7th Dec 1918. Balance of Prisoners of War Fund – Proposed Endowment of a Hospital Bed.

BALANCE OF PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
PROPOSED ENDOWMENT OF A HOSPITAL BED.

A meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Monday, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, presiding in the absence through illness of Mr Wm Flint, C.C. There were also present : Messrs R P Mason, G W Walton, C J Newman, A W Shirley, T Clarke, and J Reginald Barker (hon organising secretary).

Sergt Arthur Scott (Rifle Brigade), of Rugby, attended the meeting to thank the committee for all they had done for him during the two and a-half years he was a prisoner of war in Germany. He said his food parcels arrived very regularly, and he assured the committee that without them he and the other prisoners could not have existed.-Mr Barker reported that the Central Prisoners of War Committee felt that the balance in hand (over £800) would be better applied in Rugby.

After some discussion, the committee agreed that a definite proposal should be submitted to a meeting of subscribers for approval.-Mr Barker said he felt very strongly that the balance could not be allocated in any better way than in endowing a bed in the Hospital of St Cross in memory of prisoners of war who had died in captivity. He had mentioned the scheme to Mr F R Davenport, a member of the committee, and to Canon Blagden, and they both approved of it. The cost to endow a bed was £1,000. Mr Barker said he did not anticipate any difficulty in raising the £200 necessary to complete the sum.-Mr Walton said that, knowing the struggle the hospital had to meet the great increase in costs, and also that there was no doubt the Prisoners of War Fund had been the means of diverting funds from the hospital, he would second the resolution.-The resolution was unanimously carried, the Chairman remarking that it was very appropriate that, as Mr Barker had been mainly instrumental in raising the funds, his proposition should be carried. Anything he had done in the past had always carried great weight with the committee, and he did not think anyone could take the slightest objection to his scheme.

It was decided to call a meeting of subscribers to the fund early in January, when the resolution would be submitted for their approval.

DISCHARGED SAILORS & SOLDIERS.-The local branch of Discharged Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Association is now making rapid strides, and the membership numbers several hundreds. During the past week they have taken over club-rooms at the Eagle Hotel, and as the membership increases they hope to transfer this into a fine institute.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Major E K Sanders, D Battery, 211 Brigade, F.R.A, has been awarded the Italian Bronze Medal for valour. Before the War he was Lieutenant in the Rugby Howitzer Brigade, and was on the staff of Messrs Willans & Robinson.

Lieut G H I Cowley (O.R), of Coventry, solicitor (formerly of Rugby), and now serving in Italy with the Heavy Artillery, has been appointed Education Officer under the Army Scheme of Pre-Demobilisation Education. Mr Cowley has also been detailed to give to the troops a series of lectures on Topical and Educational subjects.

Pte C Rollins, King’s Liverpool Regiment (Rugby), and Rifleman H J Kedge, K.R.R (Rugby), have been reported wounded.

Mrs Keates, 29 New Street, New Bilton, has recently received information that her son, Pte B Keates, 1st Wilts Regiment, died from wounds in Oise le Veiger Field Hospital on March 26th.

Lance-Corpl A C Cox, M.G Corps, Transport Section, has been awarded the Military Medal for volunteering to go down under heavy shell fire for rations and for attempting to salve a machine gun out of the Sanbre Canal under heavy shell fire on November 3rd. He is the youngest son of Mr & Mrs Frank Cox, of 38 York Street, Rugby, and prior to the outbreak of war worked for his father. He has served over four years in the Army, and has been in France most of this time.

REFRESHMENTS FOR TRAVELLING SOLDIERS.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,-During the months of February and March, 1916, a correspondence was carried on through the local Press upon the question of a Soldiers’ Rest at Rugby Station, and also the providing of refreshments for soldiers passing through the station, or waiting connections, and possibly stranded for the night. The Soldiers’ Rest was not proceeded with owing to lack of funds. It was, however, pointed out that refreshments were being provided to necessitous cases by the station staff from the funds of the Rugby Station War Relief Fund, and your readers may be pleased to know this was carried on, and is still being continued, and increasingly just now, as many repatriated prisoners of war are passing through the station following the signing of the armistice. The fund is not in need of financial assistance at present, but it is as well that the town should know that the station staff are not unmindful of our heroes, and that they are doing in a limited way what the townspeople take upon themselves at other railway junctions.-Yours, &c,
H WINTERBURN, Hon Secretary,
Rugby Station War Relief Fund.

OFFICIAL NOTICES TO FARMERS.

Return of Soldiers to their own County.
If the employer of a soldier engaged in farm work in another county, who was formerly in Warwickshire, desired to get the man back again he should communicate at once with the Labour Officer, 12 Northgate Street, Warwick. A form of application for the man will then be sent to him.

Soldier Labour.
About 20 skilled ploughmen will shortly be available for two months’ agricultural work in Warwickshire. Application for them should be made at once to the Labour Officer, 12 Northgate Street, Warwick.

Demobilisation.
Farmers should apply to the nearest Employment Exchange for postcard ED40G, and return it with the full military or naval description and address of any man for whom there is a vacancy. The man applied for will then obtain priority of release when demobilisation commences.

AT the Rugby Cattle Market on Monday Messrs Howkins & Sons conducted a sale of surplus Army horses. There was a good company, and trade was sharp for the best and younger animals, prices ranging from 20 to 67 guineas.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

OUR SOLDIER BOYS.-Quite a number of local soldiers have been able to pay flying visits home since the armistice was signed. The following recent casualty cases have been invalided home :-Pte Austin Smith (Royal Irish Fusiliers), Gunner Sidney Webb (R.G.A), and Pte Albert Priest (Rifle Brigade).

MRS MOORE has received official intelligence that her eldest son, Pte Wm Moore, who is with the Royal Warwicks in Russia, was wounded on October 18th. He served in the Boar War, and has been all through the prevent struggle. This is the second time he has been wounded.

BRANDON.
The influenza epidemic is now subsiding, and many families have been attacked. The schools, which have been closed for three weeks by the Medical Officer, will re-open on Monday.

DEATHS.

BROMWICH.-Pte J. H. BROMWICH, 10th Queen’s R.W.S., died November 5, 1918 ; aged 18 years and 9 months, at hospital at Outrean, France.
“ He bravely answered him counties call ;
He gave his young life for one and all.
If I could have raised his dying head,
And heard his last farewell,
The blow would not have been so hard
To part with him we loved so well.”
-Sadly missed by his Uncle, Aunt, and Ivy.

KEATES.-In loving memory of Pte. BERNARD KEATES, 29 New Street, New Bilton, who died of wounds on March 26, 1918.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
-From his loving Mother, Brother, Sisters, Will, Jack, May, Dinah, and Grandma.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Sergt S. J. BATCHELOR (SID), 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment. who died of wounds in France on December 1, 1917.
“ Father in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our dear son sleeping.”
-From his loving Father, Mother and Sisters.

EDMANS.-In loving memory of FRANK, the dearly beloved son of W. & B. Edmans, of New Bilton, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
-Sadly missed and silently mourned by his Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

GLENN.-In ever-loving memory of Pte. JOHN GLENN, who died in France, Dec. 8th, 1916.-From his loving wife and children.

MAYES.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, 5th Oxford & Bucks LI., who died in Bristol Military Hospital from wounds received in action on December 6, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ The midnight star shine o’er the grave
Of a dear son and brother, a soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in that Better Land.
Oh, brother dear, ’tis hard to part
With one so good and kind in heart.
When others return we’ll miss you more,
The realisation will make our hearts sore.”
-Sadly missed by his loving Mother, Dad, and Family, also Lizzie.

 

11th May 1918. New Bilton Man Wins Military Medal

NEW BILTON MAN WINS MILITARY MEDAL.
TWICE REPORTED MISSING.

Pte G Starkey, Border Regiment, has had exceptional experiences. He joined up from the Cement Works on January 1st, 1915, and was already the possessor of two South African medals and seven bars. In 1915 he was, in error, reported to be missing. After nearly three years’ fighting, in which he was unscathed, he was invalided home suffering from shell shock. He returned to the front in February, and was reported missing, and believed killed, as from March 21st. On April 26th he wrote home that on the previous day he received the Military Medal.

DEATH OF SERGT. J. SOMERS, V.C.

Sergt James Somers, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who won the V.C in Gallipoli, died on Tuesday at the home of his parents, Cloughjordan, Ireland, of lung trouble, after being badly gassed in France some months ago. Sergt Somers joined the Inniskillings in 1913, crossed the Channel with his Battalion with the original Expeditionary Force on August 21, 1914, and was wounded three times in Flanders. In the following spring he was billeted with the 2nd Battalion in Rugby, and proceeded with them to the Dardanelles, where he won the V.C for gallantry on the night of July 1st and 2nd, “when owing to hostile bombing some of our troops had retired from a sap, remaining alone on the spot until a party brought up bombs.” He then climbed over into the enemy’s trench, and bombed the Turks with great effect. Later on he advanced into the open under very heavy fire, and held back the enemy by throwing bombs into their flank until a barricade had been established. During this period he frequently ran to and from our trenches to obtain fresh supplies of bombs. “ by his great gallantry and coolness,” the official account concluded, “ Sergt Somers was largely instrumental in effecting the re-capture of a portion of our trench which had been lost.” During his stay in Rugby, Sergt Somers was billeted with Mr & Mrs W D Burn, 16 Corbett Street. Immediately after his investiture at Buckingham Palace he visited the town, and was awarded a civic and enthusiastic welcome. After meeting several of his friends and receiving their congratulations at Mrs Burn’s residence, he attended a large recruiting rally at the Clock tower, and made a short and inspiring appeal for recruits.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

We regret to learn that there is still no news of Capt T A Townsend, M.C., who was reported missing a few weeks ago.

Lieut G P Rathbone, youngest son of Mr Rathbone, Hillmorton, who was recently posted as missing, has written home to say he was taken prisoner on March 21st, after severe fighting, and is unwounded.

Pte W H Mitchell, Worcestershire Regt, second son of Mr and Mrs David Mitchell, of Lodge Road, Rugby, has been reported missing since the 23rd March, 1918. He joined up 13 months ago, at the age of 18 years, and he was in France three months. He formerly worked for Mr Varney, builder.

Pte Charles James Fretter, R.W.R, was killed in action on March 22nd. He was the eldest son of the late Mr & Mrs Samuel Fretter, and was an old St Matthew’s boy. Before joining up he worked for Willans & Robinson. His age was 42 years, single, and he had been in France two years.

News has been received by Mrs W Middleton, Sandown Road, Rugby, that her husband, Lance-Corpl W Middleton, 79th Field Company, Royal Engineers has been missing since March 21st. At that he time was working on the front line near Moy during the German advance. Lance-Corpl Middleton, son of Mr J Middleton, 101 Claremont Road, is 26 years of age. He has been in France three years and was formerly employed in Willans & Robinson’s pattern shop.

Sergt T F Gambrall, Oxon and Bucks L.I, of 174 Cambridge Street, has been reported missing since March 23rd. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, employed at the B.T.H. and he enlisted in September, 1914. A brother of Mrs Gambrall was also killed March 24th; another brother has been reported missing, and two others wounded.

Pte John Reynolds. R.W.R, of 9 Little Elborow Street, died in hospital at Liverpool on Wednesday from wounds received in action. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, 32 years of age, and when joined up was employed the Rugby Co-operative Society.

Lieut Henry Boughton-Leigh, of Brownsover Hall, has been wounded in the knee during the recent fighting, and is now in the Officers’ Military Hospital at Plymouth, where he is making satisfactory progress.

Pte Fred Wright, Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr John Wright, 32 Lawford Road, New Bilton, is reported as missing since March 21st. He was formerly a sailor and visited the Dardanelles a number of times. He was afterwards employed at the B.T.H, subsequently joining the Army. He is 20 years of age.

RUGBY MEN MISSING.

The following local men have been reported as missing :—Sergt E Watts, Oxford and Bucks L. I, of 10 Benn Street, Rugby : Lance-Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs G H Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road ; and Pte F Shears, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs J Shears, 66 Murray Road.

LIEUT I D MOORE, R.F.A, Reported KILLED.

Information has been received that Lieut I D Moore, Royal Field Artillery, has been reported as “killed in action” on March 22nd. Prior to joining his Majesty’s Army, Lieut Moore was a member of the B.T.H. Testing Department.

A RUGBY MILITARY MEDALLIST.

Honours are falling fast to Rugbeians, and one of the latest to receive the Military Medal for gallantry in the field is Signaller E Manners, R.F.A, son of Mr Frank Manners, of Windmill Lane. He joined in January, 1917, and has been in France since September. He writes optimistically of our prospects, and refers to the enormous losses the Germans have sustained.

MAGISTERIAL.—At the Rugby Police Court on Wednesday—Before Mr A E Donkin—Pioneer Thomas Henry Cox, Royal Engineers, 3 Addison Row, Bilton, was charged with being an absentee.—Defendant stated that he had served in France two years, and had been wounded. As he had been ill he had delayed his return to his unit, but had he not been arrested he would have returned that morning.—He was discharged on promising to return by the next train.

BILTON.
MILITARY MEDAL.—Lance-Corpl G T Stibbard, K.R.R, son of Mr James Stibbard, of this village, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct “ in carrying important messages under heavy fire at all times of the day and night during the period between March 21st and April 7th.” He has been warmly congratulated by the General commanding his Division. Corpl Stibbard is the first Biltonian, we believe, to gain distinction of this kind. He formerly worked at Willans & Robinson’s, and joined up in September, 1914, so that he has seen a lot of service, and has been twice wounded. He was also a popular member of the Working Men’s Club and of the football team.

DUNCHURCH.

ON Monday afternoon several little children were walking along the bottom of the Mill Street allotments, when one of them, named Frost, fell in the ditch. The other ran away frightened; But Postman T Brain, who happened to be at work close at hand, ran to the spot, and found the little one at the bottom of the ditch covered with water, and had he not been there the child would have been drowned.

DR POWELL has received news that his eldest son Corpl R Prince Powell, who was serving with the Australian Forces, is reported missing as from April 14th. Dr Powells second son is also serving with the Australian Forces.

MR & MRS JAMES BORTON, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, have received the news from their son, R Borton, who went to Germany with some polo ponies before the War broke out, that he has been a prisoner of war, and is now in Holland. Mr & Mrs James Borton’s family were agreeably surprised to receive the news.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
A MEMORIAL SERVICE was held in the Church on Sunday, for Bombardier Frederick Ward, who was killed in action in France on March 30th. He joined the Army at the beginning of the War, and was recently promoted bombardier in recognition of his bravery in action. He was universally liked and respected, and much sympathy is felt for his family.

STOCKTON.
MR REGINALD TARRANT, the junior master in the Council Schools, has left to become a wireless operator in the Navy. The children assembled to wish Mr Tarrant “Good-bye,” and gave him three rousing cheers as a send off. The Rev A C Easu expressed the good wishes of the managers.

BRANDON.
WOUNDED AND PRISONER OF WAR.—Mr & Mr. T Ward have received news, that their son, Lance-Corpl J Ward, has been wounded and is now a prisoner of war. He had been in France for 18 months, and was previously wounded in April, 1917. Before joining he was learning dentistry with Mr Daniels at Coventry. His father is a well-known Oddfellow, having occupied most of the principal offices. Much sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Ward, who have already lost one son, Pte C Ward, K R.R ; had another badly wounded, Pte J Ward ; and another discharged for ill-health, Pte W Ward. Lance-Corpl J Ward is wounded in the shoulder.

STRETTON-UNDER-FOSSE.
MR CONOPO has received news to the effect that his eldest son, Gunner L S Conopo, of the 132nd Oxford Heavy Battery, R.G.A, is a prisoner of war in Germany. Gunner Conopo had been in France two years, and was taken prisoner on the 21st March. He is believed to be in Cassel Internment Camp.

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT NEAR RUGBY.
While flying near Rugby on Thursday, Lieut James Donald McRae Reid (21), Royal Air Force, a Canadian, fell from an altitude of about 1,000ft, and was killed instantly. The incident is believed to have been caused by something going wrong with the engine.

THE B.T.H. EXPLOSION.

The inquest on George Alsop, the man who died as the result of injuries received at the B.T.H on Monday in last week, was opened by Mr E F Hadow on Friday, May 3rd.—Mr H Lupton Reddish represented the B.T.H Company and the Insurance Company. Mr G Ralph and Mr S London also attended.

Lucy Alsop, the widow, said her husband was 58 years of age, and had been employed as a stoker by the B.T.H Company for the past three years. When she saw her husband at the hospital he was unconscious and unable to tell her how the accident occurred. He died without recovering consciousness. He was previously employed as a stoker by the Oxford Canal Company.

Dr C R Hoskyn said death was due to a fracture of the base of the skull. He also suffered from a secondary scald, extending down the whole of the left leg, but this alone would not have been sufficient to cause death.

Mr Reddish said he was instructed by the directors of the Company to say how much they deplored the accident, and wished him to express their great sympathy with the relatives of Alsop and the other men who had been injured. He assured the jury that the Company were prepared to do everything humanly possible to assist them to ascertain the cause of the explosion.—The Coroner and the Jury associated themselves with these remarks.

The inquest was then adjourned till Wednesday, June 5th, for a full investigation of the cause of the accident.

THE FUNERAL took place at Napton on Monday in the presence of a large number of friends and sympathisers. The service was conducted by the Rev J Armstrong (vicar), and, in addition to the members of the family, fifteen employees of the B.T.H, representing the Power House staff, Wiring Department, and the Workers’ Union, attended. There was a large collection of  floral emblems, including tributes from neighbours in Rowland Street, Rugby ; his fellow-workmen in the Power House ; Wiring Department, B.T.H ; Workers’ Union, Branch No. 2 ; and the staff and his fellow-workers.

RUGBY’S MEAT SUPPLY.
LITTLE HOPE OF IMPROVEMENT IN QUALITY.

In view of a letter read at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday afternoon there appears to be very little prospect of any immediate improvement in the quality of the foreign meat consigned to the town. It will be remembered that at the last meeting the committee a letter was read from Messrs Clayson[?], Wait, and Woolley, asking to be relieved of their undertaking to be responsible for the payment for foreign meat consigned by the Area Meat Agent to make up for the deficiency of meat obtained from Rugby Market. This step, they said, was forced upon them by the fact that the meat was of such an inferior quality that they doubted whether the other butchers would continue to purchase it from them, in which case they would be faced with a serious financial loss. At Thursday’s meeting the Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) reported that he had written to the district Commissioner on the subject, and he had replied to the effect that he would be pleased to grant an interview to the Chairman of the Committee and the Executive Officer, but did not think any useful purpose would be served by a discussion, because neither he nor the Area Meat Agent were able to alter the conditions under which foreign meat was supplied. The Area Meat Agent was not responsible for the quality of the meat, which was liberated by the Government from their own cold storage, and it was impossible to guarantee any uniform standard of quality. The time had now arrived when it was no longer practicable for people to be too fastidious with regard to their meat. Any district which objected to frozen meat was not obliged to accept it, if they preferred to go short; but any deficit could only be made up with frozen meat. All meat sent from cold storage had to be paid for, and any dispute as to payment might result in no further supplies being sent without cash.—To this the Executive Officer replied that the objection was not to frozen meat, but to the quality of the supplies which had been sent, and he asked what would be his financial position in the event of meat being sent of such quality that the butchers would not accept it ? Would the Food Committee be held responsible? It was rather serious from their point of view, considering the large quantity of frozen meat sent into the district.

The Chairman (Mr T A Wise) said the Commissioner took up the line that they received the meat from the Government cold storage, and distributed it equitably. The committee could not go beyond that, because they could not prove that they were getting worse meat than anyone else.—Mr Mellor asked if it was a fact that the meat sent to the foreign shops from the Central Depot was of a better quality than that sent to the order of the Executive Officer.—The Chairman : If it is this the committee can do nothing, nor can the Government. The old-established firms naturally get the pick of the market.—Mr Ewart pointed out that under present system the Government stood to lose nothing, because if the meat was sent they had keep it ; whereas if a butcher bought bad meat he would have to stand by the loss.—The Chairman : But if everyone refused to buy it the Government would lose a great deal.—The Executive Officer said some of the beef in the foreign shops was no better than that sent to the other butchers.—Mr Griffin : Anyone in the trade knows that the foreign shops better beef than we get.—With reference to the late arrival of meat, the Executive Officer said that neither the Butchers’ Association nor he was responsible  for that. They were expected to send the account of their deficit early on Monday morning, but they did not know what it would be until mid-day, when he immediately ‘phoned or wired the shortage. This week the butchers had been advised to attend Eardsley Market, Herefordshire, but they were unable to do so, and on telegraphing their requirements to the auctioneer there they received a reply to the effect that this was not the week in which the market was held. He then had to inform the Area Meat Agent, who had promised to forward the meat on Friday, which would make things very awkward for the butchers.—The Chairman pointed out that the cheque for imported meat this week amounted to £750, and they could not run the risk of having £100 or £200 of this left on their hands. It was only by the kindness of the master butchers that they had been able to go on.—It was stated that the master butchers had decided to carry on as usual for a short time, and the matter was, therefore, referred to the Finance Committee, the Executive Officer in the meantime to get into communication with other centre to ascertain their mode of procedure.

INCREASED BACON SUPPLIES.

From Monday last only two of the four ration coupons can be used for butchers’ meat weekly, but the bacon allowance will be practically doubled. The new scale of coupon weights will be :—
Bacon, uncooked, with bone. . . . .8oz.
without bone. . 7oz.

Ham, uncooked, with bone . . . . .12oz.
without bone . . 10oz.

Bacon, cooked, with bone . . . . . 7oz.
without bone . . .5oz.

Ham, cooked, with bone . . . . . .10oz.
without bone . . . .8oz.

Two coupons only will be required for picnic hams weighing up to 5lb, with one coupon for each additional pound.

These weights may not be permanent; but they will be in force for least a month, so large are the supplies of American bacon in the country. It is hoped that before it is necessary to reduce the bacon ration again it may be possible to increase the fat ration, probably by an addition of lard.

The previous scale was 5oz of ham or bacon with bone, or 4oz without bone. The reduction in the meat rations means that each consumer may only spend 10d weekly with the butcher.

NUNEATON.
WAR MEMORIAL.—Lord Denbigh visited Nuneaton on Monday afternoon to unveil a temporary war memorial, containing the roll of honour of Nuneaton’s brave soldiers who have made the supreme sacrifice. The inscription on the memorial, which has been erected the Mayor, is : “ They wrought to save us, and to save us died. H C Jones, Mayor, 1918.” Canon Deed and the Rev J C Masterton took part the unveiling ceremony, which was witnessed by thousands of people. In the course of an oration, Lord Denbigh paid solemn tribute to the sacrifices which our brave soldiers had made and the great debt of gratitude the country owed them in fighting that we might still exist as a great nation.

DEATHS.

FRETTER.—Pte CHARLES JAMES FRETTER, 10th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action on March 22, 1918.
“ At duty’s call, with soul inspired,
 To fight for honour, truth and right ;
 His task well done, yet still untired,
 He marches now in realms of light.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving Sisters and Brothers.

HARRIS.—In loving memory of Pte. THOMAS HARRIS, who died of wounds in Egypt.—“ Our loss was his gain.”—From his loving Wife and Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Pte. THOMAS BATCHELOR, of the 5th Royal Berks., who died of wounds in Germany on December 25, 1917.
“ May the winds of heaven blow gently
On that sweet and sacred spot,
Though sleeping in a far-off grave,
Dearest one, you are not forgot,”
—Sadly missed by his loving Children, Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

FROST.—In loving remembrance of Pte. JAMES FROST,  youngest son of the late Mr. John Frost, butcher, Daventry, who died of wounds in France on May 9, 1917.
“ We miss you from our home, dear Jim ;
It’s sweet to breath your name.
In life we loved you very dear,
In death we do the same.”
—From his loving sister Nellie, 47 Alfred Rd., Coventry.

