3rd Nov 1917. Value of the Acorn Crop

VALUE OF THE ACORN CROP.

The President of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries again urges upon stock-keepers the great importance of making full use of the present abundant crop of acorns. Acorns are specially adapted for pig-feeding, and can be used most effectively and economically when pigs are allowed to gather them where they fall. While it will still be necessary to prevent the indiscriminate straying of pigs, the Home Office concurs with the Board in thinking that, if in consequence of this notice the number of pigs found straying on highways by the police should increase, proceedings against their owners should not be instituted except when direct negligence on the part of the owners is shown.

THE SALE OF POTATOES.

The Potato Order, which prohibits any person, except the grower, to sell potatoes without a license, came into force on Thursday. It is also necessary for retailers to exhibit price lists in their places of business.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of this committee was held on Monday, Mr W Flint, c.c. presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Wilson,. Mr G W Walton, Mr A W Shirley, Mr Pepper, and the Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker). The latter reported that since the last meeting there had been five additions to the list of prisoners of war, and he regretted say that there were the prospects of further increases in the near future. The acknowledgements from the men had much improved, and letters he had received and reports from Regimental Care Committees showed that practically all the parcels now reached the men. Apart from the newly captured men, all the others were now in regular communication. The only one who had been giving any anxiety of late was Driver F Furniss (A.S.C), of Rugby, of whom nothing had been heard for several months. During the week-end, however, Mr Barker said he had heard from Furniss, who in his letter said that he had received all his parcels from Nos. 1 to 55 inclusive, which were quite satisfactory, and adding that he was in good health. A number of efforts were promised during the winter months, which would assist the funds of the committee. He regretted that it had been found necessary to increase the cost of the standard food parcels from 6s to 8s owing to the rise in the price of commodities and materials and the necessity for making the parcels a little larger. This meant that, instead of £2 3s 6d per month per man, the cost would be £2 15s 6d, or a total charge of £216 9s per month inclusive for the 78 men. Fortunately for the fund 27 of these men were now fully adopted, and with small sums guaranteed on behalf of other men, there remained a balance of about £130 per month still to be found, provided, of course, it was the committee’s wish that they bear the increased cost. The subscriptions continued to come in splendidly, and during the past two months they had received more than sufficient to cover the cost of the parcels, thus being able to add slightly to the bank balance.

Mr Barker said he thought the committee and the subscribers to the fund would feel proud of the fact that they had been able to “ carry on ” without asking for financial assistance from the British Red Cross Society, who, who as they knew, had guaranteed the parcels. The committee would appreciate this more fully when he reminded them that the Chairman of that Society recently stated that they had to find £1,500 per day to make good the lack of funds and support given to other Prisoners of War Committees throughout the country. Mr Barker said he could not too strongly emphasise the fact that every subscription to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was virtually a subscription to the British Red Cross Society.

Mr Flint said that, in view of this report, he felt that it would be everybody’s wish that the committee completed the cost of the food parcels and bread, and therefore moved this resolution.—In seconding, Mr G W Walton said that, notwithstanding the many other demands upon the public, the Prisoners of War Fund received the support of everyone. There were many persons contributing every week in a quiet way, and he felt sure they would be able to secure sufficient funds to enable the increased expenditure to be made.—The resolution was unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr & Mrs Brett have received official intimation that their son, Pte A J Brett, R.A.M.C, was wounded in October 7th, and is in hospital in France.

Mr W Cowley, of 34 Poplar Grove, has been notified by the War Office that his son, Pte G V Cowley, of the Dorset Regiment, was wounded by shrapnel in the thigh in an advance near Ypres on October 4th. He is an old St Matthew’s boy, He was previously wounded in September 1915.

Pte C E Freeman, Royal Warwicks, was wounded on October 17th, sustaining a severe gun-shot wound in the chest. His home is at 17 Charlotte Street.

In the list of casualties published last week-end appears the name of Lieut W E Littleboy, of the Warwickshire Regiment. He was educated at Rugby School, and was a prominent member of the Football XV of three years ago.

A letter has been received from Second-Lieut Basil Parker, Machine Gun Company, who was recently reported missing, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He is a son of Mr E Parker, of the Avenue Road, New Bilton, and was formerly a teacher at St Matthew’s School.

