaper cuts of meat, the more popular kinds of fish—be left for those who cannot afford to buy anything else. The rich can endure breadless days, but the poor cannot.

Another aspect of the campaign is TO CHECK WASTE. Waste of any kind of food is, under the present stress of war, not only selfish and disloyal, but criminal. Before the War, it has been said, the nation could have lived on the food it wasted, and the waste is still very great. Waste of meat, of vegetables, waste in over-cooking or in over-eating-the campaign aims at checking all the forms of helping Germany.

To bring home to the people the enormous losses in the food supply by the apparently trivial waste of food which goes on daily, the Food Controller has issued a series of leaflets, of which the following is an example :

MR SLICE-o’-BREAD.
“ I am a slice of Bread.
I measure three inches by two-and-half, and my thickness is half-an-inch.
My weight to exactly an ounce.
I am wasted once a day by 48,000,000 people in Britain.
I am the “ bit left over;” the slice eaten absent mindedly when really I wasn’t needed ; I am the waste crust.
If you collected me and my companions for a whole week you would find that we amounted to 9,380 tons of good bread—WASTED !
Two Shiploads of Good Bread !
Almost as much—striking an average—as two German submarines could sink—even if they had p[?] luck.
When you throw me away or waste me you are adding twenty submarines to the German Navy.”

TO UTILISE WASTE PAPER.
A LOCAL SCHEME.

Probably no result of the War has been brought home to the public generally more emphatically than shortage of paper, due to the great reduction in the quantity of pulp and other materials for making it being imported from abroad. There are, however, in the country vast accumulations of paper which might be used up and re-manufactured if it could only find its way to the mills. Any white paper, whether printed or written upon or not, such as newspapers, letters, old receipts, and other documents too numerous to describe, old account books, magazines, novels, &c, can be utilised ; and in order to facilitate the collection of these materials and have them forwarded to the proper quarters for re-manufacture, an organisation has been formed in Rugby, which, if adequately supported, cannot fail to have gratifying results. In conjunction with Mrs Blagden, of The Rectory, Mr J Reginald Barker has undertaken to receive all waste paper of the kind mentioned, and see that it is properly baled and sent off to certain mills, the owners of which will pay good price per ton for it—much higher than the rates which have usually been paid on waste paper.

All the proceeds will be devoted to Rugby charities, so that no one will make a personal profit, and all who help will know they are gaining a twofold advantage by helping to maintain the paper supply and assisting charity.

Mr W T C Hodges, headmaster of Murray School, and Mr W T Simmonds, headmaster of Elborow Schools, have made arrangements to collect the waste from people’s houses, and a postcard addressed to either of these gentlemen will receive prompt attention.

Those who turn out old letters, documents, account books, &c, are assured that they will be carefully baled, despatched, and destroyed without being subjected to the scrutiny of prying eyes.

All stiff covers should be removed from books before being handed over to the collectors. It is estimated that several tons per month can be collected in Rugby, and a very handsome sum may in due course be available for disposal in charitable objects.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Frank Leslie Hogg, second son of Mr and Mrs George Hogg, of the Eagle Hotel, has passed as a Second Air Mechanic into the Royal Flying Corps, and is now stationed at Farnham.

A PURE BRED BELGIAN HARE rabbit, belonging to Harry Redgrave Lovell, the infant son of P C Lovell, was sold by Mr W Wiggins in Rugby Cattle Market on Monday for the Red Cross Funds, £5 being realised.

Mr T Johnson, High Street, has received information that his son, 2nd-Lieut H T Johnson, of the 129th Field Company, Royal Engineers, was wounded in the shoulder last week in France. He has now been removed to a London hospital.

A letter has been received from Pte Huckle, R.A.M.C — a member of the Rugby St John Ambulance Brigade — whose home is at 14 Spring Street, Rugby, stating that he was on a hospital ship that was recently torpedoed.

Pte T Lane, Durham Light Infantry, of Bridget Street, formerly employed at the Newbold Road Co-operative Stores, has sustained a badly shattered arm and other wounds ; Corpl L G Archer, Bennett Street, has been severely wounded, and his right arm has been amputated ; and Lance-Corpl W Labraham, Little Pennington Street, has been wounded in Palestine. All three are Old St Matthew’s boys.

Lieut R C Herron, of the Second Anzacs Supply Column (whose marriage with Miss Thompson, of Paradise Street, Rugby, we recently announced), has been promoted to the rank of captain and adjutant.

Corpl Bert Wilkins (bandsman), of the Rifle Brigade, was killed on the 4th inst. He was brought up from childhood by Mrs Kempton, 67 King Edward Road, and before joining Kitchener’s Army at the age of 16 was employed at the B.T.H Works, and was a drummer in the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade. Mrs Kempton’s eldest son has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the Battle of Mons. Her youngest son had been twice wounded, and went back to the front as recently as a month ago.

RUGBY PLATELAYER WINS D.C.M.

Corpl Ernest W Hallam of the Railway Section of the Royal Engineers, whose wife lives at the New Station, has won the D C M. Before joining the army he was a platelayer in Rugby Coal Yard.

LIEUT J J McKINNELL AGAIN WOUNDED.

Mr J J McKinnell has received news that his son, Lieut J J McKinnell, of the R.W.R, has been seriously wounded in the ankle. Some time ago Lieut McKinnell was wounded, and he had only returned to the front a fortnight when he received his present injury.

BRANDON.

PRIVATE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs T Ward have received news that their son, Pte J Ward, of the Warwicks, has been wounded in the left shoulder and face. ‘Mr and Mrs Ward’s four sons joined up—one, Charlie, has been killed ; Jack has lost the sight of one of his eyes from wounds, and the other son was invalided home. Much sympathy is felt for them in their trouble. Mr Ward himself has been ill for some length of time.

RUGBY WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, SATURDAY, JUNE 2.

WILL YOU HELP THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE TO MAKE THIS EFFORT A SUCCESS BY TAKING UP A COLLECTION IN YOUR OWN HOME EVERY WEEK UNTIL SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd ?

It is very necessary that Generous Support be given to ensure that the Men from Rugby and District who have fallen into the hands of the enemy shall not lack the Food necessary to keep them in Health and Strength.

ANOTHER RUGBY HOSPITAL.

Colonel and Mrs Mulliner recently offered to lend and to entirely equip Clifton Court as a hospital, and this generous offer has now been accepted by the Military Authorities, who will devote it to wounded officers of the Royal Flying Corps.

Mrs Mulliner will act as commandant, and the voluntary aid detachment will consist entirely of local ladies.

The charming situation and beautiful gardens of Clifton Court make it an ideal place for convalescent patients.

ONE MAN BUSINESSES.

Dear Mr Editor,-—A conference comprising committees appointed by the Urban and Rural District Councils of Rugby, and the Rugby Chamber of Trade, has been formed with a view to framing a scheme for assisting owners of one man businesses in Rugby, in the event of their being called up for military or national service. Will anyone interested in the scheme kindly communicate with the secretary, at the address given below, by Wednesday, the 2nd May ? Yours faithfully, T Wise, Chairman, H LUPTON REDDISH, Secretary, Market Place, Rugby.

DEATHS.

PYWELL.—Killed in action, on Easter Monday, Sergt. F. W. Pywell, of London (Middlesex) Regiment, youngest son of E. Pywell, 23 Sandown Road, Rugby ; aged 30.

THORNEY.—Died in France on April 10th of wounds received in action, ALFRED, the second and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Thorney, Rose and Crown, Basingstoke.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVIS.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private ROLAND DAVIS, of New Bilton, who was killed in action in France on April 27, 1916.-Not forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS.

GREEN.—In loving memory of Private JOHN GREEN, of Catthorpe, who died in Tidworth Military Hospital on April 16, 1914 ; aged 35 years.—“ His memory is as fresh to-day as the hour in which he passed away.” — Never forgotten by his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTER.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, HERBERT, who was killed in action at Ypres on April 27, 1915.
“ Two years have passed since Jesus called him ;
As time goes on we miss him more.
His loving smile, his kindly face,
No one can fill his vacant place.
Not dead to those who love him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory,
And will for ever more.”
—From PARENTS, SISTERS and BROTHER, Kilsby.

OGBURN.—In loving memory of my dear husband. Pte. CHARLES ROBERT OGBURN, who died April 26, 1916.—“ He is gone but not forgotten.”

OWEN.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother. GEO. ERNEST OWEN (TAS), Royal Warwicks., who fell in action at Ypres on April 25, 1915. — “ He nobly answered duty’s call, and gave his life for one and all.”—Never forgotten by DAD, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

ROBBINS.—In affectionate remembrance of Lance-Corpl. F. ROBBINS, Royal Warwicks., who was killed in action in France on April 30, 1916.
“ Sleep on, beloved, in a far-off grave :
A grave I may never see ;
But as long as life and memory last
I will remember thee.”
—From EM.

19th Dec 1914. News From The Front

WITH THE H.A.C. AT THE FRONT.

MR McKINNELL’S SON RELATES HIS EXPERIENCES.

J J McKinnell, the only son of Mr McKinnell (chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council), who is with the Honourable Artillery Company at the Front, has sent home a number of interesting letters, giving accounts of his experiences. Writing on November 18th he says :—

“ We have stayed for a week at the place from which I last wrote. My section had a comfortable billet in the front room of a cottage. We had straw down on the floor, and so got pretty warm at night ; whereas some other unfortunate people were up in a barn without a door, and places nearly as bad.

REAL WARFARE.

“ It has been a week of real war for us. One night we made a night march of three hours to reserve trenches a thousand yards behind the firing line, which we had to occupy in case we were wanted. There were one or two anxious moments on the march, owing to the “ range finders ” shot into the air by the enemy—that is, brilliant lights which enable a man with glasses , to pick out, and get the range of, objects in the distance. However, we had no shells our way.

“Just after we settled down in the trenches our artillery behind opened a tremendous cannonade on the Germans, firing from three batteries, at a rate which, I am sure, was four shots a minute. At the same time the British Infantry made an attack. This cannonade was continued for two hours or so, and then slackened off.

“ I was told afterwards, that the object of the attack was to drive some German sharp-shooters from dead ground between the English and German trenches, and that this end was achieved.

“ Our part of the battle was simply to sit still and keep our heads well down to avoid any chance bullets, which, as a matter of fact, never came. Our company had to be without overcoats, as we had not got our new ones, and it really was awfully cold. However, we must be thankful that there was no rain. very few people felt any ill-effects from the nocturnal excursion, so yon see we are pretty fit.

SPADE WORK UNDER SHELL FIRE.

“ On three other days we have been digging reserve trenches at another point about 400 yards behind the firing line. The first day we had several shells explode round us, but none nearer than 200 yards, and a few stray rifle bullets. The second day, on which I was absent on officers’ mess, they were treated to some shrapnel quite close to the trenches, and had to keep down in them for a quarter of an hour or so, as well as to rifle bullets which were obviously aimed.

“ Next day two companies went out. One company had got into position, and were digging. The other company were going along a ditch by a certain road in single file, when the Germans began to sweep the road with shrapnel fire. We all lay down in the ditch, with our faces as near the ground as they would go, for two hours, while the shells kept bursting near us. Fortunately nobody was hit. Some of the shells were only 30 yards away from us. The other company fared worse than we did, and six men were wounded, but only one at all seriously.

“ About one o’clock an Indian doctor came along the road and told us to move on and get into a safety trench, running at right angles to the road, to avoid their shelling. We did so, and sure enough before long they started shelling the road again. There were some trenches behind the road with Indian troops in them, and I think they must have got it badly this time. We remained in our trenches until dusk, and then got out and marched back.

“ By the way, shrapnel is the most deadly kind of shell there is, as it bursts in the air and shoots out bullets towards the ground. Other shells don’t burst till they bit the earth, and generally do nothing more than make a big hole. As you can imagine, there are many shell holes near the firing line.

“ Other evidences of war are villages half-destroyed and churches with only the walls standing. One church we saw was destroyed by our own shells, as the Germans had placed two quick-firing guns in it.

“A staff officer told us that a trick of the German artillery is to pick up a mark, such as a cottage, and simply shell it to pieces, the only possible object being to prevent troops billeting close up to the firing line ; otherwise it is sheer wantonness.” — P.S. We have our overcoats now.

In a letter dated November 28th the writer says :—

“ The only incident of note that I have to record is the fact that the four companies of a H.A.C have each spent 24 hours in the FIRING LINE TRENCHES, and of these two companies have had another 24 hours. “ Our own company’s little experience was to parade at 3.15 a.m, after six hours sleep, march for two miles or so along a road up to the trenches, and then walk in single file avoid attracting attention if searchlights were turned on the country for a mile along a field path to the front trenches themselves. These were much more comfortable than the reserve trenches I told you of, being wide and deep with straw at the bottom.

