2nd Feb 1918. The Food Shortage

THE FOOD SHORTAGE.

The queue evil reached a climax at Rugby on Friday last when large crowds besieged practically the whole of the provision and butchers’ shops in the centre of the town. An unusually large quantity of margarine, five tons, was received in the town the previous day, and a large portion of this was commandeered by the Executive Officer and distributed amongst about a dozen other shops. Notwithstanding this, however, people were unable to obtain a share, while others by dodging from queue to queue, or sending different members of their families, secured considerably more than their reasonable requirements.

In the afternoon large crowds, estimated at several thousands of persons, including number of locomotive men, assembled in and near the Market Place. These latter were interviewed by Mr T A Wise, chairman of the Food Control Committee, and they also visited the warehouses of several tradesmen to satisfy themselves that there were no large hoards of supplies. The tradespeople did everything possible to satisfy the people, and when the much sought for fats could no longer be obtained a large stock of jam was released. The Police also exercised considerable tact in dealing with the crowd, which several occasions showed signs of exasperation. On the other hand those who were engaged in the difficult task of distributing were impressed with the inconsiderate and unreasonable attitude adopted by many of the people who besieged the shops.

On Saturday, however, the scenes were quite normal again, and in fact there were fewer queues than has been the case for some time.

This state of affairs continued til yesterday (Friday) morning, when large queues had assembled by seven o’clock, and at one establishment the police were sorely pressed to keep a huge crowd from forcing an entrance into the shop.

CULTIVATION OF RAILWAY LAND.—The L N-W announce that they are prepared to allocate plots of vacant land both inside and outside their fences to anyone, whether railway servants or not, who desire to add to the food production at a nominal rent of 1s each lot.

FATAL FALL FROM AEROPLANE.

An inquest was held at the Court House on Friday last week by Mr E F Hadow (coroner), concerning the death of Second-Lieut Harold Griffith Nelson (25), which took place, as reported in our last issue, as the result of an aeroplane accident.

Capt William Hubert Taylor deposed that the deceased officer’s home was in New York. He was a member of the American Air Service, and attached to the R.F.C. He was a learner, but very competent, and had flown altogether 67 hours.

Sergt Eric Jack Robjohns and Corpl William Hunter gave evidence to the effect that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good condition before the flight.

Capt Leslie Randall Wren deposed that he saw decease start off. After he had been up about half-an-hour he pulled the machine into a vertical stall, an evolution by which the machine would be practically “ standing ” on the tail. This evolution was of no practical use. He added that the position would automatically cause the machine to nose dive violently, and it would be out of control for a time. One would want a good deal of depth for such a dive, but 2,000ft. would be quite high enough. While the machine was turning over into the nose dive witness saw the deceased fly out of the machine.—The Coroner: It came round so quickly that it practically “ chucked ” him out ?—A: That is what it comes to ; or, on the other hand, his head might have struck the front of the machine, and during unconsciousness he might have fallen out. The tendency would be for him to fall out if he was not strapped in. Witness added that he immediately went to the machine and examined the belt, but it was not strapped up. It was the pilot’s businesses see that he strapped himself in, and he could not say whether deceased had taken that precaution. There was a possibility, but not a probability, that he might have jerked the belt open by the motion of his arms. Witness had never hoard of such a thing being done.

Second-Lieut G W Curtis gave evidence as to the damage to the machine, which came to earth a-half to three-quarters of a mile away.

Surgeon-Major Collins explained the frightful injuries received by the deceased, who, he said, might have been alive, but would probably have been unconscious by the time he touched the earth. Despite the tremendous impact deceased’s wrist watch, with an open dial, was unbroken, and continued to go without losing a second.

The Coroner referred to the surprisingly few accidents which occurred, in view of the number of flights made daily, and said this appeared to be a clear case of the usual precautions not having been taken.

The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death ” ; but added that there was no evidence to prove whether the belt was fastened or not when deceased began the flight.

After the inquest an officer gave a demonstration with the belt, as a result of which the Coroner and Jury expressed the opinion that it probably was fastened up before the flight.

WOMEN LAND ARMY.

EFFICIENCY CERTIFICATES FOR LOCAL WORKERS.

The presentation of efficiency certificates won by Warwickshire women at the Midland test last autumn was made the occasion of a public demonstration at Birmingham on Tuesday, in which between 20 and 30 workers from the Rugby district took part, along with several hundred women from all parts of the county. The majority were wearing the severely practical uniform in which they are accustomed to work, and the cheerfulness of the girls and their healthy and robust appearance were at once a tribute to the wholesome effect which the work, despite trying conditions, has upon spirits and physique. The certificates were presented by the Lord Mayor (Ald Brookes), who said there were now 180 girls employed on farms in Birmingham and Warwickshire, and, in addition, there were 1,400 women in the villages who had registered themselves as willing to give part of their time to farm work.

