5th Jan 1918. Carrier Pigeons Must Not Be Molested.

CARRIER PIGEONS MUST NOT BE MOLESTED.

In consequence of the indiscriminate shooting of these useful birds and the grave results that may ensue from the loss of them, it may be as well to call attention to the fact that under the Defence of the Realm Regulations a heavy penalty is imposed for killing, wounding, molesting carrier or homing pigeons not belonging to that person. Any pigeon found dead or incapable of flight must be handed over to a police constable or military post. There is also a penalty on any person neglecting to give information who has knowledge of birds being thus found, and a reward is offered for information which may lead to the conviction of offenders.

FOOD CONTROL ITEMS.

The Sugar Rationing Scheme came into force locally on Monday, and has so far worked very smoothly. The whole of the registered sugar retailers have received sufficient quantities of sugar to supply all their customers, and the only complaints received have been from people who have neglected to comply with the requirements as regards filling in and depositing their forms with the retailers. In view of all the circumstances, the number of people who neglected to do this was surprisingly small.

During the past week has been a considerable shortage of margarine locally, and with the exception of a few very small consignments none had arrived in the town on Thursday morning since Xmas Eve.

THE NEW CATTLE SALES ORDER.

The new system of selling fat cattle by weight, as ordered by the Food Controller, came into force at Rugby Market on Monday, and, so far as could be judged, worked to the satisfaction of all concerned.

Under the new instructions all fat cattle are consigned as heretofore to the auctioneers, and are then graded by a committee consisting of the auctioneer, a farmer, and a butcher, and sold by weight at prices fixed according to the grade, the farmer receiving the full value of the beast without reductions for expenses or auctioneers’ fees.

The supply of beef was quite as good as was exported in the circumstances, but there was a falling off as compared with recent weeks, many farmers having disposed of their stock in anticipation of possible restrictions, but unlike many other towns, there was sufficient to satisfy the requirements of local butchers for the time being.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
ALLOTMENTS : TO SINGLE MEN.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,- Now that the council had allotments for everyone, don’t you think it time for the single men in lodgings (often two or three in the same house) to speak for some ground and do their bit, and do it now ? I know they are badged men, so are all the married men, who are working all the ground they can get. I wonder if the single men, when they eat their vegetables, think who have grown them with so many men away fighting ? Most of these men live in the houses of soldiers’ wives or widows, and perhaps pay good board money ; but could they not get some ground and supply the vegetables at small cost ? I do not suggest that they should work for nothing. They may say they do not know how to start gardening. It was the same with many on the Clifton Road allotments, yet look at the result ! Beginners are not laughed at ; there are several women on the Clifton Road allotments who have, I am sure, not done gardening before, yet they buy their sack of lime and carry it themselves to their allotments. If these single men are too busy to read their local papers and get to know how their help is wanted, why do not their fellow-workmen give them a hint or two ? They may be only thoughtless, and it is possible they might be glad to give their spare time in such a good cause.
POTATO.

 

CHRISTMAS IN RUGBY.
CHRISTMAS AT THE HARBOROUGH MAGNA HOSPITAL.

On Christmas Day the patients of the Isolation Hospital, Harborough Magna, had a most enjoyable time. Matron and nurses did everything possible to make it a joyful festival, and everything looked very bright and cheerful. The wards were beautifully decorated, one of the chief features being a Christmas tree, from which the Matron gave each patient a gift. The early morning was spent by the nurses singing carols, and after a good dinner, which everyone enjoyed, the patients were entertained by the nurses. Those who were able joined in games, &c. At the conclusion of the happy time cheers from the patients rewarded the Matron and nurses, and showed that they had appreciated all that they had been done for them. The Matron wishes most sincerity to thank all the kind donors who helped to make the Christmas time happy for her little patients.

RUGBY INSTITUTION.—Through the kindness of the Commandant, a party of wounded soldiers, under the charge of Staff-Sergt Rouse, gave an enjoyable evening’s entertainment to the inmates of the above on Friday last week. The programme consisted of character sketches, songs and duets. The chair was taken by Mr W E Robotham.

BOYS’ BRIGADE ENTERTAINED.—On Boxing Night the lst Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade, to the number of 75, were entertained to supper by Mr & Mrs H C Bradby and Mr G F Bradby. After supper they visited the pictures, where seats had been reserved for them by their hosts and hostess.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

On Saturday afternoon about 120 wounded soldiers from the Infirmary and Te Hira Red Cross Hospitals were entertained to tea, and a concert afterwards, in New Big School, which had been kindly lent by Dr David.

The party was organized by Mrs Prior and Miss Donkin, who were largely helped by kind gifts of flour, cake, jam, sugar, scones, cigarettes, and matches from friends in the town ; the tea being given by local caterers, who provided the urns, crockery, &c. The entertainment, which followed, consisted of songs, recitations, and a play, entitled “ Susan’s Embellishments,” by Mr Arthur Eckersley, the characters being admirably taken by Miss Dukes, Miss Lawrence, Miss Campbell, and Mr Eckersley. Songs were sung by Mrs Prior (with ‘cello accompaniment by Mr A E Donkin), Mr Ingham, Staff-Sergt Rouse, Sergt Sharp, and Lance-Corpl Bailey. Mrs King Stephen gave an amusing recitation. At the conclusion of the entertainment each received a useful present.

THE NEW YEAR.— In pre-war days it was the custom at Rugby, as elsewhere, for the Scottish section to welcome the New Year by assembling round the Clock Tower, drinking healths and singing “ Auld Lang Syne ”—a celebration in which many Southerners joined. Like some other customs, however, this has fallen into desuetude during the War, because, in the first instance, many of the younger element have left the town, and also because the scarcity of that indispensible accompaniment—whisky. Not more than 50 people assembled to see the passing of 1917 and the birth 1918 ; and these, after exchanging mutual good wishes, dispersed without the customary singing and dancing round the Clock Tower.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

LADY CLARE FEILDING, a daughter of the Earl of Denbigh, has been mentioned in dispatches for valuable services during the War. Viscount Feilding, who mentioned for the third time a few weeks ago, has just been awarded the C.M.G.

Two concerts were given at Bulkington on Thursday, December 27th, by the Misses Woodward, their pupils, and friends in aid of St Dunstan’s Hostel for Blind Soldiers and Sailors. The sum of £42 10s was realised.

Miss Dorothy Walding, daughter of Mrs Walding, The Limes, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has been mentioned in dispatches by Sir Douglas Haig for work as a V.A.D nurse in France. Miss Walding, who was trained at the Hospital of St Cross, was one of the first to go out to France. She was also selected as one of the first of the staff of 30 nurses to go to Italy.

Second-Lieut A R Whatmore, A.S.C, well known in Rugby through his giving his services in amateur theatrical entertainments and as a vocalist at concerts, was mentioned in Sir D Haig’s recent dispatches.

Lieut-Col W Elliott Batt, R.F.A, who was mentioned in Sir D Haig’s recent dispatches, has been awarded the Companionship of the Order of St Michael and St George for services rendered in connection with military operations in the field (dated January 1, 1918).

Second-Liuet J E Davies, younger son of the late Mr J H Davies and Mrs Davies, of Wedgnock Park, has been promoted a Lieutenant in the King’s Liverpool Regiment. He was educated at Warwick school, and at an early stage of the War he joined the Oxford and Bucks, and was promoted to the rank of sergeant. He took part in the Battle of Loos, and was afterwards recommended for a commission, being posted to the King’s Liverpool. He went out again to the front, and was badly wounded. In civil life he was engaged as an engineer at the British Thomson-Houston Works at Rugby.

Capt M D Cloran, M.C., R.G.A., an engineer on the staff of Messrs Willans & Robinson, has received a bullet wound in the thigh and is now in hospital at Manchester.

Mr W A Stevenson, secretary of the Rugby branch of the N.U.R and a member of the Urban District Council, will form one of the delegation of railwaymen who have been invited by the Government to visit the Western Front.

Two Hinkley neighbours, Pte George Mason and Pte W A Hurst, whose birthdays were on the same day, join up together in 1916, were trained together, fought together, fell side by side in the same action, and were buried together.

News has been received that Second-Lieut J E Baskott, of the Royal Garrison Artillery, died of wounds on December 11th. Prior to joining the Army he was employed in the Machine Shop at the B.T.H.

AN OPENING FOR YOUTHS.

There is a very urgent need for certain skilled men and boys for the R.N.A.S. Skilled wood-workers of categories 1, 2, and 3 are required. Boys in grades 1 or 2 between the ages of 16½ and 18 are also required for enrolment in the R.N.A.S for the duration of the War. They must have some experience of engineering or woodworking trades and a high standard of education.

RUGBY BATTERY COMMANDER AWARDED D.S.O.

Considerable pleasure has been expressed locally at the announcement that Major C P Nickalls, the officer commanding the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been awarded the D.S.O. Major Nickalls has been connected with the Battery for some years, and he is deservedly popular with all ranks.

SURGERY IN BURNING WRECKAGE.
AMPUTATION TO SAVE LIFE.

A number of remarkable acts of bravery are recorded in the list of awards of the Albert Medal, published in the “ London Gazette ” ; among them is a record of the manner in which our townsman, Dr Hoskyns, gained the Medal.

By a railway accident in France a man was pinned down by the legs under some heavy girders. The wreckage was on fire, and the flames had reached the man’s ankles, when Capt Charles R Hoskyns, R.A.M.C, crawled into a cavity in the burning wreckage, and after releasing one of the man’s legs amputated the other. The man was then drawn out alive, Capt Hoskyns keeping hold of the main artery until a tourniquet could be put on.

LEAMINGTON HASTING.

DIES OF WOUNDS.—News has been received by Mr Thos Gulliver, of Broadwell, that his son, Private Harry Gulliver, of the Warwicks, has died of wounds in France. Much sympathy is expressed for his parents who have now lost both their sons, the younger one being killed in action a few weeks ago.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—News has been received by Mrs J Williams that her thirds son, Pte Alfred T Williams, was killed in action in France on November 28th. Pte Williams, who was 23 years of age, enlisted in the 12th Lancers in September, 1914, and prior to that time was employed Coventry. Much sympathy is felt for Mrs Williams, this being the second son who has died for his country.

RED CROSS DISTINCTION.

A few days before Christmas, Miss Kathleen Bolam, lady superintendent at Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital, attended at Buckingham Palace and was presented by the King with the decoration of the Royal Red Cross, for which she had been recommended. Miss Bolam was afterwards received at Marlborough House by Queen Alexandra, who complimented her on her excellent work. This is the only distinction of the kind that has been awarded in Warwickshire.

MORE PRISONERS OF WAR.

Corpl J C Barclay, 4th South Staffordshires, son of Mr A M Barclay, 23 Murray Road, reported missing on November 3rd, has written home saying that he is a prisoner of war at Limburg A/Lahn. An old Territorial, Corpl Barclay was mobilised at the outbreak war, and had been in France 15 months.

Lance-Corpl E A Bromwich, 1st Battalion Coldstream Guards, second son of Mr E A Bromwich, Newton House Farm, has been officially reported a prisoner of war in Germany, but the address of his internment camp has not yet been received. Lance-Corpl Bromwich is well known in Rugby ; he worked for his father on the milk round for 10 or 11 years. His wife lives at Newton.

Pte L Lixenfield, son of Mr & Mrs J Lixenfield, of Wolston, is a prisoner of war in Germany, and interned at Munster. He was formerly in the employ of Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd.

Arrangements are being made by the Hon Secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee (Mr J Reginald Barker) to forward the standard food parcels and bread to these prisoners.

“ THANKS TO YOUR MEDICINE.”

The following letter has been received by J R Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, from Pte William Turner, Royal Munster Fusiliers, who is interned Giessen :- November 19th, 1917.

DEAR MR BARKER.—Just a few words to you in acknowledgment of your parcels, which I receive regularly and in good condition. I receive everything with the exception of tobacco. I wish to thank you very much, also your committee in Rugby, for what you have done for us out here. . . I am in the very pink, thanks to your medicine. Yorkshire Relish is unnecessary, as the air here is of the best. I am at present working near a famous English resort in peace time, called Bad Langenswabbach, also not many miles from Wiesbaden. I am on the land as a farm helper—a position I do not fancy very much, but I have no choice. One thing, I can start farming when I return, as I now understand all farming work.—I remain, yours very gratefully. WILLIAM TURNER.

TOBACCO FOR THE RUGBY RED CROSS HOSPITALS.

