13th Jul 1918. Rugby Soldier Honoured.

RUGBY SOLDIER HONOURED.

Sergt A Neal, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery has been awarded the Croce di Guerra for gallantry under shell fire with the Italian Army, and was decorated by the King of Italy on June 7th. On March 19 & 20, when the Battery was subjected to heavy shell fire, he set a fine example to all ranks by his calm behaviour and total disregard of danger. On May 20th he was N C.O in charge of a party making a dump in No Man’s Land. The party worked under continuous shell fire, and under most adverse conditions Sergt Neal again set a splendid example. He is a native of Hillmorton, and was employed as a fitter at the B.T. H. His wife lives at 12 King Edward Road.

RUGBY MILITARY MEDALIST MARRIED.—Much interest was taken in the wedding which took place at the Baptist Church, Rugby, on Wednesday, of Corpl J R Mayes, Royal Berks, son of Mr & Mrs J Mayes, of South Street, and Miss Ethel Davison, daughter of Mr & Mrs T Davison, of Acacia Grove. The bridegroom was formerly a staff-sergeant in the Boys’ Life Brigade, the members of which formed a guard of honour at the ceremony. His ambulance training with the brigade helped the bridegroom to win the coveted medal, for he gained it by going out under heavy fire, dressing the wounds of his comrades, and bringing them to safety. He has been since wounded twice, and also gassed. There was a large congregation at the ceremony, which was performed by the Pastor, the Rev J H Lees. Two hymns were sung, and Mr Harris (the organist) played the “ Wedding March.” The bride was given away by her father, and Misses Winnie and Jessie Davison (sisters) and Miss Katherine Mayes (sister of the bridegroom) attended as bridesmaids. Mr Mitchell, of Kilsby, was best man. Amongst the presents was a silver egg cruet, given by the Boys’ Life Brigade.

THE amount realised by the sale of War Bonds in Rugby for the week ended July 6th was £71,750, making a total for 40 weeks £293,305.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl R Robinson (Rugby), of the Queens Royal West Surrey Regiment, has been reported missing.

Mr A D Stocks, formerly of Misterton, near Lutterworth, and in recent years articled to Messrs Seabroke & Son, solicitors, of Rugby, has received a commission in the Coldstream Guards, and is now stationed at Windsor. Mr Stocks is widely known in the Midlands as a hockey player of international fame, and also in cricket circles.

Capt A D Stoop (O.B), the Queen’s, the famous English Rugby international football player, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Capt J C Palmer, 22nd Rifle Brigade, Balkans, formerly Second-Lieutenant, Accrington Pals Battalion, and Corporal, 9th Hast Surrey Regiment, has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished services in the field. He is the eldest son of Supt J T Palmer, Church, Lancashire, and grandson of the late ex-Supt Palmer, Rugby, and has served in Egypt, France, and the Balkans.

The death is announced, as the result of a flying accident, of Lieut Raymond Coape-Arnold, sixth and youngest son of Mr & Mrs H J F Coape-Arnold, formerly of Wolvey Hall. His machine came to grief through a side-slip. The deceased, who was an officer of considerable promise, was 26 years of age, and after completing his education he visited various parts of the world, including Canada and South Africa. On the outbreak of war he joined the South Staffordshire Regiment, and became a commissioned officer in November, 1915. He joined the Air Force last year.

Captain Eric Lattey, of the Worcestershire Regiment, has been again wounded in France, this being the third time his name has appeared in the list of casualties. Captain Lattey is the elder surviving son of Captain W C Lattey, RAM.C, of Southam, and was educated at Greyfriars School, Leamington (of which he was the captain), and at Bradfield, where he won an Entrance Scholarship. His brother was one of the earliest victims of the War, having been a midshipman on H.M.S Hawke, which was sunk in October, 1914, off the coast of Scotland.

We understand that Col F F Johnstone has resigned his position as Recruiting Officer at Rugby, and that the Drill Hall, Park Road, will be closed for recruiting after July 17th. During his term of office Col Johnstone has carried out his duties with considerable tact and consideration, and has taken a great interest in everything appertaining to the comfort and well-being of both soldiers and their dependents. Major Neilson will still have an office at the Drill Hall as National Service representative.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
MISSING.—Mrs R Collins has received official notification that her husband, Rifleman R Collins, Rifle Brigade, has been missing since the night of May 27-28. He is the second son of Mr & Mrs T Collins, of Stephen Street, Rugby. and joined up soon after the outbreak of war.—Mrs Sinclair has also received notice that her husband, Pte F J Sinclair, of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, has been missing since May 28th. Pte Sinclair has been previously wounded three times.

KILSBY
MISSING.—Mr & Mrs D Conopo received news on  Monday that their son, Corpl L Conopo (Middlesex Regiment) is missing. They have already lost one son, who was drowned when serving on H.M.S Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland.

STOCKTON
OUR MEN.—Perry Hodges has been dangerously wounded.

DECORATION.—Q.M.S. Sam Griffin, R.E, son of Mr W Griffin, Coventry Street, Southam. has been awarded the D.C.M. Last year he gained the M.C.M, and he also holds the Mons Star.

WAR WEAPONS WEEK.
£83,000 RAISED.

The result of the special effort in Rugby last week was very gratifying to those taking part is the campaign. Not only the town itself, but all the adjoining villages responded splendidly to this special call ; and although the figures have not yet been fully analysed, it is believed that the average per head of population in some of the villages is higher than that for the town The total amount invested during the six days’ campaign was £83,239 8s.

This was 66 per cent. in excess of the amount asked for by the National War Savings Committee ; and the controller, Mr Theodore Chambers, has sent the following telegram to the hon secretary for the local Campaign Committee :—

“ Very hearty congratulations upon splendid result of Rugby War Weapons Week, which is proof of to patriotism and fine spirit of its people.”

About £78,000 was subscribed through the banks, and remaining £6,000 was divided between the Selling Depot at the Lover School and the Post Office. At former about £5,000 worth of bonds and certificates were sold, Saturday being an especially busy day. The arrangements were made by the Executive Committee of the Rugby War Savings Association, of which Mr H Lupton Reddish is chairman and Mr G W Lawson secretary.

Certainly the local committee has every reason to be satisfied with this result, coming as it does so soon after their previous effort in connection with Business Men’s Week.

As a result of this the town will have the honour of giving its name to an aeroplane.

THE COAL AND FUEL ORDER.
APPOINTMENT OF LOCAL OVERSEERS.

A special meeting of the Rugby Urban District Council to appoint a local fuel overseer, as required by the Household Fuel and Lighting Order, was held on Tuesday evening. Mr W Flint (vice-chairman) presided, and there were also present : Messrs S B Bobbins, R W Barnsdale, F E Hands, W H Linnell, L Loverock, T Ringrose, R Walker, and H Yates.

The Clerk (Mr A Morson) explained that it was necessary to appoint a local overseer to carry out the Fuel and Lighting Order, which came into force on July 1st. Such appointment must be made within 14 days of the order coming into force, became after July 8th the protection of men engaged in the coal trade would depend upon the certificates granted by these officials. Although the order came into force on July 1st, the local authorities did not receive it until July 4th. The Local Government Board suggested that borough surveyors should be appointed overseers where possible.—Mr Loverock : What are the duties ?—The Clerk : The regulations occupy 94 pages. The duties will be important : coal merchants will have to be registered, and consumers will only be able to obtain their coal through the merchant with whom they are registered. The local fuel overseer will be responsible for issuing permits for merchants to obtain the coal they require and for seeing that it does not exceed the allotted portion.—The Chairman suggested that Mr Sharpe, the surveyor, would make an admirable overseer, and the Clerk said if the Council agreed to this, arrangements could be made whereby Mr Sharp could give plenty of time to the work.—Mr Loverock : If he has to carry out these duties he will have something to do.—Mr Robbins : He will have to have to have a clerk.—Mr Linnell said now that there was very little building going on Mr Tew would be able to assist the Surveyor.—The Clerk said unfortunately Mr Sharp had had to go to Yorkshire to attend his father’s funeral ; but he had informed him (the Clerk) that he was quite willing to take the post. The Clerk added that he was anxious that whoever was appointed should take up the work from the beginning—Mr Loverock : What is the remuneration ?—The Clerk replied that it was based on the number of inhabited houses in the district, but it would probably be revised.—Mr Yates said he did not always agree that they should accept the recommendations which came from the Local Government Board. If that body could not manage better than to send out an order four days after it came into operation they could not give much weight to their suggestion as to who should be appointed overseer, especially when they suggested that an official, who was supposed to be fully occupied with work, should be appointed to take over very onerous duties. Although this scheme was not of the same magnitude as the food rationing, it would entail a tremendous amount of detail work, and in the measure in which this was done effectively the comfort of their fellow-citizens would depend. If they had large queues of people whose requirements had not been attended to owing to the lark of facilities for dealing with them, the Council would be the responsible party. They should, therefore, appoint someone who would be able to devote his whole time to the work. The work would have to be put in hand straight away, and an office and staff would have to be provided. At present people who were in the habit of getting their coal in by small quantities were letting things slide, but they would come in with a rush latter. Although he had the greatest respect for Mr Sharpe’s abilities in other directions, he did not think he would have the necessary time to take on this work.

The Chairman said he had thought over the question thoroughly, and Mr Sharpe was perfectly willing to take the position and to get the scheme into working order. He proposed that Mr Sharpe should be appointed.—Mr Loverock seconded.—Mr Yates protested, and said the matter ought to be considered in all its bearings. The Clerk had suggested that in order to ensure efficient working someone should be in charge form the beginning, but to suggest that Mr Sharpe should get the scheme in order, and then hand it over to other people, was not the proper way to do it. There were men disabled from other work who might take the position, and devote the whole of their time to it. The work was not only for the coming winter, but would last for a number of winters, and to saddle an official who was already in charge of very important work with these duties was to make a hash and a fiasco of it.—The Chairman said he thought if Mr Sharpe found he could grapple with the work there was no reason why he should not keep the appointment permanently. There was little work to do for the Plans Committee now, and Mr Sharpe had rather more spare time on his hands than usual.—The Clerk pointed out that the Council could appoint Messrs Sharpe and Tew jointly if they wished, and the proposition was amended to this effect and carried. Mr H Yates voting against it.—It was decided that the offices should be situated at the Benn Buildings for the present.—The matter of appointing a committee to carry out the scheme was left to the monthly meeting of the Council.

SPRAYING POTATOES.

Continued experiments have shown that on an average of a series of years spraying has increased the yield of sound potatoes by approximately two tons per statute acre ; while in a bad season the neglect of this operation often means the loss of a large proportion of the crop.

Although there is no authentic record of an outbreak of the disease in Warwickshire up to the present time (June 24th), yet several suspicious cases have been reported ; these on investigation were found to be connected with “ leaf curl ”—caused by planting seed from worn-out stock—or were the result of a check to growth through drought. The time will, however, soon arrive when the real and dreaded disease “ blight,” which has so often ruined our crops, may be expected to again attack them. Fortunately spraying with Burgundy mixture provides a means by which serious damage may be prevented ; therefore, in view of the food shortage, it is the patriotic duty of all to spray mid-season and late potatoes as a method of insurance against loss.

It is not so necessary to spray First Earlies, because they are usually lifted before the disease affects the tubers, and it is always a good plan to lift and store them as soon as ready, and thus prevent risk from disease. Where, however, First Earlies have been planted late they should be sprayed, because the disease may develop on their tops and spread to Second Earlies or Main Crop potatoes growing near. The first sign of disease visible to the naked eye is the appearance on the leaves of blackish spots of irregular size and shape on the under surface of which a delicate white mould may be seen, especially round the edges of the diseased parts. Frequently the disease is first seen on the leaves near the tops of the haulms, but where the growth is dense (through close planting) disease may first occur on the leaves near the ground.

From the 8th to 15th of July is usually the most suitable time to give the first spraying in Warwickshire, but in some instances it may with advantage be done a week earlier. The second spraying should be done two or three weeks after the first.

Leaflets giving full particulars regarding the potato disease and spraying may be obtained on application to the Horticultural Organiser, 12 Northgate Street, Warwick.

BILTON.
WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Wednesday Mr B Morris, of Bilton Manor, celebrated his daughter’s birthday by entertaining about 200 wounded soldiers from the local Red Cross Hospitals. Owing to the unfavourable weather, the first part of the proceedings took place in the house, where enjoyable entertainments were given by the artistes appearing at the Empire and two entertainers from Leicester. Tea was provided in the garden, where a number of ladies and gentlemen assisted in waiting upon the guests. A gaily decorated stage had been erected on the lawn, and after tea a “ free and easy ” concert, in which several of the guests participated, was given. Several valuable presents were presented lo Miss Morris by the soldiers from the various hospitals.

NEW REGISTER ON OCTOBER 1ST.—The Local Government Board have issued an Order in Council which fixes June 29th as the date for the publication of the first list of electors and October 1st as the date when the new Register under the Franchise Act is to come into force. Naval and military voters can claim to be placed on the Absent Voters list up to July 31st. Registered civilians may be included in this list if they satisfy the Registration Officer that owing to the nature of their occupation they might not be able to vote in the ordinary way at a Parliamentary election.

THE INFLUENZA.—Owing to the widespread epidemic of influenza, all the schools in the town and New Bilton have been closed. In some cases nearly 50 per cent. of the scholars were affected. Hundreds of adults have also fallen victims, and a number of deaths from pneumonia following the influenza have been recorded.

DEATHS.

HANCOX.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, who died of wounds in France on June 5, 1918.—Deeply mourned by all who knew him.

HALE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. A. G. HALE, of Yelvertoft, who was killed in action, May 28th, 1918.
God took my loved one from my home,
But never from my heart.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.
—From his loving wife, Bernard, and all his friends.

RICHARDSON.—In loving memory of Sergt, L. RICHARDSON, of the 11th K.K.R., who was reported missing since Nov. 30th, and has now been reported killed on that date.
He marched away so bravely,
His young head bravely held ;
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed ;
But his unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever will know.
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing mother, sisters, brother, grandmother, and Nell, of “ The Banks,” Dunchurch.

IN MEMORIAM.

BENNETT.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. G. BENNETT, M.G.C, of Union Street, killed in action on July 14, 1917. Inserted by his loving brother and sister, Mr. & Mrs. T. Bennett, of Dublin.

CLARKE.—In loving memory of Gunner T. CLARKE, killed in action in France on July 11, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you :
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”

DEXTER.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son, GUNNER P J DEXTER, who died in France July 10, 1917.
We cannot forget him, we loved him too dearly
For his memory to fade away like a dream.
Our lips need not speak, though our hearts mourn him sincerely,
For grief often dwells where it seldom is seen.
—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

HIPWELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. ARTHUR HIPWELL, killed in action in France on July 14, 1916.
“ No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lent their loved and dearest,
Without saying farewell.”
—From his loving Father & Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

KENNEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. ROLAND ISAAC (1/7 R.W.R. Territorials), dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Kenney, Stretton-under-Fosse, who was killed in action on the Somme in France on July 14th, 1916 : and 23 years.
“ He fought for his country,
He answered Duty’s call ;
His home, his friends, his comforts,
He sacrificed them all ;
But he won admiration in Britain’s glorious name.”
—“ Peace, perfect peace.”—Never forgotten by his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

PAYNE.—In loving and affectionate remembrance of my dear son, LANCE-CORPL. E. PAYNE, killed in action at Verdun, July 15th, 1916.
A faithful son, a loving brother,
He bravely answered, Duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
Two years have passed, but still we miss him,
Some may think that we forget him
When at times they see a smile,
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.
—Gone, but never forgotten by his loving father, brothers and sisters.

