27th Apr 1918. Can a Greengrocer Substitute a Blacksmith?

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At a sitting of this Tribunal on Wednesday there were present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, W Johnson, jun, A Craig, and S J Dicksee. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

CAN A GREENGROCER SUBSTITUTE A BLACKSMITH ?

The appeal of Thomas White (18, general service), Dunchurch, blacksmith, assisting his father, which had been adjourned to see whether a substitute could be found, was next heard ; and addressing the father, the Chairman said : “ Whether you have a substitute or not, the boy will have to go.”—Mr Meredith explained that Major Neilson, who knew the case very well, was of opinion that, although the man was passed for general service, he should not be taken without a substitute being provided, because the firm did a good deal of agricultural work.—The Chairman said, as Mr White’s family had such a patriotic record, one son having been killed and another was serving, they wished to help him, but were they to keep this boy out of the Army until the National Service Department found a substitute ?—Mr Meredith : It is hardly our job ; it is for the Labour Exchange.—It was mentioned that the next appellant—Howard James Allkins, greengrocer (39, B2), Wolston—had been suggested as substitute.—Allkins, however, said he went to see Mr White, who expressed doubt as to whether he would be of any use, because he knew nothing of the business. It would be twelve months, he added, before he could put nail in a shoe.—Mr White explained that shoeing was a funny job. Some of the big horses he had to shoe might injure, if they did not kill, a man who was not used to the work.—The Chairman : we realise that.—Mr White : It would be a case of me picking his pocket and he picking mine.—Mr Meredith : I cannot see how a greengrocer can substitute a blacksmith. He might lame a horse for life.—The Chairman said but for the fact that Mr White had lost a son in the service of his country this man would have had to go a long time ago. They would adjourn the case for a month, but he had been asked to point out that whether Mr White was successful or unsuccessful in finding a substitute, there was no doubt as to what would happen then. Therefore, in his own interests and in the interest of the country, he urged Mr White to do his best to get someone. The Labour Exchange would help him very materially.—The case of Allkins was adjourned for a re-examination.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte A E Palmer, Royal Warwicks, of 11 Adam Street, New Bilton, was wounded at La Bassee on april 15th with a bullet wound in his left thigh.

Pte G E Higham, Royal Warwicks, of New Bilton, has been severely wounded in the buttock. He was formerly employed by the G.C Railway.

Pte Albert Coaton, Machine Gun Battalion, son of Mr C Coaton, Grosvenor Road, has been wounded by a bullet in the left knee.

Gunner Norman Atkinson, H.A.C, second son of Mr J H Atkinson, of 37 Windsor Street, has been reported wounded and missing. Prior to joining the Army he was an apprentice at the B.T.H. He was an O.L. And Old Murrayian.

Mr & Mrs J Haggar, of 10 Alexandra Road, Rugby, have received news that their son, Corpl W Haggar, Worcestershire Regiment, has been missing since March 21st. Corpl Haggar was, prior to joining the Forces, employed at the B.T.H.

Gunner A E Moore, R.F.A, has been badly gassed, and is in hospital at Etaples. This is the second time he has been gassed, and last Christmastime he was buried for a time by debris thrown up by a shell. He is the only son of Mr and Mrs E Moore, 100 Grosvenor Road, and was an apprentice at the B.T.H when called up.

Pte Alfred Elson, Hampshire Regiment, who enlisted at the out break of the war, giving up a position at the B.T.H Works, Rugby, has died of wounds received in action. He had been previously wounded, and returned to France last year. He was again due for leave when the offensive started, in which he received severe gunshot wounds, from which he died on April 6. He was of a bright and cheerful disposition, and will be missed by a large circle of friends.

The death from wounds received on April 12th of 2nd Lieut R V Wilson has now been confirmed in a letter from his commanding officer to Mr J G Wilson of York Street. The letter states that Lieut Wilson “ was a most gallant officer, and showed promise of becoming a good leader ; in spite of his youth he had command of a company in action under difficult conditions, and was one of the most capable officers in the Battalion. His brother officers loved him.” The deceased officer was educated at the Elborow and Lower Schools. Intending to become a member of the scholastic profession, he became a student teacher at Eastlands Boys’ School. In May, 1916, he joined the H.A.C, and served in France. Later he accepted a Commission with the 1/7 R.W.R. The news of his untimely end was keenly felt by boys and staff of Eastlands School and by all who knew his cheerful personality. It seems that his battalion was attached at 6 a.m, and at 7 a.m he was sent forward to relieve another officer, and reached the post alright, but was almost immediately wounded by machine gun fire. When being carried back he was full of cheerfulness and of regret that he had to leave the field.

