14th Dec 1918. Rugby’s War Trophy

RUGBY’S WAR TROPHY.
ARRIVAL OF THE CAPTURED GERMAN GUN.

We announced last week that in consideration of the excellent war record of Rugby a German field gun, captured by the Royal Warwicks, had been allocated to the Town; and this interesting relic of a shattered military system duly arrived on Wednesday afternoon. The weather was anything but suitable for an outdoor ceremony. A drizzling rain fell most of the morning, but the weather improved early in the afternoon and a large number of people then turned out to witness the arrival of the gun. It was originally arranged that the Chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P. C.C, should formally receive the gun on behalf of the Town at the urban boundary on the Bilton Road. Unfortunately, however, a break-down occurred at Bilton, and a messenger had to be despatched to Warwick for a spare part, and this necessitated an alteration in the arrangements.

The Rugby School O.T.C, under Capt C P Evers, turned out for the occasion, and, headed by the Corps Band, marched to Bilton, where Mr McKinnell, who was accompanied by Messrs W H Linnell, F E Hands, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, A Morson (Clerk), J H Sharp (Surveyor), T S Shenton (Manager of the Electric Light Dept.) received the gun (a 4.5 field cannon) which has evidently seen much service.

The procession restarted from Bilton shortly after three o’clock and when the gun crossed the parish boundary it was received with enthusiastic cheers and a frantic waving of miniature flags by the schoolchildren who had taken up positions on each side of the road.

The gun will be mounted on the grass plot fronting the Public Baths in Regent Street and to celebrate the auspicious occasion streamers of bunting had been hung round the three sides of this plot. On arriving at the Baths the Chairman standing near the gun said “ Ladies and gentlemen, this gun was captured by the gallant boys of the Royal Warwick Regiment, and all I want to do is to ask you to give three ringing cheers for the R.W.R.”

These having been given, an interesting and unique ceremony came to an end.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr Paramore, Bilton Road, Rugby, has been released from the Army and has resumed his practice.

The following B.T.H employes have been reported killed :—Lieut C A Field ; Sergt H M Bradford, R.W.R (Controller factor) ; Pte F J Swingler, Notts and Derby Regt (Collections and Credits Dept) recently died in France from influenza.

Captain R Snewing, eldest son of Mr and Mrs R Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was educated at the Lower School, and later entered the office of the B.T.H, and it still attached to the staff. He joined the Westminster Dragoons in 1916 as a trooper, and by his smartness and efficiency soon gained promotion and secured his commission, quickly following this up this his Captaincy. He was later attached to the Tank Corps, and gained the honour at La Cateau on October 23rd.

Sergt Ernest Gilbert, son of the late Mr Henry Gilbert, of St Andrew’s Street, Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M. The Sergeant joined up with the Surrey Yeomanry, and, after serving in India, took part with the Royal Engineers in the operations in Mesopotamia, where he is still on active service.

Pte Gordon Stretton, sen of Mr & Mrs A Stretton, Stanford Road, Swinford, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany, arrived home on Monday night. Thanks to the food parcels that he has received, he has not fared so badly as some, but is thankful to be in England once more.

Bombardier J Jeffery, R.F.A, son of Mr W Jeffery, 33 Rokeby Street, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field. When his battery was held up by barbed wire he went forward with a sergeant, and under heavy shell fire cleared a path, thereby enabling his battery to come into action.

RUGBY OFFICER’S RETURN.
EXPERIENCES AS A PRISONER.

Captain Gabriel Gray (Lancashire Fusiliers), who was wounded and taken prisoner on March 26th, returned to Rugby on Tuesday evening, having been interned at Pforyheim Camp, Baden, with 180 other officers. Capt Gray has returned home in the best of health and spirits. After a month in hospital at Bielefeld, he proceeded to Karlsruhe, a distributing centre for officers. From there he went to Pforyheim. The food supply, which up to this time had been of a very meagre description, was augmented in June by the arrival of Red Cross parcels, and from that time there was no more talk of starving by inches. The prisoners at Pforyheim entrained on December 3rd, and proceeded to Basle, where they had a very hearty reception from the inhabitants, and again at Pontalier, on crossing the frontier, they were received with enthusiasm. By easy stages they reached Boulogne on the 9th, and crossed to Dover on the 10th.

DUNCHURCH.

PTE HARRY EVANS, whose funeral took place recently at Dunchurch, was at the time of his death (from pneumonia) in the A.S.C. and was formerly a corporal in the 7th Battalion, K.R.R. He joined the regiment on September 2, 1914, and served through the battles of Ypres and the Somme. He was wounded in the last-named battle, and being unfit for further active service was transferred to the A.S.C. Owing to the prevalence of influenza at the depot, it was impossible to arrange for a military funeral, but a bugler was sent over to sound the “ Last Post.”

In a letter to his mother, the C.O states that Pte Evans was one of the best and most reliable men in Transport department and respected by everyone in the Company. His loss was especially felt by members of the football team, of which he was one of the best and sturdiest players. The respect in which he was held was shown by six beautiful wreaths sent by his officers and comrades. His elder brother, Pte W Evans, was killed in June, 1917, and the remaining son, Driver A Evans, M.G.C, is now recovering from an attack of fever.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
On Thursday afternoon last week Pte Bertie Evetts, Gloucester Regiment, arrived home after eight months’ captivity. He has spent his time behind the German lines, and looks very little the worse for his adventures. When he reached home he had to be informed of the recent loss of his mother, who died from influenza on the 8th ult. He enlisted on February 28, 1917, on reaching the prescribed age, and had previously lost his father and elder brother in the War, who both died fighting for their country.

KINETON.
MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Askew, who were notified this week of the death of their son Horace. This is the third son they have lost in the War.

LILBOURNE.
A CONCERT was given in the schoolroom on Wednesday, December 4th, by the R.A.F Concert Party. A large and appreciative audience greatly enjoyed the varied programme, and called for several encores, to which the performers kindly responded. The proceeds will be sent to the soldiers from this parish, and will take the form of postal orders instead of parcels.

DEMOBILISATION QUESTIONS.
AN OFFER TO OUR READERS.

The question of demobilisation is uppermost in everyone’s thoughts at the moment, and it is beset with endless difficulties and misunderstandings. This being so, we shall be pleased to secure an official reply from the Department of Demobilisation and Resettlement in London to any questions our readers may care to put to us, addressed to the Editor at 2 Albert Street, Rugby.

RUGBY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.
FRIDAY. Before Mr E M G Carmichael (chairman), Mr J Findlay (assessor for employers), and Mr E G Evans (assessor for the men).
FITTER’S SUCCESSFUL COMPENSATION CLAIM.

Kenneth H Lythgoe, fitter, 4 Kimberley Read, Rugby, claimed £4 15s compensation from the B.T.H. Company, for dismissal without notice.—Lythgoe stated that he entered the firm’s employment in 1916, and on October 26th was informed by the charge hand that there was no more work for him. He then asked for notice, or failing that a week’s wages. He subsequently saw the foreman, who said he was entitled to a week’s wages and referred him to the office, where he was told that if he had any complaint he must apply at the Tribunal.— In reply to Mr London, representing the B.T.H. Company, complainant stated that owing to the shortage of matches a Bunsen gas burner, which was used for heating materials, was kept burning during working hours, although when it was not in use it was turned low. One day the charge hand approached him with a circular from the head office urging the necessity of economy in the use of gas, and he (the chargehand) asked complainant to turn the gas out when it was not required. Complainant replied that he would turn the gas out if the chargehand would supply him with matches.—The chargehand explained that it was not so much what complainant said as the way in which he said it. On the day following this affair complainant stayed away from work, and when he returned on Saturday he was dismissed on the grounds of general insolence and unreliability as a timekeeper.—Complainant urged that he had never held a job up during his connection with the company.—The Chairman said the firm were quite justified in getting rid of such a workman, but they were not entitled to dismiss him instantly and peremptorily as they had done. Complainant would be awarded a week’s wage as compensation.

