23rd Mar 1918. Daylight Saving, Arrival of “Summer Time”

DAYLIGHT SAVING.
ARRIVAL OF “ SUMMER TIME.”

We remind our readers that after midnight on Saturday, March 23rd, [?] on Sunday, March 24th, they must but their clocks FORWARD one hour.

It may for convenience be done when going to bed on Saturday night.

The period of saving has been extended this year five weeks, and will terminate on Sept. 29.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Cadet C Wright, son of Mr E Wright, of Long Lawford, who was sent home in July last (while on active service in France) for a commission, has been gazetted Second-Lieutenant in the 4th Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regt.

FOOD PARCELS OR MONEY FOR SOLDIERS AT THE FRONT.
SYMPATHY FOR DEAR FRIENDS AT HOME.

A letter which has a bearing on this subject comes from a Rugbeian in an Artillery Regiment on the Western Front. He writes :—

“ How good of you to send us a P.O. I happened to be ‘ stoney broke,’ and we had a feed that night. We can get things at our canteen very cheap. Can get a brand of tobacco for 5d per ounce which costs at home 8½d. I see you are all on the ration system in England. We live extremely well, and begin to feel sorry for all our dear friends at home having to go so short.”

It will, therefore, be seen that, as far as the Western Front is concerned, plenty of food can be procured, provided the men have the money. But in Egypt, and Mesopotamia it is probable that parcels of suitable food which will not suffer from climatic conditions will be more useful.

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT.

Thursday, March 14th. Present : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), L Loverock, T A Wise, W H Linnell, and W A Stevenson. Mr H P Highton was the National Service representative.

The case of a jersey manufacturer (31) was again considered.—The case had been adjourned for the man to be examined by the Volunteer Corps doctor. He had not received notice to submit to this examination, however ; and even if he was passed fit, he would not now be able to attend the drills, because since the case was last heard his wife had died, and he had one to look after his house. He was making Cardigan jackets for the War Office, and he had not done any civilian work since May. He had not tried to get a protection he thought it fairer to leave for the Tribunal to decide.—The case was further adjourned, and Mr Morson was directed to communicate with Capt C H Fuller. The man was also advised to approach the War Office with a view to obtaining protection.

Other results were :—Clerk, 23, single, B3, June 15th, and advised either to get work in a munitions factory as a clerk or on the land. Fruiterer, 41, married, June 1st, on condition that he took up work of national importance for three days a week. July 15th plumber, married, and wholesale grocer, 40 married. July 1st, blacksmith’s doorman, 33, married, and accountant clerk, 41, single. June 1st, church caretaker, 42, married, and printer’s machinist.

THE NEW SYSTEM OF ALLOCATING MEAT SUPPLIES.
A GILBERTIAN SITUATION.

At a Meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday afternoon a resolution was passed protesting against the new system of allocating stock to butchers by which the stock in a market is divided out amongst the whole of the towns in the scheduled area which are represented at the market. As a result of this system the Rugby butchers must attend every market in Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Staffordshire, Herefordshire, and Shropshire before applying to the deputy meat agent for a further supply to make up their quota—a proceeding denounced by several members as wasteful and ridiculous.

(A report of the discussion will appear next week.)

THE PRIME MINISTER AND POTATOES.
APPEAL FOR A MILLION MORE ACRES.

A letter has been issued from 10 Downing Street for publication in the Press. It says :—“ I desire to impress upon all farmers and small growers the vital importance of increasing, to the utmost extent possible, the supply of potatoes this year. There is no crop under existing war conditions which can compare with it in importance as a food for either man or beast, and it would be quite impossible to plant too many potatoes this spring. . . . If we can get a million acres under potatoes in Great Britain this year the food situation will be safe, and farmers will have rendered an immense service to their country. The grower is in the front line of the fight against the submarine. He can defeat it if he chooses, but victory depends on his action and exertions during the next few weeks.—D LLOYD GEORGE.

THE DUNCHURCH ESTATE AGAIN ON THE MARKET.

Messrs May & Rowden, of London, in conjunction with Messrs James Styles & Whitlock, of Rugby, announce that they will sell by auction in June various portions of this property, extending to about 4,550 acres, including the whole of the parishes of Church Lawford and Kings Newnham and a portion of Dunchurch parish.

DEATHS.

MEREDITH.—November 20th, 1917, killed in action near Cambrai, OWEN WATKIN WYNN HARDINGE MEREDITH, 2nd Lieut. R.F.C., aged 24, the only and beloved child of the late Ven. Thomas Meredith, M.A., Vicar of Wolston and Archdeacon of Singapore, and of Mrs. Meredith, Park Road, Leamington.

IN MEMORIAM.

CHEDGEY.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. PERCY JAMES CHEDGEY, Bitteswell, Lutterworth, who gave his life for his country in France on March 22, 1917.
“ To live in the hearts those we love is not to die.”

DODSON.—In loving of our dear son, Rifleman WILLIAM DODSON, who died of wounds, March 24th, 1915.
“ We loved him—oh ! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him, and how well.
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he lies in a hero’s grave.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, Brothers, & Sister.

FOX.—In memory of our dearly loved son, NORMAN H. FOX, killed in action, March 21st, 1915.
—From Father and Mother, who loved him better than life.

HADDON.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. C. F. HADDON, of the Winnipeg Rifles, who was killed at Vimy Ridge on March 29, 1917.—Not forgotten by loved ones at home.

LEESON.—In loving memory of our two dear lads, ALBERT (Bert), killed in action, March 20, 1917, and FRED ( Bob), missing since September 25, 1915.
“ Two of the best that God could send — Loving sons and faithful friends.”
—From Father, Mother, Brothers, Sister, & Hilda.

LANGHAM.—In loving memory of HAROLD F LANGHAM, who died of wounds in France on March 23, 1917.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from his friends who loved him best,
in a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father, Brother and Sister.

MONTGOMERY.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, HERBERT MONTGOMERY, of 6 Oak Terrace, who was killed in Egypt on March 27, 1917.
“ A light from our household is gone.
A voice that we loved is stilled ;
A place is vacant in our home
Which never can be filled.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and Children.

SALISBURY.—In ever loving memory of WILFRID, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Salisbury, 17 Clifton Road, who was killed while mine sweeping on March 25th, 1917.
“ A light has from our pathway gone,
A voice we loved is stilled ;
A place is vacant in our hearts
Which can never be filled.”
—From Father, Mother, Brothers, & Sister.

 

2nd Mar 1918. Food must not be Wasted

FOOD MUST NOT BE WASTED.
NEW ORDER IN FORCE.

Under the Waste of Foodstuffs Order, 1918, which came into force on Monday, it is an offence for a person to waste any foodstuffs or permit it to be wasted.

The definition of waste is given as follows :—

(a) Whenever the foodstuff, being fit for use in human food, is wilfully or negligently damaged or is thrown away ; or

(b) Whenever any person having the control or custody of the foodstuffs omits to take any precaution which ought reasonably to be taken for its preservation ; or

(c) Whenever a person procures for any purpose a greater quantity of foodstuff than is reasonably required for such purpose, and any part of such foodstuff becomes unfit for human food ; or

(d) Whenever any person having the disposal of the foodstuff unreasonably retains the same undisposed of until the same becomes unfit for human food.

An exception is made in the case of trade waste not arising from want of due care, where the trader has been ready to sell foodstuff at reasonable prices, and could not reasonably have made it available for human food otherwise than by way of sale.

Any person authorised in writing by the Food Controller may enter premises where he has reason to believe that foodstuff is being wasted and may take samples.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT.
RUGBY & CRICK RURAL DISTRICT.
FOOD DISTRIBUTION SCHEME.

The Food Distribution Scheme now being set on foot in the above Districts will come into force on MONDAY, 25th MARCH NEXT.

The Foodstuffs to be first rationed will be Butter, Margarine, Tea. and Meat.

Ration Cards will be issued, one for Butter, Margarine, and Tea, and one for Meat.

Forms of application are now being delivered through the Post Office to every house in the district, and it is hoped that the delivery of these will be completed this week. The following is a table of dates which everyone must keep carefully in mind, as it is essential to the smooth working of the Scheme that the dates shall be strictly adhered to:—

WEDNESDAY, 6th MARCH.— Last day for receiving Shopkeepers’ Applications for Registration as Retailers.

SATURDAY, 9th MARCH.— Last day for receiving applications from the Public for Food Cards.

Do.     Do.            Last day for receiving applications from Caterers and Institutions for Authorities to obtain supplies.

THURSDAY, 14th MARCH.— Last day for Public to lodge their Food Cards with their chosen Retailers.

FRIDAY, 15th MARCH.— Last day for Caterers and Institutions to lodge their Authorities with Retailers.

SATURDAY, 16th MARCH.— Last day for receiving Retailers’ Returns of Individual Cards and Caterers and Institutions Authorities lodged with them.

MONDAY, 25th MARCH.— RATIONING SCHEME COMES INTO FORCE.

An Enquiry Office for the Rationing Section has been opened at Benn Buildings, Rugby,

where all information may be obtained.

F. M. BURTON, FREDK. FELLOWS. ) Executive Officers.
Food Office, Rugby, 28th February, 1918.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In the “ London Gazette ” of February 18th the following appeared :—
Awarded bar to Military Cross, Capt Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, M.C, R.A.M.C ; M.C gazetted 25th November, 1916.

Capt Townsend (son of Mr T S Townsend, of Clifton Manor) has been serving in France since 1915. He is regimental surgeon to the 20th London Regiment.

SOLDIER’S WEDDING.—On Saturday a very pretty wedding took place at St. Peter’s Church between Sergt C A Carter, R.F.A, nephew of Mr & Mrs G East, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, and Miss Allen, of Grosvenor Road, Rugby. The Rev — Perry officiated,and the bride was given away by her father. Her two sisters were bridesmaids, and her youngest brother was best man. The guests numbered between 30 and 40, and there were many handsome presents. Sergt Carter has been in the Army nine years, and has been in the fighting ever since the War began. He wears the bronze star. He goes to back to the front again to-day (Saturday), and leaves Dunchurch with the best wishes of the parishioners.

There are now

72 RUGBY & DISTRICT PRISONERS OF WAR IN GERMANY.

Six Standard Food Parcels, of an average gross weight of 10lbs, each parcel are sent to every man in the course of every four weeks, in addition to 26 lbs. of Bread.

The cost to provide for the 72 local men is now

£216 : 0 : 0 EVERY CALENDAR MONTH.

Are you helping to provide for our own Men ?

The poor boys count on the parcels, not merely as a means of keeping body and soul together, but as the break in the monotony of their prison life, which saves them from unutterable despair.

Proofs of this are abundant in the assurances of exchanged prisoners that the parcels stood between them and starvation, and they speak not only for themselves but for their comrades who are still in captivity.

DONATIONS or promises of regular or Monthly subscriptions, which will be gladly acknowledged, should be sent to

Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER,

Hon. Organising Secretary,

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE,

9, REGENT STREET, RUGBY (Registered War Charity).

URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL OF RUGBY.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
ROLL OF HONOUR.

DEAR SIR,—At the last meeting of the Urban District Council a was expressed that a Roll of Honour to the memory of those men of Rugby who have, during the present terrible war, made the great sacrifice in their countries cause, should be compiled. The Council are very anxious and desirous of carrying out this object, but to enable them to do so it is necessary to prepare a list of all the men so far as can be ascertained. May I appeal through your columns to the relatives of all our Rugby men who have given up their lives in the noble cause, to send their full names, together with their rank and the Navel or Military unit to which they belonged, to me, so that the Council may be in possession without delay of as accurate a list of Rugbians as is possible.—Yours faithfully,

ARTHUR MORSON, Clerk of the Council.

DEATHS.

CHEDGEY.—On February 23rd, ROBERT EDWIN CHEDGEY, officer’s steward, H.M. Destroyer “ Norman,” lost overboard and drowned at sea ; third son of Mr. & Mrs. Chedgey, Bitteswell, Lutterworth ; aged 23 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

HEWITT.—In loving memory of ELLIS JOHN (JACK), youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Hewitt, 42 Dunchurch Road, Rugby, who was killed in action on February 27, 1917.—Not forgotten by his loving Mother, Dad, and Brother.

PRATT.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. F. PRATT, of the 6th Oxford and Bucks L.I., (New Bilton), who died of wounds on March 1, 1917, in France.—Still sadly missed by his loving Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers.