12th Oct 1918. Lord Denbigh Suspects Cunning Scheme

LORD DENBIGH SUSPECTS CUNNING SCHEME.

Lord Denbigh, delivering a war lecture at Coventry on Sunday, said if the German  proposal was simply a cunning scheme for evacuation of Belgium and Northern France, with Germany insisting on retaining what they held in the East, then the Allies would, in consenting to peace on such terms, be putting their head into a noose which would give long and endless trouble in the future. It must be remembered that Germany had made enormous profit out of the War, and boasted that in the destruction they had made of machinery they had put French and Belgian industrial competition out for 10 or 20 years. Germany must, he said, pay for her robberies. If once a war like this were stopped it could not be got going again. What was needed was to make the Germans lose their faith in the military party and in the policy of blood and iron. There could be no real unity until the power of Germany was finished.

IRISH MAIL BOAT TORPEDOED.

THE OUTGOING Irish Mail boat, Leinster, was torpedoed on Thursday morning.
The passengers numbered 650, and there was a crew of 70. Of these it is believed 500 have been killed or drowned.

A Japanese liner has been sunk by submarine off the Irish Coast, and nearly 300 lives lost. It was the usual story of German brutality.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte A R Fothergill, Royal Berks Regiment, son of Mrs Fothergill, 111 Lawford Road, New Bilton, has been wounded.

The following Rugby men have been reported prisoners of war :—Corpl F C Clements, R.W.R, Pte F Wright, M.G.C, and Pte A C Williams, R.W.R.

Capt Walter Bonn, Welsh Guards, has just been awarded the D.S.O. It will be remembered that he gained the M.C in March.

Pte H C Williams, 1st Royal West Kent Regiment—formerly an apprentice in the B.T.H Drawing Office—who was reported missing on October 26th last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date.

Mr H Hyam, 8 Drury Lane, Rugby, has received official information that his son, Pte Clifford Hyam, R.W.R, was wounded with shrapnel in the leg and arm in the fighting around Cambrai on September 27th. This is the second lad Mr Hyam has had wounded.

Mr H Minchin, 10 Market Street, has received news that his son, George Victor, a private in the R.W.R, was killed in action on September 3rd. Pte Minchin, who was nearly 19 years of age, joined the Army in January last, previous to which he was employed as a waiter at a Harrogate Hotel.

Mr A H Tilley, 46 Railway Terrace, has received news that his son, Horace, a gunner in the Royal Artillery, was killed while gun laying on September 27th He was 20 years of age, and before enlisting in March, 1917, was employed in the Controller Department at the B.T.H. In a letter to the parents his sergeant says :—“ I lost in your son a very useful lad, an intelligent gunner, conscientious and thoroughly reliable taking, as he did, a great interest in his work.

Lieut Albert Francis, 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, eldest surviving son of the late William G. Francis and Mrs H Dale, 28 Bridge Street, Rugby, was killed in action on September 29. He was formerly an employee at the B.T.H, went to Canada in 1913, joined up in November, 1915, quickly gaining promotion, and obtaining his commission in June. Mrs Dale has another son, Walter, serving with the Canadians, who won the M.M. Early in this year for bravery on the field.

MENTIONED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICES.
The names of General Sir E H H Allenby, Commander-in-Chief Egyptian Expeditionary Force, Rear-Admiral T Jackson, Lieut the Hon F E Feilding, and other navel and military officers have been brought to the notice the Secretory of State for War in connection with the operations at Hedjaz.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
ERNEST WM SMITH AGAIN WOUNDED.—We are informed that Pte Ernest Wm Smith, Grenadier Guards, second son of Mr & Mrs Tom Smith, is again wounded and in hospital. A year ago he received an injury to his thigh, and is now suffering from a big gun wound in the same limb. His younger brother Tom, also in the Grenadiers,was killed in action on September 25th, 1916. Both brothers volunteered early in the War. They were well known in the cricket and football fields, and highly respected by all.

DUNCHURCH.
BLACKBERRIES.—The school children of Dunchurch have responded well to the request of the authorities for their assistance in picking blackberries for making jam for the Forces. Up-to-date the Girls’ School have picked 688 lbs, and the Boys’ School 640 lbs—in all 1,328 lbs or 11cwt 3qrs 12lbs—a record probably unsurpassed by any school of the same size in the county. The largest quantity picked by one individual was 38½lbs by Irene Ellis. Quite a large quantity of crabs have also been forwarded to the jam factory.

MARTON.
CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS.—A meeting of the Parcels Fund Committee and Old Comrades’ Committee was held on Tuesday, when it was decided to join forces in the efforts to provide comforts for our boys on active service.

TO HELP THE GUNS TO BEAT THE HUNS
And make money for yourself as well, just by saving your WASTE MATERIALS.
Simple, isn’t it ?
BONES in lbs. or cwts.
RAGS, Woollen or cotton.
BRASS, in lbs, or cwts.
LEAD in any quantity.
IRON of any kind.
We pay the TOP PRICES. Send what you have.
We will send it in the proper direction.
W. BROOK,
2 & 4. PLOWMAN STREET, RUGBY.
Telephone 240.

THE SUPPLY OF MARGARINE.
At the Food Control Committee meeting on Thursday attention was called to the shortage of margarine in the town. It reported that the shortage was due to the railway strike, but supplies had that day come along and normal conditions would prevail in the future.

SEVEN COAL SAVING POINTS.

If the following seven coal-saving points, prepared after exhaustive experiments by the Coal Controller’s Department, are observed, a saving of from 30 per cent. To 40 per cent. of coal may be effected :—

OPEN FIRES.
(1.) The back and sided of every fire should be provided with firebricks or fire-tile not less than 6 inches high.
(2.) The fire-brick at the back of the fire should not be set vertically, but should lean slightly towards the front.
(3) An open fire should measure from front to back not more than 4½ inches
(4.) The ashpit or open space under the fire should be closed with a loose metal plate resting on the hearth.
(5.) The outlet flue opening or “ throat ” above the fire should not measure more than 4 inches in width.

CLOSED STOVES AND COOKING RANGES.
(6.) Closed fires and ranges should be provided with a “ false bottom,” resting upon and covering the grate. The simplest and cheapest device for this purpose, is sheet metal plate, having holes of ½-inch diameter punched in the plate at a distance of 2½ inches apart.
(7.) When cooking is finished all dampers should be immediately closed as tightly as possible.

By adopting these and similar methods every coal user can help the nation through the coming coal crisis and bring victory nearer.

DEATHS.

MINCHIN.—GEORGE VICTOR, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Minchin, 10 Market Street, Rugby. Killed in action September 3, 1918, somewhere in France ; aged 18 years and 9 months.

TILLEY.—Killed in action in France on September 27th, 1918, Gunner HORACE A. TILLEY, R.F.A., aged 20, elder son of Mr. & Mrs. A. H. Tilley, 46 Railway Terrace, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

AMOS.—Killed in action on October 9, 1917, Pte. HARRY AMOS, Gloucester Regiment, at Poelcappelle, the dearly beloved husband of Clara Amos, 41 Lodge Road.
“ Sweet is the memory he left behind
Of a life that was manly, clean and kind ;
His fight is fought, he has gained his rest ;
We remember you, dear, as one of the best.”
—His loving Wife and Children.

BOOTE.—In ever loving memory of Pte. S. BOOTE (SYD), 4th Worcestershire Regt, who died of wounds in Belgium October 11, 1917. —From his loving brother and sister Jack and Jeannie and his little nephew Aubrey.

COLLIER.—In loving memory of my dear sons, WILLIAM C. COLLIER, 16th R.W.R., killed in France on October 9, 1917 ; and FRANCIS GEORGE COLLIER, who died from pneumonia on July 17, 1918, at Kirkstall, near Leeds.—From their loving Father.

CURTIS.—In ever-loving memory of our dear one, Pte CHARLES WILLIAM CURTIS (Old Bilton), 16th Warwicks, previously missing, October 7, 1917, now reported killed ; aged 36 years.
“ One year has passed, how we miss him,
Never shall his memory fade ;
God has claimed him, angels guard
The sacred place where he is laid.
Somewhere in France his life he gave,
A husband true, a soldier brave :
Dear Lord, protect my brother’s grave,
A British hero’s grave.”
—His loving sister Bell (Torquay).
—Deeply missed by his loving Mother and Father, sisters Fan and Bell, brother Fred (a prisoner of war in Germany).

GRANT.—In loving memory of Pte. W. GRANT, Cock-robin Cottages, Dunchurch, and of the M.G.C., who was killed in action in France on October 12, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you ;
Just a year ago.
Too far, dear Will, thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—From loving Mother, Father, Brothers & Sisters.

HAYES.—In loving memory of C.S.M. GEORGE HINDE HAYES, M.C., 1/7 R.W.R., wounded October 4, died October 10, 1917. Interred at Wirmertoux, aged 34 years.
Also of Pte. FRANK HINDE HAYES, 1/7 R.W.R., killed in action July 19, 1916, at Festubert, aged 19½ years.
“ Their forms are from our household gone,
Their voices hushed and still.
Their places vacant in our hearts,
No earthly power can fill.”
—Deeply mourned by Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

HIRONS.—In loving memory of Pte. HARRY HIRONS, Machine Gun Corps, killed in action on October 10th, 1917 ; aged 22.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—From his Father, Sisters and Brothers.

LANE.—In ever-loving memory of our dear friend, BERT, who died 13th October, 1917, from wounds received in France.—Nell and Ernie.

SALMON.—In loving memory of Rifleman J. R. SALMON, killed in action on the Somme Front on October 7, 1916.

SEATON.—In proud and loving memory of my dear husband (WILL), Corpl. SEATON, Welsh Guards, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917.
“ Oh, surely, my beloved,
Though sign and token all be swept away,
‘Tis not in that land of desolation,
But in our hearts that thou live alway.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

SEATON.—In proud and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Corpl. W. R. SEATON, 1st Batt. Welsh Guards, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917.
“ We looked for his safe returning.
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed that meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—Sadly missed by Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

WILKINS.—In loving memory of my dearly beloved son, Pte. REGINALD GERALD WILKINS, R.W.R., killed in France on October 12, 1916 ; aged 21 years.

 

Tilley, Horace Alfred. Died 27th Sep 1918

Horace Alfred TILLEY was born in Beckenham in 1898.  He was the elder son and second child of Alfred ?Horatio Tilley, b.c.1870, in Greenwich, and Mary, née Rickards, Tilley, also born in Greenwich in about 1876.  Their marriage was registered in Lewisham in Q4, 1895.  Horace’s birth was registered in Q2, 1898, in Bromley, Kent.

The family had moved to Beckenham, Kent, where their four eldest children were born and then to Weybridge, Surrey, where three younger children were born.

In 1901, the family was sharing a house at 28 Cherry Lane, Beckenham.  Alfred was a domestic gardener.

Before 1911, the family had moved near to Rugby.  In 1911, Alfred, was a ‘head gardener’ and  he and Mary had been married 15 years – and all six of their children were still living.  The family were living in Newton Road, Clifton upon Dunsmore, near Rugby.  Horace was 13, so he would be only 16 when war broke out and whenever he ‘joined-up’, it would another two years before he was old enough to serve abroad.

Before the war, Horace worked in the Controller’s Department at the B.T.H.

In November 1915, Horace was mentioned as a ‘Single Man’, who had signed up under Lord Derby’s Scheme.

‘The Recruiting Position.  Clear Definition by Lord Derby.  Lord Derby’s Recruiting Scheme.  Local Enlistments under the Group System.  … The following have enlisted at the Rugby Drill Hall under the Group System. … Tilley, Horace, Church Street, Clifton.’[1]

However, a later notice stated that he enlisted in March 1917.[2]  The CWGC site gives the Service Number: 212890 for an H. Tilley who was killed on 27 September 1918.  However, the Medal Card relating to this number is for a ‘George H. Tilley’ of the Royal Field Artillery.  There are no death records from the RFA relating to a George Tilley, and it must be assumed that this was a clerical error.

He was, at least latterly, in the “D” Battery, 52nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, as a Gunner, No: 212890, Royal Field Artillery.

The four – L to LIII (Howitzer) Brigades of the Royal Field Artillery (9th Divisional Artillery) – were formed as part of the raising of the First New Army, K1.  They are also sometimes shown as 50 to 53 (Howitzer) Brigades RFA.

LII [or 52nd Brigade] was originally comprised of numbers 166, 167 and 168 Batteries RFA and the Brigade Ammunition Column.  It was placed under command of the 9th (Scottish) Division and went to France with it in May 1915.  In February 1915 the three six-gun batteries were reorganised to become four four-gun batteries and were titled as A, B, C and D.

On 21 February 1916 D Battery left to join 53 Brigade of the same Division, … The Brigade left 9th (Scottish) Division on 8 January 1917 to become an Army Field Artillery Brigade.

Various other re-organisations occurred, and it has not been possible to find all the areas where this Artillery Brigade was in action in late September 1918 – although a War Diary for a transport section is available from the TNA.[3]

The only details of Horace’s death are that he was killed while gun laying on 27 September.  He was buried in Plot ref: II. C. 16 in the Dominion Cemetery, Hendecourt-Les-Cagnicourt.  There was no age or personal family message on the gravestone.

Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt is 16 kilometres south-east of Arras … The Cemetery is 2.5 kilometres north-east of Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt, in fields reached by a track signposted off the road between Hendecourt and the Arras to Cambrai road.  Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt was captured by the 57th (West Lancashire) and 52nd (Lowland) Division on the night of the 1-2 September 1918. Dominion Cemetery was made by Canadian units in September 1918, after the storming by the Canadian Corps of the Drocourt-Queant Line; … There are now over 200, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site.

Driver A Hodgeson from the same company, who was originally listed as killed on the same day, was later recorded as killed in action two days earlier on 25 September, and was buried next to Horace Tilley.

His death was recorded in the Rugby Advertiser and also in the Birmingham Daily Post.

TILLEY – Killed-in-action in France on September 27th, 1918, Gunner HORACE A. TILLEY, R.F.A., aged 20, elder son of Mr. & Mrs. A. H. Tilley, 46 Railway Terrace, Rugby.[4]

Gunner Horace Tilley, Royal Artillery, son of Mr. A. H. Tilley, 46, Railway Terrace, Rugby, was formerly employed in the Controller’s Department at the B.T.H.[5]

A fuller notice was also published in the Rugby Advertiser,
Mr A H Tilley, 46 Railway Terrace, has received news that his son, Horace, a gunner in the Royal Artillery, was killed while gun laying on September 27th.  He was 20 years of age, and before enlisting in March, 1917, was employed in the Controller Department at the B.T.H.  In a letter to the parents his sergeant says:- “ I lost in your son a very useful lad, an intelligent gunner, conscientious and thoroughly reliable taking, as he did, a great interest in his work.[6]

Horace Tilley is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates and on the list of BTH Employees who served in the War 1914-1918; although for some reason he does not appear on the BTH War Memorial.[7]  He is also listed on the memorial at St Mary the Virgin Church, Clifton-upon-Dunsmore, where a commemorative window has a plaque which reads
‘To the Glory of God and in honoured memory of Clifton Men who fell in the Great War, 1914-1918 … This window was given by the Parishioners.’

His Medal Card [under the incorrect name George] showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. 

 

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Horace TILLEY was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, May 2018.

 

[1]      Rugby Advertiser, 27 November 1915.

[2]      Rugby Advertiser, 12 October 1918, also https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/10/12/12th-oct-1918-lord-denbigh-suspects-cunning-scheme/.

[3]      Army Troops, 52 Army Field Artillery Brigade, 1917 Jan – 1919 Jan, Catalogue reference: WO 95/203/4.  With thanks for location information provided by: https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/261539-army-field-artillery-brigade-52-brigade-rfa/.

[4]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 12 October 1918.

[5]      Birmingham Daily Post, Monday, 14 October 1918.

[6]      Rugby Advertiser, 12 October 1918, also https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/10/12/12th-oct-1918-lord-denbigh-suspects-cunning-scheme/.

[7]      This is from a list of names on the BTH War Memorial when it was unveiled.  It is taken from the list published in the Rugby Advertiser, 4 November 1921 and given at https://www.rugbyfhg.co.uk/bth-war-memorial.