22nd Jan 1916. A Splendid Family Record

A SPLENDID FAMILY RECORD.

There are very few families in the country who can show such a good record as that which attaches to the family of the late Mr T J Neville, of Dunchurch. Of seven sons, four are now on active service, and the other three have been through the ordeal of battle. The four now serving King and country are :-

Second-Lieut G H Neville, of the Somerset Light Infantry, who has been mentioned in despatches and awarded the Military Cross for Valour.

Lieut S L Neville, now serving as second lieutenant in the 2nd Royal Bucks Hussars, served in the Rhodesian Volunteers and Warwickshire Yeomanry during the Boar War and South African Campaign, and more recently in German West Africa.

Capt F L Neville, of the 6th Northamptons, “ somewhere in France.”

Trooper John Neville, of the Rhodesian Rifles, now fighting in German East Africa after going through the German West Campaign.

The sons who have done their bit and are now non-combatant are :-

Tom Neville, who went out to the Boar War with the Warwickshire Yeomanry and received wounds in the arm which incapacitated him from further military service. He is now in Pretoria.

Richard (the eldest son), also served in the same campaign, and Benjamin, a corporal in the Imperial Light Horse, has just received his discharge after going through the German West African operations.

Lieut S L Neville has just been home to pay a visit to his mother, who now resides in Rugby.

7th WARWICKSHIRE WOUNDED.

In the official list of wounded under date January 8th, the names of Pte M Philpot (3202), Lance-Corporal Robotham (1480), Pte E Blower, and Segt A Oldbury, of the 1/7th Warwickshires, appear.

RUGBY SOLICITOR WOUNDED & GASSED.

Mr C F E Dean, of the firm of Messrs Pulman & Dean, solicitors Rugby, who joined the 9th Public Schools Battalion as a private, in now in hospital at Eastbourne. While in the trenches he was hit by a gas bomb, and in addition to being gassed was wounded in the leg. The effects of the poison gas have left him somewhat deaf and very weak, but he hopes to recover in course of time.

WELL-KNOWN B.T.H. EMPLOYE KILLED IN ACTION. SECOND-CORPL. H. E. GOVETT.

We regret to announce that Second-Corpl H E Govett, of the 67th Field Company Royal Engineers, was killed in action on the Gallipoli Peninsula on December 19th. Corpl Govett, who had been employed at the B.T.H. several years, was well-known locally, and was very popular both in the works and the town generally. An Australian by birth, Corpl Govett was educated at Geelong College, Australia, and came to England in 1907 and studied engineering at the Crystal Palace Engineering School. He came to the B.T.H. at the end of 1910 as a special course apprentice, and went through all the departments, including the Drawing Office, and when War broke out he was in the Testing Department. He joined the Royal Engineers as a sapper in September, 1914, and quickly rose to the rank of second corporal. He was a member of the Rugby Club, Rugby Lawn Tennis Club, and the Rugby Golf Club, an enthusiastic motor cyclist and all-round good sportsman, and during his stay in the town he made many friends.

[He is remembered on the BTH Memorial]

FORMER RUGBY RESIDENT GOES DOWN ON THE “ PERSIA.”

News has been received in Rugby from an authentic source that the W E Edgcombe, who was amongst those who went down on the S.S. Persia, which was torpedoed in the Mediterranean recently, was Mr William Edward Edgcombe, who was formerly assistant to Mr G W Walton, locomotive foreman at Rugby. Mr Edgcombe, it appears, held a post in India after he left Rugby, but he paid a visit to England about two months ago. The news of his death, in such tragic circumstances, will be deplored by those who knew him in the town, and sympathy will be felt with the bereaved relatives.

TWO RUGBY TERRITORIALS GAIN THE D.C.M.

Rugbeians will learn with pleasure that two members of the old E Company, 7th R.W.R, have been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for brave conduct in the field. The men thus honoured are Sergt W T Bromage, who, at the commencement of the war, was employed at Nuneaton Railway Station, and Pte L G Eaton, son of Mr. Eaton, of 93 South Street, Rugby.

The deed for which they have received the decoration took place on May 28th, 1915, and the facts of the case were reported at the time in the Rugby Advertiser, as under : “ On Friday night, May 28th, there was an exciting episode in which the Rugby lads came through with flying colours, but with further loss. The following are, as far as I could gather, the details :—A party, including Corpl W Bromage, Ptes L Hill, L Eaton, and P Hall, were out on the listening post, when a party of Germans came out and tried to surprise them. The enemy opened fire, killing L (Bleb) Hill, a Newbold lad, and wounding L Eaton. The latter stuck to his post, and continued to fire until help arrived, consisting of a party under Sergt Ward. I expect the enemy gave it up for a bad job, and upon examination by our chaps we found they had left one dead. Our men brought him in, and he proved to be an iron cross man. His rifle has been despatched to England, and will some day repose in the Rugby Drill Hall as a war trophy. The Company has been congratulated by the Colonel, as undoubtedly by their watchfulness and presence of mind they saved an awkward situation. Corpl Bromage has since been promoted Lance-Sergeant.”

Rugby may well be proud of such men, who have added lustre to the fame of the old “ E ” Company, and all will join with us in congratulating them.

Pte Eaton, who is only nineteen years of age, has also been awarded the “ Croix de Guerre ” by the President of the French Republic in recognition of his service. He has resided with his parents in Rugby for eight years, and has been a member of the battalion for nearly three years, being formerly in the Leamington Company. When the war broke out he was employed as a cleaner in the L & N W Railway Company loco department.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

About fifty men have attested under the Group System at Rugby during the past week, the proportion between married and single being about equal. The cavalry and several other units are now open, and men whose groups have not yet been called up can join these if they come up to the standard by signing up for immediate service. During the past week a number of men have availed themselves of this privilege.

All men wishing to join under the Group System must take their registration cards to the Drill Hall.

In future the Drill Hall will be closed at 4.30 p.m. on Saturdays.

The Rugby Fortress Company—now designated the 220th Army Troops Company—have now gone out of the country. A portion of the company has been sent to the East.

RUGBY ENGINEERS OPPOSE COMPULSION.

At a special quarterly meeting of the Rugby No 2 Branch of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers, held on Friday evening last week, a discussion took place on the Government’s Compulsion Bill. A vote was taken, and it was unanimously decided to oppose conscription under all considerations in view of the fact that, in the opinion of those present, a case had not yet been made out to justify such a measure.

Another resolution, calling upon the Rugby Trades and Labour Council to summon a meeting of the rank and file of the unions, to be held in the largest hall available, was also passed, as it was thought that the ordinary members, as well as the delegates to the Council, should have an opportunity of debating and deciding on the matter.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

Absent Without Leave.

W Burton, Hillmorton ; S Fisher, Chester Street, Rugby; Joseph Lane, Harborough Magna ; and E Lima, 52 Pennington Street, Rugby, were summoned by the B.T.H, Rugby.

It was alleged that Burton absented himself at Christmas time, and he replied that he was ill. He was told that for not sending in a medical certificate to the firm he would be fined 5s.

The complaint against Fisher was adjourned to see how the defendant went on, the Chairman advising him to give up the drink.

Lane was stated to have absented himself from work, and was said not to have returned to his employment yet. The defendant, a boy, said that he gave notice to the firm that he was going to leave, and the Chairman pointed out that leaving after giving notice was not an offence. The firm stated that the youth had started work elsewhere. The Chairman said he was not entitled to do that, but must wait six weeks. The case was dismissed without penalty, the Chairman remarking that defendant had probably got his new master into trouble by getting work with him, and it would be for the B.T.H to take what steps they wished against the firm.

Lima was fined 15s for absenting himself without leave.

MAKING AMENDS TO THE B.T.H.

A short time ago an article appeared in a Sunday paper which conveyed the inference that the B.T.H, Rugby, was included in the ramifications of the great German Trust known as the A.E.G. The B.T.H Company at once took steps to deny that they had anything to do with the German Trust, and commenced an action for libel against the newspaper and the writer, “ John Briton,” of the article.

In the same Journal on Sunday last the following retraction from John Briton appeared:—

When I wrote last on the German influence in the electrical industry, some two months ago, I gave an account of the extraordinary ramifications of the great German Trust, called briefly the A.E.G of Berlin, and in this connection, before I go further, I desire to clear up an unfortunate misunderstanding. Among the “ Allied and subordinate ” companies of which I gave a list, I mentioned the British Thomson-Houston Company of Rugby. I did not say that this company was owned or controlled by the A.E.G, but this inference has been drawn from my article, and I therefore desire to say that it is unfounded.

The truth is that the B.T.H of Rugby is mainly controlled by the General Electric Company of Schenectady, which in its turn is a descendant of the Thomson-Houston Company of America. The Thomson-Houston Company in its day sold its European patents to a number of companies on this side of the Atlantic, some of which in due course were absorbed by the A.E.G and some by the G.E Company.

The British Thomson-Houston Company belongs, as I have said, to the latter category. It is true that the A.E.G purchased the German rights under the patents of the G.E Co and B.T.H Co in exchange for the American and British rights under its patents, but I am glad to be able to state that the German company has no control over, or interest in, either the American or British company, and I regret if any other meaning has been read into my article, and if any harm has been done to the B.T.H Co thereby. I am also able to state that the A.E.G has no control over the electric lamp business in this country, but, on the contrary, by reason of British patents, it was obliged to purchase from British companies all such lamps as it sold here.