PAYNE.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. E. PAYNE, who was killed in action, July 15th, 1916.
“ We do not forget him—nor do we intend,
We think of him daily—and will to the end ;
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—From his wife and children.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of our dear son, Sergt. B. PEARCE, 8th Bedfords, who was killed in action somewhere in France, July 12th, 1917.—From father, mother, brothers and sisters.
One year has passed since that sad day,
When our loved one passed away,
But the hardest part is yet to come,
When other lads return ;
When we shall miss amongst the cheering crowd,
The face of our dear son.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of our brother. Pte. A. H. THOMPSON, who died of wounds in France, July 17th, 1917.—Not forgotten by his brothers and sisters, Will, Tom, Emma, and Harry.

2nd Feb 1918. The Food Shortage

THE FOOD SHORTAGE.

The queue evil reached a climax at Rugby on Friday last when large crowds besieged practically the whole of the provision and butchers’ shops in the centre of the town. An unusually large quantity of margarine, five tons, was received in the town the previous day, and a large portion of this was commandeered by the Executive Officer and distributed amongst about a dozen other shops. Notwithstanding this, however, people were unable to obtain a share, while others by dodging from queue to queue, or sending different members of their families, secured considerably more than their reasonable requirements.

In the afternoon large crowds, estimated at several thousands of persons, including number of locomotive men, assembled in and near the Market Place. These latter were interviewed by Mr T A Wise, chairman of the Food Control Committee, and they also visited the warehouses of several tradesmen to satisfy themselves that there were no large hoards of supplies. The tradespeople did everything possible to satisfy the people, and when the much sought for fats could no longer be obtained a large stock of jam was released. The Police also exercised considerable tact in dealing with the crowd, which several occasions showed signs of exasperation. On the other hand those who were engaged in the difficult task of distributing were impressed with the inconsiderate and unreasonable attitude adopted by many of the people who besieged the shops.

On Saturday, however, the scenes were quite normal again, and in fact there were fewer queues than has been the case for some time.

This state of affairs continued til yesterday (Friday) morning, when large queues had assembled by seven o’clock, and at one establishment the police were sorely pressed to keep a huge crowd from forcing an entrance into the shop.

CULTIVATION OF RAILWAY LAND.—The L N-W announce that they are prepared to allocate plots of vacant land both inside and outside their fences to anyone, whether railway servants or not, who desire to add to the food production at a nominal rent of 1s each lot.

FATAL FALL FROM AEROPLANE.

An inquest was held at the Court House on Friday last week by Mr E F Hadow (coroner), concerning the death of Second-Lieut Harold Griffith Nelson (25), which took place, as reported in our last issue, as the result of an aeroplane accident.

Capt William Hubert Taylor deposed that the deceased officer’s home was in New York. He was a member of the American Air Service, and attached to the R.F.C. He was a learner, but very competent, and had flown altogether 67 hours.

Sergt Eric Jack Robjohns and Corpl William Hunter gave evidence to the effect that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good condition before the flight.

Capt Leslie Randall Wren deposed that he saw decease start off. After he had been up about half-an-hour he pulled the machine into a vertical stall, an evolution by which the machine would be practically “ standing ” on the tail. This evolution was of no practical use. He added that the position would automatically cause the machine to nose dive violently, and it would be out of control for a time. One would want a good deal of depth for such a dive, but 2,000ft. would be quite high enough. While the machine was turning over into the nose dive witness saw the deceased fly out of the machine.—The Coroner: It came round so quickly that it practically “ chucked ” him out ?—A: That is what it comes to ; or, on the other hand, his head might have struck the front of the machine, and during unconsciousness he might have fallen out. The tendency would be for him to fall out if he was not strapped in. Witness added that he immediately went to the machine and examined the belt, but it was not strapped up. It was the pilot’s businesses see that he strapped himself in, and he could not say whether deceased had taken that precaution. There was a possibility, but not a probability, that he might have jerked the belt open by the motion of his arms. Witness had never hoard of such a thing being done.

Second-Lieut G W Curtis gave evidence as to the damage to the machine, which came to earth a-half to three-quarters of a mile away.

Surgeon-Major Collins explained the frightful injuries received by the deceased, who, he said, might have been alive, but would probably have been unconscious by the time he touched the earth. Despite the tremendous impact deceased’s wrist watch, with an open dial, was unbroken, and continued to go without losing a second.

The Coroner referred to the surprisingly few accidents which occurred, in view of the number of flights made daily, and said this appeared to be a clear case of the usual precautions not having been taken.

The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death ” ; but added that there was no evidence to prove whether the belt was fastened or not when deceased began the flight.

After the inquest an officer gave a demonstration with the belt, as a result of which the Coroner and Jury expressed the opinion that it probably was fastened up before the flight.

WOMEN LAND ARMY.

EFFICIENCY CERTIFICATES FOR LOCAL WORKERS.

The presentation of efficiency certificates won by Warwickshire women at the Midland test last autumn was made the occasion of a public demonstration at Birmingham on Tuesday, in which between 20 and 30 workers from the Rugby district took part, along with several hundred women from all parts of the county. The majority were wearing the severely practical uniform in which they are accustomed to work, and the cheerfulness of the girls and their healthy and robust appearance were at once a tribute to the wholesome effect which the work, despite trying conditions, has upon spirits and physique. The certificates were presented by the Lord Mayor (Ald Brookes), who said there were now 180 girls employed on farms in Birmingham and Warwickshire, and, in addition, there were 1,400 women in the villages who had registered themselves as willing to give part of their time to farm work.

Out the 84 Warwickshire girls who entered the tests 70 received certificates. Among them were the following local workers who passed three tests:—Miss Mary Crofts (Long Lawford), Miss Nellie Harrison (Clifton), and Miss Constance Walton (Clifton). Passed two tests: Miss Doris Stent (Pailton), Miss Richards (Clifton), Mrs Lee (Bourton), and Miss Bertha Steath (Clifton). Passed one test: Miss Annie Oven and Miss Kate Foster (Catthorpe), Miss Harriett Dickens (Brownsover), Mrs Edward Eales (Bourton). Others of the Land Army mentioned as doing good work in this district were : Miss Pape (Bretford), Mrs Harry Smith and Miss Robinson (Lawford Heath), Miss Tew (Pailton), Miss Taylor and Miss Smith (Princethorpe), Miss Edwards (Newbold), Miss Allerton (Stretton-under-Fosse), Miss Hunt, Miss Gibbs, and Miss Packer (working near Lutterworth).

There are also many whole-time and part-time workers in the Rugby area who have earned as many as six stripes on their arms for length of service, all going to work on the land. Each stripe represents 1,440 hours’ work.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Four additional prisoners of war have been added to the list of the Rugby Committee. Reported missing since Nov 30, Sergt J R Sacree, 10th Batt. Rifle Brigade, is now known to be wounded with gunshot through the shoulder, and a prisoner of war interned at Soltau. Sergt Sacree, who joined up immediately on the outbreak of war, was an assistant for six years to Mr C T Tew, of Regent Street. He had been previously wounded four times, won the Military Medal and recommended again in September last year.— Rfn W E Boyles, 10th Kings Royal Rifle Corps, whose home is at Bishops Itchington, is a prisoner of war interned at Dulmen. An employee of Messrs Greaves, Bull & Lakin, Ltd. of Harbury, he enlisted in 1914. His firm have generously offered to defray the cost of his food parcels as well as for two other employees of theirs who are prisoners of war in Germany.—Pte A C Neal. Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Napton, is a prisoner of war at Limburg-a-Lahn.—Pte A E Mumford, Machine Gun Corps, attached Cavalry, is a prisoner of war at Minden. For three years he acted as barman for Mr W Jones, of “ The Barrel,” Market Place. He enlisted in August, 1914, in the Lancers, subsequently being transferred to the 17th Lancers—Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of Rugby Committer, has made the necessary arrangements for the despatch of the standard food parcels and bread to each of the above men.

The financial support given to the Committee has been splendid, sufficient to enable them to bear the whole cost of each man’s food parcels, etc. Every month means a grave increase in the number of prisoners of war and a corresponding increase in the expenditure. Constant help is very necessary to prevent any call upon the funds of the Red Cross. The number of prisoners of war now on the list is 83, and to provide for these men £230 6s 6d has to be found every four weeks.

Pte A King, of the Royal Scots, whose home is at Napton, has been repatriated, but no further news has yet come to hand.

D.C.M. WON BY RUGBY SOLDIERS.
BRAVE DEEDS.
The following further awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are officially recorded :—

10764 Pte J H Enticott, Oxford & Bucks L.I.(Rugby).
In spite of heavy machine gun fire, he volunteered to go out and look for wounded, and succeeded in bringing back successfully an officer and N.C.O. He showed complete disregard for danger.

32651 B.S.M H W Evans, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his wagon lines were heavily shelled he promptly organised the clearing of the lines, and removed the wounded to an aid post. All this took place under very heavy shell fire, which killed or wounded six men and 37 horses. By his complete coolness and splendid disregard of personal danger he averted all panic and saved many casualties.

840150 Bty Sergt-Major G Hopewell, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his battery ammunition dump was set on fire by enemy shelling he at once went to the position with his Battery Commander and another officer ; and although under heavy shell fire and in great danger from the exploding ammunition, he collected earth and saved a large quantity of material. Both . officers were wounded whilst performing this gallant act.

A RUGBY MASTER DIES AT SEA.—Second-Lieut Leonard George Colbeck, M.C (R.F.A), reported died at sea on the 3rd January, just after completing his 33rd year, was formerly an assistant master at Rugby School. A fine all-round cricketer at Marlborough when captain of the team in 1903, his batting had not a little do with his side averting defeat from Rugby at Lord’s. Two years later he secured a place in the Cambridge University team. One three occasions he figured in the Inter-Varsity hockey match.

MORE AIR RAIDS.—During an air raid on Monday night over London and the South-Eastern Counties 47 men. women and children were killed and 169 injured—30 of them in the basement of one establishment on which a bomb fell. There was a second raid on Tuesday injured.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.
COUNTY COUNCIL ACCEPTS THE DUKE OF BUCCLEUCH’S OFFER.
OLD TREES TO BE REPLACED BY YOUNG ONE.

The Warwickshire County Council, at their meeting on Wednesday, discussed the question of the future of Dunchurch Avenue, on consideration of a special report by the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and decided, after a long discussion, in favour of the first of two alternative schemes suggested by the Duke of Buccleuch. Ald J S Dugdale, K.C, presided.

The proposals made by the Duke of Buccleuch at an interview with the committee at London on January 4th were set forth in the report of the Avenue Committee. His Grace pointed out that his agent’s letter of June 15th last year had not been read or fully reported to the County Council meeting of October 24th last ; that if that had been done it would have made it clear that he himself would have been glad to preserve the Avenue intact ; but that the preservation of the elm trees was impossible because of the rotten and dangerous state of many of them ; and he made an alternative offer which is summarised in his agent’s letter of January 8th, given below. The committee added : We expressed regret to his Grace that any misapprehension should have arisen from the letter of June 15th not having been fully reported or read, and explained that it had been fully read to the County Roads and Bridges Committee, and that the report was in the ordinary course of the Council’s procedure.

THE DUKE’S OFFERS.

The report of the committee continued : Mr Cyprian Knollys, the Duke’s agent, wrote on January 8th : ” I now write to confirm what passed at an interview between the deputation from your Council and the Duke of Buccleuch on the 4th ult. The Duke has always shared the desire expressed by the deputation that the Avenue (which is now about 180 years old) should be preserved. He has had it under observation for some years, and particularly since the gales of December, 1915, and March, 1916, when 74 of the elm trees were blown down. The opportunity which these windfalls afforded for obtaining accurate information as to the state and condition of the trees has convinced the Duke that they have become dangerous, and that even if left the trees, as an avenue, would in the course of a few years practically cease to exist. His Grace is also of opinion that any lopping or pollarding would never be successful, and would only hasten the process of decay. He feels, therefore, that he cannot take the responsibly of leaving the trees standing. In view, however of the importance of maintaining the Avenue for the public benefit in the future the Duke made the following alternative proposals :—

“ (1) That be should himself dispose of the trees standing on the unenclosed land, and after deducting expenses and charges, handover half the proceeds of the sale to the County Council (or other approved body) to be used for re-planting and keeping up the Avenue : or (2) that he should sell to the County Council (or other approved body) the trees standing on the unenclosed land at 6d per cubic foot, which may be considered half their value, on the condition that an avenue it kept up. In either case his Grace will give all his rights over this unenclosed land on which the trees stand.

“ Scheme No. 1 should provide ample money to replant the Avenue as circumstances will permit.

“ Under Scheme 2 the Avenue would belong to the public, but in connection with it there are one or two observations which the Duke thinks the Council may like him to mention for their consideration :

“ If say half the trees are cut, a sufficient sum should be obtained to pay the cost of the purchase, and young trees could then be planted in the vacant spaces. This would, to a great extent, preserve the present appearance of the Avenue. On the other hand, the shade from the remaining trees might injuriously affect the growth of the young plants, and there would be considerable risk of the young trees being injured by the fall of any of the old trees or their limbs. It should also be borne in mind that when trees are grown close, as in an avenue, every tree that is blown down increases the danger of the remainder being also blown. If it was thought desirable to reduce this risk it might be done by cutting down one-half of the Avenue and re-planting it, and then gradually to re-plant the other half.

THE DUKE’S OPINION,

“ From a practical point of view, the Duke considers Scheme 1 to be the best, as though there would be a temporary loss of the Avenue, all danger to the public would be avoided, and there would certainly be a superior avenue in the future, as experience has shown that making up an old avenue is seldom, if ever, successful. And if, as was suggested the Avenue is to be considered as part of the proposed permanent memorial to the 29th Division, it would if newly planted throughout, be in its prime 100 years after the date of his Majesty’s inspection. In making these observations, however, the Duke desires it to be understood that he leaves it entirely to the Council to decide which (if either) of these proposals they would like to adopt ; and I am to add that if the experience and advice of his Forester would be of any assistance to the Council in their consideration of the subject his Grace will be happy if they will avail themselves of it. It was suggested that you would be able to let me hear from you by March 1st.”

“ VERY GENEROUS OFFER.”

The committee proceeded :—

[LONG DISCUSSION BY W.C.C.]

The question was then put to the vote, and the amendment was carried by 32 votes to 10—Scheme No. 1 being, therefore the one accepted.

It was pointed out that a public subscription would be necessary to provide the 29th Division Memorial.

A vote of thanks was passed to the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and the committee will (it was stated) remain in being.

DEATHS.

HERBERT.—In loving memory of Pte. JAMES HERBERT, 6th Northants Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Herbert, Yelvertoft ; killed in action January 19th, 1918, aged 38 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

SMITH.—In loving memory of GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, who was killed in France on January 29, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN, who died of wounds on January 28, 1916.—From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brothers.

