20th Jul 1918. Obtaining Sugar by False Statements

OBTAINING SUGAR BY FALSE STATEMENTS.

Frank Nightingale, clerk, 20 Essex Street, Rugby, was summoned for making a false statement for the purpose of obtaining sugar for preserving fruit.—He pleaded not guilty.—Mr Reddish, for the prosecution, stated that defendant applied for sugar for preserving fruit grown by himself, and signed a declaration to the effect that he estimated that he would have 20lbs of soft fruit and 30lbs of hard fruit, in consequence of which he was allotted 10lbs of sugar for the former and 14lbs for the latter. On July 1st Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) called at defendant’s house and asked to see the fruit trees, in respect of which he had made the application. Defendant replied that he had twelve gooseberry trees and eight or ten currant trees, also some vegetable marrows. He added that the trees were not there, but on his allotment in Newbold Road. The Enforcement Officer asked when he could go to inspect the trees, and defendant replied, “ Not this evening, as I am due at a meeting shortly.” An appointment was made for the following evening, and when Mr Purchase kept the appointment defendant informed him that he had sent a letter on the matter to the office. This letter was to the effect that his application was not strictly in accordance with the regulations ; the trees were his own property, but were not on his own ground. He purchased them last July from Mr Allfrey, and they were still at Radford, near Leamington, unless they had been removed. He was prepared to surrender the permit for 14lbs of sugar which had not been used, and regretted that he had misled the committee, but his claim was perfectly just, as he would have sufficient soft fruit to use up more than the 10lbs of sugar. He had intended to plant the trees—twelve gooseberry and eight or nine currant in his allotment, but owing to delay in obtaining the land it was impossible to plant them in time. He therefore decided to leave them until the autumn, and was paying the person on whose land the trees were a small sum for the convenience. He was willing to surrender the permit for 14lbs, and suggested that he should be allowed to use the remainder. On July 4th Mr Nightingale wrote another letter to the committee, stating that he had a number of raspberry canes and currant trees in his garden which in a normal year would have yielded 20lbs of fruit ; and he therefore, claimed that his application was not a contravention of the order. The yield of the trees was 5lbs, and he asked that his application should be reduced by 75 per cent. In consequence of this letter, Mr Purchase called to see the trees, and found 14 raspberry canes, looking very sick, and which he estimated might yield 2lbs, and one red currant tree, which might yield 1ld. He asked Mr Nightingale about his Radford trees, and defendant then said he had purposely given a wrong name. He still persisted in saying that he owned the trees, but said he would not disclose the name of the person from whom he bought them. Other circumstances had arisen, as a result of which he refused to give any further names, but would take the whole responsibility himself.—Mr Reddish pointed out that the letter of July 4th was not signed, whereupon defendant signed it in Court.

After Messrs Burton and Purchase had given evidence, Defendant deposed that the declaration he made was perfectly true. The trees owned by himself, but which were not actually on the land which he was cultivating, did not enter into the question, as they had nothing to do with the statement he signed on April 3rd, because he included rhubarb and marrows in his estimate.—Mr Burton pointed out that it was not until after the application forms had been sent in that the committee decided to include rhubarb and marrows. Continuing, defendant said he had 10 pairs of raspberry canes and four single canes in his house garden, and he estimated that they would yield 15lbs of fruit, and that the currant tree would yield 5lbs.—Mr Reddish pointed out that the committee did not know which of defendant’s statements to believe.—Defendant : I actually own the trees in the neighbourhood of Leamington, but the name of the man bought them from was not Allfrey.—Mr Reddish : Don’t you see that the effect of that statement was that Mr Purchase could not investigate the facts ?—A : Yes.—The Chairman : Can’t you give the name now ?—A : No—for a particular reason.—The Chairman : It all goes against you ?—A : Unfortunately it does. I am aware of that.—The Chairman : You have been guilty of a very deliberate fraud, and we fine you £10.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Practically everyone in this district has now received his or her ration book, and those which have not yet been delivered belong for the most part, to those persons who omitted to fill in the address on the application form. It was hoped that the work of despatching the books would be completed on Saturday last, and the failure to do this is in no way attributable to Mr J T Clarke and his staff of voluntary helpers, but rather to the carelessness of the general public, no fewer than 2,800 forms having to be sent back for corrections, in addition to upwards of 600 which contained no address. By the middle of the present week about 400 of these persons had been traced, but there were still about 200 cards waiting to be despatched.

Some idea of the magnitude of the task involved in the distribution of the books may be gleaned from the fact that between 45,000 and 46,000 books have been despatched to about 12,000 households, and that the most assiduous worker cannot average more than eleven sets of books per hour. Valuable assistance in the work has been lent by squads of boys from Rugby School and the Lower School and a number of ladies. Some of the elementary school teachers seized the opportunity to assist which was afforded by the closing of the schools through influenza.

Under the new scheme three coupons instead of two can be used for butchers’ meat, but the value of each coupon has been reduced from 8d to 7d. The coupons marked a/a, b/b, and c/c are available for butchers’ meat ; but the fourth, marked d/d, can only be used for bacon, poultry, tinned meat, &c ; 8ozs of bacon with bone or 7ozs without bone can be obtained with each coupon.

The values of the other coupons are :—Sugar, 8ozs per coupon ; butter, 4ozs per coupon ; margarine, 5ozs per coupon ; lard, 2ozs per coupon. Tea will be obtainable without the production of coupons, but only from the dealer with whom the person is registered. Retailers have received instructions not to allow more than 2ozs per head per week.

NO RATIONING OF BREAD.—One of the spare pages in the new ration books was originally intended for the rationing of bread, but it is now considered extremely unlikely that this will come into force. “ One can almost say with certainty,” said an official at the Ministry of Food on Saturday, “ that bread will not be rationed this year.”

RUGBY SCHOOL FARMING SQUADS.

With the approach of the end of the term the accounts of the above have just been closed and show that during the course of the last twelve weeks 183 squads (averaging about eight members to a squad) have gone out to assist the neighbouring farmers. In the month of May the squads planted about 80 acres at potatoes ; later on they spudded or hoed shout 280 acres of corn-land. and lately they have assisted in harvesting about 145 acres of hay, as regards about half of this acreage doing all the work themselves with the exception of rick-building. Payment in the case of only one squad out of the 183 has been cancelled by agreement on the score of careless work, and this record reflects much credit on the squad leaders.

The earnings total up to £167. The expenses come to £27, including purchase and repair of tools £8, and extra rations of tea and cake or bread £14. The balance of about £140 has been voted by the squads to the following objects : Hospital of St Cross £25, Rugby Prisoners of War £25, Mine-sweepers’ Fund £20, St Dunstan’s £20, Y.M.C.A. £15, Blue Cross £5, Serbian Relief £5. £25 is reserved as a guarantee against loss on the Holiday Farming Camp, but if this contingency does not arise the sum is ear-marked for the Home Mission of the School.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut J L Griffin, 2nd Hampshires, has been awarded the Military Cross. Lieut Griffin was in the office of the late Lieut Ivan B Hart-Davies, Rugby.

Lance-Corpl F H Bert Warden, Royal Warwicks, who was posted as missing on August 27th last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was a member of “ E ” Company at the outbreak of war, and went to France in March, 1915. For 18 months previous to his death he was a Lewis gunner, and had been recommended for a commission. He had been wounded four times previously. He was 20 years of age, and the younger son of the late Mr Edward Warden, who was for many years on the staff of the “ Midland Times.”

A FAMILY RECORD.

Pte A J Bennett, R.W.R, son of Mr T Bennett, of 8 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, has been severely wounded in the leg and feet. He is 18 years of age, and had only been in France a month when he received his wounds. Three of his elder brothers are serving. The eldest—Driver C H Bennett, A.S.C—was wounded during the Retreat from Mons, and has recently been invalided home from Salonika. The second—Pte W E Bennett, Welsh Fusiliers—has been wounded twice, and is still in hospital ; while the fourth—Pte A V Bennett, R.W.R—is serving in Mesopotamia, and was recently a patient in hospital suffering from a fractured knee.

BRETFORD.
PTE WM CLARKE MISSING.—Mrs Clarke has been informed that her husband has been missing since March 26th. He had been in France some length of time. He joined the Warwicks under Lord Derby’s scheme more than two years ago, and was later transferred to the Oxford and Bucks L.I. He had two bad attacks of dysentry, and on one occasion was sent home. Before the War he had been employed in the Celluloid Department of Messrs Bluemel’s (Ltd) at Wolston for 14 years. He has four children, and the youngest is only a few weeks old. Much sympathy is felt for his wife and family. At one time he proved an excellent bowler in many matches for the Brandon and Wolston Cricket Club. He has two more brothers on active service.

BOIURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
MILITARY MEDAL.—Major-General C R R McGregor in charge of Administration Southern Command, presented about 90 medals to soldiers at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Edgbaston, on Tuesday, July 9th. Pte F Loach, of this village, was presented with the Military Medal and bar. It was when he won the bar to his medal that he received the wound which caused him to be discharged from the Army.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PRISONER OF WAR.—Pte F J Sinclair, who in last week’s issue was reported missing, has now written home saying he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
WOUNDED.—News is to hand that Pte Percival Russell, R.W.R, who is attached to the British contingent off the Italian front, has been injured in the eyes and face from the effects of a bomb explosion. Pte Russell had located an Austrian outpost, and was witnessing its destruction by our bombers, and being in too close proximity, some of the splinters reached him and inflicted the injury he sustained.

LOCAL VOLUNTEER NOTES.

The King has been graciously pleased to sanction the use of the title, “ Volunteer Battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment,” for the Battalions of this Volunteer Force in Warwickshire, and of which the Rugby Volunteers form “ B ” Company of the 2nd Battalion.

“ B ” Company (Rugby) of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, R.W Regiment, met Rugby School O.T.C in a shooting match on the Clifton range last week, in which the O.T.C scored a total of 427 points against 392 by the Volunteers. Scores :—O.T.C : Second-Lieut Juts, 63 ; Sergt Bourne, 57 ; Corpl Roberts, 53 ; Sergt Kerr, 52 ; Lance-Corpl Berendt, 52 ; Pte Weinberg, 51 ; Sergt Nisbet, 50 ; Corpl Finch, 49. “ B ” Company : Q.M.S Alderson, 55 ; Pte Edwards, 54 ; Lance-Corpl Pywitt, 54 ; Sergt Murray, 49 ; Corpl Seymour, 49 ; Corpl Batchelor, 47 ; Lance-Corpl Burton, 42 ; Pte Mochrie, 42.

THE MASQUERADERS’ COSTUME CONCERT PARTY are giving a performance in the Co-operative Hall on Wednesday, July 24th, in aid of the Royal Artillery Prisoners of War Fund. This party is composed of officers, cadets, N.C.O’s, and members of the Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps of the No. 3 R.F.A Cadet Officers’ School, Weedon, who, in their spare time, are endeavouring to assist various war funds and charities. The Masqueraders have met with considerable success at the various places they have visited, and an enjoyable evening’s entertainment is guaranteed to all who patronise this performance. For full particulars see advt.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,—Local munition factories are hard put to it for timber among other materials, and recently the absence of common packing timber seriously delayed the despatch of important Admiralty munitions which were being telegraphed for. What a contrast to see within a few miles of Rugby thousands of pounds being expended in materials and labour, including much timber, on a house apparently intended for private occupation solely. Are Government permits responsible for such a strange diversion of effort and material ? In any event, the facts are as stated.—Your obedient servant,
July 16th.
“ RUGBY.”