Capt G Gray, Lancashire Fusiliers, who was reported missing on March 26th, is a prisoner of war in Minden.

L-Corpl H Warland, 23rd Royal Fusiliers, son of Mr W Warland, Crick, who was reported as missing on   March 25th, is now known to be a prisoner of war. Prior to joining the Army two years ago, he was employed at the B.T.H.

Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth Home, Poplar Grove, has received official intimation that his son, 2nd Lieut A G Cox, reported missing 23rd March, is a prisoner of war. The camp in which he is interned is not known.

HONOURS FOR RUGBY MEN.

L-Cpl B Holmes, R.W.R, of Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M. He has acted as a company runner for over two years, and he has been in the majority of actions in which his battalion has taken part. He has always proved himself most reliable, and on many occasions has taken messages through very heavy fire, displaying singular devotion to duty.

Bombardier (Acting Corporal) W E Stay, R.C.A, of Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M for “ showing great ability on all occasions in supervising the maintenance of the Battery lines, frequently carrying out repairs fearlessly in face of very severe bombardment by high explosive and gas shells.”

THE WAR IN PICTURES.

Those who are interested in war films will have an opportunity of seeing a free display of actual war films in the Market Place, Rugby, on Monday, May 16th. The show, which is arranged by the Ministry of National Service, will be explained by men who have fought, and will take place at 8.30 p.m.

LOCAL MAN IN ZEEBRUGGE AFFAIR.

W GILBERT, son of Mr T Gilbert, was one of those who volunteered to take part in the naval raid on Zeebrugge. He was engineer on one of the motor boats engaged. Although several missiles passed through the little craft none of the crew was hit, and all reached the base safely.

THURLASTON.
FIVE TIMES WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Hedgcock have been informed that their only son, Sergt Hedgcock, has been wounded in the shoulder, which has been fractured. This is the fifth time Sergt Hedgcock has been wounded.

BIRDINGBURY.

THE sad news was received here last week of the death of Corpl G W Wall, grandson of Mr & Mrs Matthew Wall. He was badly wounded in France, and died soon afterwards in hospital. He had lately been home on leave. He enlisted soon after the War broke out, and joined the Coldstream Guards. At the beginning of December, 1914, he was sent to France. He was wounded in September, 1916, and was for a time in Coventry Hospital. In May, 1917, he was sent back to the firing line, and saw active service. On March 28th he spent an hour at his old school, where he was gladly welcomed by scholars and teachers. Before commencing his sermon on Sunday afternoon, the Rev A E Esau spoke very touchingly of him.

BROADWELL.
MISSING—Official intimation has been received by Mr Frank Goode of Broadwell that his son, Pte William Goode, of the M.G Corp, is a prisoner of war in Germany, and wounded. Before joining up he was the Secretary of the local lodge of Oddfellow.

PAILTON.
MILTARY MEDAL.—The Military Medal has been awarded Pte Augustus Horne, Northumberland Fusiliers, for conspicuous bravery in the field at Hargicourt on September 11,1917.

THE MEAT SUPPLY.

The supply of fat stock in Rugby Cattle Market on Monday was very short, but on representations being made to the Area Meat Agent a load of beast and two loads of sheep were sent from Stourbridge Market. The difference, as usual, will have to be made up with imported meat.

RUGBY SCHOOL & HELP IN POTATO PLANTING.

In explanation of the notice in your last week’s issue on the subject of the Rugby School “ farming ” squads, Dr David wishes me to say that the terms mentioned had reference to potato planting. For this work a large number of boys have had some training in the working of their own potato fields last year and this spring and the Army Canteen fields in Devonshire. Terms and conditions for help in other agricultural work, such as hoeing, &c, can be arranged later on.

In case a farmer needs a planting squad within a radius of six miles from Rugby School during the next fortnight or so will he, in applying to me, please state : (a) The exact locality of his potato field ; (b) the number of boys required ; (c) whether the squad should bring knives for cutting ungraded seed and a few bucket, if available ?

In working our own School potato field I have found it best to organise a large squad in the morning, say 9.30 a.m to 1 o’clock, so that the boys can pick out twitch from the rows (already opened), cut up potatoes, when ungraded, and plant, and so leave the horses plenty of work for afternoon ; but, no doubt, each farmer has his own method and convenience.

C.P. HASTINGS.
“ Mayfield,” Rugby.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—Sec.-Lieut. G. W. BARNWELL, K.O.Y.L.I., dearly-beloved husband of Mrs. Barnwell, 97 Grosvenor Road, killed action in France, April 13th.

BURTON.—In loving memory of ALFRED JOSEPH BURTON, aged 30 ; killed in action on April 5, 1918.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother and Family, and fiancee, Alice Kennard.

NOBLE.—Killed in action on March 29, 1918, Gunner JOSEPH WILLIAM HARRISON NOBLE, aged 27 years, beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. J. F. Noble, Braunston. Deeply lamented.

THOMPSON.—On April 12th, at Dar es Salaam, East Africa, Pte. FREDERICK THOMAS THOMPSON, A.S.C., dearly beloved and eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Thompson, of 7 Albert Street, Milverton (late of Rugby). Died of dysentry.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from those who loved him best,
In hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters, and fiancee, Nellie.

IN MEMORIAM.

BIDDLES.—In ever dear and affectionate remembrance of EVAN PERCY BIDDLES, 50th Brigade, R.F.A. (late of Estancia Loma-Pora, Republic del Paraguay), who died in the 103rd Field Ambulance from Gas poisoning received during night of April 22nd, 1917. Buried next day in the little Military Cemetery at Haute Aveanes, Aubigny-en-Artois, 6 miles N.W. of Arras.—“ Pro patria mori.”

BULL.—In loving and affectionate remembrance of Bombardier BULL (TOM), the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Bull, Southam Road Farm, Napton ; killed in France on May 3, 1917 ; aged 18.
“ A loving son and faithful brother,
One the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
And gave his life for one ans all.”
—From his loving Father, Mother & Sisters.

CLEAVER.—In loving memory of Pte. W. T. CLEAVER, R.W.R., eldest son of J. Cleaver, 17 East Street, who died of wounds in France on April 25th of last year.
“ One year has passed since that sad day.
I often sit and think of him, think of how he died.
To think he could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘ before he closed his eyes.”
—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Brother and Sister.

DAVIS.—In loving memory of Pte. R DAVIS (ROLAND), who was killed in action in France in the Battle of Arras on April 27, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving Father, Mother, Brother and sisters.

GREEN.—In loving memory of my dear husband, WALTER GREEN, killed in France April 27th, 1917, aged 29 years.
We think of him in silence,
His name we oft re-call ;
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his dear photo on the wall.
—From loving wife and child.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. WALTER GREEN, youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Henry Green, Broadwell, killed in action in France April 25, 1917. “Until we meet.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sister.

GREEN.—In memory of Pte. JOHN HENRY GREEN, the loving husband of Elizabeth Green, who died April 26.1915.
“ Sleep on, beloved, and take try rest ;
We loved you well, but God loved you best.”
—Sadly by all. From his loving Wife and Children, Mother, Father, Sister and Brothers.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of our dear Son and brother, HERBERT, who was killed in action on April 27, 1915, at Ypres.
“ We think of him in silence,
His name we oft recall ;
But there nothing left to answer
But his photo the wall.
We have lost him, we who loved him ;
And, like others, must be brave,
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.
—From Parents, Brother and Sisters (Kilsby).

JONES.—In ever-loving memory of Corpl. D. J. JONES who was killed in action in France on April, 29, 1917.
Loved one gone but not forgotten,
And as dawns another year,
In our lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of him are always dear.
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brother & Sisters, and Mill.

OWEN.—In loving memory of Pte. GEO. ERNEST (TOS), Wolston, 1st R.W.R., who was reported missing, since presumed killed, at Ypres, April 25th, 1915.
Though he was only a private soldier
He died a British son ;
He died on the field of battle,
His duty was nobly done.
The hardest part in yet to come,
When the other lads return,
And we miss among the cheering crowd
The face of him we love.
—Sadly missed by all.

WELCH.—In loving memory of our brother-in-law, Pte. E. WELCH, Oxford and Bucks L.I., who was killed in France on April 29, 1917.—Never forgotten by Erne and Ethel Lenton, 64 Wood Street.

WELCH.—In loving memory of ERNEST EDWARD WELCH, who fell in action on April 29, 1917 ; aged 36.
“ We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting ;
It will be in the Better Land.”
—Not forgotten by his Mother and Sisters.

WELCH.—In remembrance of Lance-Corpl. E. E. WELCH who was killed in action on April 28, 1917. “ Gone but not forgotton.”—From his loving Wife and Daughters.

YOUNG.—In loving memory of our dear and only son, Pte. W. C. YOUNG (BILLY), who was killed in action in Salonika on April 24, 1917, in the 25th year of his age. Dearly loved and deeply mourned.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of our dear son and soldier brave.
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better land.
—From his Father and Mother and Sisters (Pinfold Street, New Bilton).