EMPIRE CIGARETTES – THEN BACK TO THE TRENCHES.

Mr B Morris, of the Empire, has received the following letter from Q.M.S. Tomlinson, from which it will be seen that our local Territorials are still in the fighting :—

Dear Mr Morris,—At last I am able to acknowledge receipt of your kind gift of 6,000 cigarettes to the Rugby boys of old E Company.

They arrived on the 11th, so must have been delayed considerably in transit.

I was able to distribute them very quickly, as both the Transport and Maxim gunners were within easy reach.

All the boys wish me to express their grateful thanks to you for your kindness, and many, I know, are writing to thank you personally. When your gift arrived we were on the last day of a week’s rest in a little French village some three miles from the firing line. It was an exceedingly enjoyable week, and greatly appreciated by all. Duties were as light as possible. The weather was fairly fine, football matches were arranged and played, and in the evenings concerts were promoted. All these, with the relief from fatigue and tension which is ever present in trench warfare, helped to make us a happy crowd. I think it was the most enjoyable week we have spent out here.

The following day we returned to the music of the guns and the one hundred and one trench duties.

This morning our artillery opened a heavy fire on the German trenches and barbed wire, which soon drew a spirited reply from the Boches, and for an hour and a half the ground and air vibrated from the roar of cannon and bursting shells. A four-inch shell fell on one of our company dug-outs; fortunately it did not burst, otherwise I am afraid eight of our men, would have had a bad chance.

Before I close I should like once again to thank you and also all our good friends of Rugby for their kindness, and for all they have done for our welfare and comfort.—With kind regards,

I am yours sincerely,

A. C. TOMLINSON, C.Q.M.S.

COMFORTS FOR RUGBY SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

FORMATION OF A TOWN COMMITTEE.

Hitherto there has been no organised effort to raise funds for sending parcels to all soldiers and sailors belonging to Rugby who are serving their country. Only those in the Territorial units have been provided for, the others being left to the solicitude of their friends, but a representative committee has now been formed to make the public effort more comprehensive by looking after all the men from Rugby, and we have pleasure in publishing the following letter from the Chairman of the Rugby Urban Council:

DEAR SIR.—It has been suggested that the men from Rugby who have enlisted in units other than local Territorial ones should be included in a scheme to send them tobacco and other small comforts which they may need from time to time. For some months past Mrs West and Mrs C P Nickalls have been sending parcels to the men of the Rugby Howitzer Battery and the Rugby men of E Company, 7th Royal Warwicks, and many appeals have been received from men in other units with which they have been unable to deal owing to the lack of funds. A representative committee has now been formed to deal with the matter, and subscriptions, which are urgently needed, may be sent to the treasurer, Captain Thomas, United Counties Bank Ltd, Market Place, Rugby, or to myself addressed to the Benn Buildings, Rugby.

The neighbouring towns and villages have all been looking after their fighting men for some time past, and it is felt that Rugby should not be behind.

It is a fact that the men most keenly appreciate not only the little comforts sent to them, but more particularly the kind thought of their fellow-townsmen which prompts the sending of the parcels.

Yours truly,

J. J. McKinnell,
Benn Buildings, Chairman Of Council
High Street, Rugby,
January 19th, 1916.

The committee has been made as representative as possible, and includes nominations from all the large works and trading institutions, the Trades and Labour Council, and the School (two, house masters).

From this committee an executive has been formed, consisting of Mr J J McKinnell, chairman ; Capt Thomas, United Counties Bank, hon , treasurer; Mrs West, Bawnmore, Bilton, hon secretary; Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs Thomas, Messrs A Adnitt, W Flint, F E Hands, G Gauntley, and W F Wood.

The Women’s Volunteer Reserve are acting as the hon secretary’s clerical staff.

The methods under consideration for raising funds are :- A flag day, special entertainments, collection funds at all the large works and by employers of labour, subscription lists at the banks, and a house-to-house collection, for which, if possible, use will be made of the organisation which was set going for the Prince of Wales’s Fund.

WELCOME HOME—A GOOD SUGGESTION.

Thank God ! arrived at last. A deep sigh, a fleeting glance up and down as the weary, mud-stained soldier in his bearskin jacket, his knapsack, carbine, and full active service kit, steps on the platform, but as he sees the old familiar objects his face lights up with a smile. He knows full well it is home, dear old home. It does not dismay him that he has to trudge nine or ten miles to seek that sacred spot, “ home,” which has been ever in his mind during the 14 weary months of hardship and danger spent at Ypres, Loos, and Neuve Chapelle.

In answer to a question : “ Why don’t you stay the night at Rugby ?” comes the answer : “ Nay, lad, if it was twice the distance I would gladly foot it, for our leave is so short and every hour appears a day to us.”

And so they trudge cheerfully off, although no friends are there to meet them with a welcome at the station.

I am sure there are scores of kindly disposed persons in Rugby owning motor cars who would gladly meet those war-worn soldiers who have been fighting so gallantly the fierce and callous enemy. I am sure such an influential body as the Chamber of Trade might well take the matter up and add considerably to their laurels. I have met local soldiers arriving at Rugby between 10 and 11 p.m. who have had to trudge to Marton, Long Itchington, Swinford, and some have even walked to Nuneaton in their anxiety to lose a minute in seeing their dear ones at home.

It would not be a difficult matter to post a list of those sympathetic people owning motors or tri-cars at the L. and N.-W. Station, who are willing to give our brave lads a lift. There is a public telephone at the station with which to communicate to the town quickly, and, could this be accomplished, I am sure it would earn the heartfelt gratitude of the mud-stained lads from the trenches.

Thanking you, Sir, in anticipation, yours sincerely, J. TWYFORD.

 

Advertisements

15th Jan 1916. Christmas Gifts for Local Territorials

CHRISTMAS GIFTS FOR LOCAL TERRITORIALS.

Mr A Adnitt, Hon Sec of the committee for sending comforts and Christmas gifts to local Territorials on service, has received a number of letters of acknowledgment and thanks. Among them are the following :—

DEAR MR ADNITT,—Will you please convey to the “ Rugby Comforts Committee ” our very hearty thinks for the splendid gift of puddings, socks, and dainties which we have received this Christmas.

We received two parcels of socks, and these were greatly appreciated, as we have had very wet weather lately, and it has been impossible to keep dry feet. We also received the box of books and dainties. The puddings arrived Christmas Day, so we had them for dinner on Sunday and Monday, and greatly enjoyed them.

We are very grateful to our many friends, who have done so much for our comfort, and we had as enjoyable a time as was possible under existing conditions. We should also like to express to the Committee our keen appreciation of the tremendous amount of hard work which they are doing for our welfare and comfort. With best wishes for the coming year, I beg to remain,

Yours sincerely,
G. Hopewell., B.S.M,
(Rugby Howitzer Battery).

Quartermaster A C Tomlinson, of the Rugby Infantry, writes from France, under date Dec 29, 1915 :-

I am pleased to tell you that the puddings arrived safely on Christmas night, disappointing us by one day. However, they were just as fully enjoyed the following day. All the Rugby boys wish me to express their grateful thanks to the Territorial Comforts Committee and donors of puddings for their kindness. It will perhaps be pleasing for them to know that the puddings were the only reminder of Christmas that we had. Other than that, the day was the same as any other. It could not be otherwise. We were on trench duties, consequently nothing could be relaxed. The day passed quietly on our front, except for artillery fire ; this was about as active as usual, intensifying towards evening.

One of our platoons—many of them Rugby men—had the pleasure of mingling with a gun team of the Rugby Howitzer Battery.

Your letter of the 21st overwhelms one with a sense of what the T.C.C. is doing for our comfort, and it is difficult for me to sufficiently express our thanks. The articles you mention will be most useful and very welcome. I will let you know when they arrive, and will do my best to distribute them so that no one is missed. Of course, I cannot reach men who are in hospital or on detached work away from our near neighbourhood.

I cannot close without asking you to express our thanks to Mrs West for her good wishes and interest—not only to ourselves, but to our friends at home.

In a subsequent letter dated the 10th inst. Q.M.S. Tomlinson acknowledges the receipt of the four bales of “ Tommies ” cookers, shirts, socks, sponges, etc, which had been distributed. He adds: “ Everybody is delighted with the cookers and sponges. Both are most useful. Capt Payton, who is in command of our company, was particularly struck with them, and will shortly convey his thanks to the T.C.C. On behalf of my comrades of the old E Company I cannot sufficiently thank the T.C.C. and our good friends of Rugby. I can but say how deeply we appreciate their kindness.”

MOUTH ORGANS AND OTHER INSTRUMENTS WANTED.

DEAR EDITOR,—Just a line or two from a few of the Rugby boys who are doing their bit in France. Although our battalion is not a local regiment, there are a good many boys here from Rugby with us, so you can imagine your paper is well known here. . . . We are having a very rough time of it in the trenches just now, and are experiencing a little of what some of the boys went through last winter. Up to the knees in water and sludge is now getting a common occurrence, but the spirit of the lads in these hard times is wonderful. Small things of this kind cannot help but put a feeling of confidence in one’s mind and foreshadow an optimistic view of what this unconquerable spirit will do when the time for bigger operations comes. However, it is when we are out of the trenches that we need something to take the place of the excitement which we leave behind. The chief thing that appeals to us is, as yon may imagine, music, and never are we so happy as when we are murdering the chorus of some popular song. But what we want most is a few mouth organs, for many of us can play them ; and we should esteem it a favour if you could find room to publish this letter in the good old R.A., in the hope that it will catch the eyes of some kind-hearted readers, who will do their best for us. I am sure that if the good people at home could only see the pleasure that is derived from these generous gifts, they would only be too pleased to grant us this small request,-—Yours truly, Bandsman J GUBBINS, 170, A Co 10th Batt R.B, British Expeditionary Force, France.

OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOYS ON SERVICE.

The following are extracts from typical letters received from “ old boys ” of St Matthew’s School, by Mr R H Myers, headmaster :—

Writing from Egypt, Lce-Corporal P Labraham, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, says : “ I dropped across Alfred Baker at Christmas. He had been out on a frontier fight, and had just returned. Our Christmas dinner was reminiscent of old England, consisting of turkey, beef, fruit, etc. Baker and I drank a toast to the memory of our schooldays during the evening. The Museum here is very fine, and redolent of almost everything connected with ancient Egyptian life. There are mummified cats, birds, babies, cows’ heads, and, of course, an infinite number of the ordinary kind. The old Egyptians took an enormous amount of trouble to preserve their dead, some being placed in five coffins, the last of great size, and ornamented with splendid specimens of Egyptian inlaid work. The jewels here are alone worth a day to examine—golden finger-stalls from some mummies, crowns, ear-rings, bracelets, stones, and charms.”

Pte G Favell, 6th Leicestershire Regiment, writes : “ I spent Christmas Day and New Year’s Day in the trenches, and shall never forget the experience. It was pouring with rain, and we were hard at work shovelling mud out of the trenches. There was no kind of truce this year at Christmas. We always remember that the Germans are enemies, and must be treated as such. They have asked for trouble with a capital T, and they will get more than they bargained for before the ‘lads in khaki’ have finished with them. We opened the year. 1916 by presenting them with a few souvenirs in the shape of leaden pills, which may be all right to look at, but are very indigestible. There is no doubt that we have now got the upper hand in . the West, and we are looking forward to the end of the war in the near future.”

P E .Hughes, Leading Seaman, on one of his Majesty’s ships with the Grand Fleet, writes : “ We are getting it pretty rough at present somewhere in the North Sea, but it does not seem to trouble the boys, who are merry and bright as usual, and still waiting for the Huns. I am afraid there will be nothing doing, as they are getting enough from the boys in the Baltic, who are luckier than we are, though we hope to have the pleasure of meeting them yet.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut-Colonel F Dugdale, C.V.O., from the Warwickshire Yeomanry, is gazetted lieutenant-colonel in the Territorial Force Reserve.—Mr D L Hutchison has been given a commission in the Yeomanry.

The New Year honours include the conferring of the K.C.B. on Vice-Admiral R H S Bacon, C.V.O., D.S.O.

An artillery officer writes to a friend in Rugby that his battery is peculiarly well off with respect to lighting accommodation. The battery is stationed near a coal mine somewhere in France, and, by tapping a wire which supplies current to work a fan in a mine shaft, electric light is obtained in the dug-out.

Mr C J Bowen Cooke, the chief mechanical engineer for the London, and North-Western Railway, who has been gazetted major in the Engineer and Railway Staff Corps, has been connected with the L. and N.-W. R. for forty years, commencing as an apprentice in the Crewe Works, and he is the author of several works on British locomotives.

Messrs H and R S Sitwell, sons of Mrs Sitwell, of the Manor House, Leamington Hastings, and the late Canon Sitwell, were gazetted to lieutenancies in the Derbyshire Yeomanry. At the outbreak of the war both were farming in South Africa, and they at once left their farms in the care of others and joined the force which conquered German West Africa. The former has also had experience with the Germans as a prisoner, as, a few days before the surrender, while carrying despatches he got behind the German lines. Fortunately the captive period was very short, the surrender bringing his release.

“ A CERTAIN LIVELINESS.”

Mr Charles Barnwell, of 56 Manor Road, recently received a letter from his son, who is in the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the front, in which he says :- “ Two mines under the German trenches in — were successfully exploded. Rifle, machine gun, and also artillery fire was opened on the German trenches immediately the explosion took place ; the mountain gun swept the ground behind the crater at a range of 150 to 200 yards. For some time after the explosion nothing could be observed owing to the heavy cloud of dust and smoke. When the atmosphere had cleared it was seen that the corner of the parapet for quite thirty yards was completely demolished. The firing of the Howitzers was particularly effective. They obtained six direct hits on the enemy’s rear parapet, and placed the remaining rounds into the —. Almost immediately after the explosion the enemy replied with rifle grenades from their trenches, and at 10.25 a.m. their guns opened fire upon the edge of a wood, and the paths and roads leading up to our front

LAST CHANCE FOR THE SINGLE MEN.

ADVICE TO RECRUITS.

The following notice, issued by the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, was posted throughout the country on Saturday :—

GROUP SYSTEM.

Enlistment in groups will reopen on Monday, January 10, and proceed until further notice. All men between 18 and 41, both single and married, who have not attested should do so at once at the nearest recruiting office.

The month’s notice to men whose groups have been called up will commence from the day of their attestation.

Attention is called to the fact that a great deal of labour and inconvenience will be saved to the recruiting authorities if men desiring to attest will, wherever possible, do so in the area in which they have been registered under the National Registration Act. The right to attest in any area is not withdrawn, and attestation will still be accepted in any district irrespective of the area of registration ; but such men as can possibly attest in their own area are asked to assist the recruiting authorities by so doing.

The conscientious objector has already made his appearance. A tall, robust young man walked into the inquiry office at the recruiting headquarters in London on Saturday. “ I have a conscientious objection to fighting,” he began ; “ will you direct me to the proper channel for the utilisation of my services as a non-combatant ?” The young man was passed on so that his request should receive full consideration.

Outside the naval recruiting offices in the Strand chalked on a board is the warning, “ No conscientious objectors need apply.” – on the other side is an exhortation : “ Now then, you single men, don’t let grandpa join first.”

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

ANOTHER LONG LIST OF CASES.

There was a further big batch of cases to be heard before the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Monday afternoon. Professor F Tillyard presided, and the assessors present were Messrs W C Macartney (employers) and J Roberts (men), together with Messrs P E Wilks (clerk) and D G Bolland (assistant clerk).

Willans and Robinson, Rugby, complained that Frank Hancox, press tool setter, Rugby, had absented himself without leave. Defendant said he was unfit for work, and it was stated that he had not gone back to work yet. Hancox said he was 29 years old, and earned 30s a week. The Chairman : Tool setters seem to be cheap in Rugby.—Defendant: They are.—The Chairman said that, taking into consideration that his wages were not high, defendant would be fined 10s.

Nearly all the others were Coventry cases.

PAPER FAMINE PROBABLE.

DIFFICULTY OF OBTAINING RAW MATERIALS.

Many industries have been hampered by reason of the war, but it is doubtful whether any trade has faced more difficulties than the paper industry. The outlook is stated to be so serious that if the present condition of affairs continues for long there must be a paper famine in this country. Paper is made principally from three classes of materials—namely, rags, esparto (a strong fibrous grass grown in North Africa and on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea), and wood pulp. Rags are used in the manufacture of the best class of hand-made paper, but that material does not play an important part in the trade difficulties now experienced. Esparto is an important ingredient, and before the war large quantities were imported into Scotland. There is now a great difficulty in obtaining supplies, and this is one cause of the present shortage of paper and the consequent high prices. Shipping freights have increased enormously. The present rate is between 30s and 40s a ton, as compared with the pre-war rate of 2s 6d to 5s. The Scottish manufacturers of paper are considerably handicapped because of the shortage of railway trucks to carry the raw material from the ports of entry to the. districts where the paper mills are situated, while, in addition, there is a great shortage of labour at the manufactories.

Chemical dyes for colouring paper are practically unobtainable. The limited supply available is sold at a very high price ; in some cases the cost is 40s to 50s a pound, as compared with 2s before the war. Bleaching powder is largely used by manufacturers, but the bulk of this material has been commandeered by the Government. Wood pulp is mainly imported from Scandinavia. As the Germans are unable to obtain an adequate supply of cotton for the manufacture of explosives they are large buyers of wood pulp, which is said to be a good substitute for cotton. Consequently the imports of wood pulp to this country are much below the normal ; while, as in the case of other commodities, the price is very high. With the exception of rags, there are no raw materials in this country with which to make paper, and the present shortage of all kinds of paper is due to this fact. “ I have been to Scotland on three recent occasions,” said a Birmingham paper manufacturer to a newspaper representative, “ and I find the word ‘famine’ is in the mouths of all the manufacturers there. Some of the mills are standing idle because supplies of raw material cannot be obtained, and also because of the scarcity of labour.”

Germany used to send considerable quantities of paper to this country, principally vegetable parchment. That supply ceased on the out-break of war. The supply of flint paper from Belgium has also ceased, while grease-proof paper from Scandinavia is sent over in very limited quantities. It may be found necessary shortly to abandon the use of coloured paper for wrapping purposes, and shopkeepers are advised to exercise the greatest economy in the use of paper bags. Thin bank paper and super-calendered papers are very scarce.

THE NEW LIGHTING ORDER.

THE EFFECT IN RUGBY.

