8th Dec 1917. Using Potatoes to Save Bread

USING POTATOES TO SAVE BREAD.

Sir Arthur Yapp, the Director of Food Economy, is anxious that the present very large surplus stock of potatoes and vegetables should be utilised in all private houses, and also in hotels, restaurants, and other public eating places, in such a way as to save bread.

It has been brought to his notice that in many public eating places the charge for a portion of potatoes and other vegetables is so relatively high as to encourage people to order bread instead. This is very much against the national interest at present, and Sir Arthur Yapp desires it to be clearly understood that he expects the management of all public eating places to alter their arrangements accordingly.

It is stated that it is still quite common for meat, eggs, etc, to be served on toast or bread. This practice should be immediately discontinued, and the use of bread should be discouraged in every way possible, so long as potatoes and other vegetables are abundant.

In particular, it is most if desirable that in all public eating places as little bread as possible should be served at lunch and dinner when potatoes and other vegetables are available in abundance, as at present.

Sir Arthur Yapp urges the public to give their full support to these recommendations, as this is of great importance in utilising the national food supply to the utmost advantage.

NOW TO OBTAIN SUGAR.
A NEW PROCEDURE.

It is important to remember that after December 31st you can only obtain sugar by one of the following systems ; that you can only use the system which applies to your particular case :—

A.—THE HOUSEHOLD SYSTEM.—If you have already deposited with your grocer a household sugar card, and if you are still a member of the same household, you must go to your grocer after December 8th and ask for Declaration Forms. When you have filled these up your grocer will give you a Retailers Sugar Ticket for each member of the household, which must be shown when buying sugar after December 31st.

B.—THE COUPON SYSTEM.—If you have not registered with your grocer on a Household Sugar Card, or if you have left the household from which you were registered, you must go to a Post Office before December 15th, ask for an application form, fill it up, and post it as directed. You will later receive a Ration Paper, which will entitle you to get Sugar Coupons from a Post Office.

AN ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Monday —before Mr J E Cox—Corporal Charles Hammett, of Long Lawford, was charged with being an absentee from the Agricultural Company.—P.C Hunt gave evidence of arrest and defendant was remanded to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr A Marsh, 15 Little Elborow Street, Rugby, has received intimation that his son, Pte A Marsh (24) of Leicesters, was killed in action on November 2nd ; and that another son, Pte G W Marsh, of the Warwicks, was posted as missing on October 26th. The former was, before joining up, employed as a labourer by the late Mr W C Musgrave, and the latter worked for J Young, builder. Both were Murray school boy.

Mrs Bennett, 1 Hillmorton Road, has kindly forwarded to the funds of the Rugby War Hospital Supply Depot the sum of £3, the proceeds of her chrysanthemum show on November 21-24.

A SON OF THE VICAR OF GRANDBOROUGH KILLED.

The Rev John Martin, vicar of Grandborough, has just received the sad news of the death in France of his second son, Second-Lieut F H Martin, R.E, 84th Field Company. The Commanding Officer writes : “ He was shot by a German sniper whilst setting out a new piece of engineering work behind our front line. It is a consolation that he did not suffer, as he was killed instantly. He was interred by the Rev P H Hargreaves, C.F, in a military cemetery near Gonzeancourt. He had only been a very short time with the 84th Field Company. I can assure you that all the officers and men realise what a really excellent fellow he was, and we all feel we have lost a good comrade and an extremely valuable officer.” Second-Lieut F H Martin is brother of Capt C G Martin, V.C, D.S.O, R.E, and had only a few months since come home from Egypt, where he was engaged in engineering work for the Egyptian Government, to offer himself to the War Office for military service. After a few months at Newark, he left for the front in September last. He had given a few months to military work near the Suez Canal, where he was employed in laying down pipes to carry fresh water from the Canal into the desert for 21 miles. He has another brother in the R.A.M.C, who is now in India. Second-Lieut F H Martin was born in China in 1888. He was educated in Bath and Clifton College (while at Clifton he was captain of the Cricket XI). and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He had passed the examination for the I.C.E.

THE LATE CAPT FRANK NEVILLE.