THE SALVATION ARMY BAND, in connection , with their Christmas playing, are making a special effort to provide more instruments for their comrade bandsmen, who will soon be returning from active service, when a generous response is hoped for.

ABOUT 45 Army horses were sold at last Monday’s market by Messrs Howkins & Sons at prices ranging from 20 to 76 guineas each. Several bunches of store cattle also met a good trade, the prices realised being £30 to £39 per pair.

SCRAP RUBBER WANTED.—The Ministry of National Service, Rubber Salvage Department, are appealing to the public for scrap rubber, which will be sold to the War Office, and the proceeds devoted to the Red Cross. The Hon Secretary of the Rugby Part-Time Committee, Mr A W Sheasby, of 30 Sheep Street, will be pleased to receive motor-cycle, cycle and other old tyres, rubber boots, air cushions, rubber flooring, hose, belting, waterproof clothing, hot water bottles, air beds, water beds, rubber toys, heels, soles of boots, rubber off electric cables and shock absorbers, or, in fact, any form of rubber, and he will forward it to the department.

DEATHS.

BRAIN.—In ever loving memory of GEORGE WILLIAM BRAIN, of Dunchurch, who was killed in action somewhere in France or Belgium on November 1st, 1918, aged 18.
“ We loved him, yes, no tongue can tell,
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him too, and thought it best
To take him to his Heavenly rest.
Gone from us, but not forgotten.
Never shall thy memory fade ;
Sweetest thoughts shall ever linger
Round the spot where thou art laid.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

INGRAM.—In proud and loving memory of Gunner ERNEST B. INGRAM (BEN), of the R.F.A., killed in action on Dec. 8, 1916. aged 22 years.
“ Somewhere in France in a lonely grave
There sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Loved and sadly missed by his sorrowing Mother, and not forgotten by his sisters and brothers and all who knew him.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of HARRY J. MATTHEWS (the dearly beloved and only son of D. and M. A. Matthews), who died in France Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, and Sisters.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE READ, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, 46 Rokeby Street, Rugby, who was killed in action December 15, 1916, aged 22 years.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried ;
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

Snewing, Arthur Elkington. Died 18th Apr 1916

Arthur Elkington Snewing’s birth was registered in Rugby in the January-March quarter of 1893; he was baptised at St. Andrew’s church, Rugby on 20 March 1893, when his parents were living at 7 Bath Street, Rugby.

His grandfather had been a farmer, and his parents were Charles Snewing who had been born in Marylebone, and Rugby born Mary Barker née Betts. Their marriage was registered in Rugby in the third quarter of 1888. They then [1888] lived at 21 Wood Street, Rugby, but moved the next year [1889] to live at 3 Charlotte Street, and in 1893 when Arthur was born, his father, Charles Snewing, described himself as a ‘gentleman’.

In 1901, aged 8, he was with his parents, and the family was again living in Charlotte Street, but now at No.7. His father was ‘living on his own means’, as he would also be in 1911. He had an older brother Richard C Snewing who was aged 11.

He was educated at the Lower School of Lawrence Sheriff and was a member of the choir of Holy Trinity Church[1]. In 1911, aged 18 he was working as an Assistant Grocer, he was single and living at 142 Brighton Road, Balsall Heath, Birmingham.

After the war broke out he gave up his good situation to enrol in one of the Territorial battalions of the Warwickshire Regt.   When he enlisted his military record gave his residence as Handsworth, Staffordshire. His brother Richard was a Second Lieutenant in a Yeomanry Regiment in London.

He enlisted in the 15th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, he was a Private, No.908. The 15th (Service) Battalion (2nd Birmingham) was formed in Birmingham in September 1914 by the Lord Mayor and a local Committee, together with the 14th and 16th Battalions. These were the ‘Birmingham Pals’ Battalions.

He presumably enlisted in or near Birmingham around 1914 or early 1915, when he would have been aged about 22. Another member of the 15th (Service) Battalion, 19 year old George Henry Ball, who had a slightly later service number 1271, enlisted on 26 May 1915 at the Birmingham Recruiting Office. It seems likely therefore that Arthur would have enlisted slightly before that date.

After formation, the 15th Battalion moved to Sutton Coldfield. On 23 June 1915 together with the other two Birmingham Battalions, they were formally ‘taken over’ by the Army Council and transferred to Wensleydale to join the 95th Brigade of the 32nd Division and then to Codford, Salisbury Plain.

30850_A001458-01649

The Battalion was mobilised for war and on 21 November 1915, which date is also given for the ‘date of entry’ to the France theatre on Arthur’s Medal Card (above), they landed at Boulogne. He was transferred to the machine gun section on 2 February 1916.

The Division was subsequently engaged in various actions on the Western front, including in 1916, the Attacks on High Wood, the Battle of Guillemont, the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, the Battle of Morval, and the Battle of Le Transloy.

Prior to these major actions, on 14 January 1916, the 15th Battalion transferred to the 13th Brigade in the 5th Division. In March 1916, the 5th Division took over a section of front line between St Laurent Blangy and the southern edge of Vimy Ridge, near Arras.

Situated just a few kilometres from German lines for the whole of the war, the town of Arras formed a salient in the front and as such, from October 1914, was a regular target for German artillery. St Laurent Blangy adjoins the north-east side of the city of Arras and until 9 April 1917, the Allied front line ran practically through the village; Vimy is slightly further north.

Whilst there were no major actions at that date, there would have been constant shelling and risk of sniper fire whilst on duty in the trenches.

Arthur Elkington Snewing was killed in action on 18 April 1916, aged 23, shot by a sniper through the heart and lungs, while trying to arrange a rubber ground sheet in the trenches, so as to make things more comfortable for his comrades.

The officer in charge of the machine gun section said he was a thoroughly reliable and fearless man, and a man whose cheery humour at all times would keep up the spirits of the whole section.

He was buried at 6.45pm on 19 April in the Faubourg-d’Amiens Cemetery, Arras in Plot: I. A. 45. The Commonwealth section of the cemetery was only begun in March 1916, behind the French military cemetery established earlier.

Snewing grave

Arthur ‘s grave is in the first row of the cemetery, so was one of the first to be buried there.   These early burials are in approximate order of date of death, suggesting a fairly low casualty rate at that time.

This also suggests that he may have been killed nearby, in the more southern area of the line, nearer to St Laurent Blagny and Arras itself.

He is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates and Clifton Road Rugby Cemetery and the Old Laurentians Memorial.

His parents Charles and Mary Snewing were living at 20 Bath Street Rugby at the time of his death.

Probate was granted in London on 4 June 1924 to Mary Barker Snewing, widow. This was not Arthur’s widow, he was unmarried, but his mother, who had been recently widowed on the death of Arthur’s father in late 1923. It was no doubt as a result of his father’s death that it was necessary to clarify the probate situation of Arthur who had died some eight years earlier. Arthur’s effects amounted to £1,461-8s.

 

[1] Rugby Advertiser 29 April 1916. See full entry below.

An Old Laurentian Killed

On Saturday morning last Mr and Mrs Charles Snewing of Bath Street Rugby received the sad intelligence that their second son Pte Arthur Snewing had been killed in action. Pte Snewing was a bright, light-hearted and fearless young man of 23, a favourite with all who knew him, whether civilians or fellow soldiers. He was educated at the Lower School of Lawrence Sheriff and was a member of the choir of Holy Trinity Church. After the war broke out he gave up a good situation to enrol in one of the Territorial battalions of the Warwickshire Regt.   He went out to the front in November last, and was subsequently transferred to the machine gun section. The news of his death was conveyed to Mr and Mrs Snewing – for whom much sympathy is felt – in the following letter from the officer in charge of the machine gun section:

“ April 19 – It is with the greatest possible regret that I write to break to you the news of your son’s death. He had been a member of my machine gun section since February 2nd, and during this time I have proved him to be a thoroughly reliable and fearless man, and a man whose cheery humour at all times would keep up the spirits of the whole section.   He is a very great loss to me indeed, as such men are hard to find. He was killed on the morning of the 18th between 6 and 6.30 am. Shot by a sniper through the body, the bullet piercing the heart and lungs, death being instantaneous.