Out the 84 Warwickshire girls who entered the tests 70 received certificates. Among them were the following local workers who passed three tests:—Miss Mary Crofts (Long Lawford), Miss Nellie Harrison (Clifton), and Miss Constance Walton (Clifton). Passed two tests: Miss Doris Stent (Pailton), Miss Richards (Clifton), Mrs Lee (Bourton), and Miss Bertha Steath (Clifton). Passed one test: Miss Annie Oven and Miss Kate Foster (Catthorpe), Miss Harriett Dickens (Brownsover), Mrs Edward Eales (Bourton). Others of the Land Army mentioned as doing good work in this district were : Miss Pape (Bretford), Mrs Harry Smith and Miss Robinson (Lawford Heath), Miss Tew (Pailton), Miss Taylor and Miss Smith (Princethorpe), Miss Edwards (Newbold), Miss Allerton (Stretton-under-Fosse), Miss Hunt, Miss Gibbs, and Miss Packer (working near Lutterworth).

There are also many whole-time and part-time workers in the Rugby area who have earned as many as six stripes on their arms for length of service, all going to work on the land. Each stripe represents 1,440 hours’ work.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Four additional prisoners of war have been added to the list of the Rugby Committee. Reported missing since Nov 30, Sergt J R Sacree, 10th Batt. Rifle Brigade, is now known to be wounded with gunshot through the shoulder, and a prisoner of war interned at Soltau. Sergt Sacree, who joined up immediately on the outbreak of war, was an assistant for six years to Mr C T Tew, of Regent Street. He had been previously wounded four times, won the Military Medal and recommended again in September last year.— Rfn W E Boyles, 10th Kings Royal Rifle Corps, whose home is at Bishops Itchington, is a prisoner of war interned at Dulmen. An employee of Messrs Greaves, Bull & Lakin, Ltd. of Harbury, he enlisted in 1914. His firm have generously offered to defray the cost of his food parcels as well as for two other employees of theirs who are prisoners of war in Germany.—Pte A C Neal. Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Napton, is a prisoner of war at Limburg-a-Lahn.—Pte A E Mumford, Machine Gun Corps, attached Cavalry, is a prisoner of war at Minden. For three years he acted as barman for Mr W Jones, of “ The Barrel,” Market Place. He enlisted in August, 1914, in the Lancers, subsequently being transferred to the 17th Lancers—Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of Rugby Committer, has made the necessary arrangements for the despatch of the standard food parcels and bread to each of the above men.

The financial support given to the Committee has been splendid, sufficient to enable them to bear the whole cost of each man’s food parcels, etc. Every month means a grave increase in the number of prisoners of war and a corresponding increase in the expenditure. Constant help is very necessary to prevent any call upon the funds of the Red Cross. The number of prisoners of war now on the list is 83, and to provide for these men £230 6s 6d has to be found every four weeks.

Pte A King, of the Royal Scots, whose home is at Napton, has been repatriated, but no further news has yet come to hand.

D.C.M. WON BY RUGBY SOLDIERS.
BRAVE DEEDS.
The following further awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are officially recorded :—

10764 Pte J H Enticott, Oxford & Bucks L.I.(Rugby).
In spite of heavy machine gun fire, he volunteered to go out and look for wounded, and succeeded in bringing back successfully an officer and N.C.O. He showed complete disregard for danger.

32651 B.S.M H W Evans, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his wagon lines were heavily shelled he promptly organised the clearing of the lines, and removed the wounded to an aid post. All this took place under very heavy shell fire, which killed or wounded six men and 37 horses. By his complete coolness and splendid disregard of personal danger he averted all panic and saved many casualties.

840150 Bty Sergt-Major G Hopewell, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his battery ammunition dump was set on fire by enemy shelling he at once went to the position with his Battery Commander and another officer ; and although under heavy shell fire and in great danger from the exploding ammunition, he collected earth and saved a large quantity of material. Both . officers were wounded whilst performing this gallant act.

A RUGBY MASTER DIES AT SEA.—Second-Lieut Leonard George Colbeck, M.C (R.F.A), reported died at sea on the 3rd January, just after completing his 33rd year, was formerly an assistant master at Rugby School. A fine all-round cricketer at Marlborough when captain of the team in 1903, his batting had not a little do with his side averting defeat from Rugby at Lord’s. Two years later he secured a place in the Cambridge University team. One three occasions he figured in the Inter-Varsity hockey match.

MORE AIR RAIDS.—During an air raid on Monday night over London and the South-Eastern Counties 47 men. women and children were killed and 169 injured—30 of them in the basement of one establishment on which a bomb fell. There was a second raid on Tuesday injured.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.
COUNTY COUNCIL ACCEPTS THE DUKE OF BUCCLEUCH’S OFFER.
OLD TREES TO BE REPLACED BY YOUNG ONE.

The Warwickshire County Council, at their meeting on Wednesday, discussed the question of the future of Dunchurch Avenue, on consideration of a special report by the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and decided, after a long discussion, in favour of the first of two alternative schemes suggested by the Duke of Buccleuch. Ald J S Dugdale, K.C, presided.

The proposals made by the Duke of Buccleuch at an interview with the committee at London on January 4th were set forth in the report of the Avenue Committee. His Grace pointed out that his agent’s letter of June 15th last year had not been read or fully reported to the County Council meeting of October 24th last ; that if that had been done it would have made it clear that he himself would have been glad to preserve the Avenue intact ; but that the preservation of the elm trees was impossible because of the rotten and dangerous state of many of them ; and he made an alternative offer which is summarised in his agent’s letter of January 8th, given below. The committee added : We expressed regret to his Grace that any misapprehension should have arisen from the letter of June 15th not having been fully reported or read, and explained that it had been fully read to the County Roads and Bridges Committee, and that the report was in the ordinary course of the Council’s procedure.