KEEN.—In loving memory of ARTHUR WILLIAM KEEN, killed in action on May 9, 1915, in France.—From his Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers.

LIXENFIELD.—In fondest memory of JACK LIXENFIELD, Lance-Corpl., Royal Engineers, who died of wounds on May 13, 1917, at Manchester.
“ O happy hours we once enjoyed,
How sweet thy memory still.”
—Always in the thoughts of Lil.

PORTER.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, GEORGE RUPERT PORTER, who fell in action on May 8, 1915.
“ The hardest part it yet to come
When other lads return,
And we miss among the cheering crowd
The face of him we love.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

27th Apr 1918. Can a Greengrocer Substitute a Blacksmith?

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At a sitting of this Tribunal on Wednesday there were present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, W Johnson, jun, A Craig, and S J Dicksee. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

CAN A GREENGROCER SUBSTITUTE A BLACKSMITH ?

The appeal of Thomas White (18, general service), Dunchurch, blacksmith, assisting his father, which had been adjourned to see whether a substitute could be found, was next heard ; and addressing the father, the Chairman said : “ Whether you have a substitute or not, the boy will have to go.”—Mr Meredith explained that Major Neilson, who knew the case very well, was of opinion that, although the man was passed for general service, he should not be taken without a substitute being provided, because the firm did a good deal of agricultural work.—The Chairman said, as Mr White’s family had such a patriotic record, one son having been killed and another was serving, they wished to help him, but were they to keep this boy out of the Army until the National Service Department found a substitute ?—Mr Meredith : It is hardly our job ; it is for the Labour Exchange.—It was mentioned that the next appellant—Howard James Allkins, greengrocer (39, B2), Wolston—had been suggested as substitute.—Allkins, however, said he went to see Mr White, who expressed doubt as to whether he would be of any use, because he knew nothing of the business. It would be twelve months, he added, before he could put nail in a shoe.—Mr White explained that shoeing was a funny job. Some of the big horses he had to shoe might injure, if they did not kill, a man who was not used to the work.—The Chairman : we realise that.—Mr White : It would be a case of me picking his pocket and he picking mine.—Mr Meredith : I cannot see how a greengrocer can substitute a blacksmith. He might lame a horse for life.—The Chairman said but for the fact that Mr White had lost a son in the service of his country this man would have had to go a long time ago. They would adjourn the case for a month, but he had been asked to point out that whether Mr White was successful or unsuccessful in finding a substitute, there was no doubt as to what would happen then. Therefore, in his own interests and in the interest of the country, he urged Mr White to do his best to get someone. The Labour Exchange would help him very materially.—The case of Allkins was adjourned for a re-examination.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte A E Palmer, Royal Warwicks, of 11 Adam Street, New Bilton, was wounded at La Bassee on april 15th with a bullet wound in his left thigh.

Pte G E Higham, Royal Warwicks, of New Bilton, has been severely wounded in the buttock. He was formerly employed by the G.C Railway.

Pte Albert Coaton, Machine Gun Battalion, son of Mr C Coaton, Grosvenor Road, has been wounded by a bullet in the left knee.

Gunner Norman Atkinson, H.A.C, second son of Mr J H Atkinson, of 37 Windsor Street, has been reported wounded and missing. Prior to joining the Army he was an apprentice at the B.T.H. He was an O.L. And Old Murrayian.

Mr & Mrs J Haggar, of 10 Alexandra Road, Rugby, have received news that their son, Corpl W Haggar, Worcestershire Regiment, has been missing since March 21st. Corpl Haggar was, prior to joining the Forces, employed at the B.T.H.

Gunner A E Moore, R.F.A, has been badly gassed, and is in hospital at Etaples. This is the second time he has been gassed, and last Christmastime he was buried for a time by debris thrown up by a shell. He is the only son of Mr and Mrs E Moore, 100 Grosvenor Road, and was an apprentice at the B.T.H when called up.

Pte Alfred Elson, Hampshire Regiment, who enlisted at the out break of the war, giving up a position at the B.T.H Works, Rugby, has died of wounds received in action. He had been previously wounded, and returned to France last year. He was again due for leave when the offensive started, in which he received severe gunshot wounds, from which he died on April 6. He was of a bright and cheerful disposition, and will be missed by a large circle of friends.

The death from wounds received on April 12th of 2nd Lieut R V Wilson has now been confirmed in a letter from his commanding officer to Mr J G Wilson of York Street. The letter states that Lieut Wilson “ was a most gallant officer, and showed promise of becoming a good leader ; in spite of his youth he had command of a company in action under difficult conditions, and was one of the most capable officers in the Battalion. His brother officers loved him.” The deceased officer was educated at the Elborow and Lower Schools. Intending to become a member of the scholastic profession, he became a student teacher at Eastlands Boys’ School. In May, 1916, he joined the H.A.C, and served in France. Later he accepted a Commission with the 1/7 R.W.R. The news of his untimely end was keenly felt by boys and staff of Eastlands School and by all who knew his cheerful personality. It seems that his battalion was attached at 6 a.m, and at 7 a.m he was sent forward to relieve another officer, and reached the post alright, but was almost immediately wounded by machine gun fire. When being carried back he was full of cheerfulness and of regret that he had to leave the field.

Capt G Gray, Lancashire Fusiliers, who was reported missing on March 26th, is a prisoner of war in Minden.

L-Corpl H Warland, 23rd Royal Fusiliers, son of Mr W Warland, Crick, who was reported as missing on   March 25th, is now known to be a prisoner of war. Prior to joining the Army two years ago, he was employed at the B.T.H.

Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth Home, Poplar Grove, has received official intimation that his son, 2nd Lieut A G Cox, reported missing 23rd March, is a prisoner of war. The camp in which he is interned is not known.

HONOURS FOR RUGBY MEN.

L-Cpl B Holmes, R.W.R, of Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M. He has acted as a company runner for over two years, and he has been in the majority of actions in which his battalion has taken part. He has always proved himself most reliable, and on many occasions has taken messages through very heavy fire, displaying singular devotion to duty.

Bombardier (Acting Corporal) W E Stay, R.C.A, of Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M for “ showing great ability on all occasions in supervising the maintenance of the Battery lines, frequently carrying out repairs fearlessly in face of very severe bombardment by high explosive and gas shells.”

