2nd Feb 1918. The Food Shortage

THE FOOD SHORTAGE.

The queue evil reached a climax at Rugby on Friday last when large crowds besieged practically the whole of the provision and butchers’ shops in the centre of the town. An unusually large quantity of margarine, five tons, was received in the town the previous day, and a large portion of this was commandeered by the Executive Officer and distributed amongst about a dozen other shops. Notwithstanding this, however, people were unable to obtain a share, while others by dodging from queue to queue, or sending different members of their families, secured considerably more than their reasonable requirements.

In the afternoon large crowds, estimated at several thousands of persons, including number of locomotive men, assembled in and near the Market Place. These latter were interviewed by Mr T A Wise, chairman of the Food Control Committee, and they also visited the warehouses of several tradesmen to satisfy themselves that there were no large hoards of supplies. The tradespeople did everything possible to satisfy the people, and when the much sought for fats could no longer be obtained a large stock of jam was released. The Police also exercised considerable tact in dealing with the crowd, which several occasions showed signs of exasperation. On the other hand those who were engaged in the difficult task of distributing were impressed with the inconsiderate and unreasonable attitude adopted by many of the people who besieged the shops.

On Saturday, however, the scenes were quite normal again, and in fact there were fewer queues than has been the case for some time.

This state of affairs continued til yesterday (Friday) morning, when large queues had assembled by seven o’clock, and at one establishment the police were sorely pressed to keep a huge crowd from forcing an entrance into the shop.

CULTIVATION OF RAILWAY LAND.—The L N-W announce that they are prepared to allocate plots of vacant land both inside and outside their fences to anyone, whether railway servants or not, who desire to add to the food production at a nominal rent of 1s each lot.

FATAL FALL FROM AEROPLANE.

An inquest was held at the Court House on Friday last week by Mr E F Hadow (coroner), concerning the death of Second-Lieut Harold Griffith Nelson (25), which took place, as reported in our last issue, as the result of an aeroplane accident.

Capt William Hubert Taylor deposed that the deceased officer’s home was in New York. He was a member of the American Air Service, and attached to the R.F.C. He was a learner, but very competent, and had flown altogether 67 hours.

Sergt Eric Jack Robjohns and Corpl William Hunter gave evidence to the effect that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good condition before the flight.

Capt Leslie Randall Wren deposed that he saw decease start off. After he had been up about half-an-hour he pulled the machine into a vertical stall, an evolution by which the machine would be practically “ standing ” on the tail. This evolution was of no practical use. He added that the position would automatically cause the machine to nose dive violently, and it would be out of control for a time. One would want a good deal of depth for such a dive, but 2,000ft. would be quite high enough. While the machine was turning over into the nose dive witness saw the deceased fly out of the machine.—The Coroner: It came round so quickly that it practically “ chucked ” him out ?—A: That is what it comes to ; or, on the other hand, his head might have struck the front of the machine, and during unconsciousness he might have fallen out. The tendency would be for him to fall out if he was not strapped in. Witness added that he immediately went to the machine and examined the belt, but it was not strapped up. It was the pilot’s businesses see that he strapped himself in, and he could not say whether deceased had taken that precaution. There was a possibility, but not a probability, that he might have jerked the belt open by the motion of his arms. Witness had never hoard of such a thing being done.

Second-Lieut G W Curtis gave evidence as to the damage to the machine, which came to earth a-half to three-quarters of a mile away.

Surgeon-Major Collins explained the frightful injuries received by the deceased, who, he said, might have been alive, but would probably have been unconscious by the time he touched the earth. Despite the tremendous impact deceased’s wrist watch, with an open dial, was unbroken, and continued to go without losing a second.

The Coroner referred to the surprisingly few accidents which occurred, in view of the number of flights made daily, and said this appeared to be a clear case of the usual precautions not having been taken.

The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death ” ; but added that there was no evidence to prove whether the belt was fastened or not when deceased began the flight.

After the inquest an officer gave a demonstration with the belt, as a result of which the Coroner and Jury expressed the opinion that it probably was fastened up before the flight.

WOMEN LAND ARMY.

EFFICIENCY CERTIFICATES FOR LOCAL WORKERS.

The presentation of efficiency certificates won by Warwickshire women at the Midland test last autumn was made the occasion of a public demonstration at Birmingham on Tuesday, in which between 20 and 30 workers from the Rugby district took part, along with several hundred women from all parts of the county. The majority were wearing the severely practical uniform in which they are accustomed to work, and the cheerfulness of the girls and their healthy and robust appearance were at once a tribute to the wholesome effect which the work, despite trying conditions, has upon spirits and physique. The certificates were presented by the Lord Mayor (Ald Brookes), who said there were now 180 girls employed on farms in Birmingham and Warwickshire, and, in addition, there were 1,400 women in the villages who had registered themselves as willing to give part of their time to farm work.

Out the 84 Warwickshire girls who entered the tests 70 received certificates. Among them were the following local workers who passed three tests:—Miss Mary Crofts (Long Lawford), Miss Nellie Harrison (Clifton), and Miss Constance Walton (Clifton). Passed two tests: Miss Doris Stent (Pailton), Miss Richards (Clifton), Mrs Lee (Bourton), and Miss Bertha Steath (Clifton). Passed one test: Miss Annie Oven and Miss Kate Foster (Catthorpe), Miss Harriett Dickens (Brownsover), Mrs Edward Eales (Bourton). Others of the Land Army mentioned as doing good work in this district were : Miss Pape (Bretford), Mrs Harry Smith and Miss Robinson (Lawford Heath), Miss Tew (Pailton), Miss Taylor and Miss Smith (Princethorpe), Miss Edwards (Newbold), Miss Allerton (Stretton-under-Fosse), Miss Hunt, Miss Gibbs, and Miss Packer (working near Lutterworth).

There are also many whole-time and part-time workers in the Rugby area who have earned as many as six stripes on their arms for length of service, all going to work on the land. Each stripe represents 1,440 hours’ work.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Four additional prisoners of war have been added to the list of the Rugby Committee. Reported missing since Nov 30, Sergt J R Sacree, 10th Batt. Rifle Brigade, is now known to be wounded with gunshot through the shoulder, and a prisoner of war interned at Soltau. Sergt Sacree, who joined up immediately on the outbreak of war, was an assistant for six years to Mr C T Tew, of Regent Street. He had been previously wounded four times, won the Military Medal and recommended again in September last year.— Rfn W E Boyles, 10th Kings Royal Rifle Corps, whose home is at Bishops Itchington, is a prisoner of war interned at Dulmen. An employee of Messrs Greaves, Bull & Lakin, Ltd. of Harbury, he enlisted in 1914. His firm have generously offered to defray the cost of his food parcels as well as for two other employees of theirs who are prisoners of war in Germany.—Pte A C Neal. Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Napton, is a prisoner of war at Limburg-a-Lahn.—Pte A E Mumford, Machine Gun Corps, attached Cavalry, is a prisoner of war at Minden. For three years he acted as barman for Mr W Jones, of “ The Barrel,” Market Place. He enlisted in August, 1914, in the Lancers, subsequently being transferred to the 17th Lancers—Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of Rugby Committer, has made the necessary arrangements for the despatch of the standard food parcels and bread to each of the above men.

The financial support given to the Committee has been splendid, sufficient to enable them to bear the whole cost of each man’s food parcels, etc. Every month means a grave increase in the number of prisoners of war and a corresponding increase in the expenditure. Constant help is very necessary to prevent any call upon the funds of the Red Cross. The number of prisoners of war now on the list is 83, and to provide for these men £230 6s 6d has to be found every four weeks.

Pte A King, of the Royal Scots, whose home is at Napton, has been repatriated, but no further news has yet come to hand.

D.C.M. WON BY RUGBY SOLDIERS.
BRAVE DEEDS.
The following further awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are officially recorded :—

10764 Pte J H Enticott, Oxford & Bucks L.I.(Rugby).
In spite of heavy machine gun fire, he volunteered to go out and look for wounded, and succeeded in bringing back successfully an officer and N.C.O. He showed complete disregard for danger.

32651 B.S.M H W Evans, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his wagon lines were heavily shelled he promptly organised the clearing of the lines, and removed the wounded to an aid post. All this took place under very heavy shell fire, which killed or wounded six men and 37 horses. By his complete coolness and splendid disregard of personal danger he averted all panic and saved many casualties.

840150 Bty Sergt-Major G Hopewell, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his battery ammunition dump was set on fire by enemy shelling he at once went to the position with his Battery Commander and another officer ; and although under heavy shell fire and in great danger from the exploding ammunition, he collected earth and saved a large quantity of material. Both . officers were wounded whilst performing this gallant act.

A RUGBY MASTER DIES AT SEA.—Second-Lieut Leonard George Colbeck, M.C (R.F.A), reported died at sea on the 3rd January, just after completing his 33rd year, was formerly an assistant master at Rugby School. A fine all-round cricketer at Marlborough when captain of the team in 1903, his batting had not a little do with his side averting defeat from Rugby at Lord’s. Two years later he secured a place in the Cambridge University team. One three occasions he figured in the Inter-Varsity hockey match.

MORE AIR RAIDS.—During an air raid on Monday night over London and the South-Eastern Counties 47 men. women and children were killed and 169 injured—30 of them in the basement of one establishment on which a bomb fell. There was a second raid on Tuesday injured.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.
COUNTY COUNCIL ACCEPTS THE DUKE OF BUCCLEUCH’S OFFER.
OLD TREES TO BE REPLACED BY YOUNG ONE.

The Warwickshire County Council, at their meeting on Wednesday, discussed the question of the future of Dunchurch Avenue, on consideration of a special report by the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and decided, after a long discussion, in favour of the first of two alternative schemes suggested by the Duke of Buccleuch. Ald J S Dugdale, K.C, presided.

The proposals made by the Duke of Buccleuch at an interview with the committee at London on January 4th were set forth in the report of the Avenue Committee. His Grace pointed out that his agent’s letter of June 15th last year had not been read or fully reported to the County Council meeting of October 24th last ; that if that had been done it would have made it clear that he himself would have been glad to preserve the Avenue intact ; but that the preservation of the elm trees was impossible because of the rotten and dangerous state of many of them ; and he made an alternative offer which is summarised in his agent’s letter of January 8th, given below. The committee added : We expressed regret to his Grace that any misapprehension should have arisen from the letter of June 15th not having been fully reported or read, and explained that it had been fully read to the County Roads and Bridges Committee, and that the report was in the ordinary course of the Council’s procedure.

THE DUKE’S OFFERS.

The report of the committee continued : Mr Cyprian Knollys, the Duke’s agent, wrote on January 8th : ” I now write to confirm what passed at an interview between the deputation from your Council and the Duke of Buccleuch on the 4th ult. The Duke has always shared the desire expressed by the deputation that the Avenue (which is now about 180 years old) should be preserved. He has had it under observation for some years, and particularly since the gales of December, 1915, and March, 1916, when 74 of the elm trees were blown down. The opportunity which these windfalls afforded for obtaining accurate information as to the state and condition of the trees has convinced the Duke that they have become dangerous, and that even if left the trees, as an avenue, would in the course of a few years practically cease to exist. His Grace is also of opinion that any lopping or pollarding would never be successful, and would only hasten the process of decay. He feels, therefore, that he cannot take the responsibly of leaving the trees standing. In view, however of the importance of maintaining the Avenue for the public benefit in the future the Duke made the following alternative proposals :—

“ (1) That be should himself dispose of the trees standing on the unenclosed land, and after deducting expenses and charges, handover half the proceeds of the sale to the County Council (or other approved body) to be used for re-planting and keeping up the Avenue : or (2) that he should sell to the County Council (or other approved body) the trees standing on the unenclosed land at 6d per cubic foot, which may be considered half their value, on the condition that an avenue it kept up. In either case his Grace will give all his rights over this unenclosed land on which the trees stand.

“ Scheme No. 1 should provide ample money to replant the Avenue as circumstances will permit.

“ Under Scheme 2 the Avenue would belong to the public, but in connection with it there are one or two observations which the Duke thinks the Council may like him to mention for their consideration :

“ If say half the trees are cut, a sufficient sum should be obtained to pay the cost of the purchase, and young trees could then be planted in the vacant spaces. This would, to a great extent, preserve the present appearance of the Avenue. On the other hand, the shade from the remaining trees might injuriously affect the growth of the young plants, and there would be considerable risk of the young trees being injured by the fall of any of the old trees or their limbs. It should also be borne in mind that when trees are grown close, as in an avenue, every tree that is blown down increases the danger of the remainder being also blown. If it was thought desirable to reduce this risk it might be done by cutting down one-half of the Avenue and re-planting it, and then gradually to re-plant the other half.

THE DUKE’S OPINION,

“ From a practical point of view, the Duke considers Scheme 1 to be the best, as though there would be a temporary loss of the Avenue, all danger to the public would be avoided, and there would certainly be a superior avenue in the future, as experience has shown that making up an old avenue is seldom, if ever, successful. And if, as was suggested the Avenue is to be considered as part of the proposed permanent memorial to the 29th Division, it would if newly planted throughout, be in its prime 100 years after the date of his Majesty’s inspection. In making these observations, however, the Duke desires it to be understood that he leaves it entirely to the Council to decide which (if either) of these proposals they would like to adopt ; and I am to add that if the experience and advice of his Forester would be of any assistance to the Council in their consideration of the subject his Grace will be happy if they will avail themselves of it. It was suggested that you would be able to let me hear from you by March 1st.”

“ VERY GENEROUS OFFER.”

The committee proceeded :—

[LONG DISCUSSION BY W.C.C.]

The question was then put to the vote, and the amendment was carried by 32 votes to 10—Scheme No. 1 being, therefore the one accepted.

It was pointed out that a public subscription would be necessary to provide the 29th Division Memorial.

A vote of thanks was passed to the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and the committee will (it was stated) remain in being.

DEATHS.

HERBERT.—In loving memory of Pte. JAMES HERBERT, 6th Northants Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Herbert, Yelvertoft ; killed in action January 19th, 1918, aged 38 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

SMITH.—In loving memory of GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, who was killed in France on January 29, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN, who died of wounds on January 28, 1916.—From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brothers.

 

 

26th Jan 1918. Airman falls from an Aeroplane

AIRMAN FALLS FROM AN AEROPLANE.

On Tuesday morning a shocking aeroplane accident, as the result of which Second-Lieut Harold Griffith Nelson (25), a Canadian officer, lost his life, occurred near Rugby. He had been flying for nearly an hour, and when at an altitude of about 2,000ft. he was seen to fall from his machine. His body was terribly mangled, and death must have been instantaneous. The aeroplane continued its flight, and came to earth about three-quarters of a mile away. The cause of the accident has not been ascertained, and it is not known whether Lieut Nelson had strapped himself in in accordance with the rules of the Service.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt J R Sacree, 10th Rifle Brigade, late assistant to Mr C T Tew, who has been missing since November 30th, is now reported a prisoner of war in Germany. This is the fourth time he has been wounded. He has won the Military Medal, and was again recommended in September last.

The younger son of Mr T Pearman, of Ryton-on-Dunsmore, has recently been promoted to the rank of Captain. He is now with his regiment in Italy.

Major T E Manning, Yeomanry, who previously captained the Northamptonshire Cricket Club, has left his regiment to take on duty as an Assistant Provost Marshal with the British troops in Italy. Major Manning was mobilised with his regiment at the outbreak of war.

Capt J H Lee, 2/1 London Regiment, who was awarded the Military Cross at last summer, has been wounded in eight places, but is making good progress. He was employed in the B.T.H Test at the time he was granted a commission in May, 1915 he was also a member of the Albert Street Congregational Church Choir.

Lieut H A Holder, of the B.T.H Drawing Office, has been promoted Captain (R.G.A). He was wounded in June last, and has now returned to the B.EF. During his stay in England Captain Holder married Miss Nancy Sleath, of Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The following in an extract from a letter from the North Staffordshire Regiment Prisoners of War Association to Hon Secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee :—

“ The work your committee is doing is wonderful, for we know that it not an easy matter to support local men of different regiments.”

Four additional local prisoners of war have been added this week, bringing the number up to 83. The cost to provide for these men—men from our own district—is now £230 6s 6d every four weeks.

BRAVE HILLMORTON SOLDIER DECORATED.

A pleasing ceremony was performed at the usual parade of the Rugby V.T.C on Sunday afternoon, when Lt-Col F F Johnstone, as Commanding Officer of the 2nd Batt. Warwickshire Volunteer Regt, presented Driver F Davies, R.F.A, of Hillmorton, with the Military Medal, which had been awarded him for distinguished conduct in the field under shell fire. The ceremony took place at the Howitzer Battery Drill Hall, in the presence of a fairly large company. Driver Davies was accompanied by his mother, sisters and friends, and there were also present Lieut C J Newman, Mr H Yates and Mr T Ringrose (members of the Rugby Urban District Council).

Before making the presentation Lieut-Col F F Johnstone addressed the company, and said wherever such a presentation could be made it was customary to make it before a parade of soldiers, so that the example set by one brave man could be followed by others when the opportunity arose ; and he had, therefore, taken the occasion of that parade to present Driver Davies with the medal. He then read the official description of the deed for which the medal had been awarded, from which it appeared that on April 9, 1917, a shell fell on the ammunition wagon in front of the wagon Driver Davies was driving, and a comrade, Driver Hook, was pinned under his horse. Driver Davies’s horse was also wounded, and fell on Hook. Davies was pitched into the road, but he got up and went to the assistance of his friend, and got him into a place of safety. Col Johnstone then pinned the medal on the breast of the brave young fellow, and having shaken hands with him, continued: “ The attributes of a good soldier are five, and all commence with the letter c, viz, courage, commonsense, cheerfulness, cleanliness, and cunning. He thought they might congratulate Driver Davies on possessing most of these and upon having done his duty as a right down good, brave young man and soldier, a credit to his battery and also to the town from which he came. He was again leaving for the front on Tuesday night, and they all wished him all good luck and a safe was return.”

Hearty cheers having been given for Driver Davies, his mother was presented to Col Johnstone, who shook her warmly by the hand, saying: “ It is the women like you, the women with sons like this, who are winning this War for us.”

Before joining the Army Driver Davies was employed in the tinsmiths’ shop the B.T.H.

NAPTON.

MUCH sympathy is extended Mr & Mrs Frederick Sheasby, sen, of Napton, in the death of their youngest son, Horace, at the age of 19 years. He was wounded in France on December 30th and taken to hospital, but never regained consciousness. He lived with Mr Mushing, of Lower Farm, Napton, for four years, and was a most trustworthy servant and cheerful with everyone.

RUGBY NOT A MUNITION AREA.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Monday evening Mr Geo Cooke, a representative of the Rugby Trades and Labour Council, stated that the Ministry of Munitions had refused to create Rugby a munition area, which would have had the effect of preventing the eviction under any circumstances of men engaged on munition work.

THE FOOD SHORTAGE.

During the week-end the meat and margarine queues were again in evidence. The supply of margarine was smaller than usual, and many bitter complaints were made of the inadequacy of the purchases, which were only secured in many instances after dreary waits in the cold and slush. On Friday morning an angry crowd besieged one grocer’s shop under the mistaken belief that a quantity of margarine was in stock. The Executive Officer, Mr F M Burton, was summoned to the scene, and he explained the situation to the people. In order to minimise the disappointment of the crowd as far as possible, the proprietor decided dispose of his stock of jam, and for about an hour Mr Burton was busily engaged handing out the pots to the people, who subsequently dispersed in “ sweeter ” humour.

The butchers’ shops were the centres of interest on Saturday, and the shop-keepers and their assistants spent a very anxious time. Several of the traders worked till late Friday night cutting up their meat into the very smallest quantities, and even those who were lucky enough to be supplied only received infinitesimal amounts. One large establishment, containing 70 persons, was allowed 17lbs ; while many other large establishments had to be content with even less than this, in one case the supply working out at 1½ozs per person, including bone. The situation was rendered more serious by the total disappearance of rabbits, which, it was noted, coincided with the fixing of the maximum price, and all the shops were cleared out at a very early hour. The meat shortage caused a run on the fishmongers’ establishments, and small herrings, kippers, and bloaters were eagerly snapped up at 6d each, other fish fetching proportionately high prices.

NO SUGAR FOR JAM MAKING.—The Chairman of the Royal Commission on the Sugar Supply (Sir Charles Bathurst, M.P) desires to make it known that, as it will probably be impossible during the present year to make special issues of sugar to private fruit growers for the making of jam for their own home consumption, the latter would well advised to begin saving as much sugar as possible out of their own domestic rations for the above purpose. Such saving will not constitute hoarding.

POTATO BREAD.—A general notice on the use of potatoes in the manufacture of bread removes any limit to the percentage of potatoes that may be used in the manufacture of bread. As it is essential that such a general use is secured in order to conserve cereal supplies, it is the intention of the Ministry to issue at an early date an Order making the use of a certain percentage of potatoes compulsory, and as such an Order would apply to bakers and domestic bread makers alike, all makers of bread are advised at once make such arrangements as will enable them to comply with the requirements of the Order when issued.

DR DAVID’S THREAT TO CLOSE RUGBY SCHOOL.

The meat question was discussed fully at a meeting of the Local Food Control Committee, presided over by Mr T A Wise on Monday evening, when it was intimated that unless more meat could be provided, Dr David had threatened to close Rugby School.

Mr Burton (the Executive Officer) reported that there was a very serious shortage of meat in the town last week and the inspectors of three of the foreign meat shops in the town called upon him, and stated that if they were granted permits they could send more than their 50 per cent. of meat to their shops. He accordingly granted the permits.—This action was approved.—Mr Burton also reported that that afternoon he had received an application for a similar permit from one of firms, and he had promised to bring the matter before the committee. The position locally that day was that the Rugby urban and rural butchers were 17 beasts short of their 50 per cent., and the town butchers alone only got 51 sheep out of the 108 required. It was, therefore, much worse than last week.—It was decided to grant the permit, and to give the Executive Officer discretionary powers to grant others which he might deem necessary.—Mr Reeve asked how the English butchers stood if they could get extra supplies ? He could have sold more sheep last week, and he thought if the foreign butchers were allowed this privilege the English vouchers should be treated similarly provided they could get the sheep. He had eight sheep which he was willing to kill if he could do so.—The executive officer said he failed to see how the English butchers could do this, because they were limited as to their supplies, which have to be purchased through the auctioneers.—Mr Reeve said he bought these sheep several weeks ago ; but the Executive Officer reiterated his opinion that the sheep would have to be sold through the auctioneers.—Mr Reeve said he should not send them, because if he did, and he bought them, he would have to pay 3s 6d on each of them, he would also have to pay an additional 1s 6d because he was the vendor.—Mr Stevenson suggested that they write to Lord Rhondda to have the matter cleared up.—Mr Reeve also expressed the opinion that the Rugby butchers should be allowed to have their 50 per cent before other butchers received anything. In the past the big towns had largely relied on foreign meat, and now they were trying to get some of the supplies which should belong to other towns.—Mr Gay enquired whether live stock was being killed in Rugby and the carcasses sent out of the town ?—Mr Reeve replied that he had been in the habit of killing a number of beasts and sheep each week, and sending the carcasses away ; but he could not do this last week because of the shortage of meat.—Mr Burton : Then that is to the benefit of Rugby.—Mr Reeve differed from that view, and pointed out that when he sent meat away he retained all the offal, which people were very pleased to purchase.—Mr Gay thought it unfair that the town should be limited as to its supplies and for a portion of these to be sent away.—The Chairman, however, pointed out that it was Mr Reeves’ duty to continue to send meat away if he could get it. The government’s idea was that all customers should receive 50 per cent. of the supplies they were getting in October.—Mr Burton said, strictly speaking, a butcher who had been selling wholesale could not refuse to sell, otherwise the aggrieved firm would have a claim upon him. He pointed out that the foreign meat companies were in a different position to the English butchers because they received their meat frozen, and did not have to go into the open market to buy it.—Mr Cooke enquired if the additional supply could be distributed amongst the English Butchers ; but Mr Burton replied in the negative. He added that he had impressed upon the managers the necessity of cutting down their customers to 50 per cent., and not to serve them with the full 100 per cent.

THE B.T.H CANTEEN.

It was reported that, as a result of several consultations with the auctioneer vice-chairman (Mr W Howkins), the manager of the B.T.H canteen, and two other butchers, the permit of a butcher had been increased by 500lbs per week, so that he could supply meat to the B.T.H Canteen. This allowed 2ozs (uncooked) for each meal. The Executive Officer, however, understood that the butcher in question was unable to obtain this amount.—The Chairman stated that the manager of the canteen was very dissatisfied with the supplies, and complained that he could not serve all the dinners required. He (the Chairman) fully explained the situation, and pointed out that with the present shortage of meat they could not expect to get their full supply. He asked if it was expected that the B.T.H was to receive all the meat in Rugby, and other people were to go without.—Mr Mellor pointed out that in the staff restaurant they were having two meatless days per week, and there was a feeling that all the meat was being sent to the canteen in the works.

The caterer to Messrs Willans & Robinson’s also wrote complaining of the inadequate supplies of meat ; and in view of the increasing number of people dining at the works, asking that a local butcher be given a permit to supply them with 300lbs daily.—The butcher in question informed the committee that he had not accepted the offer to supply them, because he did not wish to take the trade from a colleague.—The whole question was referred to the Food Controller.

With reference to the Chester Street communal kitchen, the Divisional Commissioner wrote stating that such institutions deserve every encouragement, and authorising the committee to use their discretion as to the amount of meat to be apportioned for their use.—Miss A V Fenwick wrote stating that their requirements were 50lbs of meat daily, 10s worth of bones for soup, and 6lbs of lard or fat per week.—It was decided to give a permit for this amount.

RUGBY SCHOOL MEAT SUPPLY.

The Auctioneer-Chairman for the District wrote that he had received a complaint from Mr David, stating that the ration of meat proposed to be allowed to Rugby School was not nearly enough, and threatening, if he could not get a bigger supply, to close the School. He had wired to the Food Controller on the matter, and the only satisfaction he could get was a wire as follows :—“ Refer Headmaster of Rugby School to Food Control Committee.” It seemed to him a serious matter, and he thought the school should not be closed. He asked the committee to see what could be done, and suggested that they should see the Headmaster and ascertain what his minimum requirements were.—In a letter Dr David said he had not complained that the ration of meat supplied to the School was not nearly enough. If as he was told the ration was 2lbs, it was, in his opinion, sufficient, and even if it was not so it was not for them to complain. His complaint was that the four School butchers were not allowed to buy sufficient meat to supply anything like this ration. He therefore asked that their purchasing permits should be altered so as to allow them to send the requisite amount within that scale. With this they were perfectly prepared to be content. He could not say the minimum amount that was required.—The Chairman stated that they had sent round to all the schools and boarding-houses to ascertain what meat they received in October, so that by that means they could have the basis of their normal supplies. Returns had been received from 18 schools concerning 1,086 persons, and the meat consumption was 2,948½lbs. Some, however, had included pork pies, sausages, brawn, rabbits, game, &c, while others had not. This worked out at an average of about 2¾lbs per head per week, and he took it that the butchers could not now supply anything like that quantity.—Mr Reeve : It is impossible at the present time.—Mr Stevenson : That is more than the majority of people get in the town.—The Chairman : Under the rationing scheme boys are entitled to 3lbs of meat per week. As a munition and educational centre, he thought they should be entitled to more meat, and it was unanimously decided to support Dr David in his efforts to obtain more for the town.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS.
FAIRNESS TO ALL.—Too late for insertion this week, but you will see by reports of Food Control Committee meeting in this issue that a rationing scheme is to put in force in Rugby.

DEATHS.

FEVERS.—In loving memory of WILLIAM, the eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Fevers, of Woolscott, near Rugby, who was killed in action on April 11, 1917. Aged 24.
“ Oh ! how sadly we shall miss him,
There will be a vacant place.
We shall never forget his footsteps,
Or his dear familiar face.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Sister & Brother.

IN MEMORIAM.

CHATER.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. W. T. CHATER, who was killed at Mesopotamia on January 23, 1917.—From Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

COLLIER.—In loving memory of AMY ELIZABETH, wife of Samuel Collier, who passed away on January 20, 1914 “ At rest.”—Also of WILLIAM CHARLES COLLIER, eldest son of above, who was killed in action in France on October 9, 1917 ; aged 39 years.

McDOWELL.—In ever-loving memory of WILLIAM McDOWELL, 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in action on January 27, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever ;
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Sadly missed by his Wife.