Mrs T Neville of Rugby, whose son, Capt Frank Neville, was killed in action, as recorded in our last issue, has received a sympathetic letter from the Colonel commanding the battalion. He writes : “ I much regret that I should have been home on leave when this great loss happened to my battalion. It is difficult for me to express what your son was to the battalion ; he was a very exceptional soldier—in fact, during over two years of service in France I have not met his equal as a company commander ; and had he lived I should certainly have recommended him for rapid advancement. As a man he was loved by every man in the regiment. I, as battalion commander, was immensely proud of him, for he was a grand figure of a man and the most cheery of comrades. He overcame all difficulties with a laugh. You may be a proud mother to have had such a son. May you do as he would have wished, and bear bravely your great loss.”

DUNCHURCH.

NEWS was received on Tuesday that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of this village.

MR & MRS GAMBLE DAVIS, Mill Street, have received news that their son, Percy, has gone through a second operation, and is getting on well. He is a prisoner in Germany.

MR & MRS J BULL, Mill Street, have received news that their son has been wound in Palestine. This is the second time.

BRANDON.

PTE G BOSTOCK MISSING.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock, of Brandon, have been notified that their eldest son, Pte G Bostock, is missing. He had been in France for a long time. His parents have resided in the district all their lives.

FRANKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mrs Doyle has received the sad news that her youngest son, Pte W Doyle, Q.O.O.H, was killed in France. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved mother, this being the second son she has lost in the War. One brother is now at home wounded, and the fourth son is in Egypt. A memorial service was held on Sunday afternoon, when the Rector (Rev C Lunn) gave a sympathetic address. The Rev H F B Shuckburgh read the lessons. There was a large congregation.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT OWEN W W W MEREDITH MISSING.—Mrs Meredith, late of Wolston Vicarage, has received news that her son is missing. He had been in France for some short time, and was attached to the Royal Flying Corps. While residing in Wolston his cheerful disposition and amiable manner made him very popular. He is the only son of Mrs Meredith, who now resides at Leamington and the late Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, for upwards of seven years Vicar of Wolston.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory WILFRED JOSEPH (BILL), who was killed in France, November 11th, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave,
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MAYES.—In fond and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, who died of wounds received in action in France at the General Hospital, Bristol, December 6th, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ A devoted son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered Duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
“ Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which that smile hides all the while.
“ Gone but not forgotten—
Oh no ! not one so dear.
He is gone to his home in heaven,
And with a smile we will meet him there.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

 

Neville, Frank Septimus. Died 24th Nov 1917

Frank was the youngest of the nine children of Thomas Johnson Neville and his wife Lilian nee Lord who were married at St Paul’s Chiswick, Middlesex on 18 March 1872.   Thomas and Lilian returned to Thomas’s birthplace of Dunchurch after their marriage where he was a butcher and farmer.   Although Lilian was born in Hoxton Middlesex, her father Richard was also born in Dunchurch.

Frank was baptised in Dunchurch on 25 October 1891, his birth being registered in December Quarter of that year.

In 1901 Frank was aged 9, living with his parents and five older siblings in Dunchurch, but by 1911 he was 19 and had become a teacher in Stamford. This is confirmed by his detailed obituary in the Rugby Advertiser of 1 December 1917. This records that he was educated at Dunchurch School, then at the Lower School in Rugby (now Lawrence Sheriff). He was a member of the Howitzer Battery in Rugby, and “being a well-set up young fellow, was selected as one of the Guard of Honour when King Edward visited the town” in 1909.   He left Stamford for a post as assistant master at St Matthews School in Rugby where he took a great interest in the new Scout movement.

Just before war broke out he passed high in a Civil Service examination which enabled him to become a member of the Inns of Court Officers’ Training Corps (OTC) as Private 1013.   He was transferred to the Northampton Regiment as 2nd Lieutenant in 1914, posted to France on 26 July 1915 and was gazetted as Temporary Captain on 4 January 1917. He was involved in heavy fighting at the Somme in July 1916 in which his brother Captain George H Neville  was killed and Frank severely wounded. He was invalided home for nine months and had command of a cadet corps during his recovery.

He returned to France about August 1917 and went through a lot of heavy fighting. He died from a bullet wound in the abdomen on 24 November 1917 and is buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery near Poperinghe to the west of Ypres. Although this area was outside the front held by the Commonwealth forces in Belgium during the war, groups of casualty clearing stations were placed at three positions in July 1917. These were called by the troops with typical dry humour Mendinghem, Dozinghem and Bandagem.   3309 casualties are buried at Dozinghem, Frank’s grave is no XIII.E9 in the section to the extreme left in front of the Stone of Remembrance.

