21st Oct 1916. Conscientious Objectors in Warwick Prison

WARWICKSHIRE STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE.
CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS IN WARWICK PRISON.

The conditions under which conscientious objectors are accommodated at Warwick Prison were described in a report presented to the Warwickshire Standing Joint Committee at their meeting at Warwick on Monday. The report stated that the men “ will live in the prison, and for the most part work on the premises, though some of them may at a later date be sent to such work as may be arranged outside. They will not be subject in any way to penal discipline ; they will be allowed to leave the prison premises when their work is done, and at other times, with the permission of the agent in charge. If a man absconds, he will not be liable to arrest, but will be reported, with a view to his being recalled to the Army, or, if his prison sentence is unexpired, to be sent back to prison.”

RUGBY BOARD OF GUARDIANS.
MORE ACCOMMODATION NEEDED FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

The Chairman informed the Board that he had that day received a telephone message from Mr Michell, stating that the War Office had applied for further accommodation for wounded soldiers to be made in Rugby ; and Mr Steel, in conjunction with Mr Michell, wondered if provision could be made for any accommodation in the Workhouse Infirmary. A small committee had been appointed, consisting of the Chairman of the Board, the Vice-Chairman, Mrs Dewar, Miss McClure, Messrs Steel, C H Rowbottom, F M Burton, Garratt, and Salter ; and they had decided to get on with the work of the Board as quickly as possible, and meet that afternoon with the Guardians approval. The Local Government Board Inspector (Mr Nesbit) would have to be consulted before any arrangement could be made, and the question was whether the committee should have power to act. Personally, he thought, to the point of self-sacrifice, they ought to do everything they could ; and if it was possible, without undue strain upon the officers, he thought they should place the whole of the infirmary at the disposal of the Military Authorities (hear, hear).

It was decided to adopt the committee’s suggestion, and to give them power to act.

Mr Hicken asked if they had one of the Children’s Homes to spare ?- The Chairman said that was a most important suggestion, and it would be considered by the committee.—Mr T Mitchell mentioned that the Small-pox Hospital at Lawford Heath was vacant ; but the Chairman said that was not under the control of the Guardians.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

DEBADGING OF MARRIED MEN AT THE B.T.H WORKS.

Letters from Mr H N Sporborg, of the B.T.H Co, were read by Mr Wratislaw in answer to the statements made at a previous sitting of the Tribunal that married men were debadged while single employees were retained, and that the debadging was done by the foreman. Mr Sporborg said there was no truth whatever in the statement made by Walter Alderman, a joiner, of 85 Wood Street (whose case had been adjourned), that he was being taken in preference to single men in the building department whose work he could do. In proof of that a list of the single men retained and their occupations was given. That the question of debadging was left to the foreman of the shop was incorrect as regarded Alderman’s case, because he was debadged by the Inspector of the Ministry of Munitions.—Mr Wale : Don’t say any more. The Inspector might have been a tailor.—The Chairman pointed out to Alderman that the letters did not bear out his statement that a lot of single men were kept back. Evidently they were not.—The Military appeal against an exemption was upheld.

WAGES OF CHARGE HAND AT THE REFUSE DESTRUCTOR.

Mr John H Sharp, Surveyor to the Rugby Urban Council, appeared in support of an appeal for a further exemption for Arthur Williams, 15 Bennett Street, in charge at the Refuse Destructor. He said he had advertised, but had not been able to replace the man. Mr Wratislaw’s statement that a substitute sent by the Military was told he would be offered 30s a week was declared by Mr Sharp to be absolutely wrong.—Mr Wratislaw produced a postcard as evidence.—Mr Sharp said he saw the man, and made an appointment to meet him at the Destructor, but the man never went near the place.—The Chairman said if a man was so vital they ought to offer more than 30s.

Mr Wale thought such a man should be worth 9d an hour, which was a lot more than 30s a week. It was not a question of wages, but a question of getting a man.—Mr Wratislaw said if a man could get better wages he was not going to work for 30s.—Mr Sharp replied that if a man was satisfied with his wages, that had nothing to do with the case.—Mr Wale was quite certain there were attested men, unfit for military service, who could do this work, and Mr Wratislaw said the Military could send a suitable man.—The Surveyor : Suited to this work ?—Mr Wale : I have to take what the Military send me. I take the goods the gods provide, and don’t grumble.—Final exemption till November 30th was granted.

WORK OR WAGES ?

John Shanks farmer, Cawston, again appealed for his son George (33, single), who had been exempted till August 31st.-Mr Eaden asked for the case to be adjourned sine die, but the Tribunal refused nor would they grant an exemption till January 1st.-Mr Wratislaw : You should have taken the man we sent last August.-Mr Eadon : You sent two or three, but they didn’t like the work.-Mr Wale : Perhaps they didn’t like the wages.—Mr Eaden : The wages were all right.—Mr Eaden informed appellant that under the new Army Order his son would get till 1st of January.—The Chairman : We don’t make it the 1st of January.

Mr Channing associated himself with the appeal of Mrs Colledge, baker and corn dealer, Brandon, on behalf of her son, Sydney George Colledge, 27, single.—The Chairman : We have put him back once.—Mr Channing : If you do to again, I think that will meet the case.—Appeal dismissed, but allowed 28 days.——Francis Buckingham, carter, Combe Fields, asked for further exemption on domestic grounds, and offered to undertake farm work.—Appeal dismissed, but given 14 days.

MILITARY APPEALS.

The Military appealed against the exemption to January 1st granted to Thos Scrawley, fitter, 15 James Street, Rugby, employed by Messrs Foster & Dicksee, for whom Mr Herbert Watson, secretary to the firm, appeared. It was stated that this was the only fitter left.—Mr Wratislaw said Mr J Darby, sen, did nearly all the repairs to the Rugby Fire Brigade appliances, and a blacksmith was also employed by the firm.-Appellant said he did three parts of the Fire Brigade work, but if the Tribunal would give him the chance he would go into munition works.—The Chairman : You have spoilt your own case ; that settles it.—Final exemption till December 31st.

An appeal by the Military against temporary exemption to December 31st granted to Richard Edward Williams (37, married), proprietor of a laundry business in Stephen Street, was dismissed.-Ernest Manners, general dealer, 4 Windmill Lane, agreed to accept December 31st as final, and an order for this date was made.——Thos Arthur Stephenson (29), woollen and rag merchant, Newbold Road, placed in Class C (3), claimed that his work was of national importance, but the Tribunal considered he should do something different, and adjourned the case for 14 days to see what could be arranged.-Exception was taken by the Military to the temporary exemption till January 1st granted to Thos Hubbard Deacon (18), plumber’s apprentice, Newbold-on-Avon, but the Tribunal dismissed the Military appeal.-The appeal of the Military was upheld in the case of George Mascord White (22, single), shoeing and general smith, Dunchurch, to whom temporary exemption was granted till January 1st.-Walter Wm Heap (37, married), builder, Dunchurch, was also given to January 1st, .whilst Chas Wells, School Street, Wolston, a haulier in the employ of Kirby Bros, was allowed till December 1st, with leave to appeal again.—Alfred Webster, farm labourer, Woolscott, was given till January 1st.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lady members of Albert Street Bible Class and a few friends gave a tea and concert to 44 wounded soldiers at “ Te Hira ” on the 11th inst. It was greatly enjoyed.

Lieut Stanley Hidden, previously of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been gazetted Adjutant of the Army Service Corps of the 1st Mounted Division at the Headquarters of the Division.

As a result of the horticultural exhibition held at the Conservative Club recently, the sum of £30 was raised after paying all expenses, and this was equally divided between the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund and Rugby Soldiers Comforts Fund.

Drummer W Newman, of the Rugby Territorials, younger son of Mr C J Newman, Benn Street, has just been invalided to England from France, suffering from a severe attack of rheumatism. He is now in hospital at University College, London.

The parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men in German prison camps this week contained : ¼-lb tea, 1lb sugar, tin Nestles milk, half-cheese, tin sardines, tin rabbit and onions, a blackberry and apple pudding, and 2lbs biscuits. In addition, a warm woollen undervest and pants have been sent to each man.

ANOTHER MILITARY MEDAL.

The Military Medal has been awarded to Rifleman H E Lister, of the Rifle Brigade. The Major-General commanding the Division notifies that he has received a report of the gallant conduct of Rifleman H E Lister on September 4 and 5, 1916, for continuously carrying messages under heavy rifle and shell fire near Guillemont, and he wishes to congratulate him on his fine behaviour. Rifleman Lister is a grandson of Mr H Lister, 105 Clifton Road, Rugby. He was formerly an apprentice in the pattern shop at the B.T.H. He joined up in September, 1914, and was wounded once in the following year.

CAWSTON HOUSE HOSPITAL RE-OPENED.

After being closed for about eight months, Cawston House has been re-opened by Mr C E and Mrs Blyth for the reception of wounded soldiers. An urgent request was received from the authorities on Thursday week, and by Monday everything in the way of equipment and staff was ready, and ten wounded soldiers were brought in during the day.

A GOODS GUARD KILLED.

Mr and Mrs Edwards, of 42 Windsor Street, have received news that their oldest son, Lance-Corpl Edwards, of the London Regiment, was killed in the great fight on September 15th. The first intimation came from a sergeant of another regiment, who, when making a short cut to new lines of trench, came across the body of a young man, who, in company with some others, had been caught by machine gun fire. In the man’s pockets were two photographs of a wife and two children, which had apparently been pierced by a bullet ; also a wallet, &c, all of which the sergeant was able to send to the address written on the photos—that of the deceased’s wife at Rowington, near Warwick, together with a letter full of comfort and sympathy. Lance-Corpl Edwards, who enlisted at the outbreak was a goods guard on the L & N-W Railway, and was 26 years of age. He was discharged on account of physical defects soon afterwards, but was recalled in 1915, and transferred from the K.R.R to a London regiment. He usually carried the photographic in the left pocket of his tunic.

LONG LAWFORD.

MR & MRS ELKINGTON have received news that their youngest son, Ronald, has been promoted to be sergt in the King’s Royal Rifles. He has also been a recipient of congratulations from Major-General Douglas Smith for gallant conduct and fine behaviour on the night of August 23rd and 24th during the attack on Guillemont. Sergt Elkington, is only 20 years of age, and he has three brothers and two brothers-in-law on active service.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

MISSING.—Pte F Linnett, Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Stretton, is reported as having been missing since September 3rd. He is 26 years of age, unmarried, and has served nine years with the colours. He has not been home on leave for seven years.

BRETFORD.

Pte Arthur Wilson, of the Royal Inniskillings, has received his discharge, owing to ill-health. He was at the Dardanelles and in Serbia, where last winter he was severely frost bitten. From this he has suffered severely, and it is feared that it will be years before his strength returns.

AN ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court, on Thursday (before T Hunter, Esq), Pte Arthur Collins, of the R.W.R, 45 New Street, New Bilton, pleaded guilty to being an absentee from his Battalion since October 14th, and was remanded to await an escort.

MURRAY SCHOOL BOYS’ INGENIOUS DEVICE.—Two boys attending the Murray School—Frank James Clarke (13) and Thomas George Mann (12)—have been working on a design for an aircraft shell, and have submitted the drawings to the Coventry Ordnance Company. The officials of the Company have expressed themselves as very interested in the idea, and are considering the details.

DEATHS.

EDWARDS.—On September 15th, in France, Albert Victor, the dearly loved eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Edwards, of 42 Windsor Street, Rugby.

EDWARDS.—Killed in action in France on September 15, 1916, Lance-Corpl. A. V. EDWARDS, London Regiment, the dearly loved husband of Bessie R. Edwards.

THORNE.—Officially reported missing since October 13, 1915, now concluded killed, Lance-Corpl. CHARLES THORNE, Leicester Regiment, elder son of George and Kate Thorne, of Lutterworth ; aged 22.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s