15th Dec 1917. On Christmas Day

ON CHRISTMAS DAY every household in Rugby and district is asked to make a collection at their Dinner Table to help to maintain a continuance of the very necessary food parcels for our unfortunate men who are

PRISONERS OF WAR.

The increase in the cost of the food parcels has caused a serious strain upon the funds of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, and it is felt that everyone will be glad of this opportunity of showing in a practical manner their sympathy with these poor fellows who are languishing in prison camps in Germany.

Please place your collection in the special envelopes which will be left your house and hand same to the authorised collector, who will call soon after Christmas.

If you going away this Christmas will you forward a donation towards this Special Effort to the Hon. Secretary : Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Recent Street, Rugby.

EVERY PENNY COUNTS.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, who was wounded at Cambrai on November 29th, is making satisfactory progress.

General Sir H S Horne, K.C.B, returned to the Front from East Haddon on Wednesday.

Lance-Corpl H F Hancox, who has been a prisoner of war and on the Rugby list of Prisoners of War Fund for 2½ years, has been transferred to Switzerland

Pte W Thomson, son-in-law of Mr & Mrs Mayes, Abbey Street has been wounded with shrapnel in the eye. They lost a son from wounds twelve months ago. Mrs Mayes has four brothers serving—three of them in France—and her husband has had two nephews killed in the War.

Mr T Horton, J.P, of Ashlawn, a late captain of the Northants County Cricket Club, is acting as a volunteer tram driver.

During the past ten weeks a total of £52,845 has been subscribed to the War Loans in Rugby, of which £7,680 was invested during the week ended December 8th.

Capt C N B Hurt, East Lancs Regiment, who has been appointed Assistant Controller of Statistics under the regional scheme of National Service at Headquarters, Leamington, has been presented with a silver cigarette-case by fellow-members of the Recruiting Staff at Rugby, where he has been stationed for the past two years. He was at Oxford when the War broke out, and, joining up immediately went, with his regiment to Gallipoli, where he contracted dysentery and enteric. He has played in the Derbyshire County Cricket XI.—Pte Bateman, a clerk on the staff, has also been the recipient of a present on leaving the town.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lance-Corpl H P Arnold, of the Royal Engineers, was killed in action on November 28th. Prior to joining the Army he was employed in the turbine works.

News has been received of the death in action of Capt Leystens Llewellyn Greener, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (T.F), son of Mr Charles Greener, of Four Oaks, Captain Greener, who was 24 years of age, was educated at Rugby, where he was captain of the football fifteen and a member of the shooting eight. He joined the Territorials about eighteen months before the outbreak of the War, received his commission in the 6th Warwicks in February, 1913.

NAVAL HONOUR FOR ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY.

Warrant-Officer E W Penney, an old scholar of St Matthew’s Boys’ School, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for gallantry in the Battle of Jutland. He was on Admiral Beatty’s flagship Lion during the engagement, and the great skill and fearlessness effected essential repairs to the wireless installation while under heavy.

LIEUT-COL VISCOUNT FEILDING, D.S.O, AGAIN MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s list of mentions this week we again find the name of Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O (Coldstream Guards), son of the Earl of Denbigh. This is the third time during the War Viscount Feilding has gained distinction.

MILITARY MEDAL.

In a list of awards of the Military Medal issued on Thursday the following names appear :—Pte W Green, Worcester Regiment (Ryton-on-Dunsmore), and Gunner (Acting Bdr) W R Clarke, R.F.A (Rugby).

PRINCETHORPE.

NEWS has been received that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of Princethorpe.

MONKS KIRBY.

Farrier-Sergt-Major Bishop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has received news of the death from wounds on November 15th of his brother, Sergt Percy Bishop, Berks Yeomanry, serving with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. He was the son of the late Jonathan Bishop of this village.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another of the brave lads from this village has made the great sacrifice. Sergt S Batchelor, of the Royal Warwickshire regiment, only son of Mr & Mrs J Batchelor, died on December 1st of wounds received in action in France. He joined up on January 13th, 1915, and was drafted out to the front in April of the same year. Although not born at Church Lawford, Sergt Batchelor is regarded as a native, as his parents came to reside in the village when he was about two years old. He was educated at the village school, and when he was old enough to start work he went to Mr J Brierley’s at The Hall, Kings Newnham, to assist in the garden, &c. From there he took the situation of gardener and coachman to the Misses Townsend, of Kings Newham, where he was at the time of enlistment. Sergt Batchelor was 28 years of age, and was a fine strapping fellows, standing 6ft, and broad in proportion. He was as good-hearted as he was big, was ever ready to give a helping hand where it was wanted, and always had a cheery word and smile for everyone. He belonged to the local Cricket and Social Clubs and the choir at the Parish Church, where he was a most regular attendant. He was a very steady, thrifty young fellow, a total abstainer and non-smoker, and a jolly, all-round, good fellow. More especially, perhaps, because of these traits of character, very great sympathy is felt with his parents in the loss of their son in his prime, and whose life had taken as a whole, might well be regarded as an example by many country lads.