Mr and Mrs Whitbread have now received definite news from the War Office that the only son, Second-Lieut Basil Whitbread, was killed in action on the night of the 22nd July, 1916. His body was found outside the lines and was buried at High Wood.

The Rev R F Morson, M.A, elder son of Mr & Mrs Arthur Morson, who has for the past 4½ years been assistant priest at St Silas the Martyr, Kentish Town, London, has offered his services as a chaplain to H.M Forces, which have been accepted. He has been ordered to Salonica.

At the Rural District Tribunal on Thursday conscientious objection was pleaded by a Bilton youth, 18, single, who asked to be allowed either to undertake work with (1) the Friends’ War Relief Committee ; (2) Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section ; (3) full-time work on the land ; or (4) that the case should be referred to the Pelham Committee. He had previously been temporary exempted in order that he might complete his education. He was given conditional exemption on joining the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section.

CORPL C H TOMPKINS.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C H Tompkins, of the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, who prior to the War was employed by the Company, died on October 23rd from wounds received in action.

BRANDON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook, of Brandon, have received the news that their son, Pte Banbrook, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital in Mesopotamia suffering from sand fly fever. Out of their five sons who enlisted two others are still suffering from wounds. Pte S Banbrook was for several years in the stables at Brandon Hall.—Pte G. Newman, Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the right foot. He formerly worked at market gardening for Mr Gupwell.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford have been notified of the death of their second son, Pte S G Halford. He has been missing for more than 12 months. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, who some short time back lost another son. Deceased was formerly in the employ of Mr J Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, where his father was employed for many years.

BINLEY.

Mr & Mrs J L STEVENS have received news of the death of their elder son, Pte J A Stevens, of the Machine Gun Company. Before entering the Army he was employed at Binley Colliery, and his father was in the employ of the Earl of Craven as a keeper, and resided at Piles Coppice.

BILTON.

REPORTED MISSING.—Miss E Watts has received official notification that her nephew, Private C Eccles, Royal Warwicks, has been reported missing as from October 4th. He was in the great push on the Yser in which Lance-Corpl Houghton, also of Bilton, lost his life.

ROYAL RED CROSS AWARD.

The King has been pleased to award the Royal Red Cross to Miss Kathleen Bolam, superintendent, Ashlawn and Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital, for valuable services rendered. We believe this is the first V.A.D member in Warwickshire to receive this honour which Miss Bolam has thoroughly earned and deserves.

DEATHS.

BYERS.—In loving memory of Corpl ANGUS BYERS, 1st K.O.S.B, who was killed in action on September 20, 1917, “ somewhere in France.”—Deeply mourned. From all at 82 Rowland Street.

GRENDON.—Killed in action on the Vimy Ridge on April’s 9th, Pte. WM. GRENDON, 2nd Canadian mounted Rifles, aged 31 ; dearly loved only son of J. & A. M. Grendon, late of Grandborough.

MILLS.—In ever-loving memory of JOSEPH MAWBY, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Mills, Marton ; killed in action on October 23rd ; aged 23.
“ Had we been asked, how will we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow,’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say,
‘ Lord, we love him—let him stay,’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown gravest is the bitterness blow,
None but his loved ones will ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters, Brothers, and Percy.

 

6th Oct 1917. Successful Effort for Rugby Prisoners of War Fund

SUCCESSFUL EFFORT FOR RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
SHOW & SALE ON BENN FIELD.

Glorious weather and the prospect of performing a pleasing duty under pleasant conditions attracted a large crowd to Benn Field on Saturday afternoon, when a show and sale, arranged by the “ G.H.S ” Philanthropic Society on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held. The decision to hold the show was only reached about ten days previously, but so enthusiastically did all connected with the effort work, and so generously were they supported by the public, that the success of the undertaking was never in doubt, and this feeling of confidence was justified by the results.

The opening ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, who explained that the object of the effort was to raise as much money as possible to send parcels, of food to those “ poor chaps ” who had been taken prisoners by the unspeakable Hun, and who, as they knew well, were treated very badly indeed and were not properly fed. It was, therefore, up to the people of Rugby to see that enough money was raised, so that parcels of food could go to these men week by week, and so that they, when they were liberated after the end of the War, would be restored to their friends hale and hearty and able to take their place again in the life of the community. If they did not find the money, and if they left those poor fellows to the tender mercies of the Germans, some would never come back at all, and others would come back with their constitution devitalised by continual semi-starvation, and many, perhaps, would only come back to linger and to die. The Rugby Prisoners of War Committee was started two years ago by an energetic committee, of whom Mr J R Barker was the equally energetic secretary, and he had worked like a Trojan for it. The fund now supported 77 prisoners, all of whom were boys from Rugby or villages in the immediate neighbourhood. There was no doubt therefore, that there was a special call for them to look after these men. It cost £170 per month to send the requisite number of parcels, and of this £70 had already been guaranteed by certain kind and patriotic individuals, but the balance of £100 per month still had to be raised, and they were going to see that day if they could not realise at least several hundreds (a voice : “ Thousands ”). Thank God, Rugby, during this War had always come up to the scratch, and he had never known her let them down ; and he earnestly appealed to them to support the effort that day to the best of their ability. . .

A large number of attractions had been arranged by the committee, the principal of which was the vegetable show, where some exceptionally fine exhibits were staged and were much admired. Prizes were offered for the best exhibits, and these were divided into 27 classes, the winners being as follows :–

The judges were Messrs W Harmon (Newnham Paddox) and A Chandler (Coton House).

The Fire Brigade competitions were keenly contested. The prizes were given by the B.T.H Foremen’s and the Assistant Foremen’s Association. Mr W Spencer and Engineer Reece were the judges ; Messrs J Taylor and Cooke, timekeepers ; and Third Officer Fletcher (B.T.H) starter. . . .

A short concert was also given, the programme being arranged by Mr Charles T Mewis, and those who took part were Messrs H Phillips, W Jackson, J Farley and J Heap (Rugby Glee Party), Mr Geo Pratt, Coventry (humorist), Mr W C Sutton (ventriloquist), Mr Gough (conjuror). Mr J Littler was at the piano. A Punch and Judy show was also provided for the entertainment of the children. There was a musical chairs competition on bicycles, which was arranged for Boy Scouts, a number of whom from the Murray School Troop rendered valuable assistance during the afternoon. The competition was won by P Leader, G Day being second.

Various side-shows, skittles, “ Kaiser Bill and Little Willie,” guessing competitions, &c, were provided, and each of these did a good business.

A quantity of poultry and several sheep and lambs were sent by sympathisers for the benefit of the funds, and early in the evening the poultry were sold by Mr W Wiggins. Some very choice birds were offered, and in a number of cases they were sold over and over again. The prices, on the whole, were very satisfactory, the buyers sympathising with the genial auctioneer’s exhortation to “ Never mind the value of the things, but remember it is for a good cause.” A pet lamb was sold and re-sold ten times, realising £2 2s 6d.

The live stock having been disposed of the scene of interest shifted to the exhibition tents, where the produce was sold by Messrs W Wiggins, W Howkins, and F Frost. The visitors were in a generous mood, and, on the whole, very satisfactory prices were given. A small tan of petrol, containing about a gill of spirit, was sold and re-sold many times, the total realised being over £5 ; and by a similar method a toy motor-car realised about £7 10s. A potato, shaped like a bulldog’s head, also found many purchasers.

The sheep, lambs, and goat were sold in Rugby Market on Monday, and realised between £30 and £40.

Other diversions arranged for had to be omitted, as permission for extension and lighting could not be obtained. The proceeds will amount to well over £150.

The committee was assisted during the day by Messrs A Lord, G Vickery, G W Lawson, G Hansbury, G O Watson, W Henson, W Martin, H Clark, A C Bennett, A Allcutt, A Padbury, Mrs Barker, Misses R Palmer, Johnson, Ward, Kitchen, Twyford, Renshaw, Bromwick, Franklin, Prince, Owen, Spencer, Holyoake, Houghton, Fairfield, Walker, Cooke, and Gibbs.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R O Squarey, R.E, who has won the Military Cross, was captain of football at Rugby School.

Mrs Wakelin, of 15 Adam Street, New Bilton, has received news that her husband Pte L A Wakelin, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded by shrapnel.