 

 

12th Aug 1916. Down With Diphtheria But Not Depressed

DOWN WITH DIPHTHERIA BUT NOT DEPRESSED.

A Rugbeian has this week received a letter from his brother, who is now in a hospital in France suffering from diphtheria :—

“. . . Many thanks for sending on the dictionary. I lost mine, and as my spelling deteriorated 50 per cent without a dictionary, a dictionary becomes a very important part of my equipment. I wanted a dictionary to find the meaning of the word ‘ scabies.’ It was not in the aforesaid—that’s the right word, isn’t it ?—book. I don’t think I need refer to the dictionary for that. Sit on a box of itch-he-coo powder, it will soon explain itself . . . As you remark, diphtheria is not to be treated lightly, but it’s not thought so serious as it used to be, thanks to the injection of an anti-toxin which consists of 4,000 germs which they inject in your chest. This little army proceeds in marching order and makes a rear attack on the enemy’s trenches. After repulsing a severe counter-attack, they succeeded in opening the lines of communication again, thus enabling me to talk to Nurse and also to partake in the jellies and custards, etc. A nice soft bed to lie on—the first bed for 15 months. I made a fuss of it, too, for eight or nine days. Sister daily takes your temperature, and feels your pulse, makes the bed, and tucks you up. Dear, dear. . . . who wouldn’t have diphtheria ? Now I am stage number two, making myself generally useful washing up pots and pans, laying tables, cutting bread-and-butter, etc. I have had one swab taken since being in hospital. They take a swab every week. If you get three negatives, you are free of the germ ; but if you have positive, you are a germ-carrier, and they keep you a bit longer. My first swab was a negative.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR A RUGBY HOWITZER MAN.

Battery Sergt-Major George Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, writing to Mr A Adnitt, as hon secretary of the Rugby Territorials Comforts Association to thank him for parcels of comforts received, adds :—

“ You will be pleased to know that one of our boys, Gunner Bosworth, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field on July 21st, going out under heavy fire several times to repair the telephone wire in order to keep up communication with the battery. He was also mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch for distinguished conduct in the field.

“ We have been in the thick of the fighting since July 1st, but have been very fortunate as regards casualties, as we have had only five wounded—Corpl Hipwell, Bombardiers Smith and Rixom, and Gunners Seaton and Packwood.

“ I dare say you read in the papers about our Division, together with the Anzacs, taking one of the most important points along the front on July 23rd. They were congratulated by the Commander-in-Chief and the Corps Commander on their performance.”

Gunner Bosworth is the son of Mr G Bosworth, who formerly worked as a painter for Messrs Linnell & Son, but has now removed to Essex. His grandfather resides at Lutterworth.

In a letter to his old schoolmaster, Gunner Bosworth, an Old Murrayian, says :- “ On the morning of the ‘ big push ‘ I was on duty at our observation station, and had occasion to go out on the line and repair breakages caused by the shelling. The O.C. was good enough to bring the incident to the notice of the General, and I have since heard the good news of being granted the above medal.”

HIGH PRAISE FOR THE HOWITZER BRIGADE.

The following letter from the Brigadier Commanding the Artillery Division to the O.C’s of the Batteries and Ammunition Columns, will be of much local interest :—

“ Will you please convey to all ranks my appreciation of the excellent work performed by the batteries and D.A.C during the last five weeks. The preparation of gun positions for the July offensive entailed continuous and very hard work on the batteries, but this labour was well repaid in the fewness of the casualties suffered at the guns. The Division subsequently taking over reported that they were the best positions they had yet seen.

“ The continual night firing has been particularly trying, but the shooting was consistently good, which reflects great credit on all ranks, and the successes gained by the Infantry were, in the words of the Divisional Commander, largely due to the effective support rendered by the Artillery. I hope during this week all ranks will be able to get the rest which they all deserve.

DEFEAT OF THE TURKS.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY DO WELL.

The Turks on Friday last week made another and disastrous attempt to reach the Suez Canal. The point chosen for the attack, which was made by 14,000 troops, was Romani, 18 miles east of Port Said. While holding the frontal attack the British, on the southern flank, retired until the enemy had become involved in the sand dunes. A counter attack was then made with all arms, which was completely successful, and at dawn on Saturday the enemy was in retreat, with our troops in vigorous pursuit. The Turks suffered heavily, and so far the British captures comprise 45 officers and 3,100 men, including some Germans, four mountain guns, and a number of machine guns. The British Commander-in-Chief pays warm tributes to the Anzac troops, the Territorials, the Royal Flying Corps, and the monitors, which, firing from the Bay of Tina, gave valuable assistance. During the day the temperature was 100 degrees in the shade.

“ The Times ” correspondent says :— “ The brunt of the fighting was borne by Anzac mounted troops. Of the British troops, the Scottish and Lancashire Territorials and the Warwickshire and Gloucester Yeomanry fought splendidly, and amply avenged the previous loss of comrades by taking over 300 prisoners and two camel guns, and inflicting very heavy casualties. From Territorials of average quality in peace times they have improved into a brigade of veterans. They left the railway at a place within sound of heavy rifle fire, and light-heartedly marched away to attack through ankle-deep sand, and thoroughly proud that their time had come. A little later, from a different spot, I saw Warwickshire and Gloucestershire Yeomanry marching over flatter country, with flankers advanced and rear guards and squadrons as well alined as on parade.”

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Sergt H Lee, R.W.R, until the War employed in the gardens of Dunsmore, and Pte H T Gardner, of the same regiment, whose home is at Clifton, have been reported wounded.

Mr W W College, 9 Church Street, Rugby, has received official intimation that his youngest son, Pte W F College, Royal Warwicks, was reported missing on July 19th. He only joined up in November last year, and had been out in France about three months.

LIEUT E A R SMITH, of CLIFTON.

News has been received that Lieut Eric Arthur Ray Smith, R.W.R, son of Mr A E Smith, of Enfield, was killed in action on July 22nd. Lieut Smith, who was 27 years of age, and was married, occupied the Manor Farm, Clifton, until he was given a commission in the R.W.R last year, and was well known locally.

PTE ARTHUR REYNOLDS MISSING.

Mr W A Reynolds, of 26 West Leyes, Rugby, has received news that his son Arthur, a private in one of the Territorial Battalions of the R.W.R, has been posted missing since July 19th. Pte Reynolds was 20 years of age, and joined the army 12 months ago. He has been in France about two months. Before joining the army he was employed in the tailoring department of the Co-operative Society.

LANCE-CORPL EDWARD HARVEY.

Information has been received by Mrs R Harvey, Windsor Street, Rugby, that her son, Lance-Corpl Edward Harvey, of the Hampshire Regiment, was killed in action on July 1st. Lance-Corpl Harvey enlisted at the beginning of the War, prior to which he worked at Newbold Cement Works. He had been in France 15 months. He was 35 years of age and a native of Rugby. Before the War he lived in Bridget Street, Rugby. He leaves a widow and four children. Mrs R Harvey has two other sons at the front.

SECOND-LIEUT P A MORSON WOUNDED.

Mr and Mrs A Morson, of The Chace, on Monday received news that their son, Second-Lieut P A Morson, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, had been wounded on August 1st. Lieut Morson joined the H.A.C as a private, and proceeded to France on July 1, 1915. He saw much of the fighting round Ypres and Hooge, and then in April of this year he received his commission. He went all through the recent big advance until wounded on August 1st, and he is now in the Second General Western Hospital at Manchester. He received six wounds in the left hip and thigh and one in the left shoulder. An operation has been successfully performed, and his friends will be pleased to hear that he is now going on well.