“ We got in about an hour before dawn. There was nothing much to do on this particular day. The German trenches were 450 yards away from us, and gave us no trouble, hardly a shot being fired from them all day. We were troubled all day with snipers, who come out beyond the trenches and direct cross-fire on the trenches when they can, even getting behind them by some means or other. Only a few of our men saw anything to fire at that day. I did not fire my rifle. . . . I expect you don’t take much notice of the things you see in the papers about the H.A.C in action. I even heard, that it is said that our drum and fife band played us to and from the trenches!! Of course, this is absolute nonsense.”

Writing still later, Mr McKinnell, jun, said the company had moved again, and were supposed to be having a rest, which probably meant that they had to work harder than before. Our section is unfortunate in its billet this time, having the top storey of a barn, which is not quite so comfortable.

A RUGBEIAN IN THE BATTLE OF YPRES.

Pte J T Meadows, of the 1st Northants Regiment, who is in hospital in London with a smashed arm, has sent his parents an account of his experience prior to and in the Battle of Ypres.

“ About October 22nd we had to take up a position on the edge of a very thick wood. It was in the middle of the day—a very bad time for us-because the Germans could see us advancing, and they let us have it for all they were worth. Battery after battery let go at us, but without effect, for the 1st Division has got used to such encounters. At 3.30 p.m we reached the desired spot, and immediately we started to entrench under the buzz and bang of shot and shell. At 5.30 p.m, the trenches finished, sentries were posted, and the vigil went on through the night till the order came along at 4.30 a.m to stand to. That meant everybody at his post, for an attack at dawn was expected—and it came, too, in full force. It was lovely popping them over in hundreds, until they got too numerous for us, and we had to retire into another wood, where we had some old trenches. We dived into them like rabbits, and waited ; but not long, for we could see them coming through the trees. Then again the banging started, but still they came on in ever-increasing numbers, until they got a bit too cheeky, so we started a bayonet charge, and we cleared the wood of them. They made awful noises, just like pigs being killed. This engagement finished at 12.30 p.m on October 23rd.

“ Nothing more occurred until October 24th at 6.15 p.m. It was very dark, and I was taking first turn on sentry. I had been on duty about 40 minutes when I discovered something creeping along turnip field in front of our trench. To make sure my eyes were not deceiving me, I ran along to the next sentry. He also had seen the night bird, so I passed word down to the officer. The order, ‘ Stand to,’ was passed back, and all were on the alert. The order not to fire was given, two men crept out of the British lines, and in two minutes that night bird, was plucked of his rifle and ammunition, and marched off a prisoner. Nothing more happened till the night of the 25th, when we received the old torments, an audience of only 6,000 waiting for us. This lasted until the 28th ; then, to our surprise, we were removed to another position. This was 10.30 p.m on the 28th. We started digging a new trench, and stuck to it all night till 4.30 a.m, when the order ‘Cease digging’ passed along. The engineers had been at work all night as well putting barbed wire about 100 yards in front of our trench. We all knew too well what that meant: the position had got to be held. From 8.30 that morning until 5 p.m shells had been bursting, and so it continued, the big battle having begun at last, and it went on night and day from the morning of the 29th until November 4th. At 11.30 a.m a bursting shrapnel shell smashed my left arm. My officer was killed by the same shell that hit me. My comrade on the left of me had a shrapnel bullet right through the neck. He went, down like a log. I bound him up and laid him along the trench. It was hard working with one hand, but I forgot my own troubles. I walked along the trench to another comrade ; I asked him to load my rifle for me, and so we went on side by side, banging away round after round of ammunition, the fusilade telling its terrible tale for seven hours. I stuck this with my one good arm till the order to charge was given, for the Germans had broken through the wire entanglements. I saw my mate, who assisted me through those terrible hours, answer the Commander’s call ; but he only went about a dozen yards, poor fellow. His turn had came. I made a hurried retreat into the wood, as I was no good for a bayonet charge. I walked three and a-half miles to a hospital, and had my arm placed at an angle of 45 degrees, and it is likely to remain so for a long, long time. I am quite happy, though wounded. It was for dear old England that I fought. We won the battle at the rate of 12 to 1.”

In an accompanying letter Meadows says if he has the fortune to get better before the war is over he shall go back and finish his duty.

In a letter written on board the hospital ship he says: “ I never thought I should get back again after days and nights, weeks and months of that terrible slaughter of human beings. I have had the gruesome work of placing some of my brave comrades in their last resting-places with only a prayer to the One above. This task is very trying to a man with the strongest nerves. It was pitch dark when I had to work with pick and hovel ; but now I am wounded I can do no more. My heart is good, but my arm won’t let me.”