DEATHS.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Sergt. S. Batchelor of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment (only son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Batchelor, of Church Lawford), who died from wounds received in action in France on December 1st, 1917 ; aged 28 years.
Bravely he answered his country’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.
Father in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

IN MEMORIAM.

GLENN.—In affectionate remembrance of my dear husband, JOHN GLENN, who died in France on December 8, 1916.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on December 15, 1916 ; aged 22 years.—“ God takes our loved ones from our homes, but never from our hearts.”
—From his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

 

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8th Dec 1917. Using Potatoes to Save Bread

USING POTATOES TO SAVE BREAD.

Sir Arthur Yapp, the Director of Food Economy, is anxious that the present very large surplus stock of potatoes and vegetables should be utilised in all private houses, and also in hotels, restaurants, and other public eating places, in such a way as to save bread.

It has been brought to his notice that in many public eating places the charge for a portion of potatoes and other vegetables is so relatively high as to encourage people to order bread instead. This is very much against the national interest at present, and Sir Arthur Yapp desires it to be clearly understood that he expects the management of all public eating places to alter their arrangements accordingly.

It is stated that it is still quite common for meat, eggs, etc, to be served on toast or bread. This practice should be immediately discontinued, and the use of bread should be discouraged in every way possible, so long as potatoes and other vegetables are abundant.

In particular, it is most if desirable that in all public eating places as little bread as possible should be served at lunch and dinner when potatoes and other vegetables are available in abundance, as at present.

Sir Arthur Yapp urges the public to give their full support to these recommendations, as this is of great importance in utilising the national food supply to the utmost advantage.

NOW TO OBTAIN SUGAR.
A NEW PROCEDURE.

It is important to remember that after December 31st you can only obtain sugar by one of the following systems ; that you can only use the system which applies to your particular case :—

A.—THE HOUSEHOLD SYSTEM.—If you have already deposited with your grocer a household sugar card, and if you are still a member of the same household, you must go to your grocer after December 8th and ask for Declaration Forms. When you have filled these up your grocer will give you a Retailers Sugar Ticket for each member of the household, which must be shown when buying sugar after December 31st.

B.—THE COUPON SYSTEM.—If you have not registered with your grocer on a Household Sugar Card, or if you have left the household from which you were registered, you must go to a Post Office before December 15th, ask for an application form, fill it up, and post it as directed. You will later receive a Ration Paper, which will entitle you to get Sugar Coupons from a Post Office.

AN ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Monday —before Mr J E Cox—Corporal Charles Hammett, of Long Lawford, was charged with being an absentee from the Agricultural Company.—P.C Hunt gave evidence of arrest and defendant was remanded to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr A Marsh, 15 Little Elborow Street, Rugby, has received intimation that his son, Pte A Marsh (24) of Leicesters, was killed in action on November 2nd ; and that another son, Pte G W Marsh, of the Warwicks, was posted as missing on October 26th. The former was, before joining up, employed as a labourer by the late Mr W C Musgrave, and the latter worked for J Young, builder. Both were Murray school boy.

Mrs Bennett, 1 Hillmorton Road, has kindly forwarded to the funds of the Rugby War Hospital Supply Depot the sum of £3, the proceeds of her chrysanthemum show on November 21-24.

A SON OF THE VICAR OF GRANDBOROUGH KILLED.

The Rev John Martin, vicar of Grandborough, has just received the sad news of the death in France of his second son, Second-Lieut F H Martin, R.E, 84th Field Company. The Commanding Officer writes : “ He was shot by a German sniper whilst setting out a new piece of engineering work behind our front line. It is a consolation that he did not suffer, as he was killed instantly. He was interred by the Rev P H Hargreaves, C.F, in a military cemetery near Gonzeancourt. He had only been a very short time with the 84th Field Company. I can assure you that all the officers and men realise what a really excellent fellow he was, and we all feel we have lost a good comrade and an extremely valuable officer.” Second-Lieut F H Martin is brother of Capt C G Martin, V.C, D.S.O, R.E, and had only a few months since come home from Egypt, where he was engaged in engineering work for the Egyptian Government, to offer himself to the War Office for military service. After a few months at Newark, he left for the front in September last. He had given a few months to military work near the Suez Canal, where he was employed in laying down pipes to carry fresh water from the Canal into the desert for 21 miles. He has another brother in the R.A.M.C, who is now in India. Second-Lieut F H Martin was born in China in 1888. He was educated in Bath and Clifton College (while at Clifton he was captain of the Cricket XI). and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He had passed the examination for the I.C.E.