THE DUKE’S OFFERS.

The report of the committee continued : Mr Cyprian Knollys, the Duke’s agent, wrote on January 8th : ” I now write to confirm what passed at an interview between the deputation from your Council and the Duke of Buccleuch on the 4th ult. The Duke has always shared the desire expressed by the deputation that the Avenue (which is now about 180 years old) should be preserved. He has had it under observation for some years, and particularly since the gales of December, 1915, and March, 1916, when 74 of the elm trees were blown down. The opportunity which these windfalls afforded for obtaining accurate information as to the state and condition of the trees has convinced the Duke that they have become dangerous, and that even if left the trees, as an avenue, would in the course of a few years practically cease to exist. His Grace is also of opinion that any lopping or pollarding would never be successful, and would only hasten the process of decay. He feels, therefore, that he cannot take the responsibly of leaving the trees standing. In view, however of the importance of maintaining the Avenue for the public benefit in the future the Duke made the following alternative proposals :—

“ (1) That be should himself dispose of the trees standing on the unenclosed land, and after deducting expenses and charges, handover half the proceeds of the sale to the County Council (or other approved body) to be used for re-planting and keeping up the Avenue : or (2) that he should sell to the County Council (or other approved body) the trees standing on the unenclosed land at 6d per cubic foot, which may be considered half their value, on the condition that an avenue it kept up. In either case his Grace will give all his rights over this unenclosed land on which the trees stand.

“ Scheme No. 1 should provide ample money to replant the Avenue as circumstances will permit.

“ Under Scheme 2 the Avenue would belong to the public, but in connection with it there are one or two observations which the Duke thinks the Council may like him to mention for their consideration :

“ If say half the trees are cut, a sufficient sum should be obtained to pay the cost of the purchase, and young trees could then be planted in the vacant spaces. This would, to a great extent, preserve the present appearance of the Avenue. On the other hand, the shade from the remaining trees might injuriously affect the growth of the young plants, and there would be considerable risk of the young trees being injured by the fall of any of the old trees or their limbs. It should also be borne in mind that when trees are grown close, as in an avenue, every tree that is blown down increases the danger of the remainder being also blown. If it was thought desirable to reduce this risk it might be done by cutting down one-half of the Avenue and re-planting it, and then gradually to re-plant the other half.

THE DUKE’S OPINION,

“ From a practical point of view, the Duke considers Scheme 1 to be the best, as though there would be a temporary loss of the Avenue, all danger to the public would be avoided, and there would certainly be a superior avenue in the future, as experience has shown that making up an old avenue is seldom, if ever, successful. And if, as was suggested the Avenue is to be considered as part of the proposed permanent memorial to the 29th Division, it would if newly planted throughout, be in its prime 100 years after the date of his Majesty’s inspection. In making these observations, however, the Duke desires it to be understood that he leaves it entirely to the Council to decide which (if either) of these proposals they would like to adopt ; and I am to add that if the experience and advice of his Forester would be of any assistance to the Council in their consideration of the subject his Grace will be happy if they will avail themselves of it. It was suggested that you would be able to let me hear from you by March 1st.”

“ VERY GENEROUS OFFER.”

The committee proceeded :—

[LONG DISCUSSION BY W.C.C.]

The question was then put to the vote, and the amendment was carried by 32 votes to 10—Scheme No. 1 being, therefore the one accepted.

It was pointed out that a public subscription would be necessary to provide the 29th Division Memorial.

A vote of thanks was passed to the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and the committee will (it was stated) remain in being.

DEATHS.

HERBERT.—In loving memory of Pte. JAMES HERBERT, 6th Northants Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Herbert, Yelvertoft ; killed in action January 19th, 1918, aged 38 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

SMITH.—In loving memory of GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, who was killed in France on January 29, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN, who died of wounds on January 28, 1916.—From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brothers.

 

 

12th Jan 1918. Rugby Hero Decorated

RUGBY HERO DECORATED.

A pleasing ceremony was perfumed, in the Lower School field on Sunday morning, when, in the presence of several thousand people, including the members of the Discharged Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Association, Lance-Corpl Enticott, Oxon and Bucks L.I, son of Mr J Enticott, of 60 Union Street, was decorated by Lieut-Col F F Johnstone with the Military Medal and bar and the D.C.M.