RUGBY URBAN TRIBUNAL.

THE POSITION OF RUSSIAN-JEWS.
An interesting question was raised by the application of a master tailor (38, married).—On behalf of applicant Mr Eaden said his client was a Russian-Jew. Three years ago he applied for naturalisation, but this was not granted. He was born in Ukrania, and under the Military Service Act he was not liable for service ; but under the Military Service Allies Convention Act, 1917, mutual arrangements were come to between the Allied States, by which such men became liable for service if they remained in the country. Since the passing of this Act, owing to the disruption in Russia, the various States in that Empire, including Ukrania, had broken away and had formed self governing countries. The contention now was that this man did not come under either of the Acts cited, and that he was a free person to go his own way. This point had been fought out before Tribunals and the Police Court, and 47 Russian-Jews in Birmingham, Coventry, and Rugby were involved. When these men were taken to the Police Court as absentees it was the practice to adjourn the cases sine die until after a decision was given in the High Court in the test case of Wolf Cohen, of Coventry. For this reason he asked for exemption until the question was definitely settled.—Mr Hoper said the official instructions were that Russians were to be recruited.—Mr Eaden said if this was done his client would stand in with the others mentioned as the subject of an independent State.—Mr Hoper : The British Government do not recognise these different divisions. There is only one Government as far as we know officially.—Mr Wise said, in view of the fact that a case pending in the High Court, it would be practically impossible for a Bench to convict a man as an absentee until the decision was given.—The case was adjourned for 28 days.

DEATHS.

KENDRICK.—At Duston War Hospital, Northampton, on the 16th inst, from pneumonia, Private HAROLD KENDRICK, A.S.C., aged 33. eldest son of Harry and Elizabeth Kendrick, of 14 Warwick Street, Rugby.

NEALE.—On July 11th, 1918, in Hospital at Dover, after a very short illness, Pte. E. J. NEALE, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Neale, of Burton Dassett, age 25 years.
God took our loved one from our home,
But never from our hearts.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.
No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost their loved and dearest
Without saying “ Farewell.”
—Sadly missed by a loving wife, mother, father, brother, and sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVENPORT.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Gunner W. E. DAVENPORT, killed in action July 18, 1916.
“ Somewhere in France our dear son sleeps :
A hero laid to rest.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Father, and Sisters (Harborough Magna).

DICKEN.— In ever loving memory of Lce-Corpl S. H. DICKEN, who died of wounds in France, July 20th, 1916.
If God should call us to resign,
What most we prized it ne’er was mine ;
We only yield Thee what is Thine,
Thy will be done.
—Fondly remembered by brother and sister, Will and Amy.

HIPWELL.— In ever-loving memory of our dear son, Pte. JOHN HIPWELL, Lilbourne, who died of wounds received in action in France on July 23, 1916. Interred in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt, south-west of Albert.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He served his King and country :
God knows he did his best ;
But now he sleeps in Jesus, a soldier laid to rest.
He sleeps beside his comrades
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.”
—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers.

LENTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. W. LENTON, who died from wounds in France, July 19th, 1916. Ever remembered by Erne and Ethel, 64 Wood Street, Rugby.

LENTON.— In proud and loving memory of WILL, dearly loved son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Lenton, who died in France July 19th, 1916.—Ever in the thoughts of Tom, Ma, and Family.

SMITH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. S W. E. SMITH, Royal Fusiliers, killed in action at Beaumont Hamel on July 21, 1916.

WAREING.— In loving memory of Pte. STANLEY WAREING, 10th Warwickshire Regt., aged 18 years. Only dearly-beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. James Wareing, Lilboune Farm, killed somewhere in France, July 23rd. 1916.
Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you,
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.
From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, & Uncle.

 

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13th Jul 1918. Rugby Soldier Honoured.

RUGBY SOLDIER HONOURED.

