23rd Mar 1918. Daylight Saving, Arrival of “Summer Time”

DAYLIGHT SAVING.
ARRIVAL OF “ SUMMER TIME.”

We remind our readers that after midnight on Saturday, March 23rd, [?] on Sunday, March 24th, they must but their clocks FORWARD one hour.

It may for convenience be done when going to bed on Saturday night.

The period of saving has been extended this year five weeks, and will terminate on Sept. 29.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Cadet C Wright, son of Mr E Wright, of Long Lawford, who was sent home in July last (while on active service in France) for a commission, has been gazetted Second-Lieutenant in the 4th Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regt.

FOOD PARCELS OR MONEY FOR SOLDIERS AT THE FRONT.
SYMPATHY FOR DEAR FRIENDS AT HOME.

A letter which has a bearing on this subject comes from a Rugbeian in an Artillery Regiment on the Western Front. He writes :—

“ How good of you to send us a P.O. I happened to be ‘ stoney broke,’ and we had a feed that night. We can get things at our canteen very cheap. Can get a brand of tobacco for 5d per ounce which costs at home 8½d. I see you are all on the ration system in England. We live extremely well, and begin to feel sorry for all our dear friends at home having to go so short.”

It will, therefore, be seen that, as far as the Western Front is concerned, plenty of food can be procured, provided the men have the money. But in Egypt, and Mesopotamia it is probable that parcels of suitable food which will not suffer from climatic conditions will be more useful.

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT.

Thursday, March 14th. Present : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), L Loverock, T A Wise, W H Linnell, and W A Stevenson. Mr H P Highton was the National Service representative.

The case of a jersey manufacturer (31) was again considered.—The case had been adjourned for the man to be examined by the Volunteer Corps doctor. He had not received notice to submit to this examination, however ; and even if he was passed fit, he would not now be able to attend the drills, because since the case was last heard his wife had died, and he had one to look after his house. He was making Cardigan jackets for the War Office, and he had not done any civilian work since May. He had not tried to get a protection he thought it fairer to leave for the Tribunal to decide.—The case was further adjourned, and Mr Morson was directed to communicate with Capt C H Fuller. The man was also advised to approach the War Office with a view to obtaining protection.

Other results were :—Clerk, 23, single, B3, June 15th, and advised either to get work in a munitions factory as a clerk or on the land. Fruiterer, 41, married, June 1st, on condition that he took up work of national importance for three days a week. July 15th plumber, married, and wholesale grocer, 40 married. July 1st, blacksmith’s doorman, 33, married, and accountant clerk, 41, single. June 1st, church caretaker, 42, married, and printer’s machinist.

THE NEW SYSTEM OF ALLOCATING MEAT SUPPLIES.
A GILBERTIAN SITUATION.

At a Meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday afternoon a resolution was passed protesting against the new system of allocating stock to butchers by which the stock in a market is divided out amongst the whole of the towns in the scheduled area which are represented at the market. As a result of this system the Rugby butchers must attend every market in Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Staffordshire, Herefordshire, and Shropshire before applying to the deputy meat agent for a further supply to make up their quota—a proceeding denounced by several members as wasteful and ridiculous.

(A report of the discussion will appear next week.)

THE PRIME MINISTER AND POTATOES.
APPEAL FOR A MILLION MORE ACRES.

A letter has been issued from 10 Downing Street for publication in the Press. It says :—“ I desire to impress upon all farmers and small growers the vital importance of increasing, to the utmost extent possible, the supply of potatoes this year. There is no crop under existing war conditions which can compare with it in importance as a food for either man or beast, and it would be quite impossible to plant too many potatoes this spring. . . . If we can get a million acres under potatoes in Great Britain this year the food situation will be safe, and farmers will have rendered an immense service to their country. The grower is in the front line of the fight against the submarine. He can defeat it if he chooses, but victory depends on his action and exertions during the next few weeks.—D LLOYD GEORGE.

THE DUNCHURCH ESTATE AGAIN ON THE MARKET.

Messrs May & Rowden, of London, in conjunction with Messrs James Styles & Whitlock, of Rugby, announce that they will sell by auction in June various portions of this property, extending to about 4,550 acres, including the whole of the parishes of Church Lawford and Kings Newnham and a portion of Dunchurch parish.

DEATHS.

MEREDITH.—November 20th, 1917, killed in action near Cambrai, OWEN WATKIN WYNN HARDINGE MEREDITH, 2nd Lieut. R.F.C., aged 24, the only and beloved child of the late Ven. Thomas Meredith, M.A., Vicar of Wolston and Archdeacon of Singapore, and of Mrs. Meredith, Park Road, Leamington.

IN MEMORIAM.

CHEDGEY.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. PERCY JAMES CHEDGEY, Bitteswell, Lutterworth, who gave his life for his country in France on March 22, 1917.
“ To live in the hearts those we love is not to die.”

DODSON.—In loving of our dear son, Rifleman WILLIAM DODSON, who died of wounds, March 24th, 1915.
“ We loved him—oh ! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him, and how well.
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he lies in a hero’s grave.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, Brothers, & Sister.

FOX.—In memory of our dearly loved son, NORMAN H. FOX, killed in action, March 21st, 1915.
—From Father and Mother, who loved him better than life.

HADDON.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. C. F. HADDON, of the Winnipeg Rifles, who was killed at Vimy Ridge on March 29, 1917.—Not forgotten by loved ones at home.

LEESON.—In loving memory of our two dear lads, ALBERT (Bert), killed in action, March 20, 1917, and FRED ( Bob), missing since September 25, 1915.
“ Two of the best that God could send — Loving sons and faithful friends.”
—From Father, Mother, Brothers, Sister, & Hilda.

LANGHAM.—In loving memory of HAROLD F LANGHAM, who died of wounds in France on March 23, 1917.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from his friends who loved him best,
in a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father, Brother and Sister.

MONTGOMERY.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, HERBERT MONTGOMERY, of 6 Oak Terrace, who was killed in Egypt on March 27, 1917.
“ A light from our household is gone.
A voice that we loved is stilled ;
A place is vacant in our home
Which never can be filled.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and Children.

SALISBURY.—In ever loving memory of WILFRID, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Salisbury, 17 Clifton Road, who was killed while mine sweeping on March 25th, 1917.
“ A light has from our pathway gone,
A voice we loved is stilled ;
A place is vacant in our hearts
Which can never be filled.”
—From Father, Mother, Brothers, & Sister.

 

24th Nov 1917. Food Parcels for Men on Active Service

FOOD PARCELS FOR MEN ON ACTIVE SERVICE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—Enquires into the reason for the local shortage of certain essential foodstuffs have brought the information that the Authorities were making first claim upon these for our Armies in the field ; and having had the opportunity on several occasions lately of mixing with a number of men straight from the trenches, and quite unknown personally to me, I have raised the question of food supplies, and feel sure that Rugbeians will be glad to know that without exception the men, who belonged to various units from different parts of the front, gave me the assurance that they were now very well fed, and that of most of the things which we are short they are receiving a sufficiency. They have been unanimous, too, in stating that it was quite unnecessary, and even wasteful, to send them either food or tobacco from home, and that I should be justified in giving publicity to the fact that the majority of them would prefer money, with which they can obtain little comforts when they have opportunities of getting them—tobacco and cigarettes they can buy duty free, and of practically any brand they choose. One article they are always glad to see, and cannot get enough of, is the humble sock. They assert that a clean pair of socks is a luxury, and often hard to obtain even to come home in for their leave.

I understand, too, that the old ration of biscuit and bully beef has been modernised, and is now served in an appetising mince.

At this season numbers of people will be contemplating sending parcels to the boys : and feeling that they would mostly desire to do their bit in the most acceptable way, I respectfully suggest that it take the form of money and socks.—Yours faithfully,

HARRY TARBOX,
Chairman Rugby Rural Food Control Committee.

PIGS FOR HOME CONSUMPTION.

AN UNFOUNDED RUMOUR.

A rumour has been widely circulated in the Midland Counties to the effect that pig-keepers are forbidden to kill their pigs for their own consumption, and as the consequence has been that large numbers have been killed in an immature condition.

Mr Ernest Parke, the chairman of the Brailes Rural District Council, has received a letter, dated November 21st, from the Minister of Food, as follows :—

“ There is no truth in the rumour that any order made by this Department forbids farmers and their labourers to kill their pigs for their own consumption.”

THE FOOD QUESTION.

NATIONAL VALUE OF THE POTATO.

An interesting discussion as to the best means of turning the present abundant potato crop to the greatest national advantage took place at the Ministry of Food on Monday. After providing for the normal consumption, there is, said Sir Arthur Yapp, a surplus of considerably over 2,000,000 tons of potatoes, which, if utilised during the next six months—a most critical period—in lieu of bread, will save 500,000 ton of grain, this being sufficient to keep the whole of the United Kingdom in bread for two months. In the course of an interest Dr J Campbell gave some important figures illustrating the economic food value of the potato. The said that 2 2/3 lbs of potatoes had an equivalent food value of 1 lb of bread. There was a national gain in the fact that one acre of land devoted to the growth of potatoes produced twice the quantity of flesh-forming protein compared with the same land devoted to wheat 4½ times more starch, and 3½ times more potash. He thought, therefore, that the acreage given over to potatoes should be increased to rather than reduced. Having recommended the greater use of potato flour in bread-making, he suggested that no bread should be served at meals when potatoes were abundant.

THE FOOD SHORTAGE LOCALLY.

The shortage of certain articles of food locally, which has during the past fortnight become acute, is causing considerable uneasiness and inconvenience in the town. Several commodities, such as matches, tea, butter, bacon, and other fats, are practically unobtainable, and then only in very small quantities. Several shops dealing largely in these articles have been besieged with customers, and housewives complain bitterly of the many hours spent, without result, in shopping. Shopkeepers are their wits’ end to supply the demands of the public, and in many cases commodities, of which the supply is limited, are reserved for regular customers. The Co-operative Society has adopted the rationing system in respect of a number articles, members being served only on the production of their old sugar cards—those issued by the society. In many cases customers have added to the difficulties of retailers by adopting an unreasonable attitude, and a reflection of this state of affairs was provided at the County Appeals Tribunal on Wednesday evening, when a grocer’s manager was exempted for six months, a representative of the firm pleading that it was unsafe to leave a woman in sole charge owing to the threatening attitude of numerous customers.

RUGBY BUTCHERS BEFORE THE TRIBUNAL.

A special sitting of the Appeal Tribunal was held at Rugby on Wednesday evening to consider the claims of the Rugby butchery trade. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), KV Rotherham, S J Dicksee. Capt M E T Wratislaw was the National Service representative.

The first three cases were applications for further periods of exemption.—On behalf of George William Thomson, 39, married, West Street, Mr Eaden suggested that the position was such that the man should not be called upon to join the Army. His wife’s health was delicate, and she had been advised by a specialist that she must shortly undergo an operation.—Capt Wratislaw said this was one of the men he was pressing for. The man’s business was situated in a district where there were plenty of shops to supply the public, and Mrs Thomson was capable of carrying on her husband’s business. Messrs Thomson and Haddon worked together, and he suggested that Mr Haddon should co-operate, and so release Thomson, whose business could still be preserved by his wife carrying it on.—Mr Thomson said his wife occasionally assisted in the shop by serving a pennyworth of suet, and so on ; but she was unable to cut up meat to advantage. Her health too, was delicate, and she could not stand for any length of time.—Mr. Eaden also appeared for Mr A J Haddon, 38, married, Lawford Road.—Capt Wratislaw suggested that this man should be allowed to remain in order that he could co-operate with Mrs Thomson to keep her husband’s business going.—George Roland Harris, 30, married, 41 Park Road, was described by Mr Eaden as one of the best slaughterers in the town, and he was always willing to help other butchers in case of need. His business premises were situated in a thickly populated part of the town, and on both sides the nearest butchers were some distance away. His wife assisted in the shop.—Capt Wratislaw said this was also one of the men he was asking for.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl E E Simons, of the Royal Engineers, landlord of the New Inn, Sharnford, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lieut Herbert Proctor, of the Royal Engineers, who prior to the War was engaged in the Special Engineering Department, died on November 11th as the result of an accident in France.

Mr & Mrs Collins, 45 New Street, New Bilton, have received official news that their eldest son, Pte A Collins, Royal Warwicks, aged 29, was killed in action in France on October 26th. He was also wounded in September last year. He is their second son who has fallen in the War, and their youngest son, who is now recovering from wounds, has been wounded twice in France.

NEWS has reached Rugby that Capt Ernest Wood, Manchester Regiment, elder son of Mr T Wood, a Rugby accountant, has won the Victoria Cross. He enlisted in a Pals Battalion as a private in the early months of the War, and his brother, Capt Arnold Wood, also serving in the Manchesters, was another Pals Battalion recruit. Details of the exploits for which the coveted distinction has been awarded have not yet been known to his friends.

D.S.O. FOR CAPT P F FULLARD, M.C.