THE LATE CAPT FRANK NEVILLE.

Mrs T Neville of Rugby, whose son, Capt Frank Neville, was killed in action, as recorded in our last issue, has received a sympathetic letter from the Colonel commanding the battalion. He writes : “ I much regret that I should have been home on leave when this great loss happened to my battalion. It is difficult for me to express what your son was to the battalion ; he was a very exceptional soldier—in fact, during over two years of service in France I have not met his equal as a company commander ; and had he lived I should certainly have recommended him for rapid advancement. As a man he was loved by every man in the regiment. I, as battalion commander, was immensely proud of him, for he was a grand figure of a man and the most cheery of comrades. He overcame all difficulties with a laugh. You may be a proud mother to have had such a son. May you do as he would have wished, and bear bravely your great loss.”

DUNCHURCH.

NEWS was received on Tuesday that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of this village.

MR & MRS GAMBLE DAVIS, Mill Street, have received news that their son, Percy, has gone through a second operation, and is getting on well. He is a prisoner in Germany.

MR & MRS J BULL, Mill Street, have received news that their son has been wound in Palestine. This is the second time.

BRANDON.

PTE G BOSTOCK MISSING.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock, of Brandon, have been notified that their eldest son, Pte G Bostock, is missing. He had been in France for a long time. His parents have resided in the district all their lives.

FRANKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mrs Doyle has received the sad news that her youngest son, Pte W Doyle, Q.O.O.H, was killed in France. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved mother, this being the second son she has lost in the War. One brother is now at home wounded, and the fourth son is in Egypt. A memorial service was held on Sunday afternoon, when the Rector (Rev C Lunn) gave a sympathetic address. The Rev H F B Shuckburgh read the lessons. There was a large congregation.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT OWEN W W W MEREDITH MISSING.—Mrs Meredith, late of Wolston Vicarage, has received news that her son is missing. He had been in France for some short time, and was attached to the Royal Flying Corps. While residing in Wolston his cheerful disposition and amiable manner made him very popular. He is the only son of Mrs Meredith, who now resides at Leamington and the late Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, for upwards of seven years Vicar of Wolston.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory WILFRED JOSEPH (BILL), who was killed in France, November 11th, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave,
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MAYES.—In fond and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, who died of wounds received in action in France at the General Hospital, Bristol, December 6th, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ A devoted son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered Duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
“ Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which that smile hides all the while.
“ Gone but not forgotten—
Oh no ! not one so dear.
He is gone to his home in heaven,
And with a smile we will meet him there.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

 

1st Dec 1917. Presentation to a Howitzer Man

PRESENTATION TO A HOWITZER MAN.

On the occasion of the presentation of medals at Chatham on the 25th inst, Bombardier F A Bosworth R.F.A, was the recipient of medals. The presentation was made by Colonel H R Adair, Commander Royal Artillery, Thames and Medway Garrison, who said : “ The Royal Artillery has no colours. Our colours are the proud traditions of our Regiment, to which we cling, and around which we rally, just as other Corps have rallied round their Banners. It is men like Bombardier Bosworth who not only preserve these traditions, but, who, by their deeds, actually add to and enoble them. I am proud to stand here to-day representing His Majesty the King, who, you will remember is our Colonel-in-Chief, to present to Bombardier Bosworth, on his behalf, two medals, which he has gained by his own brave hands. They are the Military Medal of England and the Military Medal of France.”

“ The records of the deeds for which he has won these read as follows:- Military Medal of England: “Repairing telephone lines and bringing in wounded under heavy shellfire.” Bar to Military Medal of England and Military Medal of France: “Maintaining communications under heavy shell fire.”

“ These medals are a proud possession for himself and splendid heirlooms for his kindred to possess. On behalf of our Country, our Ally of France, our Regiment and its Colonel-In-Chief our King. I shake hands with Bombardier Bosworth and wish him health and happiness and long life the to wear his noble distinctions.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt E Wood, Manchester Regiment, son of Mr T T Wood, The Laurels, Park Road, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Pte W Wilks, Cameron Highlanders, an old Murrayian, has been wounded by shrapnel a second time, near Ypres, and has undergone three operations. He is now in a Military Hospital near Norwich.

The many friends of Mr A Clarke, Spencer House, Crick, will be glad to hear that his eldest son, who was serving in France with the 1st Gordon Highlanders, has been promoted to Captain.

Lord Leigh is gazetted Colonel of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Lieut R W Friend, son of Mr R Friend, of Rugby, who has been serving in Salonika for about two years in the A.S.C, has been promoted to Captain and Adjutant. He was educated at Rugby School, and passed through Sandhurst. After leaving school he was a prominent player of both the Rugby Cricket and Football Clubs.

Gunner Harold Richard Hazlewood, R.F.A, second son of Mr & Mrs Hazlewood, Weedon, has been killed in action. In a sympathetic letter the Chaplain said :—“ He died a soldier’s death at the gun.” The deceased who was 21 years of age, was educated at Weedon Boys’ School, and afterwards at the Town and County School, Northampton. On leaving school he was articled to Mr W J Pearce, auctioneer, Northampton, and joined up in January, 1915, proceeding to France in January, 1916. He was in the Somme push, the Battles of the Vimy Ridge, Beaumont Hamel, &c ; was wounded in March, 1917, and had been recently recommended for his commission on account of meritorious service.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Monday evening at the Benn Buildings, the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, reported that during the past month there had been further charges on the funds of the Committee. An additional prisoner of war had been added to the list—Pte T Bachelor, 5th Royal Berkshire Regt, of Napton, who is interned at Mulheim A/Ruhr. A lady had offered to pay for this man’s food parcels, and the Committee would only have to be responsible for the 26lbs of bread per month. Pte J Pescow, 1st Northants Regt, of Clifton, interned at Konigsmoor bei Tolstedt, who had been on the Rugby list for over two years, but who had been fully “ adopted,” had again become a charge to the Committee, as the guarantee on his behalf were only now 22/6 per month, the Committee, therefore having to provide a difference of 33/- per month. Mr Barker further reported that the subscriptions and donations received during November would cover the cost of the month’s standard parcels and bread.

The Chairman, Mr William Flint, C.C, said that this was indeed satisfactory, especially in view of the many other efforts, and showed there was no lack of support for the prisoners of war. He trusted that this excellent result would continue.

With regard to Christmas dinner table collection for the fund, Mr Barker said he had nearly completed the arrangements.

The scheme involved an immense amount of work, but many ladies had offered their services as helpers, and if a few more would assist every house in the town would have its appointed collector.

The response from the villages was excellent, and there only remained a few districts to fix up. He estimated that between 9,000 and 10,000 houses would be canvassed in the town and villages.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR

The Postmaster-General announces that the German authorities have decided not to admit parcels for prisoners of war in Germany between the 12th and 22nd of December next. Parcels intended for delivery to prisoners of war in Germany for Austo-Hungary by Christmas Day should, therefore, be posted without delay. In accordance with the arrangements made last year parcels reaching the camps in Germany before Christmas will be delivered not earlier than 24th December if they are prominently marked “ Weihnachtspaket.”

AID FOR ALIEN ENEMIES,

The fifth report of the Emergency Committee for the assistance of Germans, Austrians, and Hungarians in Distress has just been issued. The committee was convened in the early days of the war by the Religious Society of Friends, “ to aid innocent ‘ alien enemies ‘ in Great Britain rendered destitute by the war.”

The list of subscriptions from July 1, 1916 to June 30, 1917, totals £13,226 7s 6d. There are 74 amounts, ranging from £60 to one shilling under the heading of “ Anon,” and other subscribers include Messrs Cadbury Bros, £200 ; Mr J B Crosfield £100 ; eight members of the Fry family, and three Rowntrees.

Viscount Haldane sends £25, and the two largest subscribers are F Merttens and Edith M Ellis, and who send £500 each. The report states that in London alone more than 5,000 cases of need have been dealt with.

DR TANGYE’S MILITARY SERVICE.—At the meeting of the Mid-Warwickshire Joints Sanitary Committee on Thursday last week, presided over by Mr P E Shepheard, it was resolved, on the motion of Mr H Hulme, seconded by Mr Lloyd Evans, that the release of Dr C E Tangye for military service extended be extended for the period of the War on the same conditions that were agreed when he was released for a year’s service. Dr Tangye is in Aldershot Command, and is responsible for the sanitation of three large military camps, but may be called upon for foreign service at any time.

POLICE COURT.—At Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before Mr A E Donkin, Pte Fredk Curtis, of the Canadian Forestry Corps, was charged with being an absentee.—P.S Tromans deposed that on the previous evening he saw defendant in the Railway Hotel. He suspected him of being an absentee, and he called him outside and asked to see his pass. Defendant would not produce this, and admitted that he was an absentee. Remanded to await an escort.

ACORNS FOR STOCK.

The Food Production Department again drawn the attention of stockowners to the necessity of making full use of this year’s crop of acorns. In places where these are still lying on the ground collecting parties of children and others should be organized without delay. Landowners are urged to put no unreasonable obstacles in the way.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. H. BARNWELL, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regiment (of Bilton), who died from wounds received in action in France on November 19, 1917 ; aged 27 years.—From his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

ROUND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. W. A. Round, who died of wounds in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ When we last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
He did his best for one and all
And those who loved him well.”
—From his loving Father and Mother.

ROUND.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. W. A. ROUND, who died of wounds in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ In health and strength he left his home,
Not thinking death so near ;
It pleased the Lord to bid him come,
And in His sights appear.”
—From his loving Sisters and brother Fred.

IN MEMORIAM.

DODD..—In memory of Coy.-Sergt-Major DODD, R.W. Regiment, killed in France on December 2, 1915.—Sadly missed, Bill.

EDMANS.—In loving memory of our dear son, FRANK, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.—“ Three years have passed, how much we miss him.”—From Father & Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

EVERSDEN.—On November 12, WILLIAM, youngest son of Joseph Eversden, of Withybrook, who died of wounds in France ; aged 33 years.
“ For days and nights he bore great pain.
We hoped for cure, but hoped in vain.
God saw it, too, and thought it best
To take him to His Home of Rest.”
—From his loving Father, Sister and Brothers.

Morris, Richard. Died 30th Nov 1917

Richard W MORRIS was born at Newbold in 1894, the son of Richard W Morris (b.c.1862 at Harborough Magna, Warwickshire,) and his wife, Fanny, née Walker, Morris, who had married at St Andrew’s church, Rugby on 7 October 1886, when he was living at 780 Old Station, Rugby, and she was also living in ‘Old Station’.

By 1901, when Richard was 7 years old, the family had moved to live at Newbold and his father was a labourer at a ‘cement works’. By 1911 the family was living at 86 Abbey Street, Rugby.   Richard’s father was now a ‘Blacksmith’s Striker’ at the ‘BTH Works’ and Richard was the fourth of six children aged between 13 and 24, who were all living at home – three of his siblings had died before 1911. Richard was a ‘labourer’ and like his father was also at the ‘BTH Works’.

There are no extant military Service Records, only Richard’s Medal Card which shows that he went into the French ‘theatre of war’ on 16 June 1915. He had joined up as No.Z/258, Rifleman R. Morris in the 11th Battalion [Bn.] of the Rifle Brigade.   However he doesn’t appear to be under that name or number in the December 1915 to January 1916 Roll Book.

The 11th (Service) Battalion of the Rifle Brigade was formed at Winchester in September 1914 as part of K2 and came under command of the 59th Brigade in the 20th (Light) Division. They moved to Blackdown, going on in February 1915 to Witley and then in April to Hamilton Camp (Stonehenge). On 21 July 1915 the Battalion landed at Boulogne which appears to be a month or so after Richard is recorded as having arrived in France – maybe he was initially in another unit.

On 20 November 1917, after having taken part in various actions earlier in the Battle of 3rd Ypres, the 11th Battalion were part of the British Third Army which launched an attack towards Cambrai. The method of assault was new, with no preliminary artillery bombardment. Instead, a large number of tanks were used in significant force. However, having started well, with large gains of ground being made, the German reserves brought the advance to a halt. Ten days later, a counter-attack regained much of the ground.

It was probably during this German counter-attack that Richard Morris was killed in action on 30 November 1917. His Medal Card declares that he was ‘Acc[epted] as Dead’ as his body was either never found or never identified. He is remembered with his fellow Riflemen on Panels 10 and 11 of the Cambrai Memorial which is located an elevated terrace in the Louverval Military Cemetery, Louveral, France, 11 kms north of Arras. The monument commemorates more than 7,000 servicemen from Britain and South Africa who died in the Battle of Cambrai and whose graves are not known.

Richard MORRIS was awarded the British War and Victory Medals and the 1915 Star. He is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby; on the BTH List of ‘Employees Who Served’; and on the BTH War Memorial.[1]

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Richard MORRIS was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, October 2017.

[1]       The List is that published in the Rugby Advertiser, 4 November 1921.

Green, George Bernard. Died 30th Nov 1917

George Bernard Green was born on the 24th April and baptised on 12th June 1898 at St Barnabas Church in Oxford. His father Frederick was an iron moulder and lived at 11 St Barnabas Street. He and George’s mother Louisa Greenfield (nee Palmer) had married in Stockbridge RD (Hampshire). Louisa was from nearby Bowerchalke, in Wiltshire and Frederick from Oxford.

The family moved several times, with children born in Oxford, Stoke on Trent and the two youngest, Margaret Ann and John Palmer, five and two in the 1911 census, in New Bilton. George Bernard, aged 12, was still at school at this point and the family was living at 4 Gladstone Street. Frederick was still working as an iron moulder.

George’s older brother, Frederick John, signed up at the start of the war and was wounded in the Battle of the Somme and died in September 1916.

George Bernard would have enlisted later – he was only 16 in 1914 and he received only the British and Victory Medals. He joined the Montgomery and Welsh Yeomanry, part of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. In January 1917, reorganisation caused am amalgamation of regiments and on 4th March 1917 it became 25th (Montgomery and Welsh Horse Yeomanry) Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and joined the 231st Brigade of the 74th (Yeomanry) Division which took part in the Second Battle of Gaza (17-19 April 1917). Tis was an unsuccessful attempt to capture the town of Gaza. After a summer of stalemate they took part in the Third Battle of Gaza (27 Oct – 7 Nov) which resulted in the Turks abandoning the town and a rapid British advance to capture Jerusalem (8-9 December).

It must have been during this advance that Private George Bernard Green (no 60104) was killed. His body was not identified and he is remembered on the Jerusalem Memorial, which stands in Jerusalem War Cemetery, 4.5 kilometres north of the walled city and is situated on the neck of land at the north end of the Mount of Olives, to the west of Mount Scopus.

He is also remembered, with his brother on the Croop Hill Memorial

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Lissimore, Hugh Harold. Died 28th Nov 1917

Hugh was the youngest of the four sons of Thomas Lissimore and Hannah Mary nee Roberts who were married in Wellingborough Registration District, Northamptonshire, in April Quarter 1891.   His brothers were Ernest John b 1893, Cecil Joseph b 1895, both at Wellingborough, and Arthur Thomas b 1897 at Stanwick Northants; Hugh was born in 1899 at Higham Ferrers, Northants.

In 1901 the family was living in Irthlingborough, Northants, Thomas was a cement works manager born in Tividale near Dudley Staffordshire, his wife Hannah came from Chesterfield.   Perhaps his occupation was the reason for coming to Rugby to work at the cement works here, but in 1906 Thomas died at Dudley aged only 38. Was he on a family visit or did Hannah have ties with the town? Certainly Hannah was at 45 Jubilee Street in New Bilton in 1907 when all four of her sons were baptised at Bilton Church on 17 February, their father is noted in the register as “deceased”. It has not been established whether she came to Rugby before or after her husband’s death.

Hannah was still at Jubilee Street in 1911, with just the two youngest boys Arthur and Hugh – she says she is “on an allowance”.

According to Soldiers Died in the Great War Hugh enlisted at Warwick and joined the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards as Private 19339.   He was killed in action on 28 November 1917, his death was reported in the Birmingham Daily Post on 21 December when his mother was living at 23 Lodge Road. Hugh is described as a former scholar of St Matthew’s School in Rugby who had only been at the front for a few months.

Hugh is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial at Louvreval, France. His mother and sole legatee received his back pay of £5.14s.8d and a War Gratuity of £4. According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission citation, she was living in Coventry Road, Dunchurch when the memorial was set up. She died in 1962, her Executor was her son Cecil, a retired Lieutenant Commander in the Royal Navy.

Hugh was awarded the Victory and British War Medals. As well as being commemorated on the Memorial Gates, his name appears on the memorial at St Philip’s Church, Wood Street, although as this church is now closed, it is not known if the memorial is still there. The names were recorded by The Rugby Advertiser on 12 November 1920 when it was unveiled.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

24th Nov 1917. Food Parcels for Men on Active Service

FOOD PARCELS FOR MEN ON ACTIVE SERVICE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—Enquires into the reason for the local shortage of certain essential foodstuffs have brought the information that the Authorities were making first claim upon these for our Armies in the field ; and having had the opportunity on several occasions lately of mixing with a number of men straight from the trenches, and quite unknown personally to me, I have raised the question of food supplies, and feel sure that Rugbeians will be glad to know that without exception the men, who belonged to various units from different parts of the front, gave me the assurance that they were now very well fed, and that of most of the things which we are short they are receiving a sufficiency. They have been unanimous, too, in stating that it was quite unnecessary, and even wasteful, to send them either food or tobacco from home, and that I should be justified in giving publicity to the fact that the majority of them would prefer money, with which they can obtain little comforts when they have opportunities of getting them—tobacco and cigarettes they can buy duty free, and of practically any brand they choose. One article they are always glad to see, and cannot get enough of, is the humble sock. They assert that a clean pair of socks is a luxury, and often hard to obtain even to come home in for their leave.

I understand, too, that the old ration of biscuit and bully beef has been modernised, and is now served in an appetising mince.

At this season numbers of people will be contemplating sending parcels to the boys : and feeling that they would mostly desire to do their bit in the most acceptable way, I respectfully suggest that it take the form of money and socks.—Yours faithfully,

HARRY TARBOX,
Chairman Rugby Rural Food Control Committee.

PIGS FOR HOME CONSUMPTION.

AN UNFOUNDED RUMOUR.

A rumour has been widely circulated in the Midland Counties to the effect that pig-keepers are forbidden to kill their pigs for their own consumption, and as the consequence has been that large numbers have been killed in an immature condition.

Mr Ernest Parke, the chairman of the Brailes Rural District Council, has received a letter, dated November 21st, from the Minister of Food, as follows :—

“ There is no truth in the rumour that any order made by this Department forbids farmers and their labourers to kill their pigs for their own consumption.”

THE FOOD QUESTION.

NATIONAL VALUE OF THE POTATO.

An interesting discussion as to the best means of turning the present abundant potato crop to the greatest national advantage took place at the Ministry of Food on Monday. After providing for the normal consumption, there is, said Sir Arthur Yapp, a surplus of considerably over 2,000,000 tons of potatoes, which, if utilised during the next six months—a most critical period—in lieu of bread, will save 500,000 ton of grain, this being sufficient to keep the whole of the United Kingdom in bread for two months. In the course of an interest Dr J Campbell gave some important figures illustrating the economic food value of the potato. The said that 2 2/3 lbs of potatoes had an equivalent food value of 1 lb of bread. There was a national gain in the fact that one acre of land devoted to the growth of potatoes produced twice the quantity of flesh-forming protein compared with the same land devoted to wheat 4½ times more starch, and 3½ times more potash. He thought, therefore, that the acreage given over to potatoes should be increased to rather than reduced. Having recommended the greater use of potato flour in bread-making, he suggested that no bread should be served at meals when potatoes were abundant.

THE FOOD SHORTAGE LOCALLY.

The shortage of certain articles of food locally, which has during the past fortnight become acute, is causing considerable uneasiness and inconvenience in the town. Several commodities, such as matches, tea, butter, bacon, and other fats, are practically unobtainable, and then only in very small quantities. Several shops dealing largely in these articles have been besieged with customers, and housewives complain bitterly of the many hours spent, without result, in shopping. Shopkeepers are their wits’ end to supply the demands of the public, and in many cases commodities, of which the supply is limited, are reserved for regular customers. The Co-operative Society has adopted the rationing system in respect of a number articles, members being served only on the production of their old sugar cards—those issued by the society. In many cases customers have added to the difficulties of retailers by adopting an unreasonable attitude, and a reflection of this state of affairs was provided at the County Appeals Tribunal on Wednesday evening, when a grocer’s manager was exempted for six months, a representative of the firm pleading that it was unsafe to leave a woman in sole charge owing to the threatening attitude of numerous customers.

RUGBY BUTCHERS BEFORE THE TRIBUNAL.

A special sitting of the Appeal Tribunal was held at Rugby on Wednesday evening to consider the claims of the Rugby butchery trade. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), KV Rotherham, S J Dicksee. Capt M E T Wratislaw was the National Service representative.

The first three cases were applications for further periods of exemption.—On behalf of George William Thomson, 39, married, West Street, Mr Eaden suggested that the position was such that the man should not be called upon to join the Army. His wife’s health was delicate, and she had been advised by a specialist that she must shortly undergo an operation.—Capt Wratislaw said this was one of the men he was pressing for. The man’s business was situated in a district where there were plenty of shops to supply the public, and Mrs Thomson was capable of carrying on her husband’s business. Messrs Thomson and Haddon worked together, and he suggested that Mr Haddon should co-operate, and so release Thomson, whose business could still be preserved by his wife carrying it on.—Mr Thomson said his wife occasionally assisted in the shop by serving a pennyworth of suet, and so on ; but she was unable to cut up meat to advantage. Her health too, was delicate, and she could not stand for any length of time.—Mr. Eaden also appeared for Mr A J Haddon, 38, married, Lawford Road.—Capt Wratislaw suggested that this man should be allowed to remain in order that he could co-operate with Mrs Thomson to keep her husband’s business going.—George Roland Harris, 30, married, 41 Park Road, was described by Mr Eaden as one of the best slaughterers in the town, and he was always willing to help other butchers in case of need. His business premises were situated in a thickly populated part of the town, and on both sides the nearest butchers were some distance away. His wife assisted in the shop.—Capt Wratislaw said this was also one of the men he was asking for.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl E E Simons, of the Royal Engineers, landlord of the New Inn, Sharnford, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lieut Herbert Proctor, of the Royal Engineers, who prior to the War was engaged in the Special Engineering Department, died on November 11th as the result of an accident in France.

Mr & Mrs Collins, 45 New Street, New Bilton, have received official news that their eldest son, Pte A Collins, Royal Warwicks, aged 29, was killed in action in France on October 26th. He was also wounded in September last year. He is their second son who has fallen in the War, and their youngest son, who is now recovering from wounds, has been wounded twice in France.

NEWS has reached Rugby that Capt Ernest Wood, Manchester Regiment, elder son of Mr T Wood, a Rugby accountant, has won the Victoria Cross. He enlisted in a Pals Battalion as a private in the early months of the War, and his brother, Capt Arnold Wood, also serving in the Manchesters, was another Pals Battalion recruit. Details of the exploits for which the coveted distinction has been awarded have not yet been known to his friends.

D.S.O. FOR CAPT P F FULLARD, M.C.

The D.S.O has just been awarded to Capt P F Fullard, M.C, Worcestershire Regiment and Royal Flying Corps, a son of Mrs Fullard, now living at 44 Clifton Road, Rugby. This gallant officer was educated at Norwich Grammar School. He joined the Inns of Court O.T.C in September, 1915, and subsequently received a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment and the R.F.C. He went out in April, 1917, and speedily won the Military Cross, and subsequently a bar to the same for daring work in the air. He is only just 20 years of age. On Saturday last, when taking part in a Rugby football match behind the lines in France, he unfortunately had his legs broken.

DISCHARGED SAILORS AND SOLDIERS.—A whist drive and dance was held in the Co-operative Hall on Friday, November 16th, in aid of the branch funds. The prize-winners were : Mrs A Neal, Miss C Gilbert. Miss Lockwood (Mr H V Ramsey, Mr Griffiths. A large number attended. Brown’s orchestra supplied the dance music. The first prize for ladies was a gramophone, value £6 6s, kindly presented by Mr J T E Brown.

PERSONAL PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.

A new scheme comes into force on December 1st, which will enable the NEXT-OF-KIN of a prisoner of war to send a “ Personal Parcel,” not exceeding 11lbs in weight and not less than 3lbs in weight, so as to minimize the risk of loss in the post. The “ Personal Parcel ” may be sent once a quarter only. It may NOT be packed and dispatched by any authorized association, and must NOT bear the British Red Cross label. It must be packed and dispatched through the Post Office by the next-of-kin or relative, who receives a special coupon, and the coupon must be affixed to the parcel.

In the case of men in the care of Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee applications for coupons should be addressed to the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby ; where the applicant is not the prisoner’s next-of-kin the written permission of the next-of-kin must accompany the request for the coupon.

WHAT MAY BE SENT.

Any of the articles noted below may be included :—

Pipe, housewife, cloth brushes, sponge, handkerchiefs (one a quarter), buttons, pencils, shaking soap (one stick a quarter), tooth powder, health salts, chess, draughts, dominoes, pomade, insecticide powder, cap badges and badges of rank, braces and belts (provided they are made of webbing and include no rubber or leather), dubbin, hob-nails, shaving brush, sweets, safety razor, combs, medal ribbons, bootlaces (mohair), hair brushes, brass polish, pipe lights, tooth brushes, mittens and mufflers (one pair each every quarter).

Relatives are warned that the inclusion in the parcel of any article not mentioned in the above list will entail the confiscation of the parcel. Persons who pack their parcel should use strong cardboard boxes, and should have pack the articles in such a manner that they will not move or rattle.

DEATHS.

PATCHETT.—Died of wounds on November 14, 1917, in Egypt, WILLIAM IVENS PATCHETT, 1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, the beloved husband of Ellen Patchett, 7 Manor Road, Rugby.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear.
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain ;
But trust in Christ to meet again.”

BEASLEY.—Pte. C. Beasley, of Napton, was killed in France Oct. 26th, 1917. Deeply mourned by his loving mother, father, brothers, and sisters.
Only a private soldier,
But a mother’s son,
Buried on a field of battle,
His duty he done.
He served King and country—
God known did his best ;
But now he sleeps in jesus,
A soldier laid to rest.
He sleeps besides his comrades,
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
His name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he has left at home.
A day of remembrance sad to recall,
A dearly loved son and brother missed by us all.
—Deeply mourned by us all at home.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. COLLINS, of the 15th Royal Warwicks, who was killed in action in France on October 26, 1917 ; aged 29.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear ;
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain,
But trust in Christ to meet again.”
—Deeply mourned by Father and Mother, Sisters and Brother.

FRENCH.—In loving memory of Pte J. FRENCH, of the R.W.R. (of Long Itchington), who killed in action on 26th October, 1917.—From his beloved Wife, Children, Father and Mother.
When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
he did best for one and all,
And them who loved him well.

THOMAS.—In ever-loving remembrance of Pte. W. H. THOMAS, killed in action in France on October 24, 1917. —From sorrowing Aunt and Uncle, Amy and Will.

THOMAS.—Killed in action Oct. 24, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY THOMAS, beloved nephew of Mr. and Mrs. ROSE, 78 Boughton Road.—Deeply mourned.

IN MEMORIAM.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly-loved son of H. and C. PEARCE, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark, Nov. 26th, 1914.
There is link death cannot sever.
Love and remembrance last for ever.
—From Father and Mother.