THE WAR IN PICTURES.

Those who are interested in war films will have an opportunity of seeing a free display of actual war films in the Market Place, Rugby, on Monday, May 16th. The show, which is arranged by the Ministry of National Service, will be explained by men who have fought, and will take place at 8.30 p.m.

LOCAL MAN IN ZEEBRUGGE AFFAIR.

W GILBERT, son of Mr T Gilbert, was one of those who volunteered to take part in the naval raid on Zeebrugge. He was engineer on one of the motor boats engaged. Although several missiles passed through the little craft none of the crew was hit, and all reached the base safely.

THURLASTON.
FIVE TIMES WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Hedgcock have been informed that their only son, Sergt Hedgcock, has been wounded in the shoulder, which has been fractured. This is the fifth time Sergt Hedgcock has been wounded.

BIRDINGBURY.

THE sad news was received here last week of the death of Corpl G W Wall, grandson of Mr & Mrs Matthew Wall. He was badly wounded in France, and died soon afterwards in hospital. He had lately been home on leave. He enlisted soon after the War broke out, and joined the Coldstream Guards. At the beginning of December, 1914, he was sent to France. He was wounded in September, 1916, and was for a time in Coventry Hospital. In May, 1917, he was sent back to the firing line, and saw active service. On March 28th he spent an hour at his old school, where he was gladly welcomed by scholars and teachers. Before commencing his sermon on Sunday afternoon, the Rev A E Esau spoke very touchingly of him.

BROADWELL.
MISSING—Official intimation has been received by Mr Frank Goode of Broadwell that his son, Pte William Goode, of the M.G Corp, is a prisoner of war in Germany, and wounded. Before joining up he was the Secretary of the local lodge of Oddfellow.

PAILTON.
MILTARY MEDAL.—The Military Medal has been awarded Pte Augustus Horne, Northumberland Fusiliers, for conspicuous bravery in the field at Hargicourt on September 11,1917.

THE MEAT SUPPLY.

The supply of fat stock in Rugby Cattle Market on Monday was very short, but on representations being made to the Area Meat Agent a load of beast and two loads of sheep were sent from Stourbridge Market. The difference, as usual, will have to be made up with imported meat.

RUGBY SCHOOL & HELP IN POTATO PLANTING.

In explanation of the notice in your last week’s issue on the subject of the Rugby School “ farming ” squads, Dr David wishes me to say that the terms mentioned had reference to potato planting. For this work a large number of boys have had some training in the working of their own potato fields last year and this spring and the Army Canteen fields in Devonshire. Terms and conditions for help in other agricultural work, such as hoeing, &c, can be arranged later on.

In case a farmer needs a planting squad within a radius of six miles from Rugby School during the next fortnight or so will he, in applying to me, please state : (a) The exact locality of his potato field ; (b) the number of boys required ; (c) whether the squad should bring knives for cutting ungraded seed and a few bucket, if available ?

In working our own School potato field I have found it best to organise a large squad in the morning, say 9.30 a.m to 1 o’clock, so that the boys can pick out twitch from the rows (already opened), cut up potatoes, when ungraded, and plant, and so leave the horses plenty of work for afternoon ; but, no doubt, each farmer has his own method and convenience.

C.P. HASTINGS.
“ Mayfield,” Rugby.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—Sec.-Lieut. G. W. BARNWELL, K.O.Y.L.I., dearly-beloved husband of Mrs. Barnwell, 97 Grosvenor Road, killed action in France, April 13th.

BURTON.—In loving memory of ALFRED JOSEPH BURTON, aged 30 ; killed in action on April 5, 1918.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother and Family, and fiancee, Alice Kennard.

NOBLE.—Killed in action on March 29, 1918, Gunner JOSEPH WILLIAM HARRISON NOBLE, aged 27 years, beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. J. F. Noble, Braunston. Deeply lamented.

THOMPSON.—On April 12th, at Dar es Salaam, East Africa, Pte. FREDERICK THOMAS THOMPSON, A.S.C., dearly beloved and eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Thompson, of 7 Albert Street, Milverton (late of Rugby). Died of dysentry.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from those who loved him best,
In hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters, and fiancee, Nellie.

IN MEMORIAM.

BIDDLES.—In ever dear and affectionate remembrance of EVAN PERCY BIDDLES, 50th Brigade, R.F.A. (late of Estancia Loma-Pora, Republic del Paraguay), who died in the 103rd Field Ambulance from Gas poisoning received during night of April 22nd, 1917. Buried next day in the little Military Cemetery at Haute Aveanes, Aubigny-en-Artois, 6 miles N.W. of Arras.—“ Pro patria mori.”

BULL.—In loving and affectionate remembrance of Bombardier BULL (TOM), the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Bull, Southam Road Farm, Napton ; killed in France on May 3, 1917 ; aged 18.
“ A loving son and faithful brother,
One the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
And gave his life for one ans all.”
—From his loving Father, Mother & Sisters.

CLEAVER.—In loving memory of Pte. W. T. CLEAVER, R.W.R., eldest son of J. Cleaver, 17 East Street, who died of wounds in France on April 25th of last year.
“ One year has passed since that sad day.
I often sit and think of him, think of how he died.
To think he could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘ before he closed his eyes.”
—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Brother and Sister.

DAVIS.—In loving memory of Pte. R DAVIS (ROLAND), who was killed in action in France in the Battle of Arras on April 27, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving Father, Mother, Brother and sisters.

GREEN.—In loving memory of my dear husband, WALTER GREEN, killed in France April 27th, 1917, aged 29 years.
We think of him in silence,
His name we oft re-call ;
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his dear photo on the wall.
—From loving wife and child.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. WALTER GREEN, youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Henry Green, Broadwell, killed in action in France April 25, 1917. “Until we meet.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sister.