In Rugby on Monday night, the inhabitants both in the business and residential parts of the town, showed a general disposition to comply with the new regulations, which require a more drastic reduction of external and internal than hitherto.

The publication of the regulations in the columns of the Rugby Advertiser enabled householders to get a definite idea of the extent to which illumination must be reduced, but the methods by which results entirely satisfactory to the authorities could be obtained, were not so easy to devise. While in some cases lights were not completely shaded and a good deal of illumination found its way on to the roadway, in the main there was little to complain of, and perhaps in many instances people went to the other extreme, and the “ dull and subdued light ” permitted by the regulations was eclipsed altogether.

Many tradesmen, especially in the centre of the town, closed their places of business altogether at six o’clock, being under the impression that the streets would be so dark that customers would not venture out. But the public lamps were lighted as usual almost without modification, and the illumination they gave, combined with the light from the new moon, was sufficient to enable people to walk or ride through the streets with little or no danger of collision.

With regard to street lamps, we understand there are to be further modifications. Superintendent Clarke has commenced a tour of the town, and is ordering the extinction of lamps except at points where he considers, them to be absolutely necessary for the safety of the public, and in a few days the town will probably wear a much more sombre aspect at night than it did on Monday.

In some instances, where shopkeepers had not gone far enough to suit the requirements, further restrictions were ordered.

Speaking generally, there has been an honest attempt on the part of tradespeople to meet the requirements of the Order, but the results on Tuesday night, when police officers made an inspection of some of the principal streets, showed that quite a number of shopkeepers had not shaded their lights sufficiently. When this was pointed out to them they displayed a willingness to meet the wishes of those responsible for the carrying out of the new Order. Isolated cases of obstinacy may have been found, but these proved the exception to the rule, and suggestions to further reduce the light were in nearly every case promptly acted upon. These consisted of advice to extinguish altogether certain lamps, to close doors, to entirely draw down the blinds, or to change the colour of the shading material from red to dark green or blue.

In some: cases electric globes of the required colour have been adopted with good effect.

 

30th Oct 1915. Soldiers Appreciate the Rugby Advertiser

SOLDIERS APPRECIATE THE “ RUGBY ADVERTISER.”

DEAD COMRADE’S PHOTO RECOGNIZED IN THE TRENCHES.

Bandsman B Wilkins, of the Rifle Brigade, in a letter to a friend in Rugby, indicates that those who are in the habit of sending the Rugby Advertiser to men in the trenches are doing a service that is much appreciated. He says : “ I have just had a look at this week’s Advertiser, which one of our chaps had received, so do not trouble to send it this week In it you will see Rifleman Freeman’s photo. Well, I helped to bury him. He was a very decent fellow. I was only joking with him two or three hours before, but I didn’t know he lived at Kineton, so was surprised to see his photo in the Rugby paper. Rifleman Wilkins states that he is quite well, and hopes to come home on leave very shortly.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corporal E Wiggins, Northants Yeomanry, eldest son of Mr W Wiggins, has, been gazetted to a second-lieutenancy.

Lance-Corporal Esplin, of the 8th Seaforth Highlanders, an employe of Messrs Frost and Son, has been wounded, and is now in hospital at Rubery, near Birmingham.

Mr F G Greenhill, who some years ago held the office of assistant surveyor to the Rugby Urban District Council, and who is an ex-captain of the Rugby Football Club, has received a commission as lieutenant in the Royal Engineers, and expects to proceed abroad immediately.

Official notification has been received by Mr H Newitt, 58 Abbey Street, Rugby, that his son, Pte G V Newitt (Oxon and Bucks) is in hospital at Boulogne suffering from a severe bullet wound in the abdomen. Pte Newitt worked at the B.T.H before enlistment, and has been at the front since May, He was slightly wounded about two months ago.

BILTON RIFLEMAN WOUNDED.

Rifleman Harold Smith, of the K.R.R, whose parents live at Bilton Hill, has been wounded by shrapnel and is in hospital at Cambridge. Last week he underwent a successful operation. In a letter home, he states that the Rev W O Assheton (Rector of Bilton) has visited him

ANOTHER EMPLOYE OF MESSRS FROST AND SONS KILLED.

Official news has been received that Pte W Munnings, R.A.M.C, another employe of Messrs A .Frost & Sons, printers, Warwick Street, has been killed while attending to the wounded. Pte Munnings joined the Army in September, 1914, but was discharged on medical grounds. He entered a hospital and underwent an operation. however, and was then accepted.

HOME FROM THE FRONT.

Sergt F H Lines, of the Howitzers, son of Inspector Lines, of the Rugby Police Force, has this week been home from the front.—Pte Walter R Clarke, of the Rugby Infantry Co, whose home is at 26 George Street, Rugby, is also on furlough. Both are old St Matthew’s boys, and appear none the worse for their experiences at the war.

THE SILENT NAVY.

Pte W P Clarke, Royal Marines, of H.M.S Shannon, in a letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, F.E.I.S, says :—“ I see quite a large number of old boys have enlisted, and that several have been laid low. Still, they have died doing their duty, as the rest of us young men are prepared to do. I am very sorry that I cannot tell you what we have done, and what we are going to do, but we have been doing our bit. Our Navy has got the right name, the ‘ Silent Navy.’ We are all longing for the big naval battle to come. I can assure you it is a bit monotonous watching and waiting for an enemy which never turns up. The only thing which they seem to have out in our line is submarines, and they always steer clear of us. Through Mr Sidwell’s tuition I have managed to represent the Royal Marines at Deal, and Chatham, and also two ships, at cricket.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Although the canvas for recruits has not yet commenced locally, the new appeal for men has had the effect of stimulating business at the Drill Hall, and the number of men who have offered themselves has been higher than for many weeks past. The following have been attested :

J W Shrimpton (driver), G G Batchelor and A E Beech (Royal Engineers) ; F W Anderson, P G Major, A Higgins, L Boyles, F Holder, W R Townsend, E Shirley, A Mathews, W D Reeve, T Walker, E T Dunkley, H A Muddeman, J Moore, E G Marsh, A Newhound, R.F.A ; W Gunn, M.F.P. ; E Waring, Leicesters ; E G W W Hollins, J R Holder, and H E Goodwin, R.W.R ; F R M Lee and G H Neale, R.F Corps ; G T Palmer, 220th Co A.S Corp R.E ; E A Foxon, H Bartlett, H Kendrick, A.S.C ; W. J Payne, R.A.M.C ; J G Gowing, A.S.C, M.T ; A G Hone and E Osborne, A.S.C, H.T.

The following offered themselves, but owing to medical reasons were not accepted: E Eales, T Cleaver, L Painter, W E Summerfield, H C Walden, H W Kennard, and H W Duckett.

Infantrymen are urgently required.

 

TERRITORIALS COMFORTS’ COMMITTEE.

LETTERS OF THANKS FROM THE FRONT.

Mr A Adnitt (hon secretary) and members of the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee have received a number of letters of thanks from the recipients of the cakes which were recently sent to the local Territorial units at a result of the cake competition, held in the Church House. Below we give a few extracts :—

FROM THE HOWITZER BATTERY.

Battery S M George Hopewell, of the Howitzer Battery, writes :-“ Will you please convey to the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee our heartiest thanks for the splendid gift of cake which we received on Saturday. I received 24 parcels in all, and sent half of them to our drivers at the wagon line and some to the Rugby men who are on the Headquarters’ Staff and in the 4th Battery, so that 160 Rugby, boys had the pleasure of enjoying their tea with cake from HOME ; and I am sure we feel greatly honoured to think that so much time, trouble, and expense has been expended on our behalf by our many generous friends, who we feel, have adopted this very practical way of expressing all their good wishes for our welfare. We were very pleased to see that a good many ladies had enclosed their names and addresses, as it is a great satisfaction to know whose hospitality one is partaking of, and to be able to thank them personally. . . . I am pleased to say that we came through the bombardment without any casualties, and thoroughly enjoyed the extra REAL work which we had to do, and are eagerly looking forward to the next similar occasion, which we hope will be more prolonged, and the last word in this long argument of nations. . . . With the exception of a few colds and other minor ailments, we are all well and in the best spirits.”

Quartermaster-Sergt Painter, of the Howitzer Battery, in a letter to Mrs C P Nickalls, states that his section had the honour of receiving the first and fourth prize winners and two highly commended cakes. He adds :—“ We were fortunate enough to receive them on Sunday morning, and they were much appreciated by the men at tea-time. If the judging had been left to the men, I am afraid they would all have been awarded first prize. On behalf of the members of the Battery I beg to take this opportunity of thanking you and the members of the Rugby Comforts Committee for the various presents which have been sent out to us from time to time.”

THE INFANTRY COMPANY.

Corporal A Branston “ C ” Company, 1/7th R.W.R (T.F), acknowledging the receipt of the cakes, says :-“ On behalf of the men I am to express their thanks to you and the good people of Rugby for their kindness to us. I can assure you that we all enjoyed the cakes immensely. There are only a few articles badly wanted by the men in my section, such as handkerchiefs and housewives, so if you know of any good person who would send us those little articles I should be very grateful.

