19th Jan 1918. Visits of Workmen to the Front

VISITS OF WORKMEN TO THE FRONT.

The Rugby District Committee of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers have, through their Executive Council, been invited by the Ministry of Munitions to appoint a representative to visit the Front, in view of the educational value of such visits. The committee have replied to the Ministry, declining the invitation in the following terms:—“ After over three years of war the committee believe that the engineers of this district are as conversant with all the horrors of the ghastly business as they consider they need be. Contact with those who have had experience of the battle front and actual experience of the privations at home are considered sufficient from the view-point of ‘ educational value.’ The committee are much more concerned with the education of their children in the arts of peace than their own education in the bloody horrors war. They decline to be a party to the utilisation of public funds and time in the manner suggested in the invitation, and declare that what workman want is not the opportunity to visit the Front, but the opportunity to meet representative fellow-workers of all belligerent nations in order to endeavour to arrive at a common understanding with a view to stopping the slaughter and securing an immediate and lasting peace.”

HEAVY SNOWFALL.

During the night of Tuesday, Wednesday the heaviest snowfall this winter occurred. The surface was covered to the depth of 9 or 10 inches, and the branches of trees and shrubs were thickly covered with snow, which weighed them down. The countryside presented a most beautiful appearance in the bright sunshine on Wednesday ; but traffic on the roads was greatly impeded. Prompt efforts were made by the Town Surveyor to get the snow removed from the streets in the centre the town, but owing to lack of labour, &c, it was quite impossible to do so much in this direction as in previous years, but a great deal was cleared out. There was another fall of snow early on Thursday, which added another inch or so to the total downfall.

A thaw, with rain, set in on Thursday. The country mails have been delayed each day from two to four hours, and the Southam mail was “ hung up ” for a considerable time at Bilton on two occasions.

This is the heaviest fall of snow experienced in this district since April 24-26, 1908, when the measurements were 14 inches.

DUNCHURCH AVENUE TO BE PRESERVED.

The Committee appointed by the Warwickshire County Council to confer with the Duke of Buccleuch as to the preservation of the Avenue on the London Road had an interview with his Grace last week, The Duke put forward an alternative scheme by which the Avenue may be preserved, he being as anxious as the public that it should remain. The scheme will be duly considered by the committee.

LOCAL PEERS AND WOMEN’S SUFFRAGE.—Several peers well known in Warwickshire took place in the division in the House of Lords on Thursday last week, when Woman Suffrage was voted upon, and carried by 63 votes. Those in favour included of the suffrage included the Earl of Denbigh, the Bishop of Worcester, and Lord Willoughby de Broke.

RUGBY’S SUBSCRIPTION TO WAR BONDS for the week ended January 12th was £3,170. making the total for 15 weeks £73,650. The weekly quota is £10,800. The total for Leamington is £95,635 ; Nuneaton, £13,565 ; Warwick, £44,135 ; Banbury, £57,259.

TRAVELLING WITHOUT A TICKET.—At Coventry, on Monday, Levi Haxby, 75 Avenue Road, New Bilton, was summoned for travelling on the railway on November 28th last without having previously paid his fare and with intent to avoid payment. Defendant admitted the offence, and said he was very sorry. He did not know what possessed him to it. It should not occur again. Fined 40s, or 28 days.

TWO BOYS MISSING.

Two boys—one Arthur Frederick Brewin, aged 10, and the other George Alfred Catlin, of Leicester, son and nephew respectively of Mr A H Brewin. of 122 Abbey Street—went for a walk towards Clifton about 9 a.m on December 27th, and up to the present have not been heard of. It is supposed they were seen crossing Clifton Mill Farm about 11 a.m same day.

Arthur Frederick Brewin (10), dark complexion, was wearing brown and black tweed coat and vest, darker knickers, laced boots and cap.

George Alfred Catlin (14), dark, was wearing light grey suit, with striped blue and black football jersey under it, laced boots and cap.

The police were advised same night, but nothing has been heard of the lads.

Any information would be gladly welcomed by A H Brewin at 122 Abbey Street.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

ROYAL RED CROSS FOR A RUGBY NURSE.
Sister M F Fell, of the Territorial Nursing Service, and daughter of Mr E T Fell, High Street, has been awarded the Royal Red Cross for valuable services with the Armies in France. Sister Fell has also served in England and Malta, and for the last six months has been in a surgical team in the Clearing Stations at Ypres and Cambrai.

Lieut “ Pat ” Maloney, of Ontario and the R.F.C, who is recovering from wounds in a hospital near Hyde Park, takes short walks with the aid a stick made from part of a Boche ’plane. “ Pat ” was well known and himself very popular at Lilbourne during his stay there from April to September last year.

Bombardier Hessey, R.F.A, of 68 Victoria Street, New Bilton, recently died of pneumonia in Ripon Hospital. Previous to joining up in February, 1915, he was employed as painter and decorator by Messrs Foster and Dicksee. He had already served in the Navy for 14 years, and was invalided out. Being anxious to “ do his bit,” again, he with some difficulty got accepted for the army, and in due course went out to France, where he was twice wounded. In February, 1916, he went out to German East Africa, where he served about twenty months. He contracted malarial fever and was sent home invalided in August last, and subsequently complications set in which culminated in his death at the age of 37. His remains were brought to New Bilton and interred in the new Cemetery with military honours.

Lieut C A Hall, 1/8th London Regiment, son-on-law of Mr W T Smallwood, 14 Victoria Street, has been awarded the M.C, and has also been promoted to the rank of Captain.

The name of Capt G H D Coates (temporary Lieut-Col), of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is among those which have been brought to the notice Genera Sir E Allenby for distinguished services with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force.

Mrs Banner, 178 Murray Road, has received news that her cousin, Pte William Milne, of the Worcestershire Regiment, eldest son of the late Sergt T Milne, instructor at Rugby School, was killed in action on January 1st. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and leaves a widow and two children.

Corpl Yates, who married at St Peter’s Church, Rugby, on Wednesday, is an old “ E ” Company man. He met with an accident while on manoeuvres, which disabled him for service. After receiving his discharge papers he re-joined, but has been accepted for sedentary service only. Sergt Yates, his father, volunteered, and has been out since the early months of the War and had some narrow escapes, being on one occasion several days in the German lines and reported missing.

CAPT A W FIELD (O.R) BELIEVED KILLED.

Mr Edward Field, clerk to the Warwickshire County Council, has received information of the presumed death of his son, Capt Archibald Field, R.F.C. The sad intelligence was received on Tuesday in a letter from his Major, which stated that the Captain was shot down over the enemy lines by hostile machines whilst he was taking photographs on January 9th. His machine was seen to fall to pieces, and he is missing and believed killed. Capt Field was educated at Orwell House, Felixstowe, and Rugby. He saw much of the fighting throughout Flanders before the first Battle of Ypres, being one of the first members of the British Army to enter Ypres. The Major of his Squadron writes that his loss to the Squadron is a great one, as he has been a long time with them, and had done some splendid work. Capt Field’s three brothers are still serving.

ANOTHER PRISONER OF WAR.

Gunner H Maule, R.G.A, is a prisoner of war in Germany, interned at Munster i/W, Rennbahn. He was captured on November 30th. For nearly 10 years Gunner Maule worked in the quarry at the Rugby Cement Works. He had been in France over 12 months. His home is at Long Lawford. Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be despatched to this man.

PRESENTATION OF MEDAL.

Col F F Johnstone has been deputed to present the Military Medal to Driver Ward, of Hillmorton, for conspicuous conduct in the field. The presentation will be made at a parade of the Rugby Volunteers at the Howitzer Battery Headquarters on Sunday next, 20th inst., at 2.45 p.m, when all friends of Driver Ward and the public generally are cordially invited to be present.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
MISSING.—Mrs Edward Ayres has now received official information that her eldest son, Pte Edward Ayres, R.W.R. has been posted as missing.

VOLUNTEER SHOOTING.—At the parade of the “ B ” (Rugby) Company of Volunteers on Sunday last the cup and prize given by the Officer commanding were presented. The cup for the best score for last year in the two stages of regulation shooting on the open range was secured by Corpl Seymour, and the prize for the best score by a man qualified to shoot on the open range after March 18th last fell to Pte Paulin. Capt Fuller impressed on the men the great importance of the use of the rifle and good shooting.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
FOOD AT RUGBY SCHOOL.
To the editor of the Advertiser.

SIR.—In order to prevent misconception, I should be glad if you will publish our arrangements in the past and our intentions for the future in regard to supply of food for Rugby School. Since February, 19170, the boys have been restricted by the desire of the Controller to an average of 5lbs of bread and 3lbs of meat per week. In December last a scale of rations was issued by the Ministry of Food for boy of 13-18 years of a age as follows :—Bread and flour, 6lbs ;cereals, 24ozs ;meat, 2lbs ; margarine, &c, 5ozs. This scale has since been withdrawn, and it is not likely that the quantities will be increased. Until it is re-issued we propose to abide by it, but we do not expect at present to obtain the full quantity of meat.

The purchase by the boys of extra food has for a long time been restricted to a minimum, and no food parcels are allowed to be sent from home. I hope that this statement will make it clear that we neither desire nor receive more than our share of local or other supplies.—I am, Sir, &c, A A DAVID.

THE FOOD SHORTAGE.

The shortage of meat was again felt locally during the week-end, although the situation was by no means so acute as it was reported to be in other towns. Many householders took the wise precaution of ordering their Sunday joint early in the week. These people received first consideration, and several butchers kept their doors closed till the middle of the morning to enable the depleted staffs to deal with these orders. Many who had neglected to take this precaution experienced considerable difficulty in obtaining supplies, and several of the shops were besieged by queues of housewives, but by the time the shops were closed again most people had received a supply of some sort. As may be supposed, every scrap of meat was quickly cleared out, even bones being bought eagerly.

The situation on Saturday was aggravated by a shortage of fats, of which smaller suppliers than usual were received. The result was that many were able to obtain even a small quantity, and householders of all classes had to be content with dry bread for Sunday tea.

Beef was very scarce at the cattle market on Monday, and the butchers were only allowed one-half of their present requirements, which was equal to one-quarter of their October sales. The cattle available were divided between butchers from Rugby and other parts of the county, and the local butchers will have to depend on other markets to make up their full quantity allowed under the latest order. There was an extra supply of sheep, however, and several butchers made up for the beef shortage by increased purchases of mutton. The new system of grading mutton for sale came into force on Monday, and its operation should prove very advantageous to the butchers.

The butchers are again reminding the public by advertisement in another column that, till further notice, their shops will be closed on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday.

Notwithstanding the slushy and uncomfortable state of the streets, queues were to be seen at most of the butchers’ and provision dealers’ shops yesterday (Friday) morning, and stocks were quickly cleared on.

UTILITY POULTRY-KEEPERS are invited to meetings on Monday (see advertisement), when Capt Peirson-Webber will give addresses in connection with the formation of a local society.

DEATHS.

HESSEY.—On December 17th, in Ripon Military Hospital, Bombardier W. F. HESSEY, R.F.A., of 68 Victoria Street, New Bilton, of pneumonia ; aged 37.