5th Oct 1918. Margarine Shortage at Rugby

MARGARINE SHORTAGE AT RUGBY.

The non-arrival of the weekly supply of margarine last week, owing to the railway strike, occasioned considerable inconvenience locally. The majority of the grocers were left without supplies before the end of the week, and many of the late customers were unable to secure their rations. We understand that the supply arrived on Tuesday last, six days late.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Tuesday, Mr William Flint, C.C, presided. Also present: Mrs Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, Mr R P Mason, Mr J W Walton, Mr E Pepper, Mr F A W Shirley, and Mr J R Barker, hon organising secretary.

Mr Barker said the support given to the Fund from all quarters showed a most gratifying increase. The cost of the food parcels, etc, during the month of September was the highest on record, the amount being £517 14s. Yet it had been possible to meet this charge out of current subscriptions and donations, there being a surplus on the month of £2 8s 2d.

As an example of the great growth of the Fund, Mr Barker said the accounts showed that the cost of the food parcels, &c. during the-past three months amounted to £1,349 10s 6d, but so well had the Fund been supported that nearly all this amount had been raised during the same period, the deficit on the past three months’ working being only £73 15s 6d. A substantial sum could, however, be expected as a result of the recent effort organised by the General Help Society, which would wipe out this deficit and leave a good sum to carry forward towards the October parcels, which would not be less than £350.

There were now 142 local men to whom food parcels were being despatched, but he expected to have the addresses of the prison camps of eight other men very soon. Four men had been recently repatriated, who were taken prisoners at the end of March last. He regretted that these men were all badly wounded, and in consequence of the Germans not giving them proper medical and surgical treatment, in addition to half starving them, they reached England in a very serious condition. There had, of course, been no time for them to receive the food parcels which had been despatched to them from England, as in each of these cases the men had been removed from their prison camps for repatriation just before the arrival of their first parcels.

The Chairman said the splendid support the public of Rugby and District had given to the Fund had enabled them, in spite of the huge increase month by month to meet the cost of the food parcels without having to call on the British Red Cross Society to contribute anything towards the cost. He was sure the people of Rugby and district would do all they could to see that this splendid position was maintained.—Mr Shirley said he would like to associate himself with the Chairman’s remarks. He knew the working men of the district especially the railway men, were contributing splendidly, but he would like to see more organised weekly efforts from other works in the town.—Mr Barker said he thought the figures he had given showed that everyone was alive to the importance of regular and continued support. The month’s revenue was not made up by a few individual amounts, but by a very considerable number of small donations, as well as Works collections and organised efforts, so that if people were not subscribing in one particular way, they were doing it in some form or another.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sapper S J J Hodges, R.E, and Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, both of Rugby, have been taken prisoners by the Germans.

Corpl W S Bosworth, Royal Engineers, son of Mr S Bosworth, Rowland Street, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre. He is an old St Matthew’s boy.

Lieut E M W Boughton, M.C. Royal Engineers, has received an immediate award of a bar to the Military Cross which he gained in the Cambrai offensive of last year.

As a result of an egg collection amongst the staff of Mr J J McKinnell’s establishment on Saturday 37 eggs were handed over to the Infirmary V.A.D for the wounded soldiers.

Lance-Corpl A Lester, Royal Engineers, 92 South Street, Rugby, was killed in action on August 17th. For upwards of 18 years he was employed as a platelayer in Rugby. He had served in France since February last.

Mr & Mrs S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, have five sons in the Army. Four are still serving in France and one (Percy) was wounded and taken prisoner, and subsequently transferred to Switzerland. This is believed to be a record for the village.

Pte J J Hancocks, 1st Worcester Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Hancocks, Hillmorton Wharf, who was reported missing on November 22nd last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was employed at the Lodge Factory when he joined the Army on February 23, 1917, at the age of 21 years.

Pte W Lacey, R.W.R, son of Mrs F Holmes, 66 Rowland Street, has been wounded in the shoulder and neck. Pte Lacey, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, joined the Army in September, 1916. He was wounded in the following January. Fourteen months later he was invalided home with trench fever. He has an elder brother also serving in France.

Mrs G Cowley, late of Rugby, has recently received a letter from Major Eric Charles, commanding a battery of heavy gums in Italy, saying : “ Your son is one of the Subalterns in my battery. He has recently been responsible for a very brave act. The battery was being heavily shelled, a shell falling in the gun pit and setting alight to the camouflage, ammunition and the clothing of two of the wounded gun crew. Your son ran in and carried them out, thereby saving their lives.”

Lance-Corpl J A Maycock, M.M. Royal Warwicks, of Rokeby Cottage, Bennett Street, Rugby, was recently killed in a trench raid in Italy. He joined the Army three years ago, and was awarded the Military Medal for bringing in wounded men under heavy shell fire in November, 1917. He has also been twice mentioned in despatches. He was a member of Rugby Congregational Church, and also of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Prior to the War he was employed by Messrs Faulkner, St Matthew Street. He leaves a widow and two little children.

Recently the mother of the only child of the late Pte A W Bottrill received a cheque from his late father’s Captain, together with a letter, as follows :—Thank you so much for the photograph of the latest Coldstream recruit. He is very like his father, and I hope he will be as great a credit to it as his father was. I am sending these few pounds, which I hope you will put to the credit of your boy until the time when he joins the regiment. I hope your boy will be a great comfort to you and a worthy successor to his father. Pte Bottrill, who was killed in France on March 19th, was buried on his child’s third birthday. Lady Sybil Grant acted as godmother to the boy in consideration of the fact that his father was serving in the regiment at the time of the baby’s birth.

RUGBEIAN KILLED IN AUSTRALIA.—News has just been received of the death of Mr W Cox, late of 14 Market Street, Rugby, the result of a railway accident at Brighton, South Australia. Mr Cox emigrated to Australia nearly nine years ago. Two of his three sons have served for some time in the A.I.F. The eldest one at present in France, and the youngest had his discharge early this year after service in Egypt, the Dardanelles, and in France, where he was badly wounded.

HILL.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—News has come through from companions that Pte Henry Cockerill, of the M.G.C and of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of the late Mr T Cockerill and Mrs Cockerill, of Hill, was killed last week by a shell, which also very seriously injured a companion. After joining the Warwickshire Yeomanry, he went to Egypt three years ago, and was on the Seasowe Castle, which was torpedoed when the regiment returned to France.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—The sad news has reached the village that Lander Mann, formerly a choirboy in Stockton Church, has made the great sacrifice on the Western Front. The family, who now live at Rugby, have many friends in the parish, and great sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Mann in their sorrow. The lad was 19 years old.—Wheeler C Cleaver is home on leave from France. He belongs to the now historic Tank Corps, which is doing go much to make victory at the present time.

BRANDON.
ANOTHER SON WOUNDED.—Mr George Harris, who for some time has been in the employ of the L & N.-W Railway Company at Brandon Station, has received news that another of his sons has been wounded. Mr Harris had four sons, who willingly volunteered. One has already lost his life ; a second has just been released from hospital, after being there three years, half of which was spent in bed; the third son now lies in Bath Hospital. Two of his fingers have been amputated, and his left hand is badly damaged. Mr Harris’s fourth son is now with the Engineers in France. Much sympathy is felt for Mr Harris in his fresh trouble.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Several more of the village boys are reported wounded. Pte Harold Priest, Warwickshire Yeomanry, is suffering from a shrapnel wound through his left arm. He is not yet 19 years old, and has only lately gone to the front.—Pte Thos H Tandy, Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was at home less than a fortnight since, is also wounded, but it is hoped not seriously.—Pte Ernest Lane, R.W.R, whose brother Frank was lately reported missing, and whose brother Arthur has been killed, is also wounded, and cannot yet be located. He was formerly porter at Long Itchington Station. Mr & Mrs Joseph Lane, parents of the foregoing, have also received an intimation that their second son, Pte Fred Lane (another former L & N-W employee), is in hospital wounded in the right arm.—Pte Chas Biddle, Gloucester Regiment. is also in hospital suffering from a shrapnel wound in the left knee.—Pte Wm Hyde, South Staffs, is reported badly gassed, having lost his speech and sight, but it is hoped only temporarily.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains a list of 229 names of soldiers and sailors. Of these 27 have been killed in action, or have died on service, three are missing, four are prisoners of war, and 50 are known to have been wounded.

COVENTRY APPEAL TRIBUNAL .