Quartermaster-Sergt Tomlinson, of the Rugby Infantry Co, 7th R.W.R, also acknowledges the receipt of the cakes in good condition, and says :—“ With the help of Sergt Bryant I have distributed them, and we were able to reach every Rugby man now serving with the Battery, including two men in other companies and one with the second line A.S.C. Everyone was delighted with their change of fare, and scarcely know how to sufficiently thank the kind donors. However may I, on behalf of the company, ask you to convey to all concerned our deep and grateful thanks. I am sure they would have felt somewhat repaid if they could have seen the happy little groups at tea last Sunday. The happiness, too, was extended, as many shared their cake with comrades from other towns. I think our friends who made the good things, and who attached labels, will receive personal letters of thanks from the recipients. With reference to comforts you are so kindly collecting, may I ask you to withhold sending pants for the time being. We have just had an issue of these articles ; this will probably be the only issue we shall get, and wear and tear is very hard, therefore later on we shall be glad of some to replace them. I will let you know immediately the need arises. If I may I should like to suggest the following articles of which many are in need : Razors, jack knives, and enamel mugs. We are in a district where it is almost impossible to buy anything. It is a country district, and the inhabitants have all been cleared, out, and we spend several weeks in or near the firing line.”

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

BOY SCOUTS’ AMBULANCE AT THE FRONT.

DEAR SIR,—As some of your readers may be aware, there is an ambulance which was equipped by the Boy Scouts, and manned by six ex-scouts. This has been doing good service at the front, but the engine is wearing out, and the body has been found unsuitable for getting over the roads near the fighting line, where they are broken up with shell fire.

Sir Robert Baden Powell, as Chief Scout, is anxious, therefore, to provide them with, a new car, and has appealed, to the scouts throughout the country to raise the necessary funds.

It is a stringent rule of the Scout movement that there shall be no touting or begging for subscriptions, and the only way, therefore, scouts can raise money is by working for it.

In asking you, therefore to publish this letter, I am not asking for donations, but only that those of your readers who: are able, will help the scouts to raise the money themselves by providing them with work.

We have set aside the week ending November 6th for this purpose, and I would earnestly ask that any householders who are appealed to by scouts during that time will endeavour to give them some work—grass cutting, wood chopping, cycle cleaning, or, indeed, any odd jobs for which scouts are always prepared. If anyone will write to me offerings any special work, I will see that their requirements are met if possible.

Scouts applying for work should be in uniform, and all money earned by them will be devoted to the above object, being turned in to their scoutmaster, with a statement of the work done and money received.—Yours truly,

C COURTENAY WHARTON.

Assistant District Commissioner, Rugby Division of Boy Scouts.

 

WILD WEST EXHIBITION.—Broncho Bill’s exhibition will visit Rugby on Thursday next, November 4th. This exhibition has a reputation because of the originality and realism of the productions. The fact that it has to do with life “ out west ” gives it a fascination which can be rarely exceeded by other entertainments. Pictures of Wild West episodes have been produced with success, and have always appealed to audiences, but to see the real thing one should visit this exhibition. Life on the prairies is represented with striking realism, cowboys, cowgirls, Indians, and fiery prairie mustangs taking part. The scenes will leave vivid impressions in the mind of the visitor. The peculiar expertness so characteristic of a Western “ character ” is displayed with great effect. An idea of the scenes depicted will be found in our advertisement columns. There will be two exhibitions whatever the state of the weather, and arrangements have been made for the convenience and comfort of 10,000 visitors.

16th Oct 1915. Cakes for Rugby Territorials

CAKES FOR RUGBY TERRITORIALS.

INTERESTING COMPETITION AT RUGBY.

With a view to obtaining a number of cakes for the members of the Rugby Territorial Units, a cake-making competition was arranged by local ladies and the Territorial Comforts Committee, in conjunction with McDougalls, Ltd, of London. Considerable interest was evinced in the venture, and 138 competitors entered for the handsome prizes which were offered by the firm mentioned above, who also supplied the recipe by which the cakes were to be made. The competition was held on Saturday, in the St Andrew’s Girls’ Schools. Miss Pocock, the Warwickshire County Council cookery instructress, judged the exhibits, the greater number of which were of a high quality. In addition to the cakes entered for competition, 121 were sent “ not for competition,” so that there was a total of 260 cakes to be dispatched to the front.

A large number of persons visited the schools during the afternoon, and the sum realised from the small charges for admission went towards paying the carriage of the parcels to France, which was somewhat heavy.

Shortly before eight o’clock Captain West (of the Women’s Volunteer Reserve) presented the prices as follows :—1st (tea set), Nurse Jay, 53 Hillmorton Road ; 2nd (eiderdown quilt), Mrs Ballantyne, 1 Cromwell Rd ; 3rd (silk umbrella), Miss Prosser, 51 Hillmorton Rd ; 4th (handbag and purse), Miss Slack, 35 Sheep St ; 5th (two) Mrs Beeton’s “ Family Cookery,” Mrs Molcher, 1 William St, and Mrs Cobb, 2 St Matthew’s St. Consolation prizes (three), Mrs Beeton’s “ All About Cookery,” Miss D Jackson, 25 Claremont Rd ; Miss Fox, G.C.R Station ; and Mrs Hedges, Newbold Road.

Miss Fox was also awarded the prize “ Mrs Beeton’s Family Cookery,” for securing the most entries (27) for the competition. The following competitors were highly commended : Miss Lines, 79 Manor Road ; Mrs Newman, 126 Wood Street ; Miss C E Dean, 58 Hillmorton Road ; Nurse Wishey, 58 Hillmorton Road ; Miss Watkins, 17 Caldecott Street, and Miss Ethel Fortnam, 127 Oxford Street.

In presenting the prizes, Mrs West mentioned that the first prize and two honourable mentions went to the same house, but the Judge was quite certain that they were all three of different mixing and were cooked by different people. In the name of the Territorials at the front, she would thank all who had sent cakes. She knew where the Territorials were ; they were ten miles from the nearest town, and had nothing to eat but bully beef and biscuits, so that the cakes would be thoroughly appreciated. She was sure that in making those cakes they all liked to feel that they were helping by doing their bit, and those who had not secured prizes had done their share as much as those who had. She was certain that all the cakes would be very much appreciated, because the men would not know the difference. It might be a rude thing to say, but she had never known a man who knew a good cake when he had eaten it, at least they did not know the difference between a good one and a bad one (laughter).

Mr ADNITT, as secretary of the Territorial Comforts Committee, heartily thanked Mrs Abercrombie and the committee who had so kindly organized the competition. They must have gone to a great deal of trouble to obtain such a fine show of cakes. He thought the men to whom they were to be sent would heartily appreciate them.

The ceremony over, members of the Women’s Volunteer Reserve, who, under Captain Moss (Adjutant) and Captain West, appeared in public for the first time, assisted by a number of members of the Rugby Company of the V.T.C, commenced the task of packing the cakes into parcels, each containing eleven pounds. The work was very expeditiously carried out.

Among those who kindly collected promises of cakes were :—Group 1, Girls’ Clubs of Rugby and friends ; Group 2, Mrs Colbeck, Mrs G Eaton, Mrs Findlay, Mrs Frost, Mrs Hogg, Miss Walton, Miss Watson, etc ; Mr James (Castle Street) and James and Taverner (Cross Street). Others who assisted in various ways were : Mrs Abercrombie, Miss Booth, Mrs Astin, Miss L Fortnam, and Miss D Fox. The door stewards were : Mrs J W Marvin, Mrs A Lines, and Mrs E Astin ; and members of the W.V.R and H.W.C took charge of the exhibits.

The idea of holding the competition originated with several members of one of the Girls’ Clubs in the town, and other small groups, on being approached, promptly fell in with the proposal, with the satisfactory result recorded above. The competition being held on Saturday morning, a number of persons were unable to send their cakes in early enough for judging. Entries were received from several of the villages, and New Bilton sent cakes through Mrs Frost and Mrs Corbett. About 620lbs of cake were received, being about 1lb for each man, and this was packed into 61 parcels and despatched on Monday morning, 23 parcels going to the Rugby Howitzer Battery, 23 to the Rugby men of the 7th Royal Warwicks, and 13 to the Ammunition Column. The balance of the cost of carriage and packing was paid by the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee, and this body, of which Mr Adnitt is the secretary, would be pleased to receive further subscriptions towards their work. Money is urgently required for meeting the heavy charges for carriage, and also to buy articles required which are not sent in by the public, such as pants and under-vests.

THE ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT.

PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

We are asked to state that, the Lord Lieutenant’s appeal on behalf of this fund has met with an inadequate response, and the result is that Colonel Grundy, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment Old Comrades’ Association, is in great anxiety as to how to continue the parcels to the prisoners. It is obvious that the appeal must have escaped the attention of the generous and patriotic inhabitants of the county or the response would certainly have been much better. Donations should be sent to Mr. S. C. Smith, Lloyds Bank, Warwick.

PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE.

Gifts of small games and packs of cards, not necessarily new, also second-hand clothing, will be much welcomed, and may be left at the Rectory.

A further list of subscribers is published on page 5, making the total received up to about £150. This will not enable the committee to carry on the work very far, and they hope more subscribers will come forward. Many people are sending in a certain sum monthly, and the committee hope to see this system extended.

PLUM PUDDINGS.

The committee wish to thank the following ladies for promising to send puddings :—Mrs Mulliner, Miss Mulliner, Mr W Brooke, Mrs Pyne, Mrs J Gilbert, Mrs E Howard, Mrs Steel, Mrs Fabling, Mrs West, Mrs Ewart, Mrs Hidden, Mrs Hartwell, Mrs C Nickalls, Mrs C Dukes, Miss D Biggs, Mrs Dewar, Mrs Hawkesworth, Mrs Peddell, Mrs Adnitt, and Mrs Jackson.