Sergt A Neal, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery has been awarded the Croce di Guerra for gallantry under shell fire with the Italian Army, and was decorated by the King of Italy on June 7th. On March 19 & 20, when the Battery was subjected to heavy shell fire, he set a fine example to all ranks by his calm behaviour and total disregard of danger. On May 20th he was N C.O in charge of a party making a dump in No Man’s Land. The party worked under continuous shell fire, and under most adverse conditions Sergt Neal again set a splendid example. He is a native of Hillmorton, and was employed as a fitter at the B.T. H. His wife lives at 12 King Edward Road.

RUGBY MILITARY MEDALIST MARRIED.—Much interest was taken in the wedding which took place at the Baptist Church, Rugby, on Wednesday, of Corpl J R Mayes, Royal Berks, son of Mr & Mrs J Mayes, of South Street, and Miss Ethel Davison, daughter of Mr & Mrs T Davison, of Acacia Grove. The bridegroom was formerly a staff-sergeant in the Boys’ Life Brigade, the members of which formed a guard of honour at the ceremony. His ambulance training with the brigade helped the bridegroom to win the coveted medal, for he gained it by going out under heavy fire, dressing the wounds of his comrades, and bringing them to safety. He has been since wounded twice, and also gassed. There was a large congregation at the ceremony, which was performed by the Pastor, the Rev J H Lees. Two hymns were sung, and Mr Harris (the organist) played the “ Wedding March.” The bride was given away by her father, and Misses Winnie and Jessie Davison (sisters) and Miss Katherine Mayes (sister of the bridegroom) attended as bridesmaids. Mr Mitchell, of Kilsby, was best man. Amongst the presents was a silver egg cruet, given by the Boys’ Life Brigade.

THE amount realised by the sale of War Bonds in Rugby for the week ended July 6th was £71,750, making a total for 40 weeks £293,305.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl R Robinson (Rugby), of the Queens Royal West Surrey Regiment, has been reported missing.

Mr A D Stocks, formerly of Misterton, near Lutterworth, and in recent years articled to Messrs Seabroke & Son, solicitors, of Rugby, has received a commission in the Coldstream Guards, and is now stationed at Windsor. Mr Stocks is widely known in the Midlands as a hockey player of international fame, and also in cricket circles.

Capt A D Stoop (O.B), the Queen’s, the famous English Rugby international football player, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Capt J C Palmer, 22nd Rifle Brigade, Balkans, formerly Second-Lieutenant, Accrington Pals Battalion, and Corporal, 9th Hast Surrey Regiment, has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished services in the field. He is the eldest son of Supt J T Palmer, Church, Lancashire, and grandson of the late ex-Supt Palmer, Rugby, and has served in Egypt, France, and the Balkans.

The death is announced, as the result of a flying accident, of Lieut Raymond Coape-Arnold, sixth and youngest son of Mr & Mrs H J F Coape-Arnold, formerly of Wolvey Hall. His machine came to grief through a side-slip. The deceased, who was an officer of considerable promise, was 26 years of age, and after completing his education he visited various parts of the world, including Canada and South Africa. On the outbreak of war he joined the South Staffordshire Regiment, and became a commissioned officer in November, 1915. He joined the Air Force last year.

Captain Eric Lattey, of the Worcestershire Regiment, has been again wounded in France, this being the third time his name has appeared in the list of casualties. Captain Lattey is the elder surviving son of Captain W C Lattey, RAM.C, of Southam, and was educated at Greyfriars School, Leamington (of which he was the captain), and at Bradfield, where he won an Entrance Scholarship. His brother was one of the earliest victims of the War, having been a midshipman on H.M.S Hawke, which was sunk in October, 1914, off the coast of Scotland.