He was buried this evening (the 19th) at 6.45pm, the Brigade Chaplain officiating. Your son was a most popular man in the battalion, and his appearance at concerts was always looked forward to, is humour being so delightful. I assure you sincerely of my heartfelt sympathy for your loss.

The Rev Cecil Williams, the chaplain, also wrote a kind and sympathetic letter, in which he adds: – ‘His loss is really a very great one to the battalion. Always bright and cheerful, whether in or out of the trenches, he helped in a very marked degree to keep the spirits of us all up. I, in particular, shall miss him as during the period he was last in reserve, before going into the trenches for the last time I saw a great deal of him at my club, and the day before he went in he came to my evening service at the little chapel we have attached to the club. He was buried in the British Cemetery here and a cross will be put up on his grave at once’. The rev gentleman also stated that Pte Snewing was shot by a sniper while trying to arrange a rubber ground sheet in the trenches so as to make things more comfortable for his comrades.

Mr and Mrs Snewing had only two sons, and the elder one is a Second Lieutenant in a London Yeomanry Regiment now in one of the spheres of action.

Mr and Mrs Snewing desire to thank all those kind friends who have written or called to express their deep sympathy with them in their bereavement.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

6th Nov 1915. The Munitions Tribunal

THE MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL

There was a further sitting of the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Monday, thirteen cases being down for hearing, twelve informations being laid by employers for breach of regulations under the munitions Act. Mr F Tillyard presided, and the assessors present were Messrs A Lord for the employers and G Wainwright for the men.

WORKERS’ WASTE OF TIME.

Found smoking in the lavatory at the B.T.H Works (Coventry), H Clarke (18), of 110 Kingsway, Coventry, was summoned and fined 10s. He explained to the Court that he had no work to do, but the Foreman stated that there was work if he wanted it.

Against F J Moran, 55a Lower Ford Street, and Wm James Bolton, 68 East Street, Coventry, both capstan hands at the B.T.H, the information was that they wasted time in the lavatories and were found gambling. The youths, who were before the Tribunal a month ago, were each fined 15s for the present offence.

ABSENCE FROM WORK.

Alleging three days’ absence without reasonable excuse, Willans and Robinson’s, Rugby, brought proceedings against Robert Toothhill, a tool-fitter, of Rugby, who explained that he lost two days in paying a visit to his father, who was ill. Toothill, who was stated to have lost over 60 hours in the last six weeks, was fined £1.

DUNCHURCH ARTILLERYMEN HOME FROM THE FRONT.

Two Dunchurch artillerymen, Driver R Elkington, 117th Battery R.F.A, and Bombadier C Carter, 127th Battery R.F.A, who have been at the front since the commencement of the war, are at present on short leave of absence, which, after their arduous life during the past fifteen months, is proving very welcome. The two young men were schoolboys together, and have been friends all their lives, and, by a strange coincidence, their respective batteries were located in the same field for three months, during which time they were unaware of each other’s presence, and never met until they did so in Dunchurch. They both went through the retreat from Mons, La Gateau, Ligny, and the Battles of the Marne and the Aisne. Driver Elkington’s battery afterwards moved off to Ypres, and he took part in the first great fight for that much-contested town. In this battle—which was one of the hottest in which he was engaged—he was twice wounded (once in the head), and one of the other drivers was killed and one wounded, while two of the horses attached to the gun were killed. After a spell in hospital he was transferred to La Bassee, and afterwards to Ypres, where he participated in the severe fighting and the gas attack near there on Whit Monday. In this battle he experienced a very narrow escape. While near the famous Cloth Hall a shell burst in front of his gun, killing his horse, and he himself sustained injuries that necessitated his spending nine weeks in hospital. Driver Elkington feelingly added that he was one of the few men who were left in his battery of those who went out in August, 1914.