During the year just passed the sum of £103 10s 1d has been raised by subscriptions and donations for the purpose of supplying cigarettes and tobacco to the soldiers in the two Rugby Hospitals. Four-fifths of the amount was subscribed by friends who contributed 1s or 2s per week each. Altogether £83 9s 3d has been spent in purchasing the fragrant weed, which has been supplied free of duty by the Sailors and Soldiers Smokes Society. The administrators of the fund, Mr H N Sporberg and the Rev W H Payne-Smith, hoped that one year’s operations might enough, but that hope has not been realised, and both hospitals are, and are likely to remain, full to their limit.

DEATHS.

BARKER.—In loving memory of Pte. WILLIAM BARKER (Wolston), who died of wounds in France on December 15, 1917 ; aged 29 years. “ Rest in peace.”

GULLIVER.—In ever-loving memory of HARRY, the eldest and only surviving son of Mr. & Mrs. T. A Gulliver (Broadwell), who died of wounds in France on December 23. 1917, aged 28 years.
“ We loved him—oh ! No tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he lies in soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, and Sisters.

3rd Nov 1917. Value of the Acorn Crop

VALUE OF THE ACORN CROP.

The President of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries again urges upon stock-keepers the great importance of making full use of the present abundant crop of acorns. Acorns are specially adapted for pig-feeding, and can be used most effectively and economically when pigs are allowed to gather them where they fall. While it will still be necessary to prevent the indiscriminate straying of pigs, the Home Office concurs with the Board in thinking that, if in consequence of this notice the number of pigs found straying on highways by the police should increase, proceedings against their owners should not be instituted except when direct negligence on the part of the owners is shown.

THE SALE OF POTATOES.

The Potato Order, which prohibits any person, except the grower, to sell potatoes without a license, came into force on Thursday. It is also necessary for retailers to exhibit price lists in their places of business.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of this committee was held on Monday, Mr W Flint, c.c. presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Wilson,. Mr G W Walton, Mr A W Shirley, Mr Pepper, and the Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker). The latter reported that since the last meeting there had been five additions to the list of prisoners of war, and he regretted say that there were the prospects of further increases in the near future. The acknowledgements from the men had much improved, and letters he had received and reports from Regimental Care Committees showed that practically all the parcels now reached the men. Apart from the newly captured men, all the others were now in regular communication. The only one who had been giving any anxiety of late was Driver F Furniss (A.S.C), of Rugby, of whom nothing had been heard for several months. During the week-end, however, Mr Barker said he had heard from Furniss, who in his letter said that he had received all his parcels from Nos. 1 to 55 inclusive, which were quite satisfactory, and adding that he was in good health. A number of efforts were promised during the winter months, which would assist the funds of the committee. He regretted that it had been found necessary to increase the cost of the standard food parcels from 6s to 8s owing to the rise in the price of commodities and materials and the necessity for making the parcels a little larger. This meant that, instead of £2 3s 6d per month per man, the cost would be £2 15s 6d, or a total charge of £216 9s per month inclusive for the 78 men. Fortunately for the fund 27 of these men were now fully adopted, and with small sums guaranteed on behalf of other men, there remained a balance of about £130 per month still to be found, provided, of course, it was the committee’s wish that they bear the increased cost. The subscriptions continued to come in splendidly, and during the past two months they had received more than sufficient to cover the cost of the parcels, thus being able to add slightly to the bank balance.

Mr Barker said he thought the committee and the subscribers to the fund would feel proud of the fact that they had been able to “ carry on ” without asking for financial assistance from the British Red Cross Society, who, who as they knew, had guaranteed the parcels. The committee would appreciate this more fully when he reminded them that the Chairman of that Society recently stated that they had to find £1,500 per day to make good the lack of funds and support given to other Prisoners of War Committees throughout the country. Mr Barker said he could not too strongly emphasise the fact that every subscription to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was virtually a subscription to the British Red Cross Society.

Mr Flint said that, in view of this report, he felt that it would be everybody’s wish that the committee completed the cost of the food parcels and bread, and therefore moved this resolution.—In seconding, Mr G W Walton said that, notwithstanding the many other demands upon the public, the Prisoners of War Fund received the support of everyone. There were many persons contributing every week in a quiet way, and he felt sure they would be able to secure sufficient funds to enable the increased expenditure to be made.—The resolution was unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr & Mrs Brett have received official intimation that their son, Pte A J Brett, R.A.M.C, was wounded in October 7th, and is in hospital in France.

Mr W Cowley, of 34 Poplar Grove, has been notified by the War Office that his son, Pte G V Cowley, of the Dorset Regiment, was wounded by shrapnel in the thigh in an advance near Ypres on October 4th. He is an old St Matthew’s boy, He was previously wounded in September 1915.

Pte C E Freeman, Royal Warwicks, was wounded on October 17th, sustaining a severe gun-shot wound in the chest. His home is at 17 Charlotte Street.

In the list of casualties published last week-end appears the name of Lieut W E Littleboy, of the Warwickshire Regiment. He was educated at Rugby School, and was a prominent member of the Football XV of three years ago.

A letter has been received from Second-Lieut Basil Parker, Machine Gun Company, who was recently reported missing, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He is a son of Mr E Parker, of the Avenue Road, New Bilton, and was formerly a teacher at St Matthew’s School.

Mr and Mrs Whitbread have now received definite news from the War Office that the only son, Second-Lieut Basil Whitbread, was killed in action on the night of the 22nd July, 1916. His body was found outside the lines and was buried at High Wood.

The Rev R F Morson, M.A, elder son of Mr & Mrs Arthur Morson, who has for the past 4½ years been assistant priest at St Silas the Martyr, Kentish Town, London, has offered his services as a chaplain to H.M Forces, which have been accepted. He has been ordered to Salonica.

At the Rural District Tribunal on Thursday conscientious objection was pleaded by a Bilton youth, 18, single, who asked to be allowed either to undertake work with (1) the Friends’ War Relief Committee ; (2) Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section ; (3) full-time work on the land ; or (4) that the case should be referred to the Pelham Committee. He had previously been temporary exempted in order that he might complete his education. He was given conditional exemption on joining the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section.

CORPL C H TOMPKINS.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C H Tompkins, of the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, who prior to the War was employed by the Company, died on October 23rd from wounds received in action.

BRANDON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook, of Brandon, have received the news that their son, Pte Banbrook, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital in Mesopotamia suffering from sand fly fever. Out of their five sons who enlisted two others are still suffering from wounds. Pte S Banbrook was for several years in the stables at Brandon Hall.—Pte G. Newman, Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the right foot. He formerly worked at market gardening for Mr Gupwell.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford have been notified of the death of their second son, Pte S G Halford. He has been missing for more than 12 months. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, who some short time back lost another son. Deceased was formerly in the employ of Mr J Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, where his father was employed for many years.

BINLEY.

Mr & Mrs J L STEVENS have received news of the death of their elder son, Pte J A Stevens, of the Machine Gun Company. Before entering the Army he was employed at Binley Colliery, and his father was in the employ of the Earl of Craven as a keeper, and resided at Piles Coppice.

BILTON.

REPORTED MISSING.—Miss E Watts has received official notification that her nephew, Private C Eccles, Royal Warwicks, has been reported missing as from October 4th. He was in the great push on the Yser in which Lance-Corpl Houghton, also of Bilton, lost his life.

ROYAL RED CROSS AWARD.

The King has been pleased to award the Royal Red Cross to Miss Kathleen Bolam, superintendent, Ashlawn and Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital, for valuable services rendered. We believe this is the first V.A.D member in Warwickshire to receive this honour which Miss Bolam has thoroughly earned and deserves.

DEATHS.

BYERS.—In loving memory of Corpl ANGUS BYERS, 1st K.O.S.B, who was killed in action on September 20, 1917, “ somewhere in France.”—Deeply mourned. From all at 82 Rowland Street.

GRENDON.—Killed in action on the Vimy Ridge on April’s 9th, Pte. WM. GRENDON, 2nd Canadian mounted Rifles, aged 31 ; dearly loved only son of J. & A. M. Grendon, late of Grandborough.

MILLS.—In ever-loving memory of JOSEPH MAWBY, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Mills, Marton ; killed in action on October 23rd ; aged 23.
“ Had we been asked, how will we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow,’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say,
‘ Lord, we love him—let him stay,’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown gravest is the bitterness blow,
None but his loved ones will ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters, Brothers, and Percy.