We understand that Col F F Johnstone has resigned his position as Recruiting Officer at Rugby, and that the Drill Hall, Park Road, will be closed for recruiting after July 17th. During his term of office Col Johnstone has carried out his duties with considerable tact and consideration, and has taken a great interest in everything appertaining to the comfort and well-being of both soldiers and their dependents. Major Neilson will still have an office at the Drill Hall as National Service representative.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
MISSING.—Mrs R Collins has received official notification that her husband, Rifleman R Collins, Rifle Brigade, has been missing since the night of May 27-28. He is the second son of Mr & Mrs T Collins, of Stephen Street, Rugby. and joined up soon after the outbreak of war.—Mrs Sinclair has also received notice that her husband, Pte F J Sinclair, of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, has been missing since May 28th. Pte Sinclair has been previously wounded three times.

KILSBY
MISSING.—Mr & Mrs D Conopo received news on  Monday that their son, Corpl L Conopo (Middlesex Regiment) is missing. They have already lost one son, who was drowned when serving on H.M.S Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland.

STOCKTON
OUR MEN.—Perry Hodges has been dangerously wounded.

DECORATION.—Q.M.S. Sam Griffin, R.E, son of Mr W Griffin, Coventry Street, Southam. has been awarded the D.C.M. Last year he gained the M.C.M, and he also holds the Mons Star.

WAR WEAPONS WEEK.
£83,000 RAISED.

The result of the special effort in Rugby last week was very gratifying to those taking part is the campaign. Not only the town itself, but all the adjoining villages responded splendidly to this special call ; and although the figures have not yet been fully analysed, it is believed that the average per head of population in some of the villages is higher than that for the town The total amount invested during the six days’ campaign was £83,239 8s.

This was 66 per cent. in excess of the amount asked for by the National War Savings Committee ; and the controller, Mr Theodore Chambers, has sent the following telegram to the hon secretary for the local Campaign Committee :—

“ Very hearty congratulations upon splendid result of Rugby War Weapons Week, which is proof of to patriotism and fine spirit of its people.”

About £78,000 was subscribed through the banks, and remaining £6,000 was divided between the Selling Depot at the Lover School and the Post Office. At former about £5,000 worth of bonds and certificates were sold, Saturday being an especially busy day. The arrangements were made by the Executive Committee of the Rugby War Savings Association, of which Mr H Lupton Reddish is chairman and Mr G W Lawson secretary.

Certainly the local committee has every reason to be satisfied with this result, coming as it does so soon after their previous effort in connection with Business Men’s Week.

As a result of this the town will have the honour of giving its name to an aeroplane.

THE COAL AND FUEL ORDER.
APPOINTMENT OF LOCAL OVERSEERS.

A special meeting of the Rugby Urban District Council to appoint a local fuel overseer, as required by the Household Fuel and Lighting Order, was held on Tuesday evening. Mr W Flint (vice-chairman) presided, and there were also present : Messrs S B Bobbins, R W Barnsdale, F E Hands, W H Linnell, L Loverock, T Ringrose, R Walker, and H Yates.