Up to October 14th no less than 78 parcels and hampers have been sent off.

LETTERS OF THANKS.

Company Q.M.S Alf Tomlinson, of the Rugby Infantry Company, in a letter of thanks to Mr Arthur Adnitt for a box of games and magazines, says :—“ These arrived about a week after my return from England. I distributed them as widely as I could, and I don’t think there were many Rugby men who did not participate more or less in the things you sent. The games were a great source of pleasure, especially the draughts. A few further small sets of these would be deeply. appreciated. . . . You kindly ask for our wants. I am sure you cannot do more for our comfort than by sending warm under-clothing in the shape of shirts, pants, vests and socks. Sweaters and gloves will soon be eagerly sought after. Although the weather is fairly open now, it is bitterly cold at night on sentry duties in the trenches, and a dug-out is not the best place in the world to recover from two hours on the listening post or motionless sentry work in the traverse of a trench. Will you please convoy our deep and grateful thanks to the T.C.C and all friends who so kindly think of Rugby’s ‘Terriers.’”

Acknowledgments of a hamper of fruit and a parcel of underclothing have also been received from B.S.M George Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, who, speaking of under-shirts and pants, says :—” I am sending half of each back to the horse lines for distribution among the drivers, and I can assure you that they will be keenly appreciated, note that the cold weather is coming on. . . .I should like to suggest that towels would be very useful, as the Government allowance is one per man, and whilst this is being washed it is rather difficult to dry oneself after washing. Am thankful to say we all came out of the bombardment safe and sound, and are eagerly looking forward to the next round. Hearty thanks to the committee.”

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

Mr F Tillyard, Birmingham, presided at a sitting of the Coventry and District Munitions Tribunal at the Labour Exchange Office on Friday afternoon. There were present for the employers Mr T Hancox, for the workmen Mr H Dexter (Rugby), together with Mr P E Wilks (clerk) and Mr D G Bolland (assistant clerk).

LETTER FROM MUNITIONS MINISTER.

What was described by the Chairman as a case of a somewhat unusual character was then considered by the Court. John Allen Northfield, Old Manor House, Lilbourne, a mechanical engineer draughtsman, complained that his employers, Messrs Willans & Robinson, Ltd, Rugby, were unreasonably withholding a certificate. He wished to accept a post with another firm, at a higher salary than that which he was receiving. He had been in a drawing office for five years. He was not a workman within the meaning of part two of the Insurance Act, and submitted that he was not a workman within the meaning of Section 7 of the Munitions Act. He submitted the following letter from the Minister of Munitions :-

“ I am directed by the Minister of Munitions to refer to your letter of August 31st, respecting the position of the draughtsmen and other salaried employees, as distinct from workmen, with regard to leaving their employment and obtaining other engagements elsewhere.

“ I am to refer you to the enclosed copy of Section 7 of the Munitions of War Act, and of the order made thereunder by the Minister. From the latter you will see that the provisions of the section apply to workmen employed in all establishments of the classes named whether controlled or not. The Minister is advised that the terms “workman ” should be construed in its ordinary sense as meaning a person who, substantially does his work with his hands or at all events by physical exertion. I am to add that if any employee of the class to which you refer was unable to obtain employment owing to his being unable to produce the necessary certificate under Section 7 he could by applying to a Local Munitions Tribunal obtain a decision as to whether a certificate was in his case necessary.”

In giving his decision that applicant was not a workman within the meaning of the Act, the Chairman said he not wish to create a precedent as they might possibly have a number of young men who were not so highly skilled as applicant, making a similar application. In this case the certificate was not necessary. Applicant’s services might be of more use to the country in the post to which he wished to go.

BRINKLOW.

ABSENT WITHOUT LEAVE.—Pte Harry Ingram, of the 2nd Royal Warwicks, was brought before A E Donkin, Esq, at the Rugby Occasional Court, on Friday last week, on a charge of being absent without leave from the regimental headquarters at Parkhurst, Isle of Wight.—P.S Sharp arrested defendant at Brinklow on the previous night.-He was remanded in custody to await an escort.

 

 

18th Sep 1915. A Good Word for our Territorials

A GOOD WORD FOR OUR TERRITORIALS.

ALWAYS IN THE FIRING LINE IF SELDOM IN THE LIMELIGHT.

HOW THE RUGBY MEN ARE FARING.

If little is heard nowadays of the Rugby Infantry Company, it must not be assumed they are not taking their due share of the work and risk involved by the great and terribly conflict being fought out in France. As a matter of fact during the six months that have passed since they entered the war zone, the Rugby lads have been practically under fire the whole time, save perhaps for a period of three weeks or so. High explosive shells are sent their way daily, but the battalion of which they form a part has been singularly free hitherto from the evil effects of these unwelcome visitors, most of the casualties that have occurred in their ranks being due to rifle fire.

The period has not been uneventful, and an interesting story might be told of the movement of the unit from place to place, and of the varied conditions that have been experienced, but the censorship that is exercised over correspondence, and the need for reticence impressed upon soldiers returning home for a short leave, precludes this. As the Rugby men invariably “ play the game,” those desirous of learning such details must for the time being content their souls in patience.

Still, tidings of the brave fellows who have gone from Rugby homes to “ do their bit ” are always looked for with interest—sometimes, alas! with anxiety and a sense of dread-and learning that Company Q.M.S. Alfred Tomlinson was back in the town for a few days of well earned rest, a representative of the Rugby Advertiser interviewed him a day or two ago, and found him willing to communicate information as far as was expedient, without in any way divulging what might be of assistance to the enemy.

EXCELLENT TRENCHES.

“ We are in some excellent trenches now,” said Q.M.S. Tomlinson, in reply to a natural question as to the comfort of the Rugby Infantry contingent, to which he belongs. “They are some of the best trenches we have been in, and unless there is to be a forward move shortly, many are hoping that we shall stay there for some time to come. Of course, there is shell firing continually, rifle firing being now much more intermittent than formerly.”

PLENTY TO DO.

At the front soldiers find plenty of work to do. The idea that they simply stand still in the trenches looking through loop-holes for stray Germans on whom they may bestow a bullet is quite erroneous. Men are detailed off for sentry duty, and then at specified hours both day and night those in the trenches ; stand to arms. Ration parties have to go down the trench to bring up the food for meals ; and, moreover the trenches have to be kept scrupulously clean. “ At the present moment they are a picture of cleanliness,” said our informant.

OUTSTANDING FEATURES.

“ I think two outstanding features of this campaign have been the sanitary arrangements and the food arrangements, and to these may be attributed the good health of the troops. As to provisions, the food is excellent, and there is plenty of it. I don’t say that there is over abundance, or that the food is much varied, but we get enough. Water is the chief difficulty. I don’t believe I have drunk a quart of water unboiled since I have been out there. In the first trenches we occupied the men cooked their own food and had their little fire by which to boil the water, but in the present trenches we are not allowed to do this. Smoke always gives the enemy an inkling of where the men are in the trenches and draws their shell fire. The water for the bottles is brought a considerable distance now and is pretty good, but water for cooking purposes is taken from wells.

IN GOOD SPIRITS.

Q.M.S. Tomlinson spoke of the Rugby men whom he had left behind for a few days as being in good spirits and cheerful. “ Life in the trenches is not exactly ideal—you cannot expect happy conditions in warfare—but with this reservation our men are really cheerful. The fact that we are kept pretty well occupied prevents us from becoming depressed. It has been trench warfare. We nave not been seriously attacked and we have not attacked on our part. It has just been a question of holding the line ; and we have been rather lucky compared with other battalions, in the small dumber of casualties that have befallen us, these being chiefly due to rifle fire.

PROUD OF THE TERRITORIALS.

“ I have always had, and still retain, a feeling of pride in the Territorial for the work he is doing. If all the soldiers on our side are doing their part as well as our men are doing their’s, then all I can say is we have got some good troops.”

CONFIDENT OF VICTORY.

Confirmation is given by Q.M.S. Tomlinson of the reports brought home by others from the front that the men engaged in the actual fighting are confident that success will eventually crown the efforts of the Allies. ” There is an optimistic feeling at the front. You may read in the papers of the reverses that have befallen Russia, but that makes no difference. Everyone out there takes it for granted that we are bound to win. There can be only one end, and that is the end we are out for. I would rather stop out there two years longer and really finish the job, than that there should be a compromise now.”

RUGBY TERRITORIALS COMFORTS COMMITTEE.

WARM APPRECIATION FROM RECIPIENTS

GIFTS STILL NEEDED.

With the winter approaching the attention of the public may appropriately be drawn to the excellent work that is being undertaken by the Rugby Territorials’ Comforts’ Committee, of which Mrs West and Mrs Nickalls are joint presidents, and Mr A Adnitt, Regent Street, hon secretary.

The committee has been formed to send comforts to Rugby Territorials, whether in the Infantry, Howitzers, or Yeomanry, and as quite a variety of articles are now badly needed, a fine opportunity is presented for showing appreciation of the services of local men who are taking such an heroic part in their country’s cause. Shirts, socks, and underclothing (including pants, which are not supplied by the Government), are urgently required just now, and the committee appeals through our columns for such gifts, and also money to defray the cost of carriage. We would also draw attention to the appeal for 1,500 plum-puddings for local Territorials, of whom there are quite 2,000 on service, in addition to Rugby men who are soldiers and are serving in the regular army. It will thus be seen that to carry out the committee’s wish to supply every Rugbeian with present necessities and special Christmas fare, a generous response will be essential.