PTE M E CLEAVER REPORTED MISSING.

Mrs Cleaver, of 28 Plowman Street, has been notified by the War Office that her husband, Pte M E Cleaver, of the R.W.R (T.F), has been posted as missing after an engagement on July 19th. Pte Cleaver, who was a native of Rugby, lived in the town till a year or two ago, but at the time of enlistment he was residing at Banbury. He has four young children.

In the same platoon as Pte Cleaver was an old Rugby footballer, well known as “ Zooie ” Batchelor. He is now in hospital near Liverpool, suffering from shell shock, which has rendered him deaf and dumb.

LANCE-CORPL BROMWICH, of PAILTON PASTURES.

News has been received by Mrs Bromwich, of Pailton Pastures, that her son, Lance-Corpl E J H C Bromwich, of the Northants Regiment, was killed in action on July 18th. Her husband was killed in the Boer War, and Lance-Corpl Bromwich entered the Duke of York’s School for soldiers’ sons at the age of 14. Although he was only 20 years of age, he had, therefore, served six years in the Army. He was wounded last autumn, but recovered, and was drafted to the front again.

SECOND-LIEUT E A R SMITH.

Second-Lieut Eric Arthur Rae Smith, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who, as recorded in our last issue, was killed in action on July 22nd, was the youngest son of Mr Arthur K Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, and was 27 years of ago. For some years before the War he was in the H.A.C, and in April, 1915, obtained a commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, proceeding to the front last May. His Commanding officer writes : “ He was killed whilst leading with the utmost gallantry his platoon into action on the night of July 22-23. In him the Battalion has lost a truly gallant officer of great promise, who had already endeared himself to all ranks.” When Lieut Smith joined the Forces he was occupying the Manor Farm at Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

SERGT-MAJOR WILLIAM J BRYANT KILLED.

Considerable regret will be felt locally at the confirmation of the rumour, circulated in the town last week, that Sergt-Major William John Bryant, of the Rugby Infantry Company, had been killed in action. The news was conveyed to Mrs Bryant, the widow, who lives at 98 York Street, in a letter from the O.C of A Company to which Sergt-Major Bryant was attached on his promotion from the rank of sergeant. The writer says :— “ His death came as a great shock to us all. When such men as he go from us a sort of despair follows, and we feel one of our great supports has gone. He was for some time the quartermaster-sergeant of the company—a post which does not entail so much danger as that of sergeant-major. But as soon as his predeccessor (Sergt-Major Wood) was wounded he lost no time in stepping into his place, and I always remember how eager he was to be right up in the trenches, as close to the enemy as possible. His long service with the regiment, his good character and capacity for doing honest sound work, will ensure that his memory will always remain with those who have known the regiment. His loss is one that it will be hard to replace, and the sympathy of all of us goes out to you.” Sergt-Major Bryant, who was killed while leaving the trench on July 26th, was the second son of Mr Wm Bryant, of Rugby. He was 43 years of age, and leaves a widow and eight children, six of whom range from 15 to 4 years of age. He had been connected with the Rugby “ E ” Company for 25 years, and in 1914 he won one of the company challenge cups. He was a builder by trade, and was highly respected by all who knew him.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

On Wednesday last Mr and Mrs Neal received official intimation from the War Office that their son, Pte W H J Neal, of the Royal Berkshire Infantry Regiment, was killed in action on July 30th. Pte Neal was 19 years of age on the day he was killed. He only enlisted on the 13th of April last as a Driver in the Royal Field Artillery. He had been transferred about a week to the Royal Berkshire Infantry Regt and sent out to France, when he met with his sad end. On enlistment he was being employed by the Sparking Plug Co, but had previously worked at the Rugby Portland Cement Co at Newbold for a considerable time. He was a bright youth, and much sympathy is expressed with his parents in their sad bereavement.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

We regret to learn that Major Darnley is lying very ill in hospital in Malta.

Lieut-Col F F Johnstone is returning to the command of the 2nd Battalion the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Temporary Lieut W C Muriel, of the 9th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been promoted Captain as from the 1st of July.

Capt E R Hopewell, of the 7th Worcestershire Regt, who was wounded in the recent fighting in France, has been awarded the Military Cross. He is a son of Mr E W Hopewell, formerly of Rugby.

MOTOR LORRY FATALITY.

Attempting to board a motor lorry in motion, Corporal Edgar Percival Haddock, of the Royal Engineers, stationed at Welford, Rugby, fell and sustained severe internal injuries, from which he died soon after admission to Northampton Hospital, on Friday last week. At the inquest, held at the hospital on Saturday evening, a verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned. Corpl Haddock, who was 19 years of age, was a son of Mr Edgar Augustus Haddock, the director and principal of the Leeds College of Music and the director of the Mayfair School of Music. He was a motor engineer, and at the time of the accident was working with other members of his Company on the telegraph wires on the main road between Northampton and Rugby. He was located at Rugby for a time.

FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT NEAR RUGBY.

TWO OFFICERS KILLED.

As the result of a collision between two aeroplanes near Rugby on Thursday afternoon one of the machines crashed to the ground, and the occupants, Lieuts Rogers and de Frece, of the Royal Flying Corps, were killed instantly. The other machine made a safe descent, saw the occupants were uninjured.

In consequence of the accident a concert, which was to have been given on behalf of a Soldiers’ Comforts Fund, was postponed.

LETTERS FROM “ E ” COMPANY MEN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—As one of the old “ E ” Company Terriers, I am writing a few lines to let you know that some of us are still plodding along.

Since we came out to France some 17 months ago we have been practically under shell fire the whole of the time, with the exception of about a fortnight, when we were going to have a rest, but were recalled to have another spell in the trenches. Although up till the present time we have not been what we called “ over the top,” we have done some excellent work, for which we have been greatly praised by the various commanders. For one to say that he had not been away from the Battalion an hour during this long period of trench life hardly seems credible, but this is the case with the majority of us. All through the winter we had to keep pumps going, as the water was very often up to our thighs, and overflowed into the tops of gum boots, which we were provided with for winter trench work. Then, again, we had wiring to do at night. Doubtless, if our neighbour across the way could not find us sufficient work one way, he would do so by shelling our wire and trenches. During our tour we have experienced shell of all calibre. Among those we received there was one which we named “ Gommy Lizz ”— a most objectionable neighbour, for when it exploded it would throw pieces of metal with razor-like edges. The largest of these bombs weighed about 200lbs.

I must not forgot to tell you of the things that happen behind the lines in the way of amusements. There are three Pierrot troupes, who used to give us some splendid turns. Then, again, there is the cinematograph. This we must thank the B.S.A for. It is a splendid machine, and included engine and dynamo for lighting purposes.

Now we have the Divisional Band, which plays to our Battalion in turn. It is composed of all the best musicians in the Division. When hearing this it makes us wish we were in the Park at Rugby instead of this place.

I must now return to the trench life, as I think this is our most important work. We have been in the great offensive, for which we were highly praised, and I might also say we have been in the great advance, but am very sorry to say we lost some of our best pals. The work of our guns, both large and small, has been excellent at this point. I will now close, leaving us all in the best of spirits and health,—I remain, yours sincerely, A. V. A.

August 2, 1916.

A TREACHEROUS GERMAN.