He received the Victory and British War medals and the 1915 Star. He is commemorated on the Old Laurentian Roll of Honour and Dunchurch War memorial as well as Rugby’s Memorial Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Neville, George Henry. Died 2nd Jul 1916

George Henry Neville’s birth was registered in the fourth quarter of 1880 in Rugby. He was baptised on 28 November 1880 in Dunchurch. His parents were Thomas Johnson Neville, b.c.1840 in Dunchurch, and Lillian née Lord, b.c.1851 in London. Their marriage was registered in Q1, 1873 in Brentford, Middlesex.

In 1891 the family were living in the village of Dunchurch. George now had three older brothers and three younger siblings. His father was a ‘Butcher (Master) & Farmer’. George received his early education at Dunchurch School, and then at the ‘Lower School, Rugby’ now the Lawrence Sheriff School, between 1893 and 1895. When he left school …

… He came on the staff of the Rugby Advertiser for a time, and then went into the employ of Mr G E Over till he was 18, when he joined the army. He served through the Boer War, and afterwards in India. On the outbreak of the present war he came home and took service in the 9th Lancers, but, promotion being slow, he transferred to the Oxford and Bucks. [This appears to be incorrect, but occurs twice in the newspaper report.][1]

For the 1901 census, when George would have been 20, he was not at home, although the family were still living in Dunchurch. He was serving overseas in the Boer War (1899-1902). After the end of the Boer War, he served in India and then returned home and ‘took service in the 9th Lancers’.

Before 1911, when George was 30, he was a Corporal, No.7532 in the Somerset Light Infantry and for the 1911 census he was with about 50 other soldiers at the Clydach Vale Hotel in Rhonda, Wales. There were also three police constables at the hotel. This was probably in connection with the Tonypandy riots of 1910 and 1911 (also known as the Rhondda riots) …
… a series of violent confrontations between coal miners and police that took place at various locations in and around the Rhondda mines of the Cambrian Combine. … Home Secretary Winston Churchill’s decision to allow the British Army to be sent to the area to reinforce the police shortly after the 8 November riot caused ill feeling towards him in South Wales throughout his life.[2]

Soon afterwards, in mid 1912, George Neville married Alice E Culverwell at Weymouth.

In August 1914, the 1st Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry was in Colchester, as part of 11th Brigade, 4th Division. On 22 August 1914 the Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the British Expeditionary Force. The 11th Brigade fought at Mons, Le Cateau, Nery, Marne, Aisne, Meteran and Messines in 1914; Ypres, St Julien, Frezenberg Ridge, and Bellewaarde Ridge in 1915; Albert and Transloy Ridges at the Somme in 1916.

George was with the Battalion when it went to France, arriving on 21 August 1914, and it was later recorded that he had served at the Battle of Mons. Before mid-1915 he had been promoted to Company Sergeant-Major, and on 30 July 1915 he received a Commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Somerset Light Infantry. As a 2nd Lieutenant, on 1 January 1916, he was ‘Mentioned in Dispatches’,
SOMERSET LIGHT INFANTRY. Neville, Second Lieutenant G. H.[3]

On 14 January 1916, his award of the Military Cross for valour in the field was gazetted …

The Supplement to the London Gazette, 14 January 1916:
Awarded the Military Cross
No. 7532 Company Serjeant-Major (now Second Lieutenant) George Henry Neville,
Somerset Light Infantry.

Also in 1916 he was promoted to Captain, and would again, but posthumously, be ‘Mentioned in Dispatches’ as ‘2nd Lt (temp. Capt.)’ on 4 January 1917.[4]

The 1st Battalion of the Somerset Light Infantry was in the 11th Brigade of the 4th Division of the Infantry and on 1 July 1916, George Henry Neville M.C. would have taken part in the attack on Redan Ridge which is between Serre Road and Beaumont Hamel, France.   In June 1916, the road out of Mailly-Maillet to Serre and Puisieux entered No Man’s Land about 1,300 metres south-west of Serre. On 1 July 1916, the 31st and 4th Divisions attacked north and south of this road and although parties of the 31st Division reached Serre, the attack failed and George was killed during the next day.

