30th Nov 1918. Demobilisation Proceeding

DEMOBILISATION PROCEEDING.

The Ministers chiefly concerned are understood to be most busily engaged in perfecting the plans for demobilisation. It is to be remembered by the impatient that, though the armistice has brought about a cessation of hostilities, the War is not yet at an end. There is a possibility of the preliminary peace treaty (remarks the London correspondent of the “Birmingham Daily Post ”) being signed towards the end of February, but in authoritative quarters the impression is that it would be well not to expect the peace celebration until March. Until peace is absolutely assured it will be necessary to keep up a very large force, while an army of occupation in a portion of Germany may be rendered a necessity by her internal condition. In these circumstances complete demobilisation is bound to be a slow process.

EMPLOYMENT IN THE LOCAL ENGINEERING TRADES.

We are informed that the cessation of hostilities and the suspension of munition work will cause very little (if any) dislocation in local employment, and already the absorption of labour for civil work has removed the possibility of the spectre of unemployment coming out to mar what everyone hopes will be a bright and happy Christmas in Rugby. As a matter of fact, the supply of labour is not equal to the demand, as will be gathered from an advertisement on page 2 of this issue.

Amongst the reconstruction schemes which the Government have under consideration is one covering an extensive programme of large central electricity supply stations for the manufacture of electricity in bulk, so that it can be supplied at low rates to the commuter. The engineering shops of Willans & Robinson and the B.T.H Company are admirably laid out to take care of this class of apparatus required for this scheme, and should secure their share of the contracts resulting from this programme being carried through by the Government.

It is common knowledge that the B.T.H Company are in need of first-class machinists and mechanics of all descriptions, as well as a large number of unskilled labourers. Those Rugby craftsmen who temporarily obtained work away from Rugby should seek employment in Rugby now that there is a slackening of demand for labour in purely munition plants.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte J E Grimsley, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regiment, whose home is at Harborough Magna, was killed in action by a machine gun bullet on November 1st. In a letter to his wife an officer states : “ He was one of my best men ; in fact, had he come out alive, Capt Chamberlain was recommending him for a decoration. In several fights I always admired his conduct and his pluck.”

The “ Gazette ” announces that Second-Lieut G A T Vials, West Riding Regiment, the Northants County cricketer, relinquishes his commission on account of ill-health, and is granted the hon rank of lieutenant.—His father, Mr G Vials, formerly practised as a solicitor in Rugby.

Pte E P Burden, R.M.L.I., late of 24 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, died in hospital in France on November 23rd from influenza. Before joining the Colours he was employed by Messrs Willans & Robinson.

Pte A Badger, 9th Battery, R.F.A (Napton), died at Fargo Military Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on Saturday, from pneumonia. He was 25 years of age.

Bombardier Arthur Russell, R.G.A, husband of Mrs Esther Russell, of 6 Benn Street, Rugby, and son of Mr & Mrs W K Russell, died on Tuesday last at Cattrick Bridge Camp. Bombardier Russell, who was a postman at the Rugby Office, had seen two years’ service in France, had been wounded and gassed, and was just convalescent from a broken ankle, sustained by accident while in the lines.

Temp Major C D Miller, the polo player and organiser, is gazetted Acting Lieut-Colonel while commanding a Base Remount Depot.

DEATH OF ROLAND WILSON BROWNE.—Mr & Mrs Browne, of the Book Shop, Station Road, whose three sons have been doing their part in the great War, have received news of the death of their second son Roland, who was killed in action in France on November 4th. He was an Old Murrayian, and on leaving school was apprenticed in the Drawing Office of the B.T.H, where he remained until the time of his joining the 2nd Manchester. Regiment, He was very popular with and held in the highest esteem by his fellow-draughtsmen, and, apart from being quick and clever at his work, he showed great ability in his love and knowledge of art and art subjects. He was a pupil of John Hassell, B.A, and turned out some clever black and white sketches. In water colour he also displayed talent, but seemed especially to excel in oil colour painting. Touching references were made at the Congregational Church services on Sunday last. He was 23 years of age. and had been in the Army less than five months when he met with his untimely end.

INFLUENZA.—The number of deaths from influenza in Rugby district during the past week was six, a decrease of 10 on the preceding week. Since the 14th October no less than 130 deaths from either influenza or pneumonia have been registered locally.

BRITISH CASUALTIES IN THE WAR.
The figures of British casualties during the war are officially given for each theatre of war, and show a total of 3,049,991. They are made up as follows :—Killed and died, 37,876 officers ; 620,828 other ranks ; wounded, 92,664 officers ; 1,939,478 other ranks ; missing (including prisoners), 12,094 officers ; 347,051 other ranks.

POST-PRESENTATION OF A MILITARY CROSS.
At Birmingham on Friday, last week a number of decorations were presented to men who had won them, or their relatives, by Major-General Sir Hy Schlater. Among the recipients was the mother of Colour-Sergt-Major G H Hayes, R.W.R, who was wounded at Neuve Chapelle on October 4th, 1917, and died a few days afterwards. The act for which the Cross was awarded was officially described thus :—

“ The advance was held up by a strong enemy machine gun position, and all the officers became casualties. He took command and crawled under direct fire to a position from which he killed several of the enemy. He then led his men in an attack on the post, which he captured with ten prisoners and a machine gun. He showed splendid courage and initiative.”

Colour-Sergt-Major Hayes was for some time employed at the Great Central Station as a drayman, and afterwards at the B.T.H as a shunter, where he was working when called up. He had been in the “ E ” Co. (Rugby) Volunteers for 16 years. He was also a well-known local footballer, having played with the Penlee, Star, Old Boys and other clubs, by the members of which and his many friends he was much respected.

FOR WAR SERVICE.

The under-mentioned, have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War by the Chairman of the Joint War Committee of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St John of Jerusalem in England for valuable services rendered in connection with the War :— Miss L Court, Kineton Hospital, Warwick ; Miss B Lewis, Clifton Court Hospital, Rugby ; and Miss A O Tiley, Kineton Hospital Warwick.

DUNCHURCH.
RETURN OF A PRISONER OF WAR.—R Burton. son of Mr & Mrs James Burton, Daventry Road, has arrived home from Germany, where he has been a prisoner of war. He went out to France with polo ponies, and was soon in the fighting and was taken prisoner. It is needless to say he received a hearty welcome, and all his old friends were glad to see him looking fairly well.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PARISH COUNCIL.—At a special meeting on Tuesday evening there were present : Messrs C E W Boughton-Leigh (chairman), J Martin, W Allen, and F Fellows (clerk):—The question of a parish war memorial was raised, and the members were unanimously of opinion that some steps in this direction should be taken as soon as possible.—The Chairman said personally he favoured the erection of a parish hall and reading room, similar to that at Clifton and other villages, provided that they could raise sufficient funds. This would fill a growing need in the parish, and if such a memorial was erected they could have the names of all who had offered their service to the country inscribed on the walls.—On the motion of Mr Martin, who said he agreed with the suggestion of the Chairman, the question was deferred until the next meeting.

CHURCH LAWFORD.
GUN WEEK.—Houses were gaily decorated with flags when the gun visited this village. The quota necessary for Church Lawford and Kings Newnham to obtain a large shell was £1,200, but this sum was exceeded by £250. This result was the more creditable because at the recent estate sale most of the farmers and some of the other residents bought their respective homes and farms.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
DIED IN FRANCE.—A telegram was received by his mother at Broadwell, on Monday afternoon, conveying the sad information that Pte Mark Abbott, of the 7th Dragoon Guards, had died of double pneumonia while with the Forces in France. The deceased had completed his period of service in the Regular Army, having served a good portion of his time in India, from whence he came with the first Indian Forces to France. He was of a genial disposition and popular in the village.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

WALTER HART’S DEATH.—A letter has been received from the Commanding Officer of his Battalion, stating that Corpl Walter Hart was killed by a shell on the 6th ult, near Le Catelet. The writer adds that Corpl Hart had done good work for him since he came to his Company, and that he entertained the highest opinion of him.

SERGT F RUSSELL DECORATED.—Sergt F Russell (Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment), who has been spending a few days at home, has received notification that he has been awarded the Military Medal for his gallant conduct on the 14th ult, when heading his men info action. Sergt Russell is fast recovering from his wound received on that occasion, and returned to Halifax on Monday. Besides his new decoration, he already holds the Queen Victoria and King Edward VII Medals for the South African War, and the Long Service Medal.

WOUNDED.—During the last hours of the war Rifleman E G T STEEL (N.Z Rifle Brigade), only son of Mr & Mrs Geo Steel, of this village, was wounded. His company had just taken their objective, and after witnessing the loss of several of his comrades, Rifleman Steele was hit with a bullet in the right arm. He is progressing well. Pte H Windsor (R.W.R) has also been wounded in the forearm.

RETURN OF A PRISONER OF WAR.—On Friday evening last week Pte Sidney Linnett (A.S.C), who has for over six months been a prisoner of war with the Germans, was welcomed home with great rejoicing. Pte Linnett, who is the adopted son of Mr and the late Mrs W Gaskins, of the Model Village, enlisted in September, 1914, at the age of 18, in the Royal Warwicks, and was eventually transferred to the A.S.C. He had seen much service all through the War, and on April 10th last was reported missing, and afterwards found to be a prisoner of war. He was located with others in the zone of danger behind the German lines, and not only worked under these conditions, but also experienced great cruelty from his captors. On the signing of the armistice he was set at liberty, and he and his comrades had to make their way back to the British lines with no food except turnips obtained from the fields. He arrived at Dover on the 19th, and reached Marton Station on the evening of the 22nd. Being unable to walk the two miles to his home, he was driven up. He states that many of his comrades lost their lives by being made to work within range of the British guns. Pte Linnett has grown much thinner during his captivity, and is still suffering from the shock of his experiences ; but the bare mention of the word “ home ” never fails to bring back his former sunny smile.

BRETFORD.
PTE BONEHAM DISCHARGED.—Pte Francis Wm Boneham, son of Mr T & Mrs Boneham, of Bretford, has now returned home. He joined the 3rd Warwicks in 1916, and saw much service in France. He has received a bad fracture of the right knee-cap, and is permanently disabled. He was also badly gassed, from the effects of which he is now suffering. Before joining up he was a respected employee of Messrs Bluemel’s Ltd.

WOLSTON.

Sapper H Smith. R.E.—News has reached Miss Dorothy Smith that her brother, Sapper Harry Smith, of the Royal Engineers, has died of influenza in Italy. He was one of the earliest Wolston recruits, joining up in August, 1914. Before the War he was in the employ of Mr A J Lord as a carpenter. He went through many battles in France, and was wounded on five different occasions, besides being once gassed. His father—the late Mr G Smith—was for many years employed as a signalman at Brandon and Wolston Station. Another brother, who has been in the Marines for 12 years, fought in the Battle of Jutland, and was on the destroyer, Champion Leader. He had also been previously wrecked.

MILITARY MEDAL.—The medal won by the late Joseph Edmans was presented to his father—Mr J Edmans, of Wolston—by Major-General Slater, of the Midland Command. The brave deed for which the medal was awarded was for picking up a live bomb and hurling it out of danger, and thus saving many lives. He, with one of his brothers, went through the Battle of Mons, and so the Mons Star is also due to the deceased hero. Mr Edmans is proud of the Army record of his family, six sons having fought for their country. Two have paid the extreme penalty, and several of the others have been badly wounded, including Sergt Percy Edmans, who received his discharge.

PRISONER’S RETURN.—Lance-Corpl Reader, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany, returned to his home at the beginning of the week. He met with a very hearty welcome from the inhabitants. Lance-Corpl Reader has not fared so badly as many of the prisoners. Thanks to the parcels he received from the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, he had done fairly well, and is very thankful for them. Mr Reader, who is agent for Mr Udal, is well known and respected, and the inhabitants are delighted to think that he has safely returned to his wife and children.

KINETON
THE FUNERAL OF CORPL HORACE LEE THOMAS, who met with a fatal accident at the Kineton Hospital, took place at Tooting Cemetery on Monday, and was an impressive military ceremony, witnessed by a large concourse of people. The H. A.C provided a firing party, and the coffin was covered with the Union Jack. Over 30 beautiful floral tributes were sent, including several from Kineton. The relatives were deeply grateful for the kindness shown at Kineton.

PEACE.

PEACE, longed-for and fought-for, has at last arrived.

But the plenty of pre-war days will not return yet awhile. Rationing must remain in force for some time.

The International Stores ask their customers, therefore, to accept cheerfully for a little longer those restrictions which the War made necessary.

It will be their earnest endeavour, whatever conditions the future may bring, to maintain the reputation they have built up for High Quality, Low Prices, and Efficient Service.

They are confident that when normal times are restored, their old customers will continue their patronage.

International Stores

THE BIGGEST GROCERS IN THE WORLD

DEATHS.

BADGER.—In ever-loving memory of Bombardier A. BADGER, 235869, A Battery R.F.A., who passed away peacefully from pneumonia, at Fargo Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on November 23rd, aged 25.
“ A light is from our household gone,
The voice we loved is still ;
A place is vacant in our hearts
Which never can be filled.”
—Sadly missed by Mary, Sis, Jim, Fanny, Mr. & Mrs. Cockerill and Family.

BURDEN.—In loving memory of my dear brother, Pte. E. P. BURDEN, R.M.L.I., who died of influenza in hospital in France on November 23, 1918.

BROWNE.—On November 4th, killed in action in France, ROLAND WILSON, second and dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Browne, Railway Terrace, Rugby; aged 23 years.

FLETCHER.—On November 8th, at Boulogne, of pneumonia, Driver G. FLETCHER, R.F.A., aged 19 years and 10 months, the dearly beloved son of George and Lettie Fletcher, who passed peacefully away after great suffering, most patiently home.
“ The evening star shines on his grave :
The one we could not save ;
’Tis sad, but ’tis true, we cannot tell why,
The best are the first that are called on to die.”
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

GRIMSLEY.—Killed in action on November 1st, 1918, in France, JOHN EDWARD, the dearly beloved husband of Edith Ellen Grimsley, of Harborough Magna, near Rugby.
“ A day of remembrance, sad to recall,
The loss of our dear one, loved by us all.
We think of him in silence, and his name we oft recall ;
But there is nothing left but his photo on the wall.
Fondly we loved him, he is as dear to us still.
But in grief we must bend to God’s Holy Will.
If we could have raised his dying head, or heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard for us that loved him well.”
—Too dearly loved to ever be forgotten by his loving Wife, Mother, Father, Sisters and brother Will.

SMITH.—On November 7th, in Italy, of pneumonia following influenza, Sapper HARRY SMITH, Royal Engineers, youngest son of the late George Smith, of Wolston, aged 25 years.—“ Until the day breaks and the shadows flee away.”

WILLIAMS.—On October 30th, killed in action in France, WILLIAM, the dearly beloved husband of Emily Williams, 14 Lawford Road, New Bilton.

WILSON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY WILSON, killed in action in France on November 1, 1918.
“ The midnight stars are shining
On a grave I cannot see,
Amid where storms of battle raged
Lies one most dear to me.”
—From his loving Wife.

WILSON.—Killed in action in France on November 1st, 1918, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY WILSON, aged 24 years ; eldest and beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Wilson, of Bilton.
“There is a link Death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Sister and Brothers.

IN MEMORIAM.

COX.—In proud and loving memory of Rifleman E. J. COX (ERN), K.R.R., Bilton, who was killed at Cambrai on November 30, 1917.—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Father, Sisters, Brothers, and Nellie.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

RICHARDSON.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt LEONARD RICHARDSON, of the K.R.R. Corps, who was killed in France on November 30th, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Sisters, Brother, Grandmother and Nell, The Banks, Dunchurch.

WALL.—In loving memory of Corpl. LOUIS HAROLD WALL, M.M., King’s Royal Rifles, reported missing November 30, 1917.—From his loving Father and Mother, Eva and Jan.

 

Hayes, George Hinde. Died 10th Oct 1917

George Hinde was born in Brinklow in 1884 and baptised there on 3rd August 1884. He was the second son of Charles and Elizabeth (nee Hinde) Hayes who married in 1881. Charles was an Agricultural labourer and in 1891 the family was living with Elizabeth’s father John W Hinde, a carpenter in Brinklow.

In 1901, the family was living at 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton and George, his age wrongly given as 18, was a labourer at the cement works. By 1911 Charles was a gardener, living at 80 York Street Rugby and George (26) was still living at home. He worked as a railway carter.

By 1914 George Hinde Hayes was a shunter and driver at B.T.H. and joined the Territorials on 27th April. He arrived in France in April 1917 as Company Sergeant Major in the 7th Bn., Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He was wounded on 4th October 1917 at Paaschendaele and died on 10th of that month at no 11 General Hospital, Wimereux.

His Captain wrote:
“I am grieved to think that George has lost his life doing his duty to his country. As an officer of E Coy, I knew him well, and what an excellent N.C.O. he was, as well as a popular and cheerful comrade to all the other boys. I was not at all surprised to hear of his promotion to Coy. Sergt.-Major, as I know of his excellent qualifications for the appointment, and he is just the stamp of man I would have chosen for such a responsible duty myself.”

and his Coy. Quartermaster-Sergt.:
“We are sorry to lose your son, for he was always ready for duty, and the officers all join me in sympathy; we have lost both a good soldier and an ever-cheerful comrade.”

Coy.Sergt.-Major Hayes was awarded the military Cross, because when the advance was held up by a strong enemy machine-gun position, and all the officers became casualties, he took command, and crawled to a flank under direct fire from the post to a position from which he killed several of the enemy. He then led his men in an attack on the post, which he captured with ten prisoners and a machine gun; he showed splendid courage and initiative.

He was buried at Wimereux communal Cemetery. The inscription on his grave reads:

WAITING FOR THE DAWN
TO BE REUNITED
HIS DUTY DONE
R. I. P.

He is also listed on the BTH War Memorial, together with his brother Frank Hinde Hayes, who died on 19th July 1916.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Hayes, Frank Hinde. Died 19 Jul 1916

Frank Hinde Hayes was born in Brinklow, Warwickshire in 1897.

In the 1901 Census, Frank (4) was living with his parents Charles and Elizabeth Hayes at 51, Pinfold Street, Rugby.   John W Hinde, who was also living with the family, is listed as ‘Father-in-Law’ which gives us Elizabeth’s maiden name and explains Frank’s second name.

In the 1911 Census, Frank (13) and the family were now living at 80, York Street, Rugby. No occupation given for Frank at this time, presumably at school.

Frank joined the Territorial Army (No: 2216) with his brother on 22 March 1915.   At the time he enlisted he was working in the BTH Controller Dept.

Details taken from the “Long Long Trail” website

The Royal Warwickshire Regiment, the 2/7th Battalion was formed in Coventry in August 1914 as part of Warwickshire Brigade, South Midland Division. The regiment landed at Le Havre 22 March 1915. On the 13 May 1915 they became 143rd Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Division.   The Territorial Army were fully integrated into the Brigade later.

Details taken from the Rugby and Kineton Advertiser

Mrs Hayes, of 80 York Street, has received news that her younger son, Pte Frank Hayes, has been killed during the recent offensive. In a letter his Sergeant says : “Pte Hayes was killed while valiantly fighting by his comrades’ side, and his death was instantaneous.” He was 19 ½ years of age, and was attached to the Signal Department; and his officer writing to Mrs Hayes speaks of her son in very high terms. He formerly belonged to “B” Company and was an employee of the B.T.H. He was educated at New Bilton, and for a long time was a member of the Church choir there. Much sympathy is felt for his mother, who is a widow, and has six other sons and a son-in-law serving.

On Thursday Mrs Hayes received a letter from a Lieutenant of the R.W.R. to which her son belonged, stating that, “a number of their men were cut off, and it was hoped that her son was one of these, and that they were taken prisoner”.

Details taken from the War Diaries at the Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers museum

Frank probably died during an attack to capture trenches at/near the FAUQUISSART and TRIVELET Road   on 19 July 1916 and below is a short extract from the diaries.

At 11 a.m. Three Companies, B.C. and D. lining front parapet from FAUQYISSART –   TRIVELET Road with A Company in reserve.

At 5.50 p.m. The attack started.   “The attacking Companies were in four waves, 50 yards apart with Company Bombers behind the first wave and Lewis gunners behind second, Battalion Bombers behind third and a Machine Gun company behind fourth. They started to move slowly towards the enemies trenches”.

At 6 p.m.   “As the artillery was lifted, the leading Companies rushed the German first line from about 50 yards and passed over to the second line where they encountered strong opposition.   From the information obtained from the few who got back when the withdraw was ordered the first line trench was completely destroyed. Then from deep Dug-Outs German soldiers ran out holding their hands up and were ordered to proceed to our lines.   The Battalion Bombers were gradually forced   by superior numbers to withdraw”.

At 8.17 p.m. “Order received to withdraw slowly”.

Casualties          Officers, 1 killed, 9 wounded and 3 missing or believed killed,
O/Ranks 200 wounded and 170 missing.

Details taken from the Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Frank Hinde Hayes
Private 2216, with “B” Company 2nd/7th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
He died on 19 July 1916 Aged 19.

Son of the late Charles and Elizabeth Hayes, of 80, York St., Rugby, late of Brinklow.

Remembered with Honour at the Loos Memorial

Panel Reference: Panel 22 to 25

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

20th May 1916. Clocks to be put forward.

THE DAYLIGHT SAVING BILL.

CLOCKS TO BE PUT FORWARDS.

The Summer Time Bill, 1916—the object of which is to reduce the number of hours during which artificial lighting is used, and so save a very large quantity of coal required for war purposes at the present time—received the Royal Assent on Wednesday, and comes into force at 2 a.m on Sunday morning.

At that hour the time at all railway stations will be advanced one hour (that is, the clocks when at 2 o’clock’ will be altered to indicate 3 o’clock instead); the change will also be made in Post Office and other Government clocks, and arrangements are being made for the alteration of public clocks generally, either at that hour or some convenient time on Saturday evening.

The altered time, which will be generally called “summer time,” will remain in force up to and including September 30 next.

During this period “summer time” will be the time for all purposes, except astronomical, meteorological, and navigation. For instance, all trains will run according to “ summer time ”—that is, a train which, according to the time-table is timed to leave, say, at 6 a.m, will leave at 6 a.m summer time, as indicated by the clock. All establishments whose hours are regulated by law will be required to observe the altered time—e.g., factories, shops, public-houses, etc. Thus, factories which work from 6 a.m to 6 p.m will commence and finish at 6 a.m and 6 p.m summer time ; and a shop, if required to close at 8 p.m will close at 8 o’clock summer time. It is suggested that employers should warn their employees before they leave work on Saturday, and advise them to put their clocks and watches forward on Saturday evening.

The public generally are requested by the Government to alter their own clocks and watches in the same way, by putting them forward one hour, during the course of Saturday evening or early on Sunday morning.

It should be noted that the Act does not affect lighting and other Orders which fix a time by reference to sunrise or sunset. In giving effect to these orders, it will be necessary to take the alteration of the clock into consideration. For instance, the sun will set on Sunday, May 21st at 7.51, Greenwich time. Vehicles must light up half an hour afterwards—i.e, 8.21 Greenwich time, which will be represented on your clock or watch (if correctly altered) by 9.21. Similarly, the reduction of lights in houses, etc, will take place an hour and a half after sunset, Greenwich. This will be indicated by the altered clock as 10.21.

LIGHTING OFFENCES.—George G Stott, manager of a clothing establishment, Hillmorton Paddox; Walter Watts, Club steward, Market Street, Rugby; Alice Readman, lady’s help, 42 Clifton Road; were summoned for not shading windows so that no more than a dull subdued light was visible outside their premises.—Stott admitted the offence, and P.C Lester said he saw a brilliant naked electric light coming from the Grand Clothing Hall, illuminating the church and churchyard. Defendant was sent for and on his arrival he extinguished the lights.—Defendant explained that at 7.15 that evening he sent the boy upstairs to a back room for a pail. It was then quite light, and there was no necessity for him the switch the light on. He had evidently did so on this occasion, and then shut the door.-This was the only light burning in the shop.-Fined £1.—Watts pleaded guilty.—P.S Percival said the light, which was situated it the back of the Rokeby Club, was not shaded. He could see the light shining through the top of the blind. There was also an ordinary street lamp in the yard, which was shaded half-way down with brown paper.—Supt Clarke said this was a very bad light. It was like a great star, and he sent the officer round to it.—Defendant said he had done the best he could.—The Chairman : Not quite; you will be fined £2.—Miss Readman said it was quite an oversight, and the light was turned half down, there being a very subdued light.—P.C Elkington said when in the Lower Hillmorton Road he saw a very bright light from the rear of No 42 Clifton Roan. On going to the house he saw a bright, incandescent gas light in the kitchen, there being no blind drawn.-Defendant admitted her responsibility, and told witness she was very sorry ; she went to bed and forgot to turn out the light.-Margaret Fullorton, called by defendant, said she was mistress of the house. The light in question which she saw after the policeman had been, was half turned down, as it had been during the evening. She had been at considerable trouble and expense to darken all the windows, but on the night in question, being overtired, defendant forgot to turn out the light.—Fined 10s 6d.

NO LIGHT.—Geo Kenney, 30 New Street, New Bilton, was summoned for riding a bicycle without a light at New Bilton on the 4th inst.—Defendant pleaded guilty, and said he did not know what lighting-up time was.—P.C Ruane proved the case, and said it was getting dusk at the time.—Fined 6s.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Thirty-four former scholars of the Baptist Sunday School have joined the Army, and five have been granted commissions. Three of these, 2nd-Lieut J Forbes, Lance-Corpl Geo Barnwell, and Stanley Stebbing, have been killed in action.

Lieut L G Neville, a son of the late Mr J T Neville, Dunchurch, and of Mrs Neville, of 1 Bilton Road, Rugby, who went through the Boer War, the Zulu Campaign, and the German West African Campaign, left England last week for the Mediterranean Force with a Territorial Regiment.

Second-Lieut C.T Morris Davies, of Rugby, the well-known Welsh international hockey player, is now on a short leave from the front, where he has been for fourteen months. Lieutenant P E Banting, of lawn tennis and hockey fame, is also home for a few days.

Lieut C H Ivens, of the 9th Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr J H Ivens, of Hillmorton Road, Rugby, who was wounded in one of the battles in Mesopotamia, has been granted six months’ leave. The wound sustained was from a bullet which, after being deviated in its course by a rupee in his pocket, pierced the left thigh. After having been in hospital at Bombay for a time, he was on his way home, when a relapse necessitated his being landed at Alexandria, from whence he made another start a few days since.

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY WOUNDED.

The parents of Pte W J Payne, R.A.M.C, whose home is at 55 Stephen Street, have just received an intimation that Pte Payne is wounded and suffering from shock, and has been removed from the front to a hospital in England. Pte Payne is an old boy of St Matthew’s School.

MEDAL FOR AN OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY

As announced in a previous issue of the Advertise, Police Constable Herbert Archer, a Rugby man, has been awarded the bronze medal and certificate of the Royal Humane Society for conspicuous bravery in rescuing a young lad from drowning at Rosyth Naval Dockyard. The presentation was formally made to P.C Archer at Rosyth on Wednesday last week by Commodore Harvey Bruce, M.V.O, R.N, in the presence of the Dockyard officials and a contingent of the Metropolitan Police. P.C Archer is an old boy of St Matthew’s School, Rugby, and, like Sergt W Bale, who was recently decorated with the D.C.M, was in 1904-5 a member of the St Matthew’s XV which won the Rugby and District Schools’ Football Union Shield in the first competition.

ANOTHER OF MESSRS FROST’S EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Messrs A Frost & Son have received intimation that another of their employees has been killed in action. Lance-Corpl Henry Hayes, of the 6th City of London Regt was fatally shot through the chest on April 30th. He had been employed by Messrs Frost for several years as a bookbinder, and he enlisted on September 2, 1914. He went to France in March, 1915, and has been through a good deal of fighting, including the battle of Loos. A few months ago he came home on leave to get married. It is interesting to note that prior to the war Lance-Corpl Hayes lodged with Riflemen Negus and Newton, two other employees of Messrs Frost, both of whom have been killed. Thirty-four of Messrs Frost’s employes are serving with the colours, and Lance-Corpl Hayes is the seventh to be killed ; several others have been wounded.

OLD MURRAYIAN AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS.

The many friends of Bomb W K Freeman, R.F.A, son of Mrs Freeman, of 6 Lancaster Road, Rugby, will be pleased to hear that he has been awarded the Military Cross, and has been recommended for the D.C.M. Bomb Freeman is a signaller, and he gained his award by sticking to his post at the telephone under heavy fire. He was wounded in the arm and leg, and is now in the St John’s Brigade Hospital recovering from his injuries. He joined the army at Christmas, 1914, and went to the front in June, 1915. Prior to enlistment he was employed by the L & N.-W Railway in the Goods Manager’s office, Nuneaton. He is an old Murrayian and Laurentian, and brother of Sergt Jack Freeman, of “ E ” Company, 7th R.W.R.

BAND CONCERT.—On Sunday evening the B.T.H Military Band, under the conductorship of Mr H Saxon, gave a concert in the Caldecott Park. There was a large attendance.

ABOUT £10 was realised by the Rugby Branch of the National Union Railwaymen’s effort on behalf of the dependents of members killed at the front, held at Rugby recently.

THE Government have decided to instruct Local Tribunals to grant exemption in cases where, if a man with wife and family dependent were called up, his business would probably close down.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR SENTENCED.—P G Davies, a conscientious objector, lately employed in a Rugby ironmonger’s establishment, and associated with the Congregational Church, has been sentenced by Court Martial at Gosport to two years’ hard labour for refusing to obey military orders. News to this effect has been received by his father, who lives at Stratford-on-Avon.

CONSCRIPTS CHARGED.—George James Costello, dealer, 2 Gas Street, Rugby, was charged on remand with being an absentee under the Military Service Act, 1916, at Rugby on the 10th inst. George E Hart, labourer, 164 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was charged with a like offence.—Costello pleaded guilty, and Det Mighall said when he saw defendant the man admitted that he had received his papers, and that he should have gone up for service in March last. The reason he did not go up was that he was ruptured, and had a weak heart.—Prisoner was asked why he had not been up for medical examination, and he replied that he went to the Drill Hall, but they refused to give him a pass to Warwick because he was a conscript. He then offered to pay his own fare, but was told that this would be no good because he would not be examined.—The Chairman : Why did you not go at the proper time ?—Defendant: Because I thought that I was not eligible.—The Chairman : That is not for you to think. That is for the authorities.—He was fined £2 and remanded to await an escort.

Hart pleaded guilty.— P.S. Brown, who arrested prisoner, said Hart informed him he had received the notice, but he did not trouble any more about it.—The Chairman asked him why he did not go up, and he said he knew nothing about it.—Fined £2, and reminded to await an escort.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

Mr and Mrs Grant, Newbold, have received official intimation from the War Office that their son, Rifleman Harry Grant, of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, was killed in action May, 1915. Rifleman Grant was 24 years of age, and was employed at the time of his enlistment at the B.T.H. He enrolled in Kitchener’s Army in September, 1914, and has been mining since May 9th, 1915. Much sympathy is expressed with his parents. Another son of Mr and Mrs Grant has been sent home disabled, and a third son is at the present time at the front.

VOLUNTEERS’ NEED OF SHOT GUNS.

An appeal is being made by Lord Leigh, in the absence of the Lord-Lieutenant of Warwickshire, for the loan of shot guns for the Volunteer Training Corps. In Warwickshire, he states, many important munition works are guarded by the County Volunteer Regiment. Companies are organised to co-operate with the police in case of air raids, and they are of service in other ways. Only a proportion of the regiment is armed. Now a call has been made for the regiment to undertake, in case of imminent invasion, duties which will entail the employment of a number of Volunteers who are unarmed. The Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief the Home Defences has given instructions that in such cases men of the V.T.C who are unarmed should be provided with shot guns.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVIS.—In Memory of 2nd-Lieut. D. C. G. Davis, R.G.A., who died of wounds, May 15, 1915.
“ We never shall our memories forget,
The friend we found so cordial-hearted.”
-From his old friends of the Electrical Laboratory B.T.H. Co.).

ELLIOTT.—In affectionate remembrance of Gunner S J. Elliott, who was killed in action at Gallipoli, May 17, 1915.
“ There is a link Death cannot sever:
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
-Doll.