GREEN.—In memory of Pte. JOHN HENRY GREEN, the loving husband of Elizabeth Green, who died April 26.1915.
“ Sleep on, beloved, and take try rest ;
We loved you well, but God loved you best.”
—Sadly by all. From his loving Wife and Children, Mother, Father, Sister and Brothers.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of our dear Son and brother, HERBERT, who was killed in action on April 27, 1915, at Ypres.
“ We think of him in silence,
His name we oft recall ;
But there nothing left to answer
But his photo the wall.
We have lost him, we who loved him ;
And, like others, must be brave,
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.
—From Parents, Brother and Sisters (Kilsby).

JONES.—In ever-loving memory of Corpl. D. J. JONES who was killed in action in France on April, 29, 1917.
Loved one gone but not forgotten,
And as dawns another year,
In our lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of him are always dear.
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brother & Sisters, and Mill.

OWEN.—In loving memory of Pte. GEO. ERNEST (TOS), Wolston, 1st R.W.R., who was reported missing, since presumed killed, at Ypres, April 25th, 1915.
Though he was only a private soldier
He died a British son ;
He died on the field of battle,
His duty was nobly done.
The hardest part in yet to come,
When the other lads return,
And we miss among the cheering crowd
The face of him we love.
—Sadly missed by all.

WELCH.—In loving memory of our brother-in-law, Pte. E. WELCH, Oxford and Bucks L.I., who was killed in France on April 29, 1917.—Never forgotten by Erne and Ethel Lenton, 64 Wood Street.

WELCH.—In loving memory of ERNEST EDWARD WELCH, who fell in action on April 29, 1917 ; aged 36.
“ We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting ;
It will be in the Better Land.”
—Not forgotten by his Mother and Sisters.

WELCH.—In remembrance of Lance-Corpl. E. E. WELCH who was killed in action on April 28, 1917. “ Gone but not forgotton.”—From his loving Wife and Daughters.

YOUNG.—In loving memory of our dear and only son, Pte. W. C. YOUNG (BILLY), who was killed in action in Salonika on April 24, 1917, in the 25th year of his age. Dearly loved and deeply mourned.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of our dear son and soldier brave.
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better land.
—From his Father and Mother and Sisters (Pinfold Street, New Bilton).

 

8th May 1915. Exciting Times in the Trenches

EXCITING TIMES IN THE TRENCHES

Corpl Morris Davies, of Rugby, the well-known international hooker player, who is now serving in the 6th Warwickshire Regiment, with the British Expeditionary Force, writes to a friend in Rugby, under date April 29th :- If you join the Flying Corps, I can only say you will join the finest body of sportsmen or experts in the world. What you see about our pilots in the paper is true. We lads in the trenches see them all day and welcome them more than I can say. I will just tell you two little stories of the last two days. Last Monday morning, 6 a.m, an English airman came over our lines. He flew over the Germans and they sent 15 shells at him. He came back only to return, and again 15 shells were fired at him, again he came back, only to return once more. He went over the German lines four times, and in all 54 shells burst round him. He then ran home. Last Tuesday, about 4 o’clock in the afternoon, we saw a machine coming over the G lines, about 1,000ft up, directly he got over the G lines he fell to not more than 70ft. The Germans stood up in their trenches and gave him two minutes’ rifle fire as hard as they could. Out chaps then got up and let the Germans have it full in the face ; some got it, I’ll bet. The aeroplane wobbled badly, and some say the observer then took charge, and the machine rose, just cleared our lines and some trees, and off for home. It was a thrilling moment. It must have been engine trouble to start, then perhaps the volplane started things going. He must have been hit. I came out of the trenches last night after 96 hours. We had quite an easy time on the whole. The German snipers are devils. They are at us all day and all night, and you take it from me they can shoot. I wouldn’t be our top row of sand-bags for £1,000 a week. On Tuesday night I took a working party out in front of our parapet. After we had been out 2 ½ hours, the Germans spotted us. The snipers then gave us a few souvenirs. Then their lines opened on us, together with a machine gun. We all lay in a hole like rats for five minutes, and then one at a time I gave the order to up and jump the parapet back into the trench. Ye Gods, see the lads get over. All well. I have seen Redmayne, B Relton, Pomeroy, S Rogers, Jerry Lee, and various others, and Will, the Scotch three-quarter. I am now lance-corporal, and I believe, I am to get my second stripe to-night.

A RUGBY SOLDIER IN A FAMOUS CHARGE.

HOW MICHAEL O’LEAREY WON HIS V.C.

Ptc W Gardener, of the 3rd Coldstream Guards, an ex-member of the Rugby Police Force, who previous to being called up on August 1st was employed at the B.T.H. Works, visited Rugby on sick leave on Friday in last week. Pte Gardener, who was amongst the earliest to be sent to the front, has had some thrilling experiences and more than one narrow escape. As we announced last week, he was wounded in the head, and knee at La Bassee on February 16th, and was only discharged from the hospital at Sheffield about ten days ago. It was in the famous charge in the La Bassee brickfield, which was graphically described by “ Eye-witness ” at the time, that Pte Gardener was wounded. Lord Feilding, D.S.O, eldest son of the Earl of Denbigh, led the charge, and Pte Gardener waxed eloquent in speaking of this gallant young officer, remarking that he was one of the finest men he had ever seen. It was on the same occasion that Sergt O’Learey, of the Irish Guards, set the world talking by the marvellous exploit which gained for him the coveted “ V.C.” Pte Gardener was an eye-witness of O’Learey’s gallantry, and he informed our representative that he never saw a man run so hard in his life as the Irishman did when single-handed he charged the German position. “ He was over the wall before the whistle went,” added Pte Gardener, “ and was half-way across the space before the rest of his company had started. He was only an ordinary, slim-looking chap, but he got excited like the rest of us do, only a little more so.” Pte Gardener described the German troops as a “ dirty lot of blighters ” and added that he had seen them bayoneting British wounded. The British troops were having to rough it at the front ; but, he added optimistically, “ We are winning slowly, and the general advance will soon come off. When we do charge the Germans they run like rabbits. They don’t like cold steel.” Pte Gardener is still receiving surgical treatment for his knee, which was badly injured by a portion of a “ Jack Johnson.”

WITH THE RUGBY INFANTRY CO.

Pte F P Moore, of the machine-gun section C Company (formerly E Company), of the 7th Battalion R.W.R, writing from “France or Belgium” to a friend in Rugby, says :-“ We are still at the ‘four in and four out ’ shifts, and go in for the third shift to-night (April 28th). We all marched down to a city near to here and had a good bath. This last four days out we spent in hutments, some four miles behind the firing line. The trenches, or rather the firing line here, is most weird and complex, as far removed from a straight line as possible. At night you can hear firing all round you—front, rear, and flank—at varying distances. We generally get a little shelling each day, and then an aeroplane or two goes up over the German lines, taking no notice of the shells they fire at it. We counted 100 shells at one machine, all wide, and never any sign of a hit yet. The pieces of shell fall in our trenches, so we have to look out. The worst part so far is the march to and from the trenches in full pack. Shell fire is a bit rotten also.”

LOCAL WAR CASUALTIES.

NEW BILTON GUARDSMAN A PRISONER.

Mr H Collins, of 73 New Street, New Bilton, has received news that his son, Acting-Lance-Sergt Harry Collins, of the 1st Coldstream Guards, who has been missing since December 21st, is a prisoner of was at Wittenbuy, Germany, but nothing has been heard from Lance-Sergt Collins himself, although his parents have communicated with him. It will be remembered that Lance-Sergt Collins, who is not yet 20 years of age, and who evidently has a successful career before him, was wounded at the commencement of the war, and spent a few days at his home before returning to the front on November 2nd.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry have arrived at Alexandria.

Mr Lewis Loverock his received news that his son, Second Lieutenant Gerald Loverock, has been wounded, but no details are yet to hand.

Early on Tuesday morning an airship was seen hovering around in the vicinity of Rugby, and then it took a turn over Northants before returning to its base. No alarm was manifested by the people, the nationality of the ship being recognised.

Mr W G Gurney, eldest son of Mr John Gurney, formerly of Rugby, has been given a commission in the 10th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Mr Gurney was at one time a member of the Nuneaton Rugby football team.

Mr Herbert Ringrose, of Rugby, has left for France, to take up ambulance duties with the Red Cross Society, and is at present at Boulogne Hospital. For a number of years he has been a member of the Fire Brigade and Ambulance Corps, and has recently carried out the secretarial duties.

Mr J J McKinnell, son of Mr J J McKinnell, of Rugby, who has been serving in the trenches for some six months past, has obtained a commission as second-lieutenant in the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and will, we understand, be quartered in the Isle of Wight.

Lance-Sergt T Harris, of the 1st Warwicks, son of Mr T Harris, 22 Corbett Street, Rugby, has been badly wounded in both legs, and it has been necessary to amputate his right foot. He is now in hospital at Boulogne, He went out in August last year, and has been in most of the large battles. His parents do not know at present when or where the wounds were sustained.

The first list of casualties sustained during the land operations in the Dardanelles contained the name of Capt Dudley Graham Johnson, D.S.O, of the 2nd South Wales Borderers, the regiment which was recently billeted in New Bilton. Capt Johnson is reported to have been wounded. He gained his decoration by his gallant behaviour at Tsingtau on the night of November 5th. He showed conspicuous ability during the operations against the German positions there, and exhibited great gallantry in rescuing several wounded men, although he was exposed to heavy fire from the machine guns.

“ OUR SOLDIERS ” IN THE DARDANELLES.

Nowhere, perhaps, is the progress of the land forces in the Dardanelles watched more eagerly than in Rugby and the surrounding districts, and this interest is accounted for by the fact that the four regiments which were billeted in the town, and who won, the hearts of the residents in a remarkably short space of time, are taking part in this historic effort. The gallant fellows, who are affectionately referred to by Rugbeians as “ Our soldiers,” have been in action almost daily since April 25th, and, judging from the officers casualty list, their losses have been very heavy. The Scottish lads have to mourn the loss of their gallant commanding officer, Lieut-Col Koe, and several other able officers ; whilst the Border Regiment has lost its three senior and several company officers.

We gather from an announcement of death in a morning paper, that Lieut-Colonel Robert Ouseley Cuthbert Hume, of the 1st Battalion Border Regiment, has died of wounds received in the Dardanelles. When the Border Regiment and Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers came to Rugby in January, the supreme command was vested in Colonel Hume, who was the senior officer. He was a gentleman of charming personality, and won the golden opinions of all with whom he came in intact. He was very popular with the men under his command, and his kindly unassuming disposition endeared him to all ranks. Members of the staff of the Advertiser had frequently to apply to Colonel Hume for such information as the censorship regulations permitted us to publish, and they always found him most courteous and ready to give all the assistance he could.

Lieutenant-Colonel Hume was born in April, 1867, and obtained his commission as lieutenant in August, 1886. His promotions came in 1895, 1908, and 1912. With his regiment in India he took part in the Waziristen Expedition (1894-5), receiving the medal with clasp, and he had the Tirah medal with two clasps for service in the North-West frontier in 1897-8. He was the eldest son of the late Captain Walter Hume, of Rock Lodge, Lynton, Devon.

Lieut-Colonel Koe, owing to ill-health, was not with his regiment during the greater part of their stay in Rugby, but the news that he was to accompany his men to the front caused considerable jubilation, he being a very popular officer.

Among the other officers of the K.O.S B’s who have been killed is Lieut T A G Miller, an excellent Rugby footballer. Lieut Miller played back for his regiment against Rugby Town and District, and his fearless tackling and perfect touch-finding marked him at one of the best backs seen on the Rugby ground for some time.

Lieut Cheatle, who in also amongst the killed, played in the same match, as did Lieuts Agar and Renny, who are wounded.

Lieut Verschoyle, of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who is reported as wounded, played football for his regiment against the Rugby School XV.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following recruits have been attested at the Drill Hall this week by Company Sergeant-Major Winchcomb, in addition to six members for the Fortress Company (220 R.E) :—A.S.C (Remounts), J J Hancock and A S Blick ; R.E, H Turner and A Court ; Reserve Signalling Co R.E, G D Tennent ; R.W.R, J H Tustain ; Royal Flying Corps (M.W), D Weir.

Recruiting is to be re-opened for the 13th (Pioneer, Forest of Dean) Battalion Gloucester Regiment.