The D.S.O has just been awarded to Capt P F Fullard, M.C, Worcestershire Regiment and Royal Flying Corps, a son of Mrs Fullard, now living at 44 Clifton Road, Rugby. This gallant officer was educated at Norwich Grammar School. He joined the Inns of Court O.T.C in September, 1915, and subsequently received a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment and the R.F.C. He went out in April, 1917, and speedily won the Military Cross, and subsequently a bar to the same for daring work in the air. He is only just 20 years of age. On Saturday last, when taking part in a Rugby football match behind the lines in France, he unfortunately had his legs broken.

DISCHARGED SAILORS AND SOLDIERS.—A whist drive and dance was held in the Co-operative Hall on Friday, November 16th, in aid of the branch funds. The prize-winners were : Mrs A Neal, Miss C Gilbert. Miss Lockwood (Mr H V Ramsey, Mr Griffiths. A large number attended. Brown’s orchestra supplied the dance music. The first prize for ladies was a gramophone, value £6 6s, kindly presented by Mr J T E Brown.

PERSONAL PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.

A new scheme comes into force on December 1st, which will enable the NEXT-OF-KIN of a prisoner of war to send a “ Personal Parcel,” not exceeding 11lbs in weight and not less than 3lbs in weight, so as to minimize the risk of loss in the post. The “ Personal Parcel ” may be sent once a quarter only. It may NOT be packed and dispatched by any authorized association, and must NOT bear the British Red Cross label. It must be packed and dispatched through the Post Office by the next-of-kin or relative, who receives a special coupon, and the coupon must be affixed to the parcel.

In the case of men in the care of Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee applications for coupons should be addressed to the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby ; where the applicant is not the prisoner’s next-of-kin the written permission of the next-of-kin must accompany the request for the coupon.

WHAT MAY BE SENT.

Any of the articles noted below may be included :—

Pipe, housewife, cloth brushes, sponge, handkerchiefs (one a quarter), buttons, pencils, shaking soap (one stick a quarter), tooth powder, health salts, chess, draughts, dominoes, pomade, insecticide powder, cap badges and badges of rank, braces and belts (provided they are made of webbing and include no rubber or leather), dubbin, hob-nails, shaving brush, sweets, safety razor, combs, medal ribbons, bootlaces (mohair), hair brushes, brass polish, pipe lights, tooth brushes, mittens and mufflers (one pair each every quarter).

Relatives are warned that the inclusion in the parcel of any article not mentioned in the above list will entail the confiscation of the parcel. Persons who pack their parcel should use strong cardboard boxes, and should have pack the articles in such a manner that they will not move or rattle.

DEATHS.

PATCHETT.—Died of wounds on November 14, 1917, in Egypt, WILLIAM IVENS PATCHETT, 1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, the beloved husband of Ellen Patchett, 7 Manor Road, Rugby.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear.
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain ;
But trust in Christ to meet again.”

BEASLEY.—Pte. C. Beasley, of Napton, was killed in France Oct. 26th, 1917. Deeply mourned by his loving mother, father, brothers, and sisters.
Only a private soldier,
But a mother’s son,
Buried on a field of battle,
His duty he done.
He served King and country—
God known did his best ;
But now he sleeps in jesus,
A soldier laid to rest.
He sleeps besides his comrades,
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
His name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he has left at home.
A day of remembrance sad to recall,
A dearly loved son and brother missed by us all.
—Deeply mourned by us all at home.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. COLLINS, of the 15th Royal Warwicks, who was killed in action in France on October 26, 1917 ; aged 29.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear ;
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain,
But trust in Christ to meet again.”
—Deeply mourned by Father and Mother, Sisters and Brother.

FRENCH.—In loving memory of Pte J. FRENCH, of the R.W.R. (of Long Itchington), who killed in action on 26th October, 1917.—From his beloved Wife, Children, Father and Mother.
When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
he did best for one and all,
And them who loved him well.

THOMAS.—In ever-loving remembrance of Pte. W. H. THOMAS, killed in action in France on October 24, 1917. —From sorrowing Aunt and Uncle, Amy and Will.

THOMAS.—Killed in action Oct. 24, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY THOMAS, beloved nephew of Mr. and Mrs. ROSE, 78 Boughton Road.—Deeply mourned.

IN MEMORIAM.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly-loved son of H. and C. PEARCE, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark, Nov. 26th, 1914.
There is link death cannot sever.
Love and remembrance last for ever.
—From Father and Mother.