14th Dec 1918. Rugby’s War Trophy

RUGBY’S WAR TROPHY.
ARRIVAL OF THE CAPTURED GERMAN GUN.

We announced last week that in consideration of the excellent war record of Rugby a German field gun, captured by the Royal Warwicks, had been allocated to the Town; and this interesting relic of a shattered military system duly arrived on Wednesday afternoon. The weather was anything but suitable for an outdoor ceremony. A drizzling rain fell most of the morning, but the weather improved early in the afternoon and a large number of people then turned out to witness the arrival of the gun. It was originally arranged that the Chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P. C.C, should formally receive the gun on behalf of the Town at the urban boundary on the Bilton Road. Unfortunately, however, a break-down occurred at Bilton, and a messenger had to be despatched to Warwick for a spare part, and this necessitated an alteration in the arrangements.

The Rugby School O.T.C, under Capt C P Evers, turned out for the occasion, and, headed by the Corps Band, marched to Bilton, where Mr McKinnell, who was accompanied by Messrs W H Linnell, F E Hands, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, A Morson (Clerk), J H Sharp (Surveyor), T S Shenton (Manager of the Electric Light Dept.) received the gun (a 4.5 field cannon) which has evidently seen much service.

The procession restarted from Bilton shortly after three o’clock and when the gun crossed the parish boundary it was received with enthusiastic cheers and a frantic waving of miniature flags by the schoolchildren who had taken up positions on each side of the road.

The gun will be mounted on the grass plot fronting the Public Baths in Regent Street and to celebrate the auspicious occasion streamers of bunting had been hung round the three sides of this plot. On arriving at the Baths the Chairman standing near the gun said “ Ladies and gentlemen, this gun was captured by the gallant boys of the Royal Warwick Regiment, and all I want to do is to ask you to give three ringing cheers for the R.W.R.”

These having been given, an interesting and unique ceremony came to an end.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr Paramore, Bilton Road, Rugby, has been released from the Army and has resumed his practice.

The following B.T.H employes have been reported killed :—Lieut C A Field ; Sergt H M Bradford, R.W.R (Controller factor) ; Pte F J Swingler, Notts and Derby Regt (Collections and Credits Dept) recently died in France from influenza.

Captain R Snewing, eldest son of Mr and Mrs R Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was educated at the Lower School, and later entered the office of the B.T.H, and it still attached to the staff. He joined the Westminster Dragoons in 1916 as a trooper, and by his smartness and efficiency soon gained promotion and secured his commission, quickly following this up this his Captaincy. He was later attached to the Tank Corps, and gained the honour at La Cateau on October 23rd.

Sergt Ernest Gilbert, son of the late Mr Henry Gilbert, of St Andrew’s Street, Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M. The Sergeant joined up with the Surrey Yeomanry, and, after serving in India, took part with the Royal Engineers in the operations in Mesopotamia, where he is still on active service.

Pte Gordon Stretton, sen of Mr & Mrs A Stretton, Stanford Road, Swinford, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany, arrived home on Monday night. Thanks to the food parcels that he has received, he has not fared so badly as some, but is thankful to be in England once more.

Bombardier J Jeffery, R.F.A, son of Mr W Jeffery, 33 Rokeby Street, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field. When his battery was held up by barbed wire he went forward with a sergeant, and under heavy shell fire cleared a path, thereby enabling his battery to come into action.

RUGBY OFFICER’S RETURN.
EXPERIENCES AS A PRISONER.

Captain Gabriel Gray (Lancashire Fusiliers), who was wounded and taken prisoner on March 26th, returned to Rugby on Tuesday evening, having been interned at Pforyheim Camp, Baden, with 180 other officers. Capt Gray has returned home in the best of health and spirits. After a month in hospital at Bielefeld, he proceeded to Karlsruhe, a distributing centre for officers. From there he went to Pforyheim. The food supply, which up to this time had been of a very meagre description, was augmented in June by the arrival of Red Cross parcels, and from that time there was no more talk of starving by inches. The prisoners at Pforyheim entrained on December 3rd, and proceeded to Basle, where they had a very hearty reception from the inhabitants, and again at Pontalier, on crossing the frontier, they were received with enthusiasm. By easy stages they reached Boulogne on the 9th, and crossed to Dover on the 10th.

DUNCHURCH.

PTE HARRY EVANS, whose funeral took place recently at Dunchurch, was at the time of his death (from pneumonia) in the A.S.C. and was formerly a corporal in the 7th Battalion, K.R.R. He joined the regiment on September 2, 1914, and served through the battles of Ypres and the Somme. He was wounded in the last-named battle, and being unfit for further active service was transferred to the A.S.C. Owing to the prevalence of influenza at the depot, it was impossible to arrange for a military funeral, but a bugler was sent over to sound the “ Last Post.”

In a letter to his mother, the C.O states that Pte Evans was one of the best and most reliable men in Transport department and respected by everyone in the Company. His loss was especially felt by members of the football team, of which he was one of the best and sturdiest players. The respect in which he was held was shown by six beautiful wreaths sent by his officers and comrades. His elder brother, Pte W Evans, was killed in June, 1917, and the remaining son, Driver A Evans, M.G.C, is now recovering from an attack of fever.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
On Thursday afternoon last week Pte Bertie Evetts, Gloucester Regiment, arrived home after eight months’ captivity. He has spent his time behind the German lines, and looks very little the worse for his adventures. When he reached home he had to be informed of the recent loss of his mother, who died from influenza on the 8th ult. He enlisted on February 28, 1917, on reaching the prescribed age, and had previously lost his father and elder brother in the War, who both died fighting for their country.

KINETON.
MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Askew, who were notified this week of the death of their son Horace. This is the third son they have lost in the War.

LILBOURNE.
A CONCERT was given in the schoolroom on Wednesday, December 4th, by the R.A.F Concert Party. A large and appreciative audience greatly enjoyed the varied programme, and called for several encores, to which the performers kindly responded. The proceeds will be sent to the soldiers from this parish, and will take the form of postal orders instead of parcels.

DEMOBILISATION QUESTIONS.
AN OFFER TO OUR READERS.

The question of demobilisation is uppermost in everyone’s thoughts at the moment, and it is beset with endless difficulties and misunderstandings. This being so, we shall be pleased to secure an official reply from the Department of Demobilisation and Resettlement in London to any questions our readers may care to put to us, addressed to the Editor at 2 Albert Street, Rugby.

RUGBY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.
FRIDAY. Before Mr E M G Carmichael (chairman), Mr J Findlay (assessor for employers), and Mr E G Evans (assessor for the men).
FITTER’S SUCCESSFUL COMPENSATION CLAIM.

Kenneth H Lythgoe, fitter, 4 Kimberley Read, Rugby, claimed £4 15s compensation from the B.T.H. Company, for dismissal without notice.—Lythgoe stated that he entered the firm’s employment in 1916, and on October 26th was informed by the charge hand that there was no more work for him. He then asked for notice, or failing that a week’s wages. He subsequently saw the foreman, who said he was entitled to a week’s wages and referred him to the office, where he was told that if he had any complaint he must apply at the Tribunal.— In reply to Mr London, representing the B.T.H. Company, complainant stated that owing to the shortage of matches a Bunsen gas burner, which was used for heating materials, was kept burning during working hours, although when it was not in use it was turned low. One day the charge hand approached him with a circular from the head office urging the necessity of economy in the use of gas, and he (the chargehand) asked complainant to turn the gas out when it was not required. Complainant replied that he would turn the gas out if the chargehand would supply him with matches.—The chargehand explained that it was not so much what complainant said as the way in which he said it. On the day following this affair complainant stayed away from work, and when he returned on Saturday he was dismissed on the grounds of general insolence and unreliability as a timekeeper.—Complainant urged that he had never held a job up during his connection with the company.—The Chairman said the firm were quite justified in getting rid of such a workman, but they were not entitled to dismiss him instantly and peremptorily as they had done. Complainant would be awarded a week’s wage as compensation.

THE SALVATION ARMY BAND, in connection , with their Christmas playing, are making a special effort to provide more instruments for their comrade bandsmen, who will soon be returning from active service, when a generous response is hoped for.

ABOUT 45 Army horses were sold at last Monday’s market by Messrs Howkins & Sons at prices ranging from 20 to 76 guineas each. Several bunches of store cattle also met a good trade, the prices realised being £30 to £39 per pair.

SCRAP RUBBER WANTED.—The Ministry of National Service, Rubber Salvage Department, are appealing to the public for scrap rubber, which will be sold to the War Office, and the proceeds devoted to the Red Cross. The Hon Secretary of the Rugby Part-Time Committee, Mr A W Sheasby, of 30 Sheep Street, will be pleased to receive motor-cycle, cycle and other old tyres, rubber boots, air cushions, rubber flooring, hose, belting, waterproof clothing, hot water bottles, air beds, water beds, rubber toys, heels, soles of boots, rubber off electric cables and shock absorbers, or, in fact, any form of rubber, and he will forward it to the department.

DEATHS.

BRAIN.—In ever loving memory of GEORGE WILLIAM BRAIN, of Dunchurch, who was killed in action somewhere in France or Belgium on November 1st, 1918, aged 18.
“ We loved him, yes, no tongue can tell,
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him too, and thought it best
To take him to his Heavenly rest.
Gone from us, but not forgotten.
Never shall thy memory fade ;
Sweetest thoughts shall ever linger
Round the spot where thou art laid.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

INGRAM.—In proud and loving memory of Gunner ERNEST B. INGRAM (BEN), of the R.F.A., killed in action on Dec. 8, 1916. aged 22 years.
“ Somewhere in France in a lonely grave
There sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Loved and sadly missed by his sorrowing Mother, and not forgotten by his sisters and brothers and all who knew him.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of HARRY J. MATTHEWS (the dearly beloved and only son of D. and M. A. Matthews), who died in France Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, and Sisters.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE READ, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, 46 Rokeby Street, Rugby, who was killed in action December 15, 1916, aged 22 years.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried ;
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.