SOME ACKNOWLEDGMENTS.

Expressions of warm appreciation have already been received by Mr Adnitt, in acknowledgment of parcels already sent out.

Sergt W J Bryant, of the Rugby Infantry Company, says : ” Just a line to thank you for socks on behalf of the Rugby boys of No 9 Platoon. We all appreciate your thinking of us very much. They could not have come at a better time, as they arrived just before we went into the trenches.”

Battery Sergt-Major G Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzers, writes “ I have received three parcels containing 36 pairs of knitted socks and eight shirts. My men want 10 pairs of underpants and 12 undervests badly, and I should be pleased to receive any old books you have to spare. I have already written you (under cover to Mrs Nickalls), acknowledging shirts and socks. . . . Again thanking you most sincerely for all the work you are doing on our behalf.”

KEENLY APPRECIATED.

In the letter referred to, posted “ Somewhere in France,” on August 22nd, Sergt-Major Hopewell writes :—

” Will you please express our heartiest thanks to the Rugby Comforts’ Committee for the three parcels of socks and shirts which I have received for distribution among the men of the Rugby Howitzer Battery.

“These kindly gifts are always very keenly appreciated, but they were more than ever welcome on this occasion, as a number of men were reduced to one shirt and one pair of socks each, so they could not have arrived at a more opportune moment.

“ We are very grateful indeed for the money, time, and trouble, which the ladies of Rugby are expending on our behalf, and we should be very pleased if you would convey to them our sincere thanks for their interest in our welfare and personal comfort. I am pleaded to say we are all quite well and fit, and although we get a good number of shells and rifle bullets round, no one has been hurt up to now. Things are fairly quiet on our front at present, but we are waiting in keen anticipation of the time when we hope the grand move forward will begin, and we shall have the satisfaction of driving the enemy back to his own country.”

AMATEUR LAUNDRY MAIDS.

Company Q.M.S Alf C Tomlinson, of the Rugby Infantry Company, acknowledging 54 pairs of socks, says :-

“ Thank you all so much for looking after our comfort. . . .Skirts, socks, also underclothing, are always welcome. We are not the best of “ laundry-maids,” nor can we darn artistically ; and naturally these articles get the roughest wear. . . .

“ Nothing could have given more pleasure,” says the writer, “ nor could they have arrived at a happier moment. We had just finished a very trying eight days in the trenches—mud and water the whole time. I don’t suppose there were a dozen pairs of good socks left in the Company—certainly not a clean pair, so you can imagine the pleasure, not less the comfort, the T.C.C gifts gave. No less appreciated is the knowledge of the kind thoughts of Rugby friends for Rugby’s Territorial soldiers.”

Referring to the present and future needs of the men, Q.M.S Tomlinson says : “ We should be pleased to have a few ‘housewives,’ cards, magazines, and games. These would add greatly to our pleasures. A little later on, when the weather gets colder we shall be glad to ask you for some of the warmer articles you mention.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

WANTED : 500 GIRLS TO MAKE CAKES FOR OUR TERRITORIALS.

DEAR SIR,—The first intention of a few girls and their friends to make a number of cakes for the Rugby and District Territorials Comforts Dispatch Committee, and to hold a small competition, has met with sufficient encouragement, especially from the prize-givers, to enable them to ask all girls to join in, so that every Rugby man “somewhere in France, etc” will have a reminder from home early in October.

The R.T.C Committee have kindly consented to take over all on the day of judging, when they will be on show, and the prizes given. These have been offered by a well-known flour firm, and are now increased to ten prizes value in all £3 15s, on behalf of the Rugby and district men.

Group I promises cakes “ for ” and “ not for ” competition. Other groups are asked to form up and promise 100 or as many as possible. Secretaries please note. Girls please enter names early. No entrance fee. No carriage to pay. No risk, except that of getting a prize.

Mrs West, Bawnmore, Bilton, has kindly undertaken to receive names of those responsible for groups until next week, when their addresses will be made known for receiving entries and supplying the recipes. For date, place, and where to see prizes, ask for recipes.-Yours very truly,
GROUP I.

GIFTS WANTED FOR A HOSPITAL SHIP.

DEAR SIR,—Will you allow me to express to those of your readers who kindly sent gifts for a hospital ship which is fetching wounded from the Dardanelles the hearty thanks of the matron and staff.

By the kindness of many friends in many places 612 swabs, 204 bandages, 47 shirts, 24 night-shirts, 60 pairs of socks, 51 handkerchiefs, 73 lavender bags, 235 hospital bags, 240 muslin squares, and some lozenges were ready for the third voyage.

No more muslin squares are needed, as these can be washed and used again as a protection from the flies ; but the other things will all need to be replaced and woollen caps and mufflers will be needed for the next voyage, and chocolates and cigarettes are always acceptable. I shall be most grateful for any further help,—Yours truly,

MAUDE M THOMPSON.

Norwood, Clifton Road, Rugby.

BELGIANS’ ABSENCE FROM WORK.

Mr J W Shaw, representing Messrs Willans & Robinson, Ltd, complained that Jean Delrez, moulder, a Belgian, of 71 Bridget Street, Rugby, had absented himself from work without permission. It was explained that Delrez had been warned prior to his leaving. By means of the interpreter, Mr Scheldt, Delrez stated that he had not been treated properly. His earnings were £2 12s a week, and he claimed that he was not getting the district rate of wages. The Chairman expressed the view that the proper course for a man wishing to leave his employment was to first of all give legal notice, according to the rules, and apply for consent to leave. If it was refused he should appeal to that Court. In this respect the rule was not clear, and he advised the firm to communicate with headquarters. The complaint was dismissed.

A complaint against another Belgian, Jean Puraye, Coventry, by the same firm was also dismissed. Puraye said he thought he could leave when he liked, the same as in other workshops. His reason for wishing to leave was that to “ join his wife in Ireland.”

The Chairman said that in this case there had been no offence. The firm might put up a notice demanding a month or six weeks’ notice, and then when necessary they could come to the Court for decision.

RAILWAYMEN ASK FOR MORE WAGES.

In connection with the national movement initiated by the N.U.R for an advance of 5s per week to all railway employees, irrespective of grade, we are informed that a fortnight ago the Rugby Branch of the N.U.R, which has a membership of over 800, forwarded a resolution to the Head Office asking for such a movement to be set on foot.

A prominent official of the Rugby Branch of the N.U.R, in discussing the situation, stated that the reasons the men were making their request for an all-round advance was that large numbers of railwaymen, including over 80,000 members of the Union, have joined the colours, and only in a few cases have their places been filled. This, coupled with the great increase in traffic consequent upon the transportation of troops, stores, &c, has thrown considerably more work upon railwaymen, who have, without exception, worked loyally and well many hours longer than usual. The cost of living, too, has considerably increased, and the opinion is universally expressed on the railways that the men’s patriotism and devotion to duty should be rewarded.

Our representative asked whether there was any likelihood of a strike, and was informed that the men did not anticipate resorting to drastic methods, because both they and the companies recognised the great responsibilities resting upon them, and he thought that the companies would be prepared to meet the men in a conciliatory manner.

 

 

Tomlinson, William. Died 30 Jul 1915

WILLIAM TOMLINSON

William Tomlinson was born at Hyson Green in Nottingham in 1891. He was the youngest child of the 7 living children of Henry, a Lacemaker, and Harriet Tomlinson. In 1911 he was working as a Carriage Hand in a Lace Factory in Nottingham.

On 28 December that year he moved with his parents to 20 James Street Rugby as his elder brother Ernest’s wife had committed suicide by drowning in the Brownsover canal leaving 15 month old baby Jim to be looked after.

William then worked in the Pattern Shop at the BTH Rugby. He was 5’6″ tall and 35 days short of his 23rd birthday when he and his elder brother Ernest enlisted with the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, 7th Battalion on 3 September 1914 and were posted to Aldershot on 5 September.

Tomlinson

On 19 May 1915 they landed at Boulogne and fought in France and Flanders. The British Infantry had captured Hooge on 19 July but on 30 July the Germans used their new flame throwers and reclaimed their positions.

William R/79 a Rifleman was shot and killed on 31 July 1915 and his brother Ernest was shot in the head & badly injured at the same time.

William was awarded the British Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

Photo of William Tomlinson in February 1914.

Photo of William Tomlinson in February 1914.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

10th Jul 1915. News from the front – Missing and Killed

REPORTED MISSING.

News has been received that Pte G W Coleman, of the 5th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr Walter Coleman, a carpenter in the employ of Messrs Foster & Dicksee, living at New Bilton, is missing. The message came from a friend of Pte Coleman, who writing to his own father, asked that Mr Coleman should be informed that his son did not answer to the roll call when the Company left the trenches on a recent date. This is corroborated by another correspondent, who states that when coming out of the trenches Pte Coleman was killed. The young fellow was one of the many who enlisted from the B.T.H Works and had only been at the front a few weeks.

OFFICER FEARS HE IS KILLED.

Writing to the parents, on July 1st, Captain Webb, the officer commanding the Company, states:—“ I very much grieve to say that your son, Pte W G Coleman, is missing since a charge we made on the night of the 22nd. While in the cases of one or two missing men, they have been found wounded in various hospitals which they reached from the battlefield, I think it would not be wise or just to yourself to build on the hope that such is the case of your son. I fear he is killed, and I am more than deeply sorry for you. It is a terrible thing, and the suspense is awful. We made a charge and were driven back. Countless deeds of bravery were done, and all the wounded were brought in and some of the dead. Still, several men are missing, one an officer, and I’m afraid we must give them up for dead. Perhaps, when we again advance we shall be able to clear the matter up, and I will at once let you know if I am spared. The officers and men offer you their deepest and sincerest sympathy, and will do all in their power to put an end to your suspense.”

Mr Coleman has also received a communication from the Infantry Record Office at Warwick, dated July 5th, stating that a report had been received from the War Office to the effect that Pte W G Coleman was posted as “missing ” after the engagement in France on June 22nd.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

ANOTHER NEWBOLD MAN MISSING.

Mr and Mrs Williams, Newbold, have received a communication from the War Office that their son, John Williams, a private in the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, is missing, nothing having been heard of him since the 10th of May. Rifleman Williams joined the army at the commencement of the war, and was drafted to the front about twelve weeks ago. He was 20 years of age, and previous to joining the army was employed at the Newbold Works of the Rugby Portland Cement Company.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another young man, the third from the village, has given his life for his country. News was received by the parents of Charles Hancox, of the London Road, some days ago that he was dangerously wounded, and was lying in the base hospital in France. This was soon followed by news of his death. He was a good-natured lad, and was much liked by his companions. Great sympathy is felt for his parents in their trouble. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Sunday last, at which there was a full congregation. Suitable hymns were sung, and a touching, inspiring address was given by the Vicar.

RUGBY SOLDIER WOUNDED BY SHRAPNEL.

Pte Ernest Tomlinson, son of Mr and Mrs E Tomlinson, of 20 James Street, Rugby, is lying in Norwich Hospital suffering from a scalp wound, caused at the front by shrapnel. He was employed as a fitter at the B.T.H Works, and enlisted on September 2nd in the King’s Royal Rifles. He was sent to France in May, and within three weeks, whilst trench digging, was rather badly injured by a shrapnel shell. He has lost, for the time being at all events, his speech, and the use of his right hand, so that the news received by his parents has come through other sources, a soldier in an adjoining bed having sent particulars. It is gratifying to learn that Pte Tomlinson is improving, and hopes are entertained that in time his speech will be restored. He is understood to be suffering from shock as well as from wounds. Mr and Mrs Tomlinson have a younger son, William, serving his country at the front, also in the King’s Royal Rifles, but attached to a different battalion. He has been in the fighting line for some weeks now, and his last letter, received on Monday, stated that he was quite well.

FORMER MEMBER OF THE BOYS’ BRIGADE WOUNDED.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs Hayward, of 43 Lodge Road, that their son, Pte George Hayward, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded and having been in hospital for some time is now at a convalescent home at Hampton-in-Arden. Pte Hayward was for 11 years a member of the 1st Rugby Company the Boys’ Brigade, and when he enlisted in August was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinsons Works. He was shot in the fighting in Flanders, one bullet entering his cheek, injuring his jaw and affecting his eyesight, and another lodging in his hip, after passing through the water-bottle that formed part of his equipment.

MEMBER OF RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY ACCIDENTALLY SHOT.

A BROTHER’S PAINFUL EXPERIENCE.

The painful task of travelling from the front to break the news of his brother’s death this week befell Gunner George Sutton (Newton), of the Rugby Howitzer Battery. From what we can gather, the Howitzer Battery recently returned to a rest camp, and on Sunday evening it was reported that a man had been shot. Gunner Sutton, proceeded to the spot to see who was the victim, and was horrified to find his younger brother, William, a driver in the Ammunition Column, lying dead. As the result of an enquiry it was established that death was due to accident, and Gunner Sutton was graded several days’ leave of absence to convey the sad tidings to his parents. The circumstances were detailed in a letter from Capt Saunders, of the Ammunition Column, which Gunner Sutton brought home :-“ It is with much regret that I have to inform you that your son, William Sutton, was found shot at about 10 p.m on the 4th of this month. A Court of officers enquired into the circumstances very carefully, and from the evidence decided that death was due to accident, and that there was no question at all of foul play. The funeral was conducted by an Army Chaplain of the Roman Catholic Church, and a cross is being provided with an inscription suitably worded. The N.C.O’s and men of the Ammunition Column are ordering a wreath and the grave will be well cared for. It has been arranged for your other son to proceed home on leave to-day, and I hope this will help to comfort you in your loss. Please accept the sympathy of officers of the Ammunition Column, in which your son was serving.”

Driver Sutton, who was the second son of Mr Wm. Sutton, was 21 years of age, and had been a member of the Battery about two years. Previous to the war he was employed by Mr Scott Howkins, and was very popular, and highly respected by all who knew him.

NEW BILTON RECRUIT DIES OF SEPTIC FEVER.

Sympathy will be felt with Mr and Mrs Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, in the death, on Thursday, from septic fever, at Felixstowe Military Hospital, of their son Harold, the youngest of three who had responded to their country’s call. Deceased was a printer’s apprentice, in the employ of Mr George Over, and about two months ago enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment He was only 19 years of age, and expressed a liking for the military life so far as he had become conversant with it. He was very popular with the men in Mr Over’s printing office, and all have signed a letter of sympathy with Mr and Mrs Pegg in their sad bereavement.

RUGBY HOWITZERS COMPLIMENTED.

Driver C W Packwood, of the Rugby Howitzers, now serving in France, son of Mr C J Packwood, of St Matthew Street, in a recent letter home states that after three months in the firing line the section of which he belongs is now in a rest camp, the change being appreciated, especially the privilege of sleeping once again in a bed. Driver Packwood also says that the Rugby Battery has been very highly complimented on their accurate firing by the officers they have come in contact with, and the word of praise has naturally had a cheering effect upon the men.

VOLUNTEERS FOR THE FRONT.

L J D Pepperday, son of Mr J H Pepperday, of High Street ; P Morson, son of Mr Arthur Morson, of Newbold Road ; and Neville and Roland Bluemel, sons of Mr C Bluemel, of Moultrie Road, were included in a draft of 150 who volunteered for the front to fill up gaps in the 1st Battalion of the Hon Artillery Company. The draft left for France on Thursday last week.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY IN EGYPT.

Trooper E Amos, youngest son of Mr W Amos, farmer, Dunchurch, writing home from Alexandria, says :- We go out for bugle practice every morning at 6, mounted. This gives us a good chance to have a look round. We see the corn crops growing, chiefly maise, all in bloom now (middle of June) and six feet high, any amount of tomato fields, and the plants seem loaded ; then you see the fig trees and the banana trees. We also see a tremendous lot of cotton coming down the Nile in barges, pulled by men instead of horses. We have had a job this last week unloading wounded off the ships from the Dardanelles. There are thousands of them, mostly Australians, but there are a lot of soldiers who were billeted in and around Rugby. There are a lot of fine hospitals here, and that is why they keep bringing so many wounded.

PLUCKY RESCUE BY A RUGBY ATHLETE.

The “ Yorkshire Observer ” records a plucky act recently performed by Lance-Corpl Arthur Gibson, now in training with the Royal Engineers at Salisbury Plain, who was until he enlisted on the staff at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Works, being employed in the drawing office. It appears that Lance-Corpl Gibson was on a visit to a sister at Morecambe, when he noticed that a boy, who was bathing, was in difficulties. Promptly divesting himself of his tunic, he plunged into the water ; and although the tide was running strongly, he brought the lad safely to shore. He was complimented on his bravery at the time, but quickly disappeared, and it was not until some time later that his identity was established.

It will be remembered that whilst Mr Gibson was at Rugby he assisted the Football Club as a wing three-quarter. He also took part in Association six aside matches played on Willans’ Athletic Ground, being included in the team that represented the Drawing Office, and assisted Messrs Willans & Robinson’s side in their inter-firm football with the B.T.H representatives. Mr Gibson’s old comrades at Rugby will be interested to learn of his plucky rescue, and glad it has not been allowed to escape public attention altogether.

AIR RAIDS.

RUGBY FIRE BRIGADE.

A preliminary drill took place on Wednesday last, Messrs Baker, Highton, Robbins, and the Central Garage Company lending cars, and a number of Boy Scouts attended. Everything worked smoothly, and it is hoped that fires (if any) caused by a raid will be speedily extinguished.

It is desirable to have motor-cars, because those already engaged may not be available at the moment.

The Chief Officer hopes that at least four more cars will be offered for a preliminary drill on Thursday 22nd inst., at 8 p.m. More scouts are also required, and only one drill is necessary.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Drill Hall, Park Road, during the past week :—W J Hirons and H W Appleton, 220th (Rugby) Fortress Company, R.E ; C A Davis, R.W.R ; G J Smith, Cheshire Regiment ; H J Ford, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; T W Ingram, Royal Inniskilling Fusliers ; F Hawkins, Seaforth Highlanders ; W J Holliday, Royal Berks ; R W Cave, Army Veterinary Corps ; D A Leist, A.S.C ; A Townsend, Military Mounted Police ; J P Betts, Royal Engineers.