16th Mar 1918. The Advertiser Passing on Scheme Works Smoothly

THE “ ADVERTISER ” PASSING ON SCHEME WORKS SMOOTHLY
THANKS TO SUBSCRIBERS & AGENTS.
ADVERTISEMENTS TO BE RATIONED.

We should like to take this opportunity of thanking our readers for the generous way in which they received the suggestion we made last week with regard to sharing copies of the Advertiser with their friends, and for the wholehearted co-operation of a very large number in giving effect to it ; and in this acknowledgment we desire to include our agents who are giving their loyal assistance in the practical working of the idea.

It may be useful to again remind all concerned that the object of the drastic reduction of paper supplies by the Government is to limit the importation of pulp and other materials from which news-paper is made in order to release shipping for the conveyance of food to our shores, and other purposes vital to the carrying on of the war. To make one copy of the paper serve as many readers as possible is, therefore, a distinctly patriotic action.

Our sincere apologies are due to our readers for so much space in our last issue being taken by advertisements and official notices. The change we had to make came upon us so suddenly that we had no time to re-arrange our advertising contracts, but we are now taking steps to ration the space allotted to this class of matter, as well as our output of papers.

It should not, however, be forgotten that a medium like the Advertiser for making public one’s announcements is of national importance to the commercial and social life of the community. This applies especially to auctioneers’ announcements of agricultural sales, which this time of the year are always very numerous.

Then, too, space must be found for official announcements, and we were further handicapped last week by a heavy demand upon our already crowded columns by a lengthy notice under “ The Representation of the People Act,” which it was necessary to insert on that date.

Advertisements are generally read with interest, but our readers may feel assured that we shall do our best to keep them within reasonable limits, and that all important happenings in the town and district will be duly recorded in the Advertiser as heretofore.

MARKETING SURPLUS VEGETABLES.

The first general meeting of shareholders of the Warwickshire Fruit and Vegetable Collecting Society Ltd (registered under the Industrial and Provident Societies’ Act), was held at the County Hall, Warwick, last week. The primary business was to amend and pass the rules of the society. The report of the Provisional Committee was then read and adopted. Great interest was shown in the progress made towards establishing branch depots in the rural districts for the collection and marketing of surplus produce from cottage gardeners and allotment holders. It is probable that the neighbourhoods of Warwick, Rugby, Solihull, and Brailes will be the first to benefit under the scheme, and that the method of working these depots will be the same as those already found successful at Stratford-on-Avon, where a pioneer collecting and marketing depot was established last summer. The report of the Provisional Committee showed that already 6,63l shares had been applied for. The Provisional Committee was elected en bloc, with power to add to their number, as the Committee of the Warwickshire Fruit ans Vegetable Collecting Society. They comprise : Lord Leigh, Lady Ilkeston, Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, Mrs Arkwright, Mrs Melville, Mr A Allsebrook, Mr F Quartley, Mr J James, Mr H C Smith, Mr A Trafford. and Miss C Margesson.

RUGBY FOOD SUPPLY.

During the past few weeks the food problem has been much easier locally, and most people have been able to obtain provisions of one kind or another. The usual quantity of stock was sent to the Cattle Market on Monday ; and although the local butchers failed to secure their full quota of beef, mutton was fairly plentiful. Since Monday several beasts have been sent to the local butchers, so that there is every prospect of householders obtaining fair supplies this week-end.

The quantity of cheese has been very limited of late, but it is hoped that this state of affairs will now rapidly improve.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

Held at Rugby on Friday test week, before Messrs E M G Carmichael (chairman), J Findlay (assessor for the employers), and E G Evans (workmen’s assessor).

DISTURBANCE BY A DRUNKEN FITTER.
R. J. Skinner, 83 Abbey Street, pleaded not guilty to refusing to leave the workshop while the worse for liquor and creating a disturbance by persisting in remaining until he was ultimately carried out.—The foreman stated that on February 15th defendant was ordered to come back at seven o’clock and work all night. He did not turn up at seven o’clock, and at 10.15, while witness was at supper, he was fetched to Skinner, whom he found lying in the balance pit. Witness roused him, and he then appeared to be dazed. Witness told him he had better go home and come in in the morning, but he was mad drunk and commenced to use filthy language. He picked a hammer up and said, “ I will smash your brains out if you give me the sack.” Defendant produced a bottle of beer, and after drinking the beer he smashed the bottle on the wall. As witness could not persuade him to go home, he sent for the watchman.—Defendant : Perhaps he is the bloke who knocked me about.—Witness added that the watchman tried to persuade defendant to leave but he took his coat off and threatened to fight. They had to send for another watchman, and in the end to carry him out.—Defendant stated that he had been on the premises a quarter of an hour before he was accused of being drunk, and he also contended that he was entitled to sleep from 10 till 11, and should not have been disturbed—The night watchman deposed that defendant was very drunk and kept the other men from working. After he was put out he tried to get back, and was swearing and raving near the gate till two o’clock in the morning.—This was corroborated by another witness.—Defendant said the reason he would not go away was that someone said, “ Put him out.” He replied, “ There is not one amongst you can put me out.” They then started upon him and knocked him about.—In reply to the Chairman, he said he had been in the Army, and had been wounded and blown up. He had not been discharged, but lent to the firm.—The representative of the firm stated that Skinner had asked to be returned to the Colours. They had done so, and at the same time they sent a copy of the report to the Ministry of Munitions. He was a skilled fitter, and served his apprenticeship with them. They were very sorry the affair had happened, but defendant held up the whole shop.—Fined 60s in one case, and the other adjourned.

A QUIET NAP.
G Bailey, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, was summoned for sleeping during working hours.—It was stated that defendant was found lying on a table in the winding department fast asleep. The man who worked with him had complained that he had to do most of the work, and the foreman had remonstrated with him on the matter.—Defendant said he had a pain in his stomach ; he laid down to ease it, and he dropped off to sleep. He contended that he had always done his fair share of work.—Adjourned till May 17th.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr D H Hefford, stepson of Mr W F Wood, has recently been gazetted Second-Lieutenant and attached to the 5th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment.

Mr Arthur Morson (clerk to the Rugby Urban Council) and Mr A H Moseley (formerly of Rugby) attended an Investiture by the King of the Order of the British Empire at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday last.

PRISONERS OF WAR.

Pte P Mace, 2nd Oxford and Bucks L.I, of Hillmorton, who was recently transferred from his internment camp in Germany to Murren, Switzerland, writes : “ I can assure you it is quite a relief to be away from that wretched barbed wire. Everything here is so different to what it used to be in Germany. There you had a snarling Hun and a rifle following you everywhere.” After expressing his thanks for the splendid parcels sent to him, he adds : “ I suppose you know that all we have to live on was what you kind people sent from England. . . .”

Sergt Walter Kempton, Rifle Brigade, of Rugby, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany for exactly 3½ years, has been transferred to Holland. For 2½ years food parcels and bread have been regularly despatched to Sergt Kempton through the Rugby Committee, and grateful letters of thanks have been received from him.

A Dunchurch man, Rifleman W Pearce, K.R.R.C, who is a prisoner of war at Cassel, has this week been added to the Rugby list. Arrangements have been made for the regular despatch of his food parcels.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
A PIONEER AVIATOR.—One of our village lads, Joseph Henry Dell, though barely 17 years old, joined the R.F.C. nine weeks ago as a fitter. On Saturday last he ess[?]yed his first aerial voyage, and writes in glowing terms of his experiences. With Dell on board as his passenger, the pilot flew some 70 miles at a height of 2,000ft. and while in the air looped the loop twice and performed other revolutions. The embryo airman [illegeable] writes :—“ It made me feel nervous for a while, being so young, but I enjoyed it afterwards.”

DUNCHURCH.

A EWE belonging to Mrs Cosby, the Lodge Farm, has given birth to three fine lambs ; and Mr W Harker, Bilton Grange Farm, has a ewe which has followed suit.

DURING the last few weeks collections of eggs for the use of hospitals and the wounded soldiers have been made by the scholars. The boys collected no fewer than 335, and the girls and infants about 100—a splendid result, of which Dunchurch Schools may be proud.

THE COMMITTEE OF THE NURSING ASSOCIATION are very glad to state that Nurse Ridout having completed her training and successfully passed her examination in London, has returned to take up her duties as district nurse. She is most highly recommended by the matron under whom she has trained.

WATFORD.