Lieut Stanley Hidden, who has been serving for some considerable time with the Headquarters of a Mounted Division, has recently been promoted captain.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks, son of Mr & Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terrace, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th, after being twice previously wounded. He was 20 years of age, and had been in France two years. He had ten days’ leave at home in July. An elder brother, Pte F W Boyes, Berkshire Regiment, who was reported missing on July 1st, was subsequently reported killed.

ANOTHER HONOUR FOR LANCE-CORPL J H ENTICOTT.

Lance-Corpl J H Enticott, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr J Enticott, of 60 Union Street, who has already won the Military Medal and bar, has now been awarded the D.C.M for gallantry. Before the War Lance-Corpl Enticott, who is an Old St Matthew’s boy, was employed at the B.T.H. He is the third “ old boy ” to win the D.C.M, three others have received the Military Cross, about half-a-dozen the Military Medal, and numerous others have been mentioned in despatches.

LIEUT BASIL PARKER MISSING.

News has been received that Lieut W Basil Parker, of the Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr E Parker, 85 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been missing since September 29th. He was a pupil, and afterwards a student teacher, at St Matthew’s School, from where he gained a candidate teachers’ scholarship to the Lower School. He completed his education at Saltley College, and when he enlisted he held a teaching appointment in Derbyshire. He was formerly a member of the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade, and had also played forward for Rugby Football Club.

PERSONAL.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, medical officer of the London (Queen’s) Regiment, has received the Order of St Sava of Serbia in recognition of his services in that country in 1914-15.

WAR HOSPITALS SUPPLY DEPOT.

Many workers have been obliged to give up coming to the depot in order to take up other war work. More workers are urgently needed and invited to come to 8 Market Place, which is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays each week from 10 to 1 in the mornings, and from 2.30 to 4.30 on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. M MICHELL.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

HIRE TRADERS AND THE WAR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–I notice that more people are required for the National Service, and I think it is a scandalous shame that hire traders are allowed to keep groups of able-bodied men and women going from door to door pestering people to buy their goods on weekly payments. Some of the men look fit to be in khaki, while the others might also be doing useful work at a time like this. They seem to make a special business of calling on soldiers’ wives and trying to induce them to buy goods and pay for them out of the separation allowances which the Government pays to maintain the women and children, and not for any other purpose. I don’t think it right that these agents should be allowed to go about persuading soldiers’ wives to incur this liability without the knowledge or consent of the husband, and it will be a great shame if anything happens to prevent the women keeping up their payments if the trader seizes the goods without the consent of the Court when there has been a considerable sum paid. I think the Government would be justified in passing legislation to protect these people, as it would put the hire trader on a level with other tradesmen and not leave the customer at their mercy.–I remain, yours truly.
FAIR PLAT.

FOOD PRICES.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–Can anyone explain why food prices are rising simultaneously with the multiplication of Control Committees ? Take the case of butter. Why is it put up 4d a pound as soon as Rugby has a Food Control Committee ? I have had to pay an extra 2d twice lately, and I suppose I shall have to help pay the expenses of the Food Controllers. Surely we consumers are being forced to pay all round. As for the bread, we shall have to pay for it in the taxes, even if we get it for 9d a 4lb loaf. And we shall be made to fork out the money for the salaries of the hundreds and thousands of officials of the Government from top to bottom.

It was said in the old time of some professing Christians, “ Ye do wrong and defraud, and that your brethren.” What would St Paul or Thomas Carlyle say now about the greed of gain ? And what are the ministers of religion saying and doing in the face of all the avarice prevalent among traders and workmen of almost every sort ? Are honesty and religion standing a tiptoe in our land, ready to pass–I know not where !–Yours sincerely, INQUIRER.
Rugby, September 26, 1917.

SEATS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,–If your correspondent, “ Visitor,” resided here he would know that Rugby does possess public seats, but for some pre-war abuse they were banished by the “ City Fathers ” to the “ Rec,” and the Park, and thither Tommy must go if he wants a rest. It is not want of thought on the part of townspeople, because the seats have been pleaded for in previous summers, but the said Fathers said, “ No,” and it is so. What little bit of life is in this small town Tommy wants to see it, but he must stand or hang on railings to do it now the Parks are too cool.–Yours, sir, very truly,
CITIZEN.

DEATHS.

PEARCE.–On September 11, 1917, HAROLD, the dearly beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, who was killed in action in France.
“ He marched away so bravely,
His young head bravely held ;
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed ;
There on the battlefield
He calmly took his place ;
He fought and died for Britain :
An honour to his race.”

RUSSELL.–Gunner Walter Russell, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Russell, Toft Farm, Dunchurch, died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917; aged 27.

RUSSELL.–In loving memory of my dear husband, Gunner WALTER RUSSELL, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917.–NELLIE RUSSELL, Whitehall Farm, Dunchurch, Rugby.

VEARS.–Killed in action in France September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest son of Harry and Nellie Vears, of Bedworth, late of Rugby ; aged 21 years.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of a dear son and soldier brave :
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better Land.”

VEARS.–Killed in action in France on September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest grandson of Mrs. F. Draper, Long Buckby ; aged 21 years.
“ Bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
–From Grandma, Aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

SALMON.–In loving memory of Rifleman J. R. SALMON, R.B., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. H. Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road, Rugby ; killed in action on the Somme Front, October 7, 1916.

TANSER.–In ever-loving memory of Lance-Corpl. T. TANSER, of South Kilworth, killed in action October 3rd, 1916.
“ Ever in our thoughts, but the hardest part still yet to come.
When the heroes all return and we miss among the cheering crowd the face of our dear boy.”
–Mother, Wife, Sister and Brothers.

 

27th Feb 1915. Appeals for more Men.

RUGBY MAN AT THE FRONT APPEALS FOR MORE MEN.

Mr C T Mewis, 44 Bath Street, has received a very interesting letter from a friend, Pte W Gardner, of the 3rd Coldstream Guards, who is at the front. Mr Gardner was formerly a policeman at Rugby, but of late was employed in the Press Department of the B.T.H.

In the course of this letter Pte Gardner recounts his experiences, from the time he first went out, in very interesting manner. He relates that on Christmas night they were sent to the trenches, but found them in such a terrible condition that they volunteered to dig some more. This request was acceded to, but the weather was so cold that their trousers and putties were frozen to their legs and their socks to their feet. During the whole of this time they were under fire, but luckily no one was hit, although some had very narrow escapes, and a bullet passed through a parcel of Christmas dainties which he was carrying in his pack. After recounting further experiences, the writer goes on to say :-

” I was very pleased to hear that the young men of Rugby have rallied round the Old Flag in its time of danger, and I hope that if there are any slackers left they will soon buck up and come in, for every man is wanted out here. They will all get out here in time, for I think this is going to be a long war yet, and every able-bodied man ought to try and do his little bit. But it wants all the single ones to come first ; then, if it comes to a pinch, the married men should get in. If they were to see some of the sights that I have since I have been here they would soon some in, I am sure. Wherever you go you are sure to find some trace of German brutality and destruction—houses and churches burnt to the ground or blown down by shells or bombs, starving women and children walking about without any home, parents, or food. It is awful. There is no doubt but that we shall win, for we are now steadily gaining ground and winning along the line all the time. The Germans do a lot of damage sniping-a game of which they are very fond. It does not take a crack shot to do it with their rifles, which have got telescopic sights on them. They can hide in a wood or house 500 yards a way, and, looking through these sights, see a man’s head through a loop-hole as plainly as if he was only two yards away. We have caught many of them, so this is first hand information. The writer adds that he has seen several Rugby men at the front, including Pte Flavell, of the B.T.H. He states states that he has slept in a number of peculiar places of late, viz. in the trenches, in the road when the mud has been 2 or 3 inches deep, in the gutter when it had been raining and the water was running down it like a young river, in a haystack, on the railway lines, in a cattle truck, barn, stable, ploughed field, cow-shed, workhouse and college, but never in a bed.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Although there are still hundreds of young fellows in the town and district apparently without any adequate reason for holding back, only four have joined the forces this week, this being the smallest number since the commencement of the war. The total number from Rugby now exceeds 2,200. Those joining this week were:—Royal Berkshire Regiment, A H Sear and F Parker; R. W.R, E H Healey; Leicestershire, A Tyers.

MILITARY CROSS FOR ANOTHER OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOY.