Bombardier Carter, who has two brothers (one of whom has been wounded) at the front with the Royal Warwicks, also went through the whole of the earlier fighting, and has had many thrilling and exciting experiences. He has brought home a number of interesting souvenirs picked up on the battlefield, including a great grey coat belonging to a dead Uhlan of the 9th Regiment.

Both men are agreed that the morale at the Allied troops is superior to that of the Germans, and that the British artillery has now secured a definite superiority. The British shells, too, are more effective than those fired by the Germans. The munitions were now coming up well, but they wanted still more and more men. Bombardier Carter is of opinion that, given the necessary amount of ammunition and a good supply of reserves, the Allies will soon be able to smash through the German defences and bring the war to a satisfactory conclusion, but to do this more men and munitions are required. He added that the British anti-aircraft guns are very effective in bringing down German aeroplanes. He had met the “ E ” Company and Rugby Howitzers while at the front, and they both seemed to be doing well.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has been received that Rifleman Lionel T Smith, K.R.R, known as “Tiger” Smith, of Rugby, who was posted as missing after the great British advance in September, is wounded and a prisoner in Germany.

The death has occurred in London of Lieut Robert Emmet, Life Guards, elder son of Major Robert Emmet, Warwickshire Yeomanry, whose home is at Moreton Paddox, Warwick. Lieut Emmet was formerly an officer of the Yeomanry, and was only recently transferred to the Life Guards. He had been ill for some weeks.

After a stay of some 14 months in Towcester, the 2nd/1st Northants Yeomanry left on Monday morning. The men during their stay in Towcester have behaved in an exemplary manner, and had become universally liked. The town generally has greatly benefited by having the troops billeted there, and they will be very much missed. The 3rd/1st Regiment is for the time being still at Towcester.

The Territorial Forces’ Record Office have communicated with the Coventry City Police, as they are anxious to trace the next-of-kin of Private E. J Barker, No 1557 Warwickshire Yeomanry. A letter concerning him, addressed to “Mrs G Barker, Buckland House, Coventry,” has been returned through the Post Office marked “ Not to be found ” The police will be glad if Mrs Barker would communicate with them.

AN OLD “ E ” COMPANY MAN KILLED.

To the list of local heroes who fell in the gallant charge by the Territorials on the German lines has to be added the name of Pte William Baines Harris (27), nephew of Mr and Mrs James Capell, of Featherbed Lane Farm, Bilton. Pte Harris came to Rugby in 1900, and worked on Mr J H Loverock’s farm for eight years, and afterwards for Mr J E Cox. When war broke out he was working as a shunter on the railway at Bescot, and joined the North Midland Territorial Division some six weeks after. He was a member of “ E ” Company (Rugby) for some years.

PROMOTION OF A RUGBY TERRITORIAL.

Farrier Quartermaster sergeant R C Snewing, elder son of Mr and Mrs Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been appointed to a second-lientenancy in his regiment the 2nd County of London Yeomanry (Westminster Dragoons), Second Lieut Snewing enlisted as a trooper in September, 1914, and subsequently received promotion to Lance-corporal in November. Lance-sergeant in March, Sergeant in April, and Farrier-major in August last. He served in the last year of the Volunteer Form with the old F Company of the 2nd V.B Royal Warwickshire Regt, and on the inauguration of the Territorial Force, entered the Rugby Howitzer Battery, attaining the rank of Corporal. On leaving Rugby, he transferred to the 4th Kent (Howitzer) Battery, with whom he served as Sergeant during the remainder of his term.

OLD MURRAYIAN GASSED.

Rifleman Chas Read, 2nd K.R.R, an old Murrayian, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges, says : “ I have been out at the front twelve months, and have been in every action of any consequence, but I came to a full stop on September 25th, the day we started the big advance. I was gassed with poisonous gas, but I am almost well now. My word, what a time it was a couple of days before the attack ! The shelling was terrible, but it gave me great pleasure to think that at last we were going to get them going, and so we did ; but I suppose this is stale news now. I am pleased to see that so many of the old Murray boys have answered the call. Many have paid the great sacrifice, but it cheers one up very much to know that the old boys of the Murray School have not been found wanting when our country’s call to arms sounded.

PTE MACE OF HILLMORTON A PRISONER.

Pte P Mace, 2nd Oxon and Bucks L.I, a son of Mr S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, who was reported last week to be missing, has written to his sister, stating that he is a prisoner in Prussia, and adding, “ I am sorry to say I was wounded, and could not get back to our lines. I think they have got me now for the duration of the war, and I shall be glad of anything you can I send me, especially cigarettes, as I am spun right out. I must thank God that I am alive, as I had a very narrow escape. I was wounded in the legs and face, and they very nearly cut my nose off.” In a postcard to his parents, Pte Mace states that he would be thankful for gifts of food or cigarettes. He adds that he is now doing well.

WITH THE RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

Driver Clifford Tomes of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, writes from somewhere in France” to his parents, who reside at 177 Cambridge Street :- “ There was an attack on our front yesterday, but it was repulsed by us. The 7th Warwicks are catching it pretty well. It amuses us chaps when a fellow comes back off leave and he says that people ask him if we have had any fighting yet ! I should not think they ever read the papers. It is because they never see any casualties mentioned, but that is because we have such extraordinary good luck. The gunners of our battery are everlastingly under fire, but my being a driver, I only get into it occasionally, and many a time when I have been up with the rations, the rifle and maxim fire has been terrific. We start the old rum issue next Sunday, and we are having sheep skins to keep us warm. We look like a lot of bears.; but I regard myself as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Still I may have altered, for I think this life breaks anybody. We shall want plenty more men. Please post me an Advertiser every Friday night.

GRAMOPHONE FOR THE 1/7th WARWICKS

Miss Evans, of 13 James Street, who has a brother serving in the Rugby Company of the 1/7th Warwicks at the front, has recently collected between £5 and £6 with which she procured a gramophone and set of records, etc., from Mr J T E Brown. Albert Street, Rugby. The instrument was sent out to the C Company on the 3rd of October, and Miss Evans has received the following letter in acknowledgment :-

“ DEAR MISS EVANS,—I hardly know how to adequately thank you and all the people of Rugby for the handsome way in which you all think of us all out here. I need hardly say we all greatly appreciate your kindnesses which you are always showing to the Rugby contingent of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The latest contribution, the gramophone, will greatly cheer our periods of rest, and will always be a welcome and practically indispensable part of our sing-songs, which we hold whenever opportunity offers. I am requested to thank you for this trouble and time taken up in collecting for us, and also the subscribers for the generous way in which they responded.—Assuring you of our best thanks, yours sincerely, H. B. MASON, Capt.
1/7th R. War. R.”
October 90, 1915.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been less brisk at Rugby Drill Hall this week, but the recruiting authorities are anticipating a busy time next week, when the canvassing returns come in. The following have been accepted :—J W Oliver and P G Burton, R.W.R ; F F Walter and A Commons, Royal Flying Corps ; J V Sanders, C H Meacham, and A E V Meacham, R.G.A ; A C Lamb, Middlesex Regt ; T A White, H Cutler, J R Wildman, and G W C Pargetter, R.A.M.C ; W T Bridgman, A H Meadows, W O Watts, A H EASON, A W Isham, J W Gray, M J B Amey, R.F.A ; W T Hinks and R Herring, 220th Co R.E ; W H Hammond and L Sheasby, R.E (drivers); R E Clements and H Essex, A.S.C ; and C Prestidge, A.O.C.

A number of other men offered themselves, but were rejected. Recruits are still urgently required for the Infantry, and all regiments of this branch of the service are open.