SERIOUS DAMAGE BY A BOY.—At the Daventry Divisional Children’s Court on Tuesday, Walter Ernest West, aged 15, of Watford, was charged with maliciously maiming a bullock, the property of Wm Cullen, of Ashby St Ledgers. He inflicted such injuries with a stick that the bowels of the bullock were perforated, and it had to be slaughtered.—The father was ordered to whip the boy in the presence of the police, and also to pay a fine of £5 inflicted on the boy.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

MR & MRS THOMAS BONEHAM, of Bretford, have been notified that their son, Francis Wm Boneham (Dorsets), has been wounded.

BUSINESS MEN’S WEEK.
RUGBY’S MAGNIFICENT RESPONSE.
£45,000 AIMED AT—£85,000 RAISED.

As was anticipated, Rugby played up well towards the end of last week. The £45,000 aimed at was easily surpassed, and when the list was closed on Saturday evening the amount reached was £75,000. Two other sums of £5,000 each arrived on Monday, thus bringing the total up to £85,000, or nearly double the figure required for the purchase of a squadron of aeroplanes, which was the object in view.

Satisfactory as this result was, however, there is little doubt but that, had the committee had longer notice, a considerably higher figure could have been fixed up ; and, in view of Rugby’s past achievements, this would, doubtless, have been forthcoming.

The suits on the first three days were very meagre, but on Thursday things began to improve, and a total of £19,921 was realised on that day ; Friday’s total was £29,965, and Saturday’s £20,431. Of the £85,000 subscribed £73,800 was invested in War Bonds and £11,000 in War Savings Certificates.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCRIBBLING ON WALLS.

SIR,—I am glad to see that attention has been drawn by a letter in your last issue to the growing nuisance in Rugby of scribbling with chalk upon wills and gates, and even on the doors of private houses. Quite apart from the more seriously objectionable nature of some of the writings and drawings, such disfigurement of our streets is a very great eyesore, and a source of annoyance to the more respectable inhabitants. Moreover, it is a step towards the hooliganism which is filling our principal streets any evening with yells and shrieks and forms of rowdiness on the part of youths and girls—suggesting pandemonium itself, and bringing discredit to our town in the eyes of visitors from elsewhere. Cannot the teachers in our elementary schools add their already valuable services by organising a crusade against this undesirable state of affairs, and so obviate the possible necessity of police action ?

I am, Sir, yours faithfully,
A HOUSEHOLDER.

IN MEMORIAM.

GIDDINGS.—In loving memory of Corpl. A. GIDDINGS, Hillmorton, who was killed in action on March 11, 1915.—Not forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

SKINNER.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. G. SKINNER, 19th Canadians, who was killed in Belgium on March 15, 1916.
“ I do not forget him, nor do I intend ;
I think of him daily and will till the end.
I miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—From his loving wife, Charlotte.

STEEL.—In loving memory of our dear son, EDWARD, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on March 16, 1915.
“ It’s hard, dear son, to lose you,
Who have filled your place so well ;
May God above now repay you
For your acts which but Him can tell.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers & Sister.

 

 

24th Apr 1915. “ E ” Company at the Front

“ E ” COMPANY AT THE FRONT.

Pte L Stewart, one of the Advertiser employees who volunteered for active service and is with the 7th Warwickshire (Territorial) Battalion at the front, tells us in a letter we have received from him that their Easter Sunday spell in the trenches went off very well, but his Company had two wounded. About the middle of the week they were moved on to a town upon which bombs were dropped by enemy aircraft before they had been in the place half-an-hour, injuring several people. Barring a few colds, the health of the men was A1, and they had done all that had been asked of them. With full kit on, each man carries on average 70lb—the roads were rotten for marching, and their marches had been from eight to ten miles. In a subsequent letter, he writes :—“ Yesterday we made another move, and came across the Rugby Battery. From what they told me they were soon in action, and appear to have been giving a good account of themselves. I spoke to Major Nickalls (Spring Hill). He was quite pleased the old E Company (now C Company ) were so near. The respective headquarters are within a few yards of each other. C Company went into the trenches again last night for four days. You should see the country round here ; everywhere the place has been shelled—it must have been awful. I saw Mr C T Morris Davies (the well-known International hockey player) the other day. It’s really surprising who you meet.”

Another Territorial writes :—“ We are only about 400 yards from the German trenches, and I am writing these few lines in my little dug-out, under fire. We are having a fairly quiet time just now. We get a few German shells occasionally, just to let us know they are still alive. As we are so near the German trenches we have to keep one eye shut for sleep and the other on the alert. We expect to have about four days in and four out. We are all cheerful and in the pink, only for the food, for we have to eat biscuits for nearly every meal and they are as hard as bricks. The next time we come into the trenches I shall have to bring a couple of loaves with me. We get plenty of corned beef and biscuit, but we are getting about sick of these. All the houses round this district are blown to bits. Last week I had a walk round the cemetery to see the graves of our comrades who fell at the beginning of the war. They are buried three deep in ordinary wooden coffins, and a small cross, bearing their name and regiment, is erected over them. We also see small crosses scattered about the fields showing where soldiers are buried. Whilst I am writing this the sun is shining beautifully and the country looks grand. It makes one think of the fields at home. You would laugh to see us in our little dug-outs. They are built of sandbags, about a yard high, so you see we have to duck down and creep in.”

“ I am still in the best of health,” writes other man. “ France is a lot different to what I thought it would be. We are all enjoying being out here as the weather is lovely. The place we are staying at now has been very much shelled ; the Germans shell it now occasionally, but we don’t mind and take no notice at all. We see plenty of aeroplanes out here ; the best sight I have ever seen is the wonderful way in which the aeroplanes avoid the shells which are being constantly fired at them ; they must be piloted by expert airmen for the shells burst all round them. The crucifixes out here are a lovely sight, everywhere you go you see them ; it is a wonderful sight to see a place that has been shelled and the crucifix not touched.”

THE HOWITZERS AT THE FRONT.

Corpl A Sparks, of the 5th Warwickshire R.F.A (Howitzer) Battery, writing to a friend in Rugby, under date of April 14th, graphically describes the passage across the Channel. The Wednesday night after arrival was spent in camp, and next day they entrained for the front. After 20 hours’ travelling in cattle trucks they arrived at their destination—about three miles from the firing line. “ The only indication that a great war was in progress,” he say. “ was the continual booming of the guns and the burning of magnesium flares, which the Germans send up during the night to prevent surprise infantry attacks. Otherwise everything was quite normal. On Easter Sunday morning we had a Church parade and Holy Communion, so that you will see we spent this festival pretty well the same as you did at home. On Easter Monday night, in a pelting rainstorm, we took up our place in the firing line. On Tuesday night, just a week from leaving England, we were in action for the first time, and have been in action every day since. We have done some very good firing;. Major Nickalls has been thanked for the splendid support he has given to the infantry. On Sunday we had some “ Whistling Willies ” over our line and about 40 the next day. Fortunately no one in our battery was hurt, although I am sorry to say there were about ten wounded and five killed in another battery. The only casualty we have had in the brigade is one of the Coventry Battery killed.”

“ You would be astonished at the callousness of the natives round here. Even when firing is progressing it is a common sight to see the farmers doing their ploughing, etc. Even the women and children are walking about quite close to the guns, and apparently they can see no danger.”

TERRITORIALS’ FOOTBALL MATCH.

The Howitzer Battery played their first football match in France on Saturday, April 17th. Teams:— Gunners : A Goode, Major Nickalls, Spicer, Bombardier Jesson, Corpl Watson, Lieut Pridmore, Smith, Alsop, Asher, Laurceston, and Judd. Drivers : Mills, Sergt Dosher, Woolley, Corpl Shelley, Ashworth, Wood, Judd, Turner, Taylor, Dyer, Humphries. Referee: Gunner A Jobey. The match was played just behind the firing line. The Gunners proved to be dead on the target as per usual, leading 2-0 at the interval. The Drivers proved good stayers, pulling level early in the second half. After good all-round play, the Gunners snatched a victory five minutes from time. Scorers :—Lieut Pridmore, Smith and Asher, and Taylor (2).

LOCAL WAR CASUALTIES.

COSFORD: RIFLEMAN E. STEEL.

As mentioned in our last issue, news has been received from the War Office by Mr and Mrs Steel, of Cosford, that their son, Edward Steel, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action at Neuve Chapelle on March 16th. No particulars of his death have come to hand, and the only consolation that his aged father and mother have is that he died bravely fighting for his country. E. Steel, who was 27 years of age, joined Lord Kitchener’s Army on September 2nd, previous to which he was employed by the Midland Railway Company at No. 2 Length, Rugby. He was drafted from Sheerness on February 2nd to go to France with other young men of the villages around. He was much liked, and as he always lived at home with his parents, he will be sadly missed by them, as well as by all who knew him.

RUGBY SOLDIER SEVERELY WOUNDED.

Mrs H Bottrill, of Bridget Street, Rugby, has received news that her son, Pte Frank Henry Bottrill, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was admitted to Boulogne Hospital on Easter Sunday, suffering from a severe bullet wound in the head, and as the result of an operation he has lost the sight of the left eye. Pte Bottrill who was a reservist, and is married and lives at Wellingborough, is an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother-Pte A W Bottrill, of the Coldstream Guards—was badly wounded on November 2nd, and has never really recovered from the effects of the wound. He has ,however, been back to the fighting line ; but the last news that was heard of him was that he was at Havre recuperating, although he expected to be soon drafted back to the trenches.

Mr T Thompson, of Willoughby, has had several interesting letters from his son, who is a member of the Northants Yeomanry. The regiment went out to the front last November, and was one of the earliest of the Territorial forces to go on active service. They have been in several actions, and, as may be supposed have not escaped without their share of casualties. They were in the battle of Neuve Chapelle, and fortunately the quick-firing gun team, to which he was attached, passed through the engagement without mishap. Previous to that they had been nine days in the trenches, and during that time they experienced some very cold weather. Trooper Thompson had one of his feet frost-bitten. He was sent back to the base hospital, where, unfortunately, he developed bronchitis in a somewhat severe form. His latest letters however, state that he is getting better, but it will be some time before he is quite convalescent.

 

WOLSTON.

THE LATE PTE F HOWARD.—A memorial service was held in memory of Pte F Howard, only son of Mr Fred Howard, of Wolston, who lost his life at Neuve Chapelle when fighting with the Worcestershire Regiment, as reported in our issue of the 10th inst. The service was conducted by the Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, and the large edifice was well filled by residents of Brandon and Wolston and the surrounding district ; whilst a number of soldiers home on furlough attended. The Brandon and Wolston Scouts were also present to pay their last respects to their departed comrade. The principal mourners were deceased’s father and sister, Miss Clara Howard. The proceedings were most impressive, and it was quite evident that the majority of the large congregation mourned the loss of so young a life, many of them being visibly affected. The form of memorial service was the one authorised for use in the diocese of Chichester. The hymns were : “ My God, my Father, while I stray,” “ When our heads are bowed with woe,” and “ God of the living in Whose eyes.” Before the service closed the Vicar gave a suitable address, and his remarks were listened to with rapt attention. At the close the organist, Mr W S Lole, played the “ Dead March.”

The casualties in the 7th Warwickshires reported up-to-date are : One killed and 12 wounded.

A non-commissioned officer writes :— “ The Battalion has now come out of the trenches for four days. During the four days the Battalion has lost one killed, a chap from Coventry, and about 12 wounded, although I don’t think any of them are very serious. The 5th Battalion have had three killed. We relieved the Dublin Fusiliers when our Battalion went in, and now the 8th Battalion Royal Warwicks are relieving us. Most of the the firing takes place at night ; there’s not much doing during the day, except artillery fire. The Howitzer Battery are pretty close to us, and it was reported yesterday (April 14th) that they had put three of the German guns out of action. While in the trenches many of the chaps had some very narrow escapes. One of the German shells burst in “ A ” Company’s trenches, also one in “ B ” Company’s, fortunatley without hurting anyone. I think myself the Battalion has been very fortunate at having so few casualties. We are now in ——, so that we have now been in both the countries where the fighting is.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been rather more satisfactory at Rugby during the past week, and twelve have been attested, the majority for the Army Service Corps. Their names are :—A.H C : L Morris, J C Munton, C H Brown, T W Summers, F Summers, J Ingram, P Kimberley, D Jonathan, S New. Remounts : A Penn. K.R.R : M E Goodyer. Army Veterinary Corps : J W Harris.