A report on the attack from a Sergeant who had returned, wounded, to Bilton, was also reported in the Rugby Advertiser.
This sergeant was behind Captain Neville, who was leading his company in a charge, and saw him receive a shot in the arm. But, undaunted, he went on, and presently was struck again in the chest, and fell. The company continued the advance, and nothing more was seen of the wounded officer – the search parties failing to find him.[5]

The Battalion Diary for 1 July 1916 relates that ‘Battn casualties were 26 Officers and 438 O.R.’   Among those listed as ‘Missing believed killed’ was ‘Capt. G. H. Neville.’

Whilst the records of the CWGC state that Captain George Henry NEVILLE, MC, MiD, of 1st Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, was killed the next day on 2 July 1916, age, 35, this is in conflict with the Battalion Diary.

George is now buried in Plot: XIV, Row: G, Grave 12, in Serre Road Cemetery No.2. His gravestone is inscribed, ‘Beloved Husband’ ‘Love conquers all things even death’. His body was moved into the Serre cemetery from a location about 100 metres to the south-east, and although his original burial was not marked, his body was identified from the ‘uniform & buttons’. A ‘sleeve, cuff, 2 buttons Prince Albert’ identifying him as from ‘Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert’s)’ were forwarded to base. He was reburied in a coffin.

He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal; he was also listed for the 1914 Star, but it seems that on 28 August 1919, his widow, Mrs A E Neville, had to apply for its issue. It seems that the clasp for having been ‘under fire’ may already have been issued.   He had qualified for the 1914 Star when he was a Sergeant.

It seems that by mid-1919, his widow had returned to her home area and was then living at 107 Chiswell, Portland, Dorset. She later remarried in late 1920 with Victor J Pearl, the marriage being registered in Weymouth, and she is listed by the CWGC as Alice Ethel Pearl.

George Henry Neville is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates and on the Old Laurentians’ Memorial Plaque. His death is also recorded on the website of Somerset Light Infantry.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

– – – – – –

 

This article on George Henry Neville was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by Anne Rogers and John P H Frearson and is © Anne Rogers, John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, June 2016.

[1]       Rugby Advertiser, 15 July 1916.

[2]         https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonypandy_riots

[3]       Medal Card, and ref: London Gazette, 1 January 1916, p.36.

[4]       Medal Card, and ref: London Gazette, 4 January 1917, v.29890, p.224.

[5]       Rugby Advertiser, 15 July 1916.

 

22nd Jan 1916. A Splendid Family Record

A SPLENDID FAMILY RECORD.

There are very few families in the country who can show such a good record as that which attaches to the family of the late Mr T J Neville, of Dunchurch. Of seven sons, four are now on active service, and the other three have been through the ordeal of battle. The four now serving King and country are :-

Second-Lieut G H Neville, of the Somerset Light Infantry, who has been mentioned in despatches and awarded the Military Cross for Valour.

Lieut S L Neville, now serving as second lieutenant in the 2nd Royal Bucks Hussars, served in the Rhodesian Volunteers and Warwickshire Yeomanry during the Boar War and South African Campaign, and more recently in German West Africa.

Capt F L Neville, of the 6th Northamptons, “ somewhere in France.”

Trooper John Neville, of the Rhodesian Rifles, now fighting in German East Africa after going through the German West Campaign.

The sons who have done their bit and are now non-combatant are :-

Tom Neville, who went out to the Boar War with the Warwickshire Yeomanry and received wounds in the arm which incapacitated him from further military service. He is now in Pretoria.

Richard (the eldest son), also served in the same campaign, and Benjamin, a corporal in the Imperial Light Horse, has just received his discharge after going through the German West African operations.

Lieut S L Neville has just been home to pay a visit to his mother, who now resides in Rugby.

7th WARWICKSHIRE WOUNDED.

In the official list of wounded under date January 8th, the names of Pte M Philpot (3202), Lance-Corporal Robotham (1480), Pte E Blower, and Segt A Oldbury, of the 1/7th Warwickshires, appear.

RUGBY SOLICITOR WOUNDED & GASSED.

Mr C F E Dean, of the firm of Messrs Pulman & Dean, solicitors Rugby, who joined the 9th Public Schools Battalion as a private, in now in hospital at Eastbourne. While in the trenches he was hit by a gas bomb, and in addition to being gassed was wounded in the leg. The effects of the poison gas have left him somewhat deaf and very weak, but he hopes to recover in course of time.

WELL-KNOWN B.T.H. EMPLOYE KILLED IN ACTION. SECOND-CORPL. H. E. GOVETT.

We regret to announce that Second-Corpl H E Govett, of the 67th Field Company Royal Engineers, was killed in action on the Gallipoli Peninsula on December 19th. Corpl Govett, who had been employed at the B.T.H. several years, was well-known locally, and was very popular both in the works and the town generally. An Australian by birth, Corpl Govett was educated at Geelong College, Australia, and came to England in 1907 and studied engineering at the Crystal Palace Engineering School. He came to the B.T.H. at the end of 1910 as a special course apprentice, and went through all the departments, including the Drawing Office, and when War broke out he was in the Testing Department. He joined the Royal Engineers as a sapper in September, 1914, and quickly rose to the rank of second corporal. He was a member of the Rugby Club, Rugby Lawn Tennis Club, and the Rugby Golf Club, an enthusiastic motor cyclist and all-round good sportsman, and during his stay in the town he made many friends.

[He is remembered on the BTH Memorial]

FORMER RUGBY RESIDENT GOES DOWN ON THE “ PERSIA.”

News has been received in Rugby from an authentic source that the W E Edgcombe, who was amongst those who went down on the S.S. Persia, which was torpedoed in the Mediterranean recently, was Mr William Edward Edgcombe, who was formerly assistant to Mr G W Walton, locomotive foreman at Rugby. Mr Edgcombe, it appears, held a post in India after he left Rugby, but he paid a visit to England about two months ago. The news of his death, in such tragic circumstances, will be deplored by those who knew him in the town, and sympathy will be felt with the bereaved relatives.

TWO RUGBY TERRITORIALS GAIN THE D.C.M.

Rugbeians will learn with pleasure that two members of the old E Company, 7th R.W.R, have been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for brave conduct in the field. The men thus honoured are Sergt W T Bromage, who, at the commencement of the war, was employed at Nuneaton Railway Station, and Pte L G Eaton, son of Mr. Eaton, of 93 South Street, Rugby.

The deed for which they have received the decoration took place on May 28th, 1915, and the facts of the case were reported at the time in the Rugby Advertiser, as under : “ On Friday night, May 28th, there was an exciting episode in which the Rugby lads came through with flying colours, but with further loss. The following are, as far as I could gather, the details :—A party, including Corpl W Bromage, Ptes L Hill, L Eaton, and P Hall, were out on the listening post, when a party of Germans came out and tried to surprise them. The enemy opened fire, killing L (Bleb) Hill, a Newbold lad, and wounding L Eaton. The latter stuck to his post, and continued to fire until help arrived, consisting of a party under Sergt Ward. I expect the enemy gave it up for a bad job, and upon examination by our chaps we found they had left one dead. Our men brought him in, and he proved to be an iron cross man. His rifle has been despatched to England, and will some day repose in the Rugby Drill Hall as a war trophy. The Company has been congratulated by the Colonel, as undoubtedly by their watchfulness and presence of mind they saved an awkward situation. Corpl Bromage has since been promoted Lance-Sergeant.”

Rugby may well be proud of such men, who have added lustre to the fame of the old “ E ” Company, and all will join with us in congratulating them.

Pte Eaton, who is only nineteen years of age, has also been awarded the “ Croix de Guerre ” by the President of the French Republic in recognition of his service. He has resided with his parents in Rugby for eight years, and has been a member of the battalion for nearly three years, being formerly in the Leamington Company. When the war broke out he was employed as a cleaner in the L & N W Railway Company loco department.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

About fifty men have attested under the Group System at Rugby during the past week, the proportion between married and single being about equal. The cavalry and several other units are now open, and men whose groups have not yet been called up can join these if they come up to the standard by signing up for immediate service. During the past week a number of men have availed themselves of this privilege.

All men wishing to join under the Group System must take their registration cards to the Drill Hall.

In future the Drill Hall will be closed at 4.30 p.m. on Saturdays.

The Rugby Fortress Company—now designated the 220th Army Troops Company—have now gone out of the country. A portion of the company has been sent to the East.

RUGBY ENGINEERS OPPOSE COMPULSION.

At a special quarterly meeting of the Rugby No 2 Branch of the Amalgamated Society of Engineers, held on Friday evening last week, a discussion took place on the Government’s Compulsion Bill. A vote was taken, and it was unanimously decided to oppose conscription under all considerations in view of the fact that, in the opinion of those present, a case had not yet been made out to justify such a measure.

Another resolution, calling upon the Rugby Trades and Labour Council to summon a meeting of the rank and file of the unions, to be held in the largest hall available, was also passed, as it was thought that the ordinary members, as well as the delegates to the Council, should have an opportunity of debating and deciding on the matter.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

Absent Without Leave.

W Burton, Hillmorton ; S Fisher, Chester Street, Rugby; Joseph Lane, Harborough Magna ; and E Lima, 52 Pennington Street, Rugby, were summoned by the B.T.H, Rugby.

It was alleged that Burton absented himself at Christmas time, and he replied that he was ill. He was told that for not sending in a medical certificate to the firm he would be fined 5s.

The complaint against Fisher was adjourned to see how the defendant went on, the Chairman advising him to give up the drink.

Lane was stated to have absented himself from work, and was said not to have returned to his employment yet. The defendant, a boy, said that he gave notice to the firm that he was going to leave, and the Chairman pointed out that leaving after giving notice was not an offence. The firm stated that the youth had started work elsewhere. The Chairman said he was not entitled to do that, but must wait six weeks. The case was dismissed without penalty, the Chairman remarking that defendant had probably got his new master into trouble by getting work with him, and it would be for the B.T.H to take what steps they wished against the firm.

Lima was fined 15s for absenting himself without leave.

MAKING AMENDS TO THE B.T.H.

A short time ago an article appeared in a Sunday paper which conveyed the inference that the B.T.H, Rugby, was included in the ramifications of the great German Trust known as the A.E.G. The B.T.H Company at once took steps to deny that they had anything to do with the German Trust, and commenced an action for libel against the newspaper and the writer, “ John Briton,” of the article.

In the same Journal on Sunday last the following retraction from John Briton appeared:—

When I wrote last on the German influence in the electrical industry, some two months ago, I gave an account of the extraordinary ramifications of the great German Trust, called briefly the A.E.G of Berlin, and in this connection, before I go further, I desire to clear up an unfortunate misunderstanding. Among the “ Allied and subordinate ” companies of which I gave a list, I mentioned the British Thomson-Houston Company of Rugby. I did not say that this company was owned or controlled by the A.E.G, but this inference has been drawn from my article, and I therefore desire to say that it is unfounded.

The truth is that the B.T.H of Rugby is mainly controlled by the General Electric Company of Schenectady, which in its turn is a descendant of the Thomson-Houston Company of America. The Thomson-Houston Company in its day sold its European patents to a number of companies on this side of the Atlantic, some of which in due course were absorbed by the A.E.G and some by the G.E Company.

The British Thomson-Houston Company belongs, as I have said, to the latter category. It is true that the A.E.G purchased the German rights under the patents of the G.E Co and B.T.H Co in exchange for the American and British rights under its patents, but I am glad to be able to state that the German company has no control over, or interest in, either the American or British company, and I regret if any other meaning has been read into my article, and if any harm has been done to the B.T.H Co thereby. I am also able to state that the A.E.G has no control over the electric lamp business in this country, but, on the contrary, by reason of British patents, it was obliged to purchase from British companies all such lamps as it sold here.

EMPIRE CIGARETTES – THEN BACK TO THE TRENCHES.

Mr B Morris, of the Empire, has received the following letter from Q.M.S. Tomlinson, from which it will be seen that our local Territorials are still in the fighting :—

Dear Mr Morris,—At last I am able to acknowledge receipt of your kind gift of 6,000 cigarettes to the Rugby boys of old E Company.

They arrived on the 11th, so must have been delayed considerably in transit.

I was able to distribute them very quickly, as both the Transport and Maxim gunners were within easy reach.

All the boys wish me to express their grateful thanks to you for your kindness, and many, I know, are writing to thank you personally. When your gift arrived we were on the last day of a week’s rest in a little French village some three miles from the firing line. It was an exceedingly enjoyable week, and greatly appreciated by all. Duties were as light as possible. The weather was fairly fine, football matches were arranged and played, and in the evenings concerts were promoted. All these, with the relief from fatigue and tension which is ever present in trench warfare, helped to make us a happy crowd. I think it was the most enjoyable week we have spent out here.

The following day we returned to the music of the guns and the one hundred and one trench duties.

This morning our artillery opened a heavy fire on the German trenches and barbed wire, which soon drew a spirited reply from the Boches, and for an hour and a half the ground and air vibrated from the roar of cannon and bursting shells. A four-inch shell fell on one of our company dug-outs; fortunately it did not burst, otherwise I am afraid eight of our men, would have had a bad chance.