Before making the presentation Lieut-Col Johnstone said it gave him very great pleasure to be amongst soldiers again, and more especially to be amongst men who had served their country and taken their part in this terrible War. Many of those on parade had been wounded, and they would all be very pleased to see those decorations conferred upon a man who had behaved most gallantly in the War. He noticed that several present had also distinguished themselves, and had been awarded the D.C.M, and no one would accord greater praise to Lance-Corpl Enticott than those men who had also conducted themselves well. Lance-Corpl Enticott had most conspicuously distinguished himself on several occasions, and had won the Military Medal for “ conspicuous bravery on the field and dressing the wounded and heavy shell fire on September 15, 1916, on the Somme.” He was awarded a bar to this medal for “ conspicuous conduct on May 3, 1916, in the Battle of Warnecourt, for dressing the wounded and getting them away under heavy shell fire.” He was also warded the D.C.M for, on August 23rd, at Hooge, going through two barrages—our own and the German—into a wood to fetch out the wounded and getting them away under heavy fire on August 24, 1917. Having pinned the decorations on Lance-Corpl Enticott’s breast, Lieut-Col Johnstone reminded them that nn man could have greater love than he who was willing to risk his life or give it up for his friend ; and although he was glad to say that Lance-Corpl Enticott had not given up his life, he had risked it a number of times. They were glad to see the return of such a noble soldier ; they trusted that he would have good luck in the future and a happy life ; and as he had to go back to the front, they also hoped that he would be protected and brought back safely to Rugby.

Lance-Corpl Enticott, in a brief, soldierly speech, returned thanks for his warm reception. He hoped soon to be living amongst them again, and that the War would finish during the coming year.

Hearty cheers were then given for Lance-Corpl Enticott, after which the company dispersed.

Lance-Corpl Enticott is an old St Matthew’s boy and a former member of the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade, and his old Captain, Mr W F Wood, was present during the ceremony.

LIEUT. NEVILLE HANDS AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS.

The latest list of recipients of the Military Cross contains the name of Lieut Neville Hands, R.W.R, second son of Mr & Mrs F E Hands, Sheep Street. Lieut Hands, who is an Old Laurentian, enlisted in the 7th R.W.R as a private, and after a period of active service he was given a commission in March, 1916. He returned to France in the following September, and after taking part in the fighting on the Somme, he was appointed sniping and intelligence officer. He is now in charge of a Sniping Corps in Italy.

D.C.M FOR ANOTHER ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY.

The last list of awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field includes the name of Corpl W E Stay, Royal Garrison Artillery, son of Mr F Stay, 99 Grosvenor Road, Rugby. Corpl Stay is a former scholar of Matthew’s School, and the fourth old boy of that school to obtain this honour, previous recipients being the late Sergt W Bale, Lance-Corpl J Enticott, and Pte A Norman.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut W S Stebbing, R.W.R, has been recently mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches for gallantry on the Western Front.

Bombardier A C Dandridge, son of Mr & Mrs C Dandridge. Railway Terrace, has been mentioned in despatches for distinguished service in the field. Before joining the Colours he was employed by the Urban District Council. He is an “ old boy ” of the St Matthew’s School.

The death occurred at Genoa Hospital, Italy, on Christmas Day, of Pte William Murphy, 3rd Royal Warwicks, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Wm Murphy, of 101 South Street, Rugby, The deceased, who was 19 years of age, enlisted eighteen months ago on attaining the age of 18. He served in France, from whence he was invalided for a time, but returned to France, and thence to Italy.

Pte A W Kinzett, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs E Kinzett, Wolverton Fields, Stratford-on-Avon, died of wound received in action on December 2nd. He was a native of Dunchurch, and was educated at the Village School. Formerly employed at the Daimler Works, Coventry, he joined the Royal Warwicks in June, 1915. He went to France in the following April, and was invalided home in December, He was subsequently transferred to the M.G.C. and returned to France last April.

BILTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Referring in the Parish Magazine to the death of Pte Chris Eccles, Royal Warwicks, at the front, the Rector Writes :— “ The memory of him will live on. A Bilton man, a familiar figure, a kindly disposition, and a generous heart made him well known to all in the village, while he was no less well known in the Parish Church, where he fulfilled the duties of a sidesman with diligence and affection. We miss him greatly.
Pte Ernest Cox is now reported missing.

MARTON.
OUR SOLDIERS.—Pte G Johnson, who was severely wounded in the arm and thigh and has been in hospital in France for some months, passed away on Friday last week. He was 35 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

We recently announced that Lance-Corpl Harwood F Hancox had been transferred from his prison camp in Germany to Switzerland, and this week Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, has received the following letter from him, dated December 28, 1917, in which he says : —“ I now take the pleasure of answering your kind letter, hoping you had a happy Christmas, as I can assure I and my comrades in Interlaken enjoyed ours. We had a good dinner and supper. After supper a concert was given, which was very good, our artistes being British soldiers, Canadians, and Australians. In the interval was the distribution of her Majesty Queen Mary’s gifts, also cigarettes from the English colony at Geneva. We had three quarters of an hour for dancing, which, after three years behind barbed wire, was a great treat to us. I think from the time your committee was first formed for the Rugby district I received your parcels fairly regularly. Of course, sometimes I might miss a week, and then got two sent on the next week, as I went from Soltau Lager to Lichtenhorst Lager in March, 1915, and all our parcels had to be addressed to Soltau for some time, as that was the headquarter camp. Afterwards we got them addressed direct to Lichtenhorst, where I remained till March, 1916, when I was sent on a farm with five more, but we always had our parcels sent through every week, and they were mostly in a good condition. I do not think I had more than four or five damaged. I am still getting the parcels sent on from Germany to me. I must thank you, the Rugby Committee, and all helpers for the great kindness the prisoners have received. If it had not been for the help in food and clothing there would not be many alive to tell the tale. You would not believe the number of Russians that have died through starvation. I was never with any Rugby men after I left Munster Lager. We had about 150 men join us here to-day from Germany, and they looked as if they had seen very hard times. I now close with best wishes to you and your committee. Wishing all ‘ A Happy New Year.’”

MORE WAR PRISONERS.

Corpl F Evans, 11th Rifle Brigade, whose home is at 13 James Street, Rugby, has written home to say he is a prisoner of war and interned at Wahn, but will shortly be removed to another camp.

Corpl S T Smith, K.R.R.C, is a prisoner of war in Germany, inturned at Dulmen. Corpl Smith’s home is at Barby, where he worked for Mr Thomas Pittom, and was also in the choir of Barby Church.

Sergt R G Elkington, K.R.R.C, son of Mrs W Elkington, Long Lawford, is a prisoner of war prisoner of war in Germany, inturned at Dulmen. He worked at Rugby Gas Works. He joined up in September, 1914, had been in France 2½ years. In April last he was awarded the Military Medal for great courage and personal bravery in the storming of the village of Metz.

Corpl J C Barclay, North Staffs Regt, who was recently reported prisoner of war, has now been transferred from Wahn to Dulmen.

These men have all been handed over to the care of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J R Barker, is arranging for the dispatch of standard food parcels and bread to them.

In addition to Bandsman Rowe and L-Corpl Harwood, F Hancox, Pte P Gamble Davis, of Dunchurch, and Pte P Mace, of Hillmorton, have also been transferred to Switzerland, where they will be well cared for.

Pte C Bragg, Royal Warwicks, whose home is at Brinklow, has succeeded in escaping from his internment camp in Germany, and has arrived in England.

Pte Bert Holmes, Royal Warwicks, son of Mrs Everington, 47 Wood Street, Rugby, has been reported missing since November 20th. Apprenticed at Willans & Robinson’s, he joined up immediately on the outbreak of war, and had been in France since November, 1914. He was last seen wounded and lying in a shell hole. A search party sent out failed to find him, and it is believed he is a prisoner of war. Holmes was an old Murray School boy.

The number of men now on the Rugby list who still have to be provided for is 77, the cost being £213 13s 6d every four weeks.

BRITISH HEROES OF THE AIR.

Of our airmen on the Western Front the names of two who have met with remarkable success recur constantly in conversation among flying men in France, at home, and even overseas. One is Capt J Byford McCudden, M.C., of London. So far he has brought down 34 German machines.

The other man is Capt Philip Fletcher Fullard, D.S.O, M.C. He is a fine, upstanding young fellow, who loves every form of sport. Next to flying, football is his favourite recreation and in a game in which he took part in France a few weeks ago he sustained a fractured leg. The accident necessitated a stay in a London hospital from which he has just been discharged, and checked his record of air triumphs.

Capt Fullard went fresh from school into an Officers’ Training Corps. He has flown in France for about six months, and during that time has brought down 42 enemy machines and three balloons. In a single day he brought down four German aeroplanes—his record day’s “ bag.” On another occasion he and another airman brought down seven enemy machines before breakfast, Fullard accounting for three of them. Up to the middle of October the squadron to which he belongs had brought down 200 enemy machines, and their number now stands at about 250. The outstanding feature of Capt Fullard’s record is the few casualties his “ flight ” has suffered. For three months he worked with the same flight of six pilots without a casualty among them, and in that time they brought down more enemy machines than any other flight in France. He has a narrow escape when fighting a German two-seater, his goggles being shot away from his eyes. The Very lights in his machine caught fire and set the woodwork of the aeroplane alight, but he managed to get his burning machine back to the British lines. Capt Fullard respects the fighting capacity of the Boche airman, and considers they are good in a tight corner.

Capt Fullard, is the son of the late Mr Thomas Fletcher Fullard, of Hatfied, and Mrs Fullard, who now lives at Rugby. He was educated at Norwich Grammar School, and in 1915 joined the Inns of Court Officers’ Training Corps. Passing high in his examination, he was offered a commission in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, but was selected as suitable for flying work, and joined the Royal Flying Corps. He went to Upavon, and was given a post as instructor there. In April, 1917, he was sent to the front. He has gained the D.S.O and the Military Cross, with a bar.

FOOD CONTROL.

RUGBY AND CRICK RURAL DISTRICT.

At the first meeting of the Rugby and Crick Joint Committee on the 22nd ult, there were present : Mrs Anderson, Mrs Draper, Mrs Neilson, Mrs Peet, Mrs Townsend, Rev R S Mitchison, and Messrs A Appleby, J Cripps, J C Harrison, H Tarbox, A T Watson, and W Woodward.

H Tarbox was unanimously appointed Chairman of the Joint Committee, and Mr F Fellows Executive Officer and Enforcement Officer for the joint district.

A circular was received giving details of the Milk Priority Scheme which the Government propose should be adopted in the districts where there is a shortage of milk, and consideration of this matter was adjourned so that each member might receive a print. A Finance Committee was appointed, consisting of the Chairman and Messrs A Appleby and J Cripps.

Applications were received from bakers in the district for a supply of potatoes (for use in bread) and as the applications were from a very small proportion of bakers, it was resolved that the Commissioner for the district to be asked whether there was any likelihood of the use of potatoes in bread being made compulsory upon the bakers in this area. It was pointed out that this is a fairly large potato-growing district, and a good proportion were of varieties that would not keep, and it would be better for the potatoes to be used in this way rather than they should be allowed to bad and waste. The Executive Officer was directed to arrange for supplies of potatoes to the bakers who applied for them.

A number of certificates were granted to retailers of meat, and the Executive Officer pointed out that apparently these applications were from shopkeepers who sold sausages.

A number of letters were received from the Secretary of Food Economy Sub-committee in the district asking for leaflets and for arrangements to be made for speakers to address meetings, and for cookery demonstrations. The Executive Officer promised to send leaflets, and to ask Mr W E Lovsey, of Birmingham, the Assistant Divisional Commissioner, if he would come into this area and address meetings.

The question of the distribution in the Rural area of margarine commandeered in the Urban District was fully discussed, and the Committee is taking up this matter with the Urban authorities.

THE MEAT SHORTAGE.

BUTCHERS’ SUPPLIES TO BE CUT DOWN BY HALF.

A meeting of butchers of the town and district to consider a new order concerning the supplies of meat was held at the Benn Buildings on Tuesday morning. Mr H Tarbox presided, and there was a good attendance.

A memorandum from the Divisional Commissioner was read to the effect that in future all meat retailers will only be allowed to receive 50 per cent. of the quantity sold by them in October last, and pointing out that particulars of the weekly meat supplies required by butchers in the district should be forwarded to the Auctioneer-Chairman of the Cattle Purchase Committee, but any serious complaints or difficulties should be reported to the Live Stocks Sub-Commissioner for the County, Mr H F Knightley, Sheep Street, Stratford-on-Avon. Dead meat, either home-killed or frozen, hitherto purchased from wholesalers, must continue to be obtained through the same channel as far as possible. “ It seems probable,” the Commissioner continued, “ that Local Food Control Committees will be required to take an active part in meat distribution, and if the matter is one that affects your area to any great extent I suggest that you make arrangements accordingly.”

A copy of the form which each retailer has to fill up weekly was also produced.

Mr Reeve drew attention to the fact that the dead cattle did not yield the percentage of meat that it should do, and instead of paying 1s 2½d per lb for their meat, they were really paying 1s 4¼d ; but the Chairman pointed out that the new regulations were to ensure that they obtained a supply of meat. It had nothing to do with the price.—Mr Reeve : But there is no use for us to stop in our shops to sell meat at a loss, as we are doing at present. It is hard to think that we have got to cut meat at a loss to feed the public. Sheep are 2s per lb ; and how are we to get a living at that price ? He pointed out that some butchers only had one small beast per week ; and if, in consequence of this supply being cut down by half they had to close their shops, would other butchers be allowed more meat to supply his customers ?—Mr Burton replied in the affirmative.—In reply to Mr Waite, the Chairman said if the butchers neglected to make their returns they would probably find themselves without any meat.—The butchers present, however, expressed themselves as willing to do all they could in the matter ; and two committees to assist the Executive Officers were appointed, viz : Urban District, Messrs H V Wait and C W Clayson ; Rural District, Messrs Wooley (Dunchurch) and B Page (Wolston). Mr A H Reeve was nominated to receive beasts consigned to the Rugby butchers by the Authorities.

SOLDIER’S WONDERFUL ESCAPE.—An Army Sergeant travelling on the Euston to Scotland express on Friday evening in last week had a wonderful escape from death. When the train, which was travelling at about seventy miles an hour, was near Stow tunnel, a few miles south of Weedon, the man accidentally fell out. The accident was reported by some comrades on arriving at Rugby, and Night Stationmaster Walton immediately left with a search train and an ambulance party. In the meantime the soldier had regained consciousness and had walked to the Heyford signal-box. He was conveyed to Rugby and taken to the Hospital of St Cross, where his injuries, which consisted mainly of severe cuts on the head, were attended to.

SAVE THE MEN !
THE Chemico BODY SHIELD is BULLET-PROOF.
SEND ONE TO YOUR MAN AT THE FRONT.
Call and see the many testimonials of lives saved
SOLE AGENT: CHAS. T. TEW, TAILOR, 7 Regent Street, Rugby.

DEATHS.

MURPHY.—In loving memory of WILLIAM, the eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Murphy, of 101 South Street, Rugby, who died in Genoa Hospital, Italy, at the early age of 19, on December 25, 1917.
“ Oh ! how sadly we shall miss him ;
There will a vacant place.
We shall never forget his footsteps,
Or his dear, familiar face.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Sister & Brothers.

6th Oct 1917. Successful Effort for Rugby Prisoners of War Fund

SUCCESSFUL EFFORT FOR RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
SHOW & SALE ON BENN FIELD.

Glorious weather and the prospect of performing a pleasing duty under pleasant conditions attracted a large crowd to Benn Field on Saturday afternoon, when a show and sale, arranged by the “ G.H.S ” Philanthropic Society on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held. The decision to hold the show was only reached about ten days previously, but so enthusiastically did all connected with the effort work, and so generously were they supported by the public, that the success of the undertaking was never in doubt, and this feeling of confidence was justified by the results.

The opening ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, who explained that the object of the effort was to raise as much money as possible to send parcels, of food to those “ poor chaps ” who had been taken prisoners by the unspeakable Hun, and who, as they knew well, were treated very badly indeed and were not properly fed. It was, therefore, up to the people of Rugby to see that enough money was raised, so that parcels of food could go to these men week by week, and so that they, when they were liberated after the end of the War, would be restored to their friends hale and hearty and able to take their place again in the life of the community. If they did not find the money, and if they left those poor fellows to the tender mercies of the Germans, some would never come back at all, and others would come back with their constitution devitalised by continual semi-starvation, and many, perhaps, would only come back to linger and to die. The Rugby Prisoners of War Committee was started two years ago by an energetic committee, of whom Mr J R Barker was the equally energetic secretary, and he had worked like a Trojan for it. The fund now supported 77 prisoners, all of whom were boys from Rugby or villages in the immediate neighbourhood. There was no doubt therefore, that there was a special call for them to look after these men. It cost £170 per month to send the requisite number of parcels, and of this £70 had already been guaranteed by certain kind and patriotic individuals, but the balance of £100 per month still had to be raised, and they were going to see that day if they could not realise at least several hundreds (a voice : “ Thousands ”). Thank God, Rugby, during this War had always come up to the scratch, and he had never known her let them down ; and he earnestly appealed to them to support the effort that day to the best of their ability. . .

A large number of attractions had been arranged by the committee, the principal of which was the vegetable show, where some exceptionally fine exhibits were staged and were much admired. Prizes were offered for the best exhibits, and these were divided into 27 classes, the winners being as follows :–

The judges were Messrs W Harmon (Newnham Paddox) and A Chandler (Coton House).

The Fire Brigade competitions were keenly contested. The prizes were given by the B.T.H Foremen’s and the Assistant Foremen’s Association. Mr W Spencer and Engineer Reece were the judges ; Messrs J Taylor and Cooke, timekeepers ; and Third Officer Fletcher (B.T.H) starter. . . .

A short concert was also given, the programme being arranged by Mr Charles T Mewis, and those who took part were Messrs H Phillips, W Jackson, J Farley and J Heap (Rugby Glee Party), Mr Geo Pratt, Coventry (humorist), Mr W C Sutton (ventriloquist), Mr Gough (conjuror). Mr J Littler was at the piano. A Punch and Judy show was also provided for the entertainment of the children. There was a musical chairs competition on bicycles, which was arranged for Boy Scouts, a number of whom from the Murray School Troop rendered valuable assistance during the afternoon. The competition was won by P Leader, G Day being second.

Various side-shows, skittles, “ Kaiser Bill and Little Willie,” guessing competitions, &c, were provided, and each of these did a good business.

A quantity of poultry and several sheep and lambs were sent by sympathisers for the benefit of the funds, and early in the evening the poultry were sold by Mr W Wiggins. Some very choice birds were offered, and in a number of cases they were sold over and over again. The prices, on the whole, were very satisfactory, the buyers sympathising with the genial auctioneer’s exhortation to “ Never mind the value of the things, but remember it is for a good cause.” A pet lamb was sold and re-sold ten times, realising £2 2s 6d.

The live stock having been disposed of the scene of interest shifted to the exhibition tents, where the produce was sold by Messrs W Wiggins, W Howkins, and F Frost. The visitors were in a generous mood, and, on the whole, very satisfactory prices were given. A small tan of petrol, containing about a gill of spirit, was sold and re-sold many times, the total realised being over £5 ; and by a similar method a toy motor-car realised about £7 10s. A potato, shaped like a bulldog’s head, also found many purchasers.

The sheep, lambs, and goat were sold in Rugby Market on Monday, and realised between £30 and £40.

Other diversions arranged for had to be omitted, as permission for extension and lighting could not be obtained. The proceeds will amount to well over £150.

The committee was assisted during the day by Messrs A Lord, G Vickery, G W Lawson, G Hansbury, G O Watson, W Henson, W Martin, H Clark, A C Bennett, A Allcutt, A Padbury, Mrs Barker, Misses R Palmer, Johnson, Ward, Kitchen, Twyford, Renshaw, Bromwick, Franklin, Prince, Owen, Spencer, Holyoake, Houghton, Fairfield, Walker, Cooke, and Gibbs.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R O Squarey, R.E, who has won the Military Cross, was captain of football at Rugby School.

Mrs Wakelin, of 15 Adam Street, New Bilton, has received news that her husband Pte L A Wakelin, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded by shrapnel.

Lieut Stanley Hidden, who has been serving for some considerable time with the Headquarters of a Mounted Division, has recently been promoted captain.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks, son of Mr & Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terrace, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th, after being twice previously wounded. He was 20 years of age, and had been in France two years. He had ten days’ leave at home in July. An elder brother, Pte F W Boyes, Berkshire Regiment, who was reported missing on July 1st, was subsequently reported killed.

ANOTHER HONOUR FOR LANCE-CORPL J H ENTICOTT.

Lance-Corpl J H Enticott, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr J Enticott, of 60 Union Street, who has already won the Military Medal and bar, has now been awarded the D.C.M for gallantry. Before the War Lance-Corpl Enticott, who is an Old St Matthew’s boy, was employed at the B.T.H. He is the third “ old boy ” to win the D.C.M, three others have received the Military Cross, about half-a-dozen the Military Medal, and numerous others have been mentioned in despatches.

LIEUT BASIL PARKER MISSING.

News has been received that Lieut W Basil Parker, of the Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr E Parker, 85 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been missing since September 29th. He was a pupil, and afterwards a student teacher, at St Matthew’s School, from where he gained a candidate teachers’ scholarship to the Lower School. He completed his education at Saltley College, and when he enlisted he held a teaching appointment in Derbyshire. He was formerly a member of the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade, and had also played forward for Rugby Football Club.

PERSONAL.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, medical officer of the London (Queen’s) Regiment, has received the Order of St Sava of Serbia in recognition of his services in that country in 1914-15.

WAR HOSPITALS SUPPLY DEPOT.

Many workers have been obliged to give up coming to the depot in order to take up other war work. More workers are urgently needed and invited to come to 8 Market Place, which is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays each week from 10 to 1 in the mornings, and from 2.30 to 4.30 on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. M MICHELL.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

HIRE TRADERS AND THE WAR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–I notice that more people are required for the National Service, and I think it is a scandalous shame that hire traders are allowed to keep groups of able-bodied men and women going from door to door pestering people to buy their goods on weekly payments. Some of the men look fit to be in khaki, while the others might also be doing useful work at a time like this. They seem to make a special business of calling on soldiers’ wives and trying to induce them to buy goods and pay for them out of the separation allowances which the Government pays to maintain the women and children, and not for any other purpose. I don’t think it right that these agents should be allowed to go about persuading soldiers’ wives to incur this liability without the knowledge or consent of the husband, and it will be a great shame if anything happens to prevent the women keeping up their payments if the trader seizes the goods without the consent of the Court when there has been a considerable sum paid. I think the Government would be justified in passing legislation to protect these people, as it would put the hire trader on a level with other tradesmen and not leave the customer at their mercy.–I remain, yours truly.
FAIR PLAT.

FOOD PRICES.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–Can anyone explain why food prices are rising simultaneously with the multiplication of Control Committees ? Take the case of butter. Why is it put up 4d a pound as soon as Rugby has a Food Control Committee ? I have had to pay an extra 2d twice lately, and I suppose I shall have to help pay the expenses of the Food Controllers. Surely we consumers are being forced to pay all round. As for the bread, we shall have to pay for it in the taxes, even if we get it for 9d a 4lb loaf. And we shall be made to fork out the money for the salaries of the hundreds and thousands of officials of the Government from top to bottom.

It was said in the old time of some professing Christians, “ Ye do wrong and defraud, and that your brethren.” What would St Paul or Thomas Carlyle say now about the greed of gain ? And what are the ministers of religion saying and doing in the face of all the avarice prevalent among traders and workmen of almost every sort ? Are honesty and religion standing a tiptoe in our land, ready to pass–I know not where !–Yours sincerely, INQUIRER.
Rugby, September 26, 1917.

SEATS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,–If your correspondent, “ Visitor,” resided here he would know that Rugby does possess public seats, but for some pre-war abuse they were banished by the “ City Fathers ” to the “ Rec,” and the Park, and thither Tommy must go if he wants a rest. It is not want of thought on the part of townspeople, because the seats have been pleaded for in previous summers, but the said Fathers said, “ No,” and it is so. What little bit of life is in this small town Tommy wants to see it, but he must stand or hang on railings to do it now the Parks are too cool.–Yours, sir, very truly,
CITIZEN.

DEATHS.

PEARCE.–On September 11, 1917, HAROLD, the dearly beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, who was killed in action in France.
“ He marched away so bravely,
His young head bravely held ;
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed ;
There on the battlefield
He calmly took his place ;
He fought and died for Britain :
An honour to his race.”

RUSSELL.–Gunner Walter Russell, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Russell, Toft Farm, Dunchurch, died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917; aged 27.

RUSSELL.–In loving memory of my dear husband, Gunner WALTER RUSSELL, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917.–NELLIE RUSSELL, Whitehall Farm, Dunchurch, Rugby.

VEARS.–Killed in action in France September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest son of Harry and Nellie Vears, of Bedworth, late of Rugby ; aged 21 years.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of a dear son and soldier brave :
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better Land.”

VEARS.–Killed in action in France on September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest grandson of Mrs. F. Draper, Long Buckby ; aged 21 years.
“ Bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
–From Grandma, Aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

SALMON.–In loving memory of Rifleman J. R. SALMON, R.B., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. H. Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road, Rugby ; killed in action on the Somme Front, October 7, 1916.

TANSER.–In ever-loving memory of Lance-Corpl. T. TANSER, of South Kilworth, killed in action October 3rd, 1916.
“ Ever in our thoughts, but the hardest part still yet to come.
When the heroes all return and we miss among the cheering crowd the face of our dear boy.”
–Mother, Wife, Sister and Brothers.