Held on Wednesday. Present: Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and A Craig. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

In support of his appeal for exemption on domestic grounds, Joseph Hayes Davenport, brick setter, Brockhurst (45, B2) explained that he was recently ordered to take up work of national importance by the National Service Department and he accordingly obtained work as a labourer at the B.T.H.—Mr Meredith urged that bricklayers were in great need in the army.— Application refused, but given 21 days to settle up his affairs.

Bourton Page (33, Grade 1), butcher, Wolston, applied for a further exemption. Mr C A Kirby represented appellant, and said his client, who was formerly a C2 man. had now been placed in Grade 1.—Mr Meredith, however, said he did not think the question of age or grade entered into this case. It was a fact that between Coventry and Lawford on the one hand, and Brinklow and Wappenbury on the other, there was no other butcher.—The Chairman : There is very little meat to distribute, but what there is the people are entitled to share.—Mr Meredith : It seems that if one butcher is not left the people in this district will starve, or, rather, have to go without meat.—The Chairman agreed, and also reminded the Tribunal that a very satisfactory agreement had been entered into by appellant and another butcher whereby the latter joined up and was guaranteed financial assistance.—Four months conditional exemption, and excused the V.T.C.

Mr H Eaden represented Charles Francis Graham Hancox (36, Grade III, sedentary), accountant, who asked for a further exemption. He explained that his client had fulfilled the condition imposed by the Tribunal—i.e, that he should work thirty hours a week on the land. This work was proving too much, however, and in consequence Hancox was forced to remain in bed half a day each week. Mr Eaden accordingly asked that the hours should be reduced to twenty per week.—The Tribunal agreed to this, and a .National Utility order was granted subject to this condition.

Arthur James Haddon, butcher (B1), 38 Lawford Road, was exempted till January 15th, and excused the V.T.C.

The cases of four bakers—Wm Walter Perkins Cowley (34, Grade 1), Cambridge Street ; Austin William Harris (40), 37 Pennington Street ; Marcus Ophir Russell (36, Grade II) ; and Edgar Matthew Bates (35, general service), 106 Park Road—were down for hearing, but Mr Meredith asked for an adjournment for 14 days. A conference was to be held at Rugby that day with regard to the Food Trade of the town, and he hoped that after this conference they would be entirely agreed as to who was essential and who was not.—The application was granted.

Samuel Dowell, hay, corn, and coal merchant (40), Stretton-under-Fosse, who had lodged an appeal against the decision of the Monks Kirby Tribunal, wrote explaining that he wished to withdraw the appeal because he had a protection certificate.—Mr Meredith said he could never understand what the man had appealed for. The reason why he was refused exemption by the Lower Tribunal was that he already held a conditional protection certificate, and dual protection was not allowed. It was a most extraordinary case.

WAR WORK VOLUNTEER SCHEME.

It has been decided to extend offers of enrolment for the “ Z ” class of work under the above scheme until further notice. instead of until October 1st, 1918, only, as previously announced.

Offers of enrolment from men for the “ Z ” class of work under this scheme will continue to be open under certain conditions to Grade 3 men of any age ; to Grade 2 men of 35 or over on January 1st, 1918 ; and Grade 1 men of 43 or over on January 1st, 1918. Offers of enrolment from men for “ ordinary class ” war work volunteer vacancies are open, under certain conditions, to men of Grade 3 of any age to Grade 2 men of 45 or over on January 1st, 1918.

Men who are enrolled for either class of vacancy under the scheme will, as previously announced, be protected from military service so long as they continue in employment as war work volunteers, provided that they prove to be within the grades and ages named above and satisfy the other necessary conditions.

Opportunities for enrolment under this scheme are available at every Employment Exchange, where full particulars of the scheme can be obtained. There are at present many thousands of vacancies under the scheme.

DEATHS.

LESTER.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. ARTHUR (DICK), dearly beloved husband of Mrs. Lester, 92 South Street, killed in France on August 17, 1918.
“ God takes our loved ones from our home,
But never from our heart.”
— From his sorrowing Wife and little daughter.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. EDWARD, killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 20 years.
“ God knows how much we miss him,
More than loving words can tell ;
Not a day have we forgotten him
Since he bade us his farewell.
Daily in our minds we see him,
As we did in days of yore ;
But some day we hope to meet him
On that bright and golden shore.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Father in France, Brothers and Sisters.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear grandson and nephew, Pte. EDWARD, Killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 30 years.
“ We think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall ;
There is nothing left to answer but his photo on the wall.”
—Not forgotten by his loving Grandmothers and Grandfather, aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

HOUGHTON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action on October 4, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Wife and Child.

HOUGHTON.— In loving memory of our dear one, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on Oct. 4, 1917.
“ We pictured your sale returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LINDLEY.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. J. LINDLEY, who was killed in action on October 5, 1917.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
And heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For those he loved so well.
I think of him in silence.
And make no outward show ;
The heart that mourns most truly
Mourns silently and low.”
—From his loving Wife, Son and Daughter.

LUDFORD.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. C. H. LUDFORD (HARRY), who died of wounds in France on October 6, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love, honour, and remembrance live for ever.”
— Ever in the thoughts of Monica.

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Cockerill, William Thomas. Died 25th Aug 1915

William Thomas COCKERILL (1879-1915)

William Thomas Cockerill was born in 1879 in Hanley Staffordshire. It is not known what the family were doing in Staffordshire as the rest of the children were born in Hillmorton. Thomas’s father Walter, a plasterer, married Martha Brown at Hillmorton Parish Church on 28th June 1875. Martha died the following year and Walter married Elizabeth Goode in 1877. By 1881 the family lived in Upper Street, Hillmorton. Walter died in 1884 at the age of 35 and in 1890 Elizabeth had married Edward King. By 1891 the family were living at 19 Plowman Street, Rugby and by 1901 they had moved to Gas Street, Rugby.

Cockerill

Thomas was educated at St Matthews School and worked as a bricklayer’s labourer in Rugby. By 1901 he had left home and joined the 1st Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry. He served in the Boer War, receiving two medals. After leaving the army, he remained in the reserves. He settled in Sheffield, where he married Nellie Pearson in 1906 and by 1911 was working as a labourer for an armour plate manufacturer (Vickers Ltd). He and Nellie had two children, Walter and Lewis. A third child was born later.

When WW1 started Thomas was called up (private, no. 6039, 1st Bn, KOYNI) and in November 1914 he was wounded. He came home, but on recovery returned to the front. On 25th August 1915 he died from wounds caused by the bursting of a shell.

He was buried at Etaples Military Cemetery.

An inscription on his gravestone reads: “He died that we might live, From Wife and Children”

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

17th Oct 1914, Local War Notes

Among recent casualties is the name of 2nd Lieut F A Sampson (R. Fus), wounded and missing. Sampson represented both Rugby and Cambridge at racquets.

The King motored from Buckingham Palace on Tuesday to Epsom Downs, and there inspected the Public Schools Brigade, which several Rugbeians have joined.

Fireman Fred Wood, of the Rugby Fire Brigade, son of Mr W F Wood, Market Place, left Coventry on Tuesday morning last, where he has been training, to join his unit, the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, at Chelmsford ; also Mr Tom Lane, son of Mr J H Lane, the Windmill Hotel.

According to statistics gathered by the “ Railway News,” it would appear that 11 of our railway systems have contributed over 35,000 men to the colours. The L & N-W Company has supplied 9,400, and the Great Central 1,300.

On Wednesday the King reviewed 20,000 Territorials of the South Midland Division in Hylands Park, Chelmsford. His Majesty was accompanied by General Sir Ian Hamilton and General Heath, commanding the division, to whom he expressed his pleasure at the physique and bearing of the troops.

The number of employees of the B.T.H Company now serving with the Colours is upwards of 1,000, and a complete list of these, with rank, regiment, number, and other particulars, will appear, in a special enlarged war issue of the “ Asteroid”—the organ of the B.T.H Social Club—which will be published this month.

LOCAL NAMES IN THE CASUALTY LIST.

Mrs F Bennett, of 8 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, has received news from her son, Driver Charles Bennett, Army Service Corps, that he is at present in Netley Hospital suffering from a bullet wound in the foot, received in France. He states that “ it is terrible at the front ” ; and adds : “ The French people are very good to us all.” Driver Bennett’s parents visited him on Tuesday, and he is progressing satisfactorily.

Pte A Phelps, Rifle Brigade, 11 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, is a prisoner in the hands of the Germans.

No further news has as yet been received of the three Rugby men, all members of the Royal Warwicks—Pte Walter Geo Goodman, Pte W Busson, and Lance-Corpl Hancox, who were reported as missing after the fighting round Ligny on August 26th.

The 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment (including the Rugby Company) were under orders to move to Coggerstell yesterday (Friday) morning, and in doing so would have to march about 14 miles.

THE NEW WARWICKSHIRE BATTALION.

Steps are being taken to secure 600 recruits from Coventry and district for the 7th Home Service Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which Colonel H J Nutt is raising. Recruiting for this commenced at 10 a.m on Monday at the following stations :—The Barracks, Coventry ; the Labour Exchange, Leamington ; the Law Courts, Nuneaton ; the Drill Hall, Rugby; the Town Hall, Stratford-on-Avon; and the men will be billetted at the Old Artillery Barracks, Coventry.

At Rugby, where Major A Welch has been in charge recruiting has been rather slow, only about a dozen having been accepted. We are asked to point out that all Rugby men joining will be placed in the same company, and at least 62 are required to complete the company now training at Chelmsford, but more than this number will be welcomed.

NECESSARIES FOR THE 9th ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT.

To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—I have been asked by Lieut Coates to make an appeal to provide for the Commanding Officer of the 9th Service Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment a fund for the supply of the many extras that the Government grants do not cover, such as the purchase of extra range finders, field glasses for picked men, and many other necessaries. A sum of £200 is required, and to meet this any donation sent to me shall be forwarded to the proper quarter.—Yours faithfully,

J J McKINNELL,

Chairman, Urban District Council,

Benn Buildings, Rugby, October 15th.

 

Messrs Sam Robbins, Ltd, have supplied the Northamptonshire Yeomanry (now stationed at Hurst Park, Winchester) with five “ Triumph ” 3-speed motor cycles, and also with 15 “ B.S.A.” bicycles. It is understood the motor cycles are for despatch work.

 

MAINTAINING BRITISH TRADITIONS.

Private J T Meadows, of the 1st Northampton Regiment , now serving in France (whose home is at Inwood’s Cottages, near Bilton Grange), has written stating that he is in the pink of condition. He adds : “ Times are getting better now, as you know that we are progressing favourably. The travels of the troops have been great, but the duty has been well done. The high traditions of the British Army are still maintained by the sons of many an anxious mother. Time will prove this. I suppose George and Herbert are still hard at work. Never mind ; one wing of the family is flying along. The weather is terribly hot in the day-time, but at night it is the extreme reverse ; but all these little hardships we look upon as nothing when such a prize is at stake. Four of us from Rugby are still all together.”

RUGBY YEOMANRY TROOP GETTING READY.

For some weeks past “ C ” Squadron (which includes the Rugby Troop) of the Warwickshire Yeomanry has been in training with the 1st South Midland Mounted Brigade at Newbury. It was understood that this week the Squadron would move out to Donnington Mill, about a mile from the Racecourse, All the local men are reported to be fit and well ; and having volunteered for active service, they expect in due time to embark for France, where it is presumed they will be required to assist in guarding communications.

RUGBY PRINTERS IN LORD KITCHENER’S ARMY.

Fredk Favell, a member of the Rugby Typographical Association, and formerly an employee of G Over, and who has joined the Royal Garrison Artillery, has written from Woolwich Common to the local Secretary, and says : “ It is a bit of a drop from Rugby rate to 7s a week, but I should not like to be walking about where the girls are six to one.” After stating that the food is rough, but plentiful, he goes on to say: “ We shave every morning now in cold water, and as there is only one small mirror for ten men in our tent, you can believe me when I say that one does not know whether he is shaving his own face or somebody else’s there are so many round the glass.” From a letter Mr Favell has Written to his fellow-workmen it would appear that he and his friend, Mr D Kennard, from the same office, are having a good time and are keeping in good health.

“ GIVING THE GERMANS ALL THEY WANT.”

Pte T Cockerill, of the Yorkshire Light Infantry, now serving with the Expeditionary Force, has written a card to his mother (Mrs Grumble, of 33 Gas Street), in which he says : “ I think things are going on the right road. It is so with our Brigade. We seem to be giving the Germans all they want, for every day we keep advancing, and that means a lot. We are getting plenty of good, food, and that is a lot more than the enemy can say. . . . Tell Harry I shall have a lot of pints to sup before I am straight up, as there is no such thing as beer here ; but if I do get down for Christmas we will make up for lost time.”