In addition to Sergt-Major J W Goddard, mentioned in our columns last week, another old St Matthew’s boy has been awarded the Military Cross by the King, after being mentioned in Sir John French’s despatches. The recipient on whom the honour has been bestowed is Sergt-Major F A Nason, of the Army Veterinary Corps, a nephew of Mr T Nason, 130 Railway Terrace.

RUGBY RAILWAY WORKER KILLED IN ACTION.

News has been received that Mr William Dirbin, who formerly lived at 11 Spring Street, Rugby, was killed in action near Soissons in January. The deceased, who was a reservist in the Royal Field Artillery, was for several years employed in the Goods Department at Rugby L & N-W Railway Station, but was transferred shortly before the war broke out. He was called up in August last. The gallant fellow was of a quiet, unassuming disposition, and was a favourite with all who knew him ; and the news of his untimely end has come as a great shook to his wife, with whom much sympathy is expressed, and his friends.

CHEERING NEWS OF A DUNCHURCH S0LDIER.

Mr C J Beard, of Murray Road, Rugby, still receives letters occasionally from his son, Pte Sidney Beard, of the 2nd Warwickshire Regiment, who is detained as a prisoner of war at Gottingen, Germany. At the request of Mr Adams, of Dunchurch, Mr Beard wrote to his son recently, asking if he knew anything of the fate of his soldier son, Pte Willie Adams, of the same regiment. The letter was posted at Paris, and yesterday (Friday) morning Mr Beard got a reply, in which the following gratifying sentence was given :—“ I have spoken to Adams ; he is quite safe.” Private Beard has also asked for food, clothing, soap and other articles to be sent to him

Pte John Richardson, of the Coldstream Guards, the eldest son of Mr W and Mrs Richardson, The Banks, Dunchurch, volunteered for the front at the outbreak of the war, and landed in France on November 12th. He died from wounds received in action on February on 11th. He was one of the smartest of the young men that went from Dunchurch. Up to the present, in addition to Pte Richardson, the following Dunchurch men have been killed :— Lance-Corp E Parker, Lance-Corpl White, Pte R Norman, and Gunner Harry Pearce (on the Bulwark).

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

During the week the troops in Rugby have been exercised in route marching, and on Thursday they joined contingents from Leamington ; while Nuneaton and Coventry men met for similar work.

Captain the Hon E A FitzRoy, M.P. is not yet medically fit for active service, and is doing light work with his regiment.

In the area in Essex over which the German aeroplane raid took place last week-end a number of the Warwickshire Territorials, including “ E ” Company, are located.

Mr W G B Over, formerly of Rugby, who joined the colours in September last, is now engaged as musketry instructor attached to the 10th (Service) Battalion of the 19th Yorkshire Regiment. He holds the rank of Sergeant-Major, and is stationed at Aylesbury.

On Monday last coal supplied by the bag was advanced in Rugby 1d per cwt. On Monday next another halfpenny will be put upon the 4lb loaf, making the price 8d.

PROPOSED ALARM IN CASE OF AIR RAIDS

With regard to the proposal made by the Urban District Council to use the B.T.H hooter for an alarm signal in case of air raids, a correspondent living in Lower Hillmorton Road writes to point out that when the wind is blowing from a southerly direction the hooter is almost inaudible in that district, and therefore would be useless as an alarm. Our correspondent suggests that the new bell at Rugby School should be sounded as well as the hooter in case of air raids. This would ensure that when the wind was blowing from such a direction as to diminish the volume of sound from one of the alarms, it would increase that of the other. It is suggested that a key of the door giving access to the bell-rope should be left either at the Police Station or given to the police officer on duty in the town, and that immediately notice of a raid is received the officer shall make his way to the tower and ring the bell. The suggestion seems to be a good one, and we recommend it to the Urban Council for their consideration.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

Tuesday.—Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), T Hunter, T A Wise, A E Donkin, and J J McKinnell, Esqrs.

HANDED OVER TO THE MILITARY AUTHORITIES,-Pte George Oliver, of the Scottish Regiment, was charged on remand with stealing a gentleman’s overcoat, of the value of £1, from the doorway of a shop belonging to Tom G Hough, pawnbroker, in Little Church Street, on February 16th.—Application was made by an officer of defendant’s regiment for the man to be handed over to the Military Authorities to be dealt with.— This course was agreed to, and defendant was remanded till next week in the same bail for the authorities to report as to whether he had been dealt with.

Parker, Edward Joseph. Died 3rd Nov 1914

4316, 1st Bn. Coldstream Guards. Died 03 November 1914, aged 32

Edward Joseph Parker was born in Dunchurch and baptised there on 20th March 1882. His parents were Thomas, a labourer from Wappenbury and Elizabeth (nee Barnett) who married in Dunchurch in 1873. Edward Joseph was the fourth of six children and by 1901 was a painter’s apprentice and living with his parents in Dunchurch.

In 1908, while living in Clifton Road, he married Nellie May Hancock. Nellie was born in Bicester, Oxfordshire and probably in service in Yelvertoft at the time. In 1909 they had twins, Nelly May and Edward Charles and by 1911 the family was living in Corbett Street, Rugby. Edward Joseph was a shunter on the L&NW railway.

Although his service record does not survive, an article in the Rugby Advertiser of 14th November 1914 provides the information that he had served three years with the Coldstream Guards, probably in South Africa and was then in the reserves. This explains why he was called up at the start of the war and arrived in France on 30th August 1914. He died of wounds on 3rd November 1914 and was buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery.

Edward Joseph Parker. Rugby Advertiser 14th Nov 1914

Edward Joseph Parker. Rugby Advertiser 14th Nov 1914

“RUGBY GUARDSMAN’S DEATH FROM WOUNDS.

General sympathy will be felt with Mrs E J Parker, of 19 Corbett Street, Rugby, who has received information that her husband, Lance-Corpl Parker, of the Coldstream Guards, has died from a gunshot wound in the back in a hospital in France. The first news that her husband had been wounded was conveyed to Mrs Parker early last week in the following letter from Sister Cameron, of the Hospital:- ” Your husband has been very badly wounded, and I am very much afraid he will not recover. He wished to send a message to you just to say that he had been wounded, and was anxious to get well for your sake and the baby’s, and to send his love.” The official news did not arrive until November 4th, and shortly after this the following letter was received from the Rev Hedley R Burrows, chaplain of the Forces :- ” You will have heard by this time that your husband has been taken to his rest.   He died here of his wounds at 1.45 p.m on November 3rd. I was with him just about an hour before the end, and gave him the Blessing. He gave me your address, and sent his love to you and the children. The doctors and nurses worked with great skill and devotion to save his life. I hope you will be comforted in your great loss, and sustained by the sense of power that Christ will bring to all those who suffer in the faithful discharge of their duty. No act of duty done is ever forgotten or thrown away.” Lance-Corpl Parker, who was 32 years of age and a native of Dunchurch, was well known in the town. He had been in the employ of the L & N- W Railway for ten years, and when called up was head shunter. He had served three years with the colours and nine in the reserve, and had signed on for further service. He leaves a widow and two young children, with whom much sympathy is expressed. In one of his letters from the front he said: ” Things are a bit warm, shells bursting over and around us all day, and we are burrowed in the ground like rabbits. I have just been touched with a bit on the lip and foot, but nothing to hurt – got a thick lip, that’s all.” On October 15th he wrote : ” We are still in the trenches and in the same place ; but, of course, we must not say where. I expect when we move it will be a move with a vengeance, and I hope that I shall go through it all right. Still, ‘what is to be will be.’ I thought we should be home for Christmas, but I am doubtful about it now. I am afraid there is some very heavy work to be done yet. It will take a lot more men, and I think that there will be little trouble to get them according to the papers.”
(Rugby Advertiser, 14 November, 1914.)

As well as the Rugby Memorial Gates, Edward Joseph Parker is also listed on the Dunchurch Memorial. Entries in the Rugby Advertiser In Memoriam also remember him.

PARKER.—In loving memory of Edward Joseph Parker, who died at Boulogne Hospital, from wounds received in action, November 3rd, 1914. Gone, but not forgotten by his loving parents.
(Rugby Advertiser, 6 November, 1915.)

PARKER.—In loving memory of EDWARD JOSEPH, the beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Parker, of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action on November 3, 1914.—At rest.—Not forgotten by Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.
(Rugby Advertiser, 2 November, 1918.)

 

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM