Patchett, William Ivens. Died 14th Nov 1917

William Ivens Patchett was born on 4th July 1880 at Clifton on Dunsmore, second son of Bethuel Patchett and his wife Sarah nee Ingram who were married in the June quarter 1877 in Rugby district. He was baptised on the 29th August 1880 at Mary’s Clifton and in the register it states his father as a farmer. In the 1881 census they lived on the Rugby Road in Clifton along with his older brother, his father’s occupation was a milk dealer. By 1891 they were living in Sharps Villa Clifton. He had five brothers and his Father was the assistant overseer of taxes. By 1901 they were still at Sharps Villa, William was a printer by this point still living with his family, his father was the collector of local taxes and he resided with seven siblings four brothers and three sisters.

William married Ellen Colton on June 13th 1904 at St Mary’s parish church Clifton, and in the 1911 census he is living at 7 Manor Rd, Rugby. It states they have been married for seven years and have two children, Nellie 6 and William C.H. 5 month

From the Rugby Advertiser dated November 24th 1917 it stated:
Mrs Patchett of 7 Manor Road has received official information that her husband, trooper W.I.Patchett of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, died of wounds received in the recent fighting on November 14th. He was the eldest son of Mr Bethuel Patchett, and was 38 years of age. A compositor by trade, he was apprenticed at the “Midland Times” office. For a time subsequently he was employed at the Rugby Advertiser Works; and when he enlisted in August 1915 he was employed by Messrs Frost & Sons. He is the tenth employee of this firm to be killed. He was a keen sportsman and played for the Rugby Onward Cricket Club and Clifton Cricket Club, of which he was captain for a time; and also for Rugby Football Club .He leaves a widow and two children.

There was also a notice in De-Ruvigny’s roll of Honour as follows:
Patchett William Ivens Trooper, No 3100976, 1st Warwickshire Yeomanry (T.F.) s. of Bethuel Patchett, of 36, Kimberley Road, Rugby, by his wife, Sarah, dau.of Charles Ingram; b Clifton, co.Warwick, 4th July, 1880; educ.St Matthew’s School, Rugby; was a Compositor by trade, and for a time captain of the Clifton Cricket Club; joined the Warwickshire Yeomanry 1st August 1915; served with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force in Palestine from 13 Feb. 1916, and died at Beersheba 14 Nov.1917 of wounds received in action there. Buried at Beersheba. He m. at Clifton, 13 June, 1904 Ellen (7, Manor Road, Rugby) dau.of Edwin Colton, and two children: William Charles Herbert, b, 26th Oct.1910, Nellie, b 8th Sept.1905.

His medal card form the National Archive has him receiving the Victory and the British medals, but has two regimental numbers one for the Warwick. Yeo as 3061, the second for C of Hrs. as 310976.

He is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery in Plot C29 and on his headstone is the following:
Patchett Pte. William Ivens   1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry 14th November   1917, Aged 38. Husband of Ellen Patchett 6, Rowland St, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

Perry, Victor Charles. Died 31st Oct 1917

Victor Charles Perry was the sixth of the ten children of George and Sarah Perry, born in Aston, Birmingham in Sep Quarter 1897. His father was born in Dublin, his parents according to the 1911 census had been married for 27 years, probably in Ireland as their five eldest children were born in Co Waterford. The couple moved to Birmingham around 1893, between the births of their fifth and sixth children.

George seems to have been prosperous. In 1901 he was aged 41, living with his wife, nine children aged 9 months to 15 years, and three servants at Oakfield House, Yardley Road, Aston.   His occupation is given as the “director of a gin distillery and rectifier of British wines”.

In 1911 they are in Stechley, at “Home Lea”, Richmond, a very large house with 14 rooms. George was a self-employed wine merchant, assisted by his sons William and George. Victor was 14, but no occupation is given.

Victor’s connection with Rugby has not as yet been uncovered, but as he is remembered on the Old Laurentians Roll of Honour it seems he attended or had connections with the school after 1911. He did enlist at Warwick according to Soldiers Died in the Great War, and must have done so before September 1915 when his medal card records that he was sent to Egypt. He joined the 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry as Private 2530, but later became Trooper 310565 in the Corps of Hussars.

The Yeomanry fought at Gallipoli as unmounted troops in August 1915, and suffered heavy losses.   Victor maybe joined these forces after this as he arrived in Egypt in September, and the regiment was withdrawn in October. Perhaps he never reached Gallipoli but remained in Egypt.   The Warwickshire Yeomanry was assigned to the Australian Mounted Division in February 1917 where it served as cavalry in Palestine. It was part of the XXI Division, 5th Mounted Brigade of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) led by General Allenby, to regain territory in Egypt (then a British Protectorate) and Palestine and drive back the Ottoman forces with the aim of capturing Jerusalem from the Turks. It saw action in the First and Second Battles of Gaza in the spring of 1917.

The EEF had already decided to invade Ottoman territory before the first battle of Gaza, on the basis of Britain’s three major war objectives: to maintain maritime supremacy in the Mediterranean, preserve the balance of power in Europe, and protect Egypt, India and the Persian Gulf. Despite the EEF’s defeats during the first two battles of Gaza (with about 10,000 casualties), Allenby planned an advance into Palestine and the capture of Jerusalem to secure the region and cut off the Ottoman forces in Mesopotamia from those in the Eastern Mediterranean and on the Arabian Peninsula. The capture of Gaza, which dominated the coastal route from Egypt to Jaffa, was a first step towards these aims.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Beersheba_(1917) – cite_note-27

The Battle of Beersheba, on the edge of the Negev Desert and some 75km from Jerusalem, took place on 31 October 1917, and it was here that Victor lost his life. It was a very intense attack, with much shelling and mortar fire, and close fighting to take the enemy trenches. The mounted divisions which included the Warwickshire Yeomanry suffered artillery and aeroplane attacks, causing a great deal of confusion among the men and horses.

The town was eventually taken by the Desert Mounted Corps.   There is a good account of the battle on wikipaedia.

Victor was buried in the Beersheba War Cemetery, established after the battle. His back pay of £8.10.5d and a War Gratuity of £13.10s were forwarded to his father George.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM