22nd Jun 1918. Memorial Tablets in Churches.

MEMORIAL TABLETS IN CHURCHES.—The Bishop of Worcester, in this month’s Worcester Diocesan Magazine, writes :—“ I wish again to call the clergy’s attention to the growing number of large tablets which are being proposed in our churches. We have really no right to occupy the church wall space in this way. The best way to commemorate those who have died in the War is the brotherly way of one memorial for the whole parish, on which the name of comrades can be inserted. For rich persons to occupy the wall space with memorials which cannot be afforded by poorer parishioners is as objectionable as occupying the floor space by large private pews. I appeal to the church feeling of my diocese to consider this.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

CORRECTION.—In our last issue it was inadvertently stated that Lieut H N Salter, who had been awarded the Military Cross, was the son of Mr A G Salter. It should have been Mr H S Salter, of 3 Elborow Street, Rugby.

Mrs. F. Kirby, 15 Sun Street, Rugby, has been informed that her son, Pte A Kirby, R.W.F, had been wounded for the third time and brought to Southampton War Hospital. She has another son in France, and her husband is also serving in Palestine.

The following Rugby men have appeared in the casualty lists issued this week :—Killed, Rfn W Griffin, Rifle Brigade ; missing, Pte G W Wale, Border Regt, Pte J Harris (Royal Scots), and Pte B Lawley (R.W.R).

Mr and Mrs Bland have received news from the War Office that their son, Pte R G Bland, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action on June 4th. Also a letter from the Chaplain to say he had buried him in one of the Military Cemeteries, and the Battalion had erected a cross to his memory. He was 18 years of age, and was an Elborow old boy.

Mr and Mrs Pulham, of Barby, have received a letter from their son, Rfn H W Pulham, who has been missing since April 15th, 1918, saying he is a prisoner in Philippapalis, Bulgaria. He joined the colours at the outbreak of the war, and served 12 months in France, where he was wounded on July 1st, 1916. He was transferred to Salonica in November, 1916, where he served till reported missing. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. Machine Assembly Department.

Mr Doyle, of 71 Victoria Street, New Bilton, received news this week that his brother, Pte Thomas Doyle, had been killed in action in Palestine. This makes the third brother he has lost, Frank and Joseph Wilfred Doyle having been killed in France. They were the sons of the late Mr Joseph Doyle, and of Mrs Doyle, of Frankton.

Pte W H Fallon, Wiltshire Regt, son of Mr and Mrs Fallon, 7 Adam Street, New Bilton, who was previously reported missing, is a prisoner of war at Munster, and Pte A Backle, R.W.R., whose wife lives at 27 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, is a prisoner at Hamburg.

AWARDS FOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE.

The meritorious Service Medal in recognition of valuable service rendered in France has been awarded to :—
Sergt H E Gregory. A.S.C., Rugby.
L-Corpl S G Hall. R.W.R., Rugby.
Reg.Q.M.S. E L Hewitt, R.W.R., Rugby.
L-CorpI J W Hooper, R.W.R., Newbold-on-Avon.
Sapper A W Rathbone, R.E., Rugby.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.
ALL SOLDIERS TO BE BURIED FREE.

The Cemetery Committee reported that they had considered the question of the free interment of members of His Majesty’s Forces dying in Rugby and the neighbourhood, and recommended that in future the same facilities be granted as to Rugby men, and in case of any difficulty arising the matter should be referred to the discretion of the Chairman of the Council, Mr Stevenson, and the Clerk.—They had instructed the Clerk to allow the erection of a headstone or curbing over graves of men dying in His Majesty’s Forces and interred in the Cemetery, free of charge, where necessary.

The Public Health Committee reported that four cases of infectious disease had been noticed, of which two had been removed to the Hospital at Harborough Magna.

BRANDON.
HUNS BEHAVE DECENTLY TO SOME PRISONERS.—Mr and Mm L Ward have received a card from their son, Lance-Corpl J Ward, who is now a prisoner at Langensalza, in Germany. He informs them that his right arm was fractured just below the right shoulder. The wound is healing up finely and he can to use his fingers a little. He further states : “ We are being treated well, under the circumstances, and we have nothing to grumble about, so cheer up and do not worry.”

BRETFORD.
PTE JAMES CASTLE.—Pte James Castle, who was an Army Reserve man when the war commenced, has just received his discharge certificate. He joined the Leicester Regt in 1903, and was mobilised when war started. He went to France on the 20th of September, 1914, and was in the thick of the fighting until the 20th of January, 1915, when he was badly injured in the knee through a trench being blown in upon him. He was then sent to an English hospital. Although his knee never got thoroughly well he did a lot of useful work in assisting in the drilling of recruits and afterwards as a Military Policeman. The certificate, which speaks highly of him, says he was honourably discharged. Being the first received at Bretford during the war it is an object of interest to the inhabitants.

NAPTON.
P.C and Mrs Bradbury, of Napton, have recently received the news from their third son in France, Regt-Sergt-Major A H Bradbury, 2/6 R.W.R, that he has won the Military Cross. His Colonel, when wounded, handed over the command of the Regiment to him, although Bradbury himself was slightly wounded. Before joining the army Sergt-Major Bradbury was a member of the Warwickshire Constabulary, stationed at Warwick. Mr and Mrs Bradbury have three other sons in France—Corpl H Bradbury, of the Royal Engineers ; Corpl L Bradbury, of the: Army Service Corps ; and Pte M Bradbury, of the Suffolk Regiment. Mr Bradbury has served eight years in the Royal Rifle Corps, seven of which he was serving in India. He has been in the Police Force over 27 years.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

SIDNEY LANE HOME.—L-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), second son of Sergt and Mrs Frank Lane, has now been invalided home. He was severely wounded in France last November, and his left leg has been amputated above the knee.

WOUNDED.—Miss Ada Allen has received a notification that her brother, Pte Walter Allen (Cheshire Regt), was wounded by a bullet through his right arm during the advance on the 30th ult He joined up in September, 1914, and though he has been through some trying experiences since then, this is the first time he has been wounded.

DILUTION OF BREAD AND HEALTH.

We are asked to remind the public that bread should be kept in a cool place during warm weather. At temperatures above 60 degrees Fahrenheit bread made from the flour at present in use is apt to become “ ropey ”, and unsuitable for food, but at lower temperatures its keeping qualities are good. Complaints continue to be heard from time to time against the so-called war bread made from standard wheaten floor, with an admixture of flour obtained from other cereals. We are informed that the policy of raising the percentage of flour extracted from wheat and adding flour from other cereals was only adopted after the fullest scientific investigation both as to the digestibility and the nourishing qualities of the resulting product.

The present position of the cereal supplies completely vindicates the policy of dilution as applied to bread. It is authoritatively stated that no evidence whatever has been adduced that the health of the nation has generally suffered from the lowering of the quality of bread, and at the present time the stocks in the country are enough to enable the Royal Commission on Wheat Supplies to make the definite statement that the bread supply of the country is assured until the next harvest is gathered. The total saving effected up to the present is estimated as the equivalent of the cargoes of more than 400 steamers of average size, or nearly one-third of an average annual importation. It is held that such a saving could not have been effected by rationing without disastrous effects on the general national health. The outlook at the moment is distinctly promising.

SUGAR FOR JAM.

UNFAIR CRITICISM RESENTED BY RUGBY COMMITTEE.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week the Chairman (Mr T A Wise) referred to the dissatisfaction which has been caused by the refusal of permits to purchase sugar to people who had neglected to enclose a stamped addressed envelope with their application forma. Many people he said, thought that the committee of their own malicious stupidity made this regulation, but it was not so; it was a Government instruction, and the local officials did all they could by drawing the attention of the applicants to the regulation by placing a mark at each side of the paragraph relating to it. Any remarks about red tape had nothing to do with the Committee ; they should be addressed to the Government. Before any agitation arose over the matter he discussed the question with the Executive Officer, and they wrote to London to see if they could get some redress. They had no desire to be harsh or unfair, but when a regulation was printed on a form it saw not too much to expect that the people concerned would read it, particularly when their attention was especially attracted to it ; and the remarks which had been made concerning the committee and the officials were grossly unfair. He thought people should appreciate the difficulties under which the staff had worked.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) said with regard to the suggestion that letters should be sent to all persons who had received permits, asking them to return them for re-consideration if their fruit crop had not come up to expectation, this would have required 5,000 envelopes ; and, after consulting the Chairman and Vice-Chairman, he had placed an advertisement in the local Press, and had had some window bills printed to this effect.—This action was endorsed.

The Executive Officer read a letter from the Ministry on the subject, asking for particulars as to the number of late applications, and stating that if the number was not a large one permits could be issued. If this involved a large indent of sugar details should be sent to the Ministry before issuing the permits. As there were 685 applicants affected he had sent the details.—The Chairman said he hoped they would now get something from the London authorities.

Mr Griffin mentioned the case of a man who could not get his form when he applied for it, but left a penny for the stamp.—The Chairman : That was risky (laughter). I do not mean that as a reflection on the staff ; but if there were a number like that they could not possibly recollect all who left money.—The Executive Officer said they had quite a pile of money handed in, and every penny was used in stamps.

At a later stage of the meeting the Executive Officer stated that if people retained sugar, and had not sufficient fruit to utilise it, they would be liable to be prosecuted.—Mr Humphrey pointed out, however, that many people whose ordinary fruit crop had failed would grow marrows, and it would be impossible for them to say how many of these would be available for jam.—Mr Mellor enquired the position of a man who applied for 20lbs of sugar, and was allowed 10lbs if he had only sufficient fruit to use the 10lbs.—The Chairman : He would be perfectly right in keeping it.—Mr Appleby enquired whether the members of the committee who signed application forms as references were satisfied that the applicants had the fruit trees they claimed to have.—Mr Tarbox said he was satisfied that all those which he signed were in order ; and although many people had not got stone fruit, the vital point was to see that the sugar released was used for jam making.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
ALIEN’S MISUNDERSTANDING.— Ingrid S Andersson, tailoress, 18 Bath Street, Rugby, an alien, was summoned for failing to furnish the Registration Officer with the particulars required under the Aliens’ Restriction Order.—Charles G Youngmark, tailor, 18 Bath Street, was summoned for having an alien living as a member of his household and failing to furnish the Registration Officer with the particulars required under the Order, or to give notice to the Registration Officer of the presence of an alien.—Mr H W Worthington defended both, and pleaded guilty.—Detective Mighall deposed that on June 7th Miss Andersson visited the Police Station, and said she had read in the papers that all aliens over 18 years of age had to register. She added that she had been in England since 1903. Witness asked if she was aware that she should have registered two years ago and she replied in the negative. He registered her, and on the following day he interviewed Mr Youngmark, who said Miss Andersson was his niece, and had lived with him since 1903 as an adopted daughter. He was not aware that he ought to have notified the police that she was staying with him.—Supt Clarke said after such a registration a copy had to be sent to the Chief Registration Officer at Warwick, who had ordered the proceedings.—Mr Worthington said Mr Youngmark was a Swede, who came to England 41 years ago, and had been naturalised. Miss Andersson, his wife’s niece, was also born in Sweden, and on her mother’s death Mr & Mrs Youngmark brought her to England, where she had lived continuously. Miss Andersson was not aware that friendly aliens had to be registered until she read a paragraph in the newspapers.—Both cases were dismissed without conviction under the Probation of Offenders’ Act.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory of my dearest husband, Pte TOM DOYLE, of Borton, killed in action June 6th, 1916, with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call.
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his sorrowing wife and children, mother, sister, and brothers.

HICKINGBOTHAM.—On the 10th inst., WILLIAM (late Pioneer R.E.), eldest son of Mr. & Mrs Hickingbotham, 33 Cambridge Street, Rugby..—“ Thy will be done.”

LEVETT.—Killed in action, in Palestine, March 30th, 1918, Sergeant C. E. LEVETT, 16th N.Z.Coy., I.C.C., only son of Mr. C. A. J. and the late Mrs. Levett (nee Buchanan), Ratanui, Kiwitea, New Zealand ; and grandson of the late Captain C. R. Levett, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

HUGHES.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl (JACK) HUGHES, who was killed in action in France on June 18th, 1915.
“ A loved one gone, but not forgotten,
And as dawns another year,
In our lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of him are always dear.”
—Never forgotten by his father, mother, brothers, sister Edie, Kitty and Dick.

MULCASTER.—In proud and loving memory of Coy.-Sergt.-Major J. MULCASTER, who died from disease contracted while serving with his Majesty’s Forces on June 13, 1917.—Fondly remembered by his Wife and Children.

SANDS.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte H. SANDS (HARRY), who died on June 17th, 1917, at El-Arish, Egypt.
“ One year has passed since that sad day,
When our dear one was called away ;
Bravely he went to duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.”
—From his loving wife and children.

8th Dec 1917. Using Potatoes to Save Bread

USING POTATOES TO SAVE BREAD.

Sir Arthur Yapp, the Director of Food Economy, is anxious that the present very large surplus stock of potatoes and vegetables should be utilised in all private houses, and also in hotels, restaurants, and other public eating places, in such a way as to save bread.

It has been brought to his notice that in many public eating places the charge for a portion of potatoes and other vegetables is so relatively high as to encourage people to order bread instead. This is very much against the national interest at present, and Sir Arthur Yapp desires it to be clearly understood that he expects the management of all public eating places to alter their arrangements accordingly.

It is stated that it is still quite common for meat, eggs, etc, to be served on toast or bread. This practice should be immediately discontinued, and the use of bread should be discouraged in every way possible, so long as potatoes and other vegetables are abundant.

In particular, it is most if desirable that in all public eating places as little bread as possible should be served at lunch and dinner when potatoes and other vegetables are available in abundance, as at present.

Sir Arthur Yapp urges the public to give their full support to these recommendations, as this is of great importance in utilising the national food supply to the utmost advantage.

NOW TO OBTAIN SUGAR.
A NEW PROCEDURE.

It is important to remember that after December 31st you can only obtain sugar by one of the following systems ; that you can only use the system which applies to your particular case :—

A.—THE HOUSEHOLD SYSTEM.—If you have already deposited with your grocer a household sugar card, and if you are still a member of the same household, you must go to your grocer after December 8th and ask for Declaration Forms. When you have filled these up your grocer will give you a Retailers Sugar Ticket for each member of the household, which must be shown when buying sugar after December 31st.

B.—THE COUPON SYSTEM.—If you have not registered with your grocer on a Household Sugar Card, or if you have left the household from which you were registered, you must go to a Post Office before December 15th, ask for an application form, fill it up, and post it as directed. You will later receive a Ration Paper, which will entitle you to get Sugar Coupons from a Post Office.

AN ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Monday —before Mr J E Cox—Corporal Charles Hammett, of Long Lawford, was charged with being an absentee from the Agricultural Company.—P.C Hunt gave evidence of arrest and defendant was remanded to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr A Marsh, 15 Little Elborow Street, Rugby, has received intimation that his son, Pte A Marsh (24) of Leicesters, was killed in action on November 2nd ; and that another son, Pte G W Marsh, of the Warwicks, was posted as missing on October 26th. The former was, before joining up, employed as a labourer by the late Mr W C Musgrave, and the latter worked for J Young, builder. Both were Murray school boy.

Mrs Bennett, 1 Hillmorton Road, has kindly forwarded to the funds of the Rugby War Hospital Supply Depot the sum of £3, the proceeds of her chrysanthemum show on November 21-24.

A SON OF THE VICAR OF GRANDBOROUGH KILLED.

The Rev John Martin, vicar of Grandborough, has just received the sad news of the death in France of his second son, Second-Lieut F H Martin, R.E, 84th Field Company. The Commanding Officer writes : “ He was shot by a German sniper whilst setting out a new piece of engineering work behind our front line. It is a consolation that he did not suffer, as he was killed instantly. He was interred by the Rev P H Hargreaves, C.F, in a military cemetery near Gonzeancourt. He had only been a very short time with the 84th Field Company. I can assure you that all the officers and men realise what a really excellent fellow he was, and we all feel we have lost a good comrade and an extremely valuable officer.” Second-Lieut F H Martin is brother of Capt C G Martin, V.C, D.S.O, R.E, and had only a few months since come home from Egypt, where he was engaged in engineering work for the Egyptian Government, to offer himself to the War Office for military service. After a few months at Newark, he left for the front in September last. He had given a few months to military work near the Suez Canal, where he was employed in laying down pipes to carry fresh water from the Canal into the desert for 21 miles. He has another brother in the R.A.M.C, who is now in India. Second-Lieut F H Martin was born in China in 1888. He was educated in Bath and Clifton College (while at Clifton he was captain of the Cricket XI). and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He had passed the examination for the I.C.E.

THE LATE CAPT FRANK NEVILLE.

Mrs T Neville of Rugby, whose son, Capt Frank Neville, was killed in action, as recorded in our last issue, has received a sympathetic letter from the Colonel commanding the battalion. He writes : “ I much regret that I should have been home on leave when this great loss happened to my battalion. It is difficult for me to express what your son was to the battalion ; he was a very exceptional soldier—in fact, during over two years of service in France I have not met his equal as a company commander ; and had he lived I should certainly have recommended him for rapid advancement. As a man he was loved by every man in the regiment. I, as battalion commander, was immensely proud of him, for he was a grand figure of a man and the most cheery of comrades. He overcame all difficulties with a laugh. You may be a proud mother to have had such a son. May you do as he would have wished, and bear bravely your great loss.”

DUNCHURCH.

NEWS was received on Tuesday that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of this village.

MR & MRS GAMBLE DAVIS, Mill Street, have received news that their son, Percy, has gone through a second operation, and is getting on well. He is a prisoner in Germany.

MR & MRS J BULL, Mill Street, have received news that their son has been wound in Palestine. This is the second time.

BRANDON.

PTE G BOSTOCK MISSING.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock, of Brandon, have been notified that their eldest son, Pte G Bostock, is missing. He had been in France for a long time. His parents have resided in the district all their lives.

FRANKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mrs Doyle has received the sad news that her youngest son, Pte W Doyle, Q.O.O.H, was killed in France. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved mother, this being the second son she has lost in the War. One brother is now at home wounded, and the fourth son is in Egypt. A memorial service was held on Sunday afternoon, when the Rector (Rev C Lunn) gave a sympathetic address. The Rev H F B Shuckburgh read the lessons. There was a large congregation.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT OWEN W W W MEREDITH MISSING.—Mrs Meredith, late of Wolston Vicarage, has received news that her son is missing. He had been in France for some short time, and was attached to the Royal Flying Corps. While residing in Wolston his cheerful disposition and amiable manner made him very popular. He is the only son of Mrs Meredith, who now resides at Leamington and the late Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, for upwards of seven years Vicar of Wolston.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory WILFRED JOSEPH (BILL), who was killed in France, November 11th, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave,
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MAYES.—In fond and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, who died of wounds received in action in France at the General Hospital, Bristol, December 6th, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ A devoted son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered Duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
“ Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which that smile hides all the while.
“ Gone but not forgotten—
Oh no ! not one so dear.
He is gone to his home in heaven,
And with a smile we will meet him there.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

 

22nd Jul 1916. Helping the Prisoners of War

HELPING THE PRISONERS OF WAR.

A meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held on Wednesday evening. Mr Wm Flint, C.C, Chairman of the Committee, presiding. Also present : Mrs Lees, Rev Father Jarvis, and Messrs A E Donkin, W H Clay, C J Newman, G W Walton, J Mellor, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J R Barker. Apologies for absence were received from Mrs Blagden, Mr F R Davenport, and Mr S H Weobley.

The Chairman, in reviewing the past work of the Committee, said that, starting with a list of 13 prisoners of war, the work had grown to such an extent that the Committee were now looking after the welfare of 55 men from Rugby and the villages. The expenditure had increased so very considerably that the Executive thought the Committee should meet to consider what steps should be taken to maintain the weekly parcels to the prisoners of war.

The Hon Secretary presented a statement of accounts to date. Subscriptions and donations amounted to £526 16s 6d, and the cost of food parcels and other expenditure was £417 8s 2d, which left a balance in hand of £109 8s 4d. He was glad to be able to report that during the past week there had been a slight improvement in the subscriptions, and although the money in hand would only provide for a few weeks parcels, he was glad to be able to report that several local efforts were being made to raise funds. It was, however, very necessary that, without delay, the Committee made arrangements to secure sufficient money to carry on the work for several months ahead, especially in view of the possibilities of further names being added to the list.

Various schemes were suggested and agreed upon, the first effort to be a Flag Day, Mr Newman and Mr Barker agreeing to carry out the arrangements as early as possible.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

The following local cases were heard before Mr Carmichael at the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Friday in last week.

Alick J Tabor, Woolscott, near Rugby, applied for a leaving certificate from the B.T.H.—The case was adjourned from a previous Court. Another adjournment for four weeks was granted ; and the Court instructed the lad to return to work.

G North, 113 Railway Terrace, Rugby, was fined 10s for absenting himself from work at the B.T.H without leave for the whole of the week ending July 8th, the fine to be paid in four weekly instalments.

A King, 385 Clifton Road, Rugby, was charged by the B.T.H Company with being absent from work without leave on Saturday, July 8th, for 8¾ hours on Monday, and the whole of Tuesday, July 11th. The man’s previous time-keeping had been bad, and he was fined 15s and ordered to pay in weekly instalments of 2s 6d.

F H Shorthose, 19 Market Street, Rugby, was summoned for refusing to work overtime at the B.T.H on Saturday afternoon, July 8th, thereby delaying skilled men.—He was fined 10s (2s 6d per week), and was warned by the Chairman regarding his defiant attitude before the Court.

J Asquith, Shawell, Rugby, employed at the B.T.H, was charged with failing to work diligently on the morning of July 8th, and the case was dismissed owing to the conflicting evidence. Asquith asked for expenses ; but, in reply, the Chairman informed him that he was lucky to get off.

POST LETTERS EARLY.—The Postmaster-General calls attention to the fact that in view of the restricted number of postal collections and deliveries now afforded throughout the kingdom, it is particularly desirable that letters should be posted as early in the day as possible. In many rural districts there is only one delivery, and letters for such districts, unless posted in time for early evening mails, will not be delivered until the second day after posting. Early posting also facilitates the work of the Post Office sorters, and on account of the great depletion of staff for military purposes this assistance will be much appreciated.

PUBLIC BATHS.

The Baths Committee reported the receipt of an application from the Officer Commanding a Squadron, Royal Flying Corps for facilities for his men to attend the Baths at a reduced rate. They had informed him that free use of the swimming bath was granted to all soldiers or sailors in uniform on condition that they provided their own towels and drawers, or paid the regulation price for same. The numbers attending the baths and the amounts received for the month of June as compared with the same month in 1915, were as follows :—Baths, &c : Swimming bath, 1916, 5,511 ; 1915, 6,008. Slipper baths, 1916, 1,455; l915, 1,074[?]. Receipts, 1916, £54 10s 2d ; 1915, £56 10s 7d.-Approved on the motion of Mr Walker.

RESERVOIR GROUNDS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

The Water Committee had decided that the grounds at Brownsover Mill be opened during the summer from noon to 8.30 p.m (Sundays included) so long as no damage was done.—Adopted.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt the Earl of Clonmell, of the Warwickshire R.H.A, is transferred to the Territorial Force Reserve.

The Rev C T Bernard McNulty, M.A, vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, has recently been promoted from 4th to 3rd Class Chaplain, with the rank of Major, and has been appointed Senior Chaplain of his Division.

We are pleased to note that Capt G T Hilton, of North Street and Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has been mentioned in despatches for distinguished conduct in the field.

George E Middleditch, 1st Lieutenant, Oxon and Bucks L.I, was wounded at Ypres, France, some four weeks ago. Before the War Lieut Middleditch was an apprentice (premium) in the L & N-W Rly Erecting Shop. At the outbreak of the War he joined up at once as a private. He soon got promotion—first a lance-corporal, then a corporal, next a sergeant, then a commission as 2nd lieutenant, now 1st lieutenant ; and, we understand, has been recommended for a captaincy. He was wounded in the leg and back at Ypres, and is now well again. He visited the shop on Tuesday, and received a splendid ovation from his fellow-workmen and a very hearty send-off.

CASUALTIES TO RUGBY MEN IN THE GREAT ADVANCE.

Pte J F Holmes, East Surrey Regiment, son of Mr J Holmes, of Union Street, has been seriously wounded during the recent fighting.

Capt S Morris Bickersteth (O.R), a brother of the Rev Julyan K F Bickersteth, formerly of Rugby, was killed during the attack on Serre on July 1st. He was 23 years of age.

Mrs Greenwood, Kirstall, Lower Hillmorton Road, has received news that her son, Lieut J Greenwood, Northants Regiment, the well-known Rugby and Newbold footballer, has been wounded.

Other Rugby casualties reported recently are : Diver W Elkington (11137) killed ; and F H Warden (2168), F Burberry (275), and Sapper H Barrows, R.E. ; Ptes J Varney (Rugby), A Welsby (New Bilton), and T Lee (Swinford), wounded.

LANCE-CORPL W J COOPER OF HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

Lance-Corpl W J Cooper, R.W.R, son of Mr Jack Cooper, of Harborough Magna, was killed in action on June 26th. Lance-Corpl Cooper was a native of Newbold, but had spent most of his life at Harborough Magna. He was 30 years of age, and was called up as a reservist in August, 1914, and had been in France from the beginning of the war. Prior to the outbreak of hostilities, he was employed in the Cement Works at Newbold.

NEWBOLD SOLDIER REPORTED MISSING.

Mr Tom Smith, of Newbold, has received official intimation that his son, Rifleman Tom Smith, of the Rifle Brigade, was wounded on June 1st, and has been missing since that date. Rifleman Smith, who was about 23 years of age, was employed at the Cement Works before he enlisted at the commencement of the War.

Pte Wm Curtis, Leicester Regiment, another employee of the Cement Works, and son of Mr A Curtis, has written informing his parents that he has been wounded, and is now in hospital.

BRAUNSTON.

LOCAL CASUALTY.—Mrs J Manning received news last week that her son, Pte Thomas Manning, was wounded and in a base hospital in France ; and on Tuesday notification came that he had died. Mrs Manning has three other sons serving in the Army, two in France, and one at Salonica. Much sympathy is felt with the family in their bereavement.

HILLMORTON.

MRS CASHMORE of Lower Street, has received information that her youngest son, Pte F Cashmore, of the 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, died of wounds received in the great push on the 6th inst. Previous to this Pte Cashmore had taken part in much fighting both at the Dardanelles and Egypt.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

CORPORAL CONSTABLE WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Ernest Constable have received an intimation from Corporal Harry Constable, stating that he is lying wounded in Firdale Hospital, Sheffield. The wounds are in both legs, right arm, and head, but he writes cheerfully, and it is hoped that he may effect a good recovery. It is barely six weeks since he was sent to the front.

DEATH OF PRIVATE SUTTON RUSSELL.-The sad news was received on Tuesday of the death of Private Joseph Sutton Russell in hospital of malarial fever on the 14th last. Private Russell enlisted in the Army Ordnance Corps in December, 1914, and was with the contingent in Mesopotamia. It was known that he had been in hospital, and only on Tuesday morning a post card was received from him, dated 6th June, on which he stated that he was out of hospital, and that his health was improving. So the shook caused by the news of his death was very great to all his relatives and friends, and, indeed, to the whole village. Before he joined the army, Private Russell had been for some years a clerk in the office at Messrs Kaye & Co’s Cement Works. He was also the Clerk to the Parish Council, assistant overseer, tax and rate collector, and Secretary to the Co-operative Society. He was of a genial temperament, and always ready to make himself useful. As a member of the Parish Church choir, and in many other capacities, he will be greatly missed. Private Russell was the life and soul at the Cricket Club in the pre-war days, and it was always a pleasure to witness his performance either as a bats man or a bowler. The deepest sympathy is felt for his widowed mother, brother and sisters, and for his fiancée, Miss Hilda Jeacock. His brother, Lance-Corpl Arthur Russell, is now in training in the Royal Warwicks.

FRANKTON.

KILLED IN ACTION.-News was received on Tuesday of the death of another of our brave village lads. Corporal Frank Doyle, a bright young fellow, was attached to the Berkshire Regiment. He enlisted early in the war. He was shot down at his post, with three more of his comrades. The sad news was conveyed to his widowed mother by the Rev R S Mitchison, of Barby, who motored to tell her. Much sympathy is felt throughout the village with Mrs Doyle in her sad loss. Mr Mitchison’s son-in-law is an officer in the same soldiers Company, and has been severely wounded.

WOLSTON.

Mr and Mrs John Orton have received news that their son, Pte H Orton, of the 1st Worcesters, has been wounded in the left hand. He is now in hospital in England, and progressing favourably. He has seen many months of fighting in France.

RIFLEMAN R B BUTLIN KILLED.—Mr J Butlin has received news of the death of his son, who was shot through the heart. He was one of Kitchener’s Army, who joined the King’s Royal Rifles. His death occurred on the 10th inst., and he was laid to rest at Potijze Military Cemetery, near Ypres. The inscription on the tomb was : “ He tried to do his duty.” Much sympathy is felt for Mr Butlin, who has lost his wife, a grandchild, and son in the space of a few months, and is himself an invalid. He has also received a sympathetic and comforting letter from the chaplain.

 

BISHOPS ITCHINGTON.

FROM THE FRONT.—Pte Thomas Thacker, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was slightly wounded in the latest attack on the West. Pte Thacker, who had previously been wounded, received some shrapnel in the ankle. He has been at his home since July 13th, and has made such good progress that he will return to his depot in the course of a few days.

DUNCHURCH.

SERGT W E CONSTABLE, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable (formerly of Dunchurch), who joined the Royal Engineers early last year, has been mentioned in despatches by General Sir Douglas Haig, dated April 30th. He is to be warmly congratulated upon his distinction.

DEATHS.

CASHMORE.—Died of wounds in France,. Private F. Cashmore, 1st R.I.F., aged 24 years.

CHATER.—In loving Memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. Chater, Machine. Gun Section, 12th R.B. Killed in action in France, June 30th, 1916, aged 31 years.
“ Sleep on, beloved, and take thy rest,
We loved you well, but God loved you best.”

COOK.—Died of wounds on July 8th, Cyril Edward, Second-Lieutenant, Royal Sussex Regiment, elder son of Sam Cook, Wargrave, Berks, and grandson of the late Mrs. Cook, of Hillmorton House, aged 23.

DOYLE.—In ever-loving memory of Corporal Frank Doyle, the dearly loved son of Betsy and the late Joseph Doyle, of Frankton. Killed in action at No Man’s Land, July 13, 1916.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving MOTHER, BROTHERS, and only SISTER (LIZ).