Before I close I should like once again to thank you and also all our good friends of Rugby for their kindness, and for all they have done for our welfare and comfort.—With kind regards,

I am yours sincerely,

A. C. TOMLINSON, C.Q.M.S.

COMFORTS FOR RUGBY SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

FORMATION OF A TOWN COMMITTEE.

Hitherto there has been no organised effort to raise funds for sending parcels to all soldiers and sailors belonging to Rugby who are serving their country. Only those in the Territorial units have been provided for, the others being left to the solicitude of their friends, but a representative committee has now been formed to make the public effort more comprehensive by looking after all the men from Rugby, and we have pleasure in publishing the following letter from the Chairman of the Rugby Urban Council:

DEAR SIR.—It has been suggested that the men from Rugby who have enlisted in units other than local Territorial ones should be included in a scheme to send them tobacco and other small comforts which they may need from time to time. For some months past Mrs West and Mrs C P Nickalls have been sending parcels to the men of the Rugby Howitzer Battery and the Rugby men of E Company, 7th Royal Warwicks, and many appeals have been received from men in other units with which they have been unable to deal owing to the lack of funds. A representative committee has now been formed to deal with the matter, and subscriptions, which are urgently needed, may be sent to the treasurer, Captain Thomas, United Counties Bank Ltd, Market Place, Rugby, or to myself addressed to the Benn Buildings, Rugby.

The neighbouring towns and villages have all been looking after their fighting men for some time past, and it is felt that Rugby should not be behind.

It is a fact that the men most keenly appreciate not only the little comforts sent to them, but more particularly the kind thought of their fellow-townsmen which prompts the sending of the parcels.

Yours truly,

J. J. McKinnell,
Benn Buildings, Chairman Of Council
High Street, Rugby,
January 19th, 1916.

The committee has been made as representative as possible, and includes nominations from all the large works and trading institutions, the Trades and Labour Council, and the School (two, house masters).

From this committee an executive has been formed, consisting of Mr J J McKinnell, chairman ; Capt Thomas, United Counties Bank, hon , treasurer; Mrs West, Bawnmore, Bilton, hon secretary; Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs Thomas, Messrs A Adnitt, W Flint, F E Hands, G Gauntley, and W F Wood.

The Women’s Volunteer Reserve are acting as the hon secretary’s clerical staff.

The methods under consideration for raising funds are :- A flag day, special entertainments, collection funds at all the large works and by employers of labour, subscription lists at the banks, and a house-to-house collection, for which, if possible, use will be made of the organisation which was set going for the Prince of Wales’s Fund.

WELCOME HOME—A GOOD SUGGESTION.

Thank God ! arrived at last. A deep sigh, a fleeting glance up and down as the weary, mud-stained soldier in his bearskin jacket, his knapsack, carbine, and full active service kit, steps on the platform, but as he sees the old familiar objects his face lights up with a smile. He knows full well it is home, dear old home. It does not dismay him that he has to trudge nine or ten miles to seek that sacred spot, “ home,” which has been ever in his mind during the 14 weary months of hardship and danger spent at Ypres, Loos, and Neuve Chapelle.

In answer to a question : “ Why don’t you stay the night at Rugby ?” comes the answer : “ Nay, lad, if it was twice the distance I would gladly foot it, for our leave is so short and every hour appears a day to us.”

And so they trudge cheerfully off, although no friends are there to meet them with a welcome at the station.

I am sure there are scores of kindly disposed persons in Rugby owning motor cars who would gladly meet those war-worn soldiers who have been fighting so gallantly the fierce and callous enemy. I am sure such an influential body as the Chamber of Trade might well take the matter up and add considerably to their laurels. I have met local soldiers arriving at Rugby between 10 and 11 p.m. who have had to trudge to Marton, Long Itchington, Swinford, and some have even walked to Nuneaton in their anxiety to lose a minute in seeing their dear ones at home.

It would not be a difficult matter to post a list of those sympathetic people owning motors or tri-cars at the L. and N.-W. Station, who are willing to give our brave lads a lift. There is a public telephone at the station with which to communicate to the town quickly, and, could this be accomplished, I am sure it would earn the heartfelt gratitude of the mud-stained lads from the trenches.

Thanking you, Sir, in anticipation, yours sincerely, J. TWYFORD.