DEAR —-— Just a few lines in haste to let you know I am all right. No doubt by now you will know we have been in for it. We have lost very nearly all of the Company. I am the only sergeant left. We have no officers ; they are all wounded or killed. We thought none of us would get through alive. We smashed them up with a seven hours’ bombardment, and then went for them. We got into their second line, and stopped there for about two hours. The slaughter was awful ; there were heaps of dead. Captain — was killed going over, two lieutenants were wounded, and the others we do not know anything about. We sent about 35 prisoners back from their front line to ours. I stood talking to the sergeant-major at the time, and one of the Germans asked for a drink of water. One of our men gave him one, and as soon as he had had a drink he snatched up a rifle that stood by the trench and shot our Company sergeant-major through both legs. I need not say what became of him. I am glad I am all right, thank God ; but their are a good many that have gone. Just fancy, it took two years to train the Battalion, and they were cut up in about two hours. But I will not say any more about it ; I want to try and forget it. GEORGE.

To Employers

Employers are reminded that it is an offence under the Munitions of War Acts 1915 and 1916, punishable by Fine not exceeding £50, for any person to Employ anyone who has been engaged in a Controlled Establishment within Six Weeks from the date of leaving unless he or she can produce a Leaving Certificate (Form M.T. 23), or a Certificate issued by the Chairman of a Munitions Tribunal.

The attention of Employers is directed to Statutory Rule No. 121 relating to Certificates, also to M.M. 14, being a Memorandum for the guidance of Employers in regard to Leaving Certificates which can be obtained upon application at any Labour Exchange.

The British Thomson-Houston Co. Ltd.
Willans & Robonson Limited.

PROSPETS OF DEARER BREAD.—There has recently been a substantial advance in the price of flour. Within three weeks it has risen by 8s a sack, and it is very possible that the effect will be that householders will have to pay more for their bread in the near future. Sugar continues to be scarce and dear, and the Sugar Commission has just issued posters urging economy in the use of this very essential article of food.

DEATHS.

HARVEY. Killed in France on July 1st, 1916, Lance-Corporal Harvey, 1st Hampshire Regiment, son of Mrs. R. Harvey, Windsor Street, Rugby, aged 35.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

LEACH.—In loving memory of our dear son, Percy John Leach, who was killed at Sulva Bay, Gallipoli, on August 6,1915.
“ A light is from our household gone,
A voice we loved is still;
A place is vacant in our hearts
The world can never fill.
He went away to a distant land,
And fought his country’s foes;
He there was kept by Death’s grim hand :
To return to his home no more.”
—From his FATHER & MOTHER, BROTHERS & SISTER.

ROWBOTTOM.—In loving memory of Corporal S. Rowbottom, Oxford and Bucks L.I., who died of wounds received in action at Ypres, August 12, 1915. Buried near Poperinghe.
“ There isn’t much we did not share since our school-days begun ;
The same old work, the same old play, the same old sport and fun,
The same old chance that laid you out, but winked and let us through,
The same old life, the same old death, ‘Good-bye’ and ‘God bless you.’ ”
—From FRANK and ALBERT (B.E.F.).

WORMLEIGHTON..—In loving memory of Frederick James Wormleighton, R.E., killed August 9th, 1915 (In France).
“ In the midst of life we are in death.”
—From his loving mother, brothers, and sisters.

31st Jul 1915. Shirts, Socks and Wild Thyme

WILD THYME NEEDED FOR WAR PURPOSES.

AN OPPORTUNITY FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN.

Many people are anxious to help their country in the present crisis, and children will be interested to learn that there is a way in which they can assist. Wild thyme, which grows plentifully in certain localities—and also the cultivated variety for the matter of that—forms the basis of an important disinfectant, of which there is just now a great shortage.

At Rugby School Chemical Laboratory arrangements have been made in connection with some work asked for by the War Office, by which large quantities of thyme can be dealt with.

Here is a splendid opportunity for school children to render valuable aid, and an appeal is made to boys and girls of the district to collect as much thyme as they possibly can during the next six weeks, and forward the same to Mr B B Dickinson, 5 Barby Road, Rugby.

Of course, it is expected that this will be done voluntarily, as there is no fund from which payment can be made ; but no doubt many children will be glad during their holidays to gather the thyme growing wild in the locality near their homes, and if in each village community one or two leading residents will interest themselves in the scheme, and see that the thyme when collected is duly despatched to Mr Dickinson, their assistance will be much appreciated.

In most large gardens, too, there is sure to be a certain quantity of the cultivated thyme in the portion allotted to herbs, and this will also prove most acceptable. Anyone willing to contribute or help in any way is invited to communicate with Mr Dickinson, who will be glad to give further information.

SHIRTS AND SOCKS WANTED FOR “ E ” COMPANY.

Mrs Spencer, 17 High Street, Rugby appeals to the people of Rugby on behalf of the Rugby boys of the old “ E ” Company, serving in France, for shirts and socks, or subscriptions for purchasing same. The boys are badly in need of both shirts and socks, and Mrs Spencer will be pleased to receive same at her residence to forward to them. Some have already been sent out, but many more are needed, as there are between 60 and 70 boys of the old “ E ” Company serving in France.

APPRECIATION OF RUGBY LANDLADIES’ MESSAGE.

To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—Seeing in a copy of your excellent paper a message for “ the boys from the landladies,” I now take the opportunity on behalf of my comrades of letting you know how much the letter, or rather message, was appreciated,

I myself received the paper while in the Red Cross Hospital at Giza, Cairo, Egypt, where I am recovering from wounds received in Gallipoli, and after perusing its columns I blue-pencilled the message and re-posted this good old Advertiser to my chum on the Peninsula. A few days afterwards I received a letter telling how the paper was passed from hand to hand along the trenches of my regiment (the Inniskillings), and how the message brought memories back and gave the battalion something to talk about—for landladies were the sole topic in the trenches for the next week, and all were saying how they would enjoy themselves in Rugby when they had completed the job on hand, viz, dealing out to their “ Oriental friends ” a very-much-needed lesson.

Well, I will close now, wishing you and your paper the best of luck. Hoping I am not intruding on your valuable time, and at the same time thanking the people who inserted the message,—I am, sir, yours truly,

C BEST (Bandsman),
Inniskillings,
Red Cross Hospital, Giza, Cairo, Egypt.
July 15th, 1915.

NEW BILTON GUARDSMAN’S EXPERIENCES.

Pte George Walden, of the 2nd Coldstream Guards, who went out to the front with the original Expeditionary Force, is visiting his patents at 20 Campbell Street, New Bilton, on sick leave, having been wounded in the wrist at La Bassee on June 15th. During the ten months that he was at the front Pte Walden took part in the big engagements in which the British were concerned, vis, the Retreat from Mons, the Battle of the Aisne, the first attempt on Ypres, and the glorious charge in the La Bassee brickfield. In his opinion the worst engagement, however was the rearguard action in the retreat from Mons, when the British covered 186 miles in eight days. Personally, Pte Walden has been very lucky, for although practically the whole of the original battalion to which he belongs has been wiped out, it was ten months before he was hit, although on more than one occasion he has had narrow escapes. On one occasion during the fighting round Ypres he had an exceedingly close shave. Being a staunch teetotaller, he refused tea with rum in it, and went out to fetch some water. The Germans caught sight of him, however, and opened fire with a machine gun. Realising his danger, he fell on to his stomach, and crawled the remainder of the way. On his return he was again fired upon, but luckily reached the lines safely. Our representative then asked Pte Walden what was his opinion of the personnel of the German army, and whether the stories to the effect that it was not so good now as at the beginning of the war were true ? In reply, he stated that there was little doubt but that the flower of the German Army had been destroyed, but the present troops were quite as good as their predecessors in trench warfare. It was in advances and retirements, however, that the difference was apparent, and in these directions the German troops of to-day were vastly inferior to those Germans who faced the British in the early days of the campaign. The original Prussian Guards were a fine body of fighters, but by the Kaiser’s orders they were pitted against the British Brigade of Guards, who completely wiped them out. Pte Walden paid a tribute to the marksmanship of the German troops and to their effective use of the hand-bombs. In conclusion, he wished to remind readers through the medium of this paper that the most acceptable gift at the front is “ Woodbine ” cigarettes, which are in greater request than any other brand.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—A party of nineteen wounded soldiers from the “ Ashlawn ” Hospital, Rugby, were very kindly entertained on Tuesday last week, by Mr and Mrs Wilcox, of “ The Knob,” Stretton-on-Dunsmore. The party, in charge of a nurse, arrived about three o’clock by break, which Mr Wilcox had sent for them, and various amusements, including whist, were indulged in till four o’clock, when tea was provided indoors, as, owing to the uncertain weather, it was not thought advisable to sit outside. After tea the party spent the time strolling round the garden. A start was made for home about six o’clock. The wounded men were very hearty in their thanks, and were loudly cheered by the villagers when they left. On the kind invitation of Mr and Mrs Wilcox, many of the inhabitants assembled to meet the soldiers, and were hospitably entertained afterwards. Among the wounded guests were some men who were present with their regiments when the King inspected the famous 9th Division on the London Road, a few days before their departure to the Dardanelles. The drive down the London Road was, therefore, particularly interesting to those men.

STOCKTON.

GRENADE-THROWER WOUNDED.—Recently Messrs F W Neal and Thomas Neal went to London to see their brother Jack, who lies badly wounded in the King George Hospital. Jack Neal was one of 25 picked men who were instructed to throw hand-grenades into the German trenches, which were only about 13 yards away. Before throwing the soldier pulls a piece out of the ball, which leaves him only a few moments before it goes off. Somehow one that Jack Neal was going to throw went off in his hand, which it very badly damaged. The extent he does not yet know. He has part of a finger off and one hanging loose ; he is also badly wounded down the right leg, and it is said it is miraculous that he escaped alive. Jack Neal enlisted in December. The other week he just escaped with his life. His company were asleep in the trenches with someone on watch when his pal (Tibbs, from Napton) shouted to them to get out quick. He had to call several times before the worn-out soldiers heard him, and just as they bolted to safety a shrapnel shell came down where they had been asleep. It killed the fellow who followed Jack Neal when racing from the spot, and smashed up Neal’s rifle.

SAPPER C W WALTON’S LUCKY ESCAPE.

Sapper Charles W Walton, of the Royal Engineers, youngest son of Mr E Walton, 81 Claremont Road, recently had a remarkable escape from death at the front. On July 1st, at Festubert, he was working with a small party, including Sapper Snook, of Rugby, who, as we reported last week, was also wounded, when he was struck by a bullet in the region of his heart. Upon examination it was found that the bullet had struck a pay book and wallet, which were in a pocket immediately over Sapper Waltons heart. These evidently diverted the course of the bullet, and saved the young man’s life. The book and wallet, together with the contents of the latter, were considerably damaged, and at first sight bear the appearance of having been gnawed by a mouse. Sapper Walton joined the Army in August, and is now in the Sussex County Hospital, Brighton, where he is doing well. On Friday last week his photograph appeared in a daily paper in connection with a garden party given for wounded soldiers there.

THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY IN EGYPT.

A Rugby member of the Warwickshire Yeomanry in writing to a friend, states that they are now encamped in one of the best parts of Alexandria, close to the sea, where there is some fine bathing. The regiment has been turned into an army of occupation, so that there is little prospect at present of them seeing any fighting ; and this, the writer says, has given rise to a certain amount of grumbling, the men not liking their inactivity. He states that he receives the Rugby Advertiser each week, and notices that recruiting is still going on, and ventures the opinion that some of those who are hanging back ought to go to Egypt and see some of the wounded Australians, who had been brought back from the Dardanelles. These had not only bullet wounds, but deliberate atrocities had been committed upon them by the Turks. “ If these men could only see such sights as we who are here do Lord Kitchener would have 3,000,000 men.” At present, he says, the Yeomanry are doing routine work, principally training the horses they received to replace those which were on the Wayfarer. They recently experienced a dust storm. The wind blew half a gale, carrying dust and sand with it, and filling everything with fine sand. The temperature was 108 in the shade and 132 in the sun, and the men of the regiment, who were in “ stalls ” at the time, went into the sea and stood with the water up to their chins for two hours. The storm lasted from 9 a.m to 3.30 p.m ; and the men, he facetiously adds, were “ eating ” sand for two days afterwards. He concludes with the opinion that there is no place to beat Warwickshire, with its green fields, even if it is cold and wet. One can have too much sand and sunshine.

BRITISH TROOPS IN A FAVOURABLE POSITION.

RUGBY SOLDIER’S OPINION.

Bombardier Turner, of the Royal Field Artillery, whose home is at 21 Plowman Street, and who has been at the front since the commencement of the war, visited his home for a few days this week. This is the second time Bombardier Turner has been home on leave, the first occasion being in January last. Although he took part in the retreat from Mons, and has been in most of the great fights since then, he has, fortunately, so far escaped injury. Nevertheless, he has had many narrow escapes. He is now attached to the grenade section with the Royal Engineers, and his duty consists in keeping the infantry men well supplied with hand grenades and operating the trench mortars. In his opinion, the British force is now in a better position than it has been in since the commencement of the war-in fact, had they been as strong last August the retreat from Mons would never have taken place. They now had plenty of ammunition, good serviceable guns and men, and, he added : “ If Mr Lloyd George will only keep on giving us ammunition like he is now doing we shall be all right.” Life at the front is evidently not all hard work, although there is plenty of that and to spare, for Bombardier Turner informed our representative that the trenches have now been made very comfortable, with arrangements for pumping out water in case of floods, and facilities for games are provided. Sports of various kinds are arranged in the rest camps, and recently a horse-jumping competition for a small gold cup, presented by King Albert, took place between the British and the Belgians, ending in a win for the latter. In an international football match the British Cavalry Division defeated the Belgians, and secured the medals given by the King of Belgium. Cricket and other games are also indulged in, and Bombardier Turner, who left on Thursday for the front, volunteered the information that the troops were quite cheerful and only waiting to “ slash it across the Germans.”

RUGBY MEN WIN THE D.C.M.

News has just been received in Rugby that one of the first volunteers to enlist from the B.T.H Works has been decorated with the Distinguished Conduct Medal. This decoration has been awarded to Pte A Hotz, of the 1st East Surrey Regiment, for conspicuous gallantry on Hill 60, where he placed himself in front of a communication trench occupied by the enemy, and on the enemy advancing attacked them with hand grenades and dispersed them. Pte Hotz was employed in the construction department at the B.T.H Works, and the members of the staff are naturally very pleased that this award for gallantry has been received by one of their number.

Lce-Corpl P V Stent, of the 5th Service Batt Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, whose parents live at 28 Worcester Street, Rugby, has received the D.C.M for valour in the trenches, He was a bomb-thrower, and succeeded in taking a trench almost entirely by himself. He brought back with him an explosive mine and showed it to his Colonel. Lce-Corpl Stent was for seven years in “ E ” Company, Rugby, and when he enlisted at the beginning of the war was employed as a moulder at Willans & Robinsons.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been recruited at Rugby Drill Hall during the past week :-H Smith, R.W.R ; J Ryan, Scottish Rifles ; J Clowes, R H Lucas, R S Hirons, H R Hirons, and H Matthews, East Kent Regiment ; E Humphries Webb, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; E J Dalzel, J Welch, and H Lines. R.A.M.C ; C A Goodman, R.F.A ; J Andrews, R.G.A.

More recruits are still wanted, and arrangements have been made for each town to raise its own Company, to be drilled together. At present those who are willing to join are asked to send in their names to the Recruiting Officer, Drill Hall, Rugby. When sufficient men have been obtained to start training they will be called up.