The Clerk (Mr A Morson) explained that it was necessary to appoint a local overseer to carry out the Fuel and Lighting Order, which came into force on July 1st. Such appointment must be made within 14 days of the order coming into force, became after July 8th the protection of men engaged in the coal trade would depend upon the certificates granted by these officials. Although the order came into force on July 1st, the local authorities did not receive it until July 4th. The Local Government Board suggested that borough surveyors should be appointed overseers where possible.—Mr Loverock : What are the duties ?—The Clerk : The regulations occupy 94 pages. The duties will be important : coal merchants will have to be registered, and consumers will only be able to obtain their coal through the merchant with whom they are registered. The local fuel overseer will be responsible for issuing permits for merchants to obtain the coal they require and for seeing that it does not exceed the allotted portion.—The Chairman suggested that Mr Sharpe, the surveyor, would make an admirable overseer, and the Clerk said if the Council agreed to this, arrangements could be made whereby Mr Sharp could give plenty of time to the work.—Mr Loverock : If he has to carry out these duties he will have something to do.—Mr Robbins : He will have to have to have a clerk.—Mr Linnell said now that there was very little building going on Mr Tew would be able to assist the Surveyor.—The Clerk said unfortunately Mr Sharp had had to go to Yorkshire to attend his father’s funeral ; but he had informed him (the Clerk) that he was quite willing to take the post. The Clerk added that he was anxious that whoever was appointed should take up the work from the beginning—Mr Loverock : What is the remuneration ?—The Clerk replied that it was based on the number of inhabited houses in the district, but it would probably be revised.—Mr Yates said he did not always agree that they should accept the recommendations which came from the Local Government Board. If that body could not manage better than to send out an order four days after it came into operation they could not give much weight to their suggestion as to who should be appointed overseer, especially when they suggested that an official, who was supposed to be fully occupied with work, should be appointed to take over very onerous duties. Although this scheme was not of the same magnitude as the food rationing, it would entail a tremendous amount of detail work, and in the measure in which this was done effectively the comfort of their fellow-citizens would depend. If they had large queues of people whose requirements had not been attended to owing to the lark of facilities for dealing with them, the Council would be the responsible party. They should, therefore, appoint someone who would be able to devote his whole time to the work. The work would have to be put in hand straight away, and an office and staff would have to be provided. At present people who were in the habit of getting their coal in by small quantities were letting things slide, but they would come in with a rush latter. Although he had the greatest respect for Mr Sharpe’s abilities in other directions, he did not think he would have the necessary time to take on this work.

The Chairman said he had thought over the question thoroughly, and Mr Sharpe was perfectly willing to take the position and to get the scheme into working order. He proposed that Mr Sharpe should be appointed.—Mr Loverock seconded.—Mr Yates protested, and said the matter ought to be considered in all its bearings. The Clerk had suggested that in order to ensure efficient working someone should be in charge form the beginning, but to suggest that Mr Sharpe should get the scheme in order, and then hand it over to other people, was not the proper way to do it. There were men disabled from other work who might take the position, and devote the whole of their time to it. The work was not only for the coming winter, but would last for a number of winters, and to saddle an official who was already in charge of very important work with these duties was to make a hash and a fiasco of it.—The Chairman said he thought if Mr Sharpe found he could grapple with the work there was no reason why he should not keep the appointment permanently. There was little work to do for the Plans Committee now, and Mr Sharpe had rather more spare time on his hands than usual.—The Clerk pointed out that the Council could appoint Messrs Sharpe and Tew jointly if they wished, and the proposition was amended to this effect and carried. Mr H Yates voting against it.—It was decided that the offices should be situated at the Benn Buildings for the present.—The matter of appointing a committee to carry out the scheme was left to the monthly meeting of the Council.

SPRAYING POTATOES.

Continued experiments have shown that on an average of a series of years spraying has increased the yield of sound potatoes by approximately two tons per statute acre ; while in a bad season the neglect of this operation often means the loss of a large proportion of the crop.

Although there is no authentic record of an outbreak of the disease in Warwickshire up to the present time (June 24th), yet several suspicious cases have been reported ; these on investigation were found to be connected with “ leaf curl ”—caused by planting seed from worn-out stock—or were the result of a check to growth through drought. The time will, however, soon arrive when the real and dreaded disease “ blight,” which has so often ruined our crops, may be expected to again attack them. Fortunately spraying with Burgundy mixture provides a means by which serious damage may be prevented ; therefore, in view of the food shortage, it is the patriotic duty of all to spray mid-season and late potatoes as a method of insurance against loss.

It is not so necessary to spray First Earlies, because they are usually lifted before the disease affects the tubers, and it is always a good plan to lift and store them as soon as ready, and thus prevent risk from disease. Where, however, First Earlies have been planted late they should be sprayed, because the disease may develop on their tops and spread to Second Earlies or Main Crop potatoes growing near. The first sign of disease visible to the naked eye is the appearance on the leaves of blackish spots of irregular size and shape on the under surface of which a delicate white mould may be seen, especially round the edges of the diseased parts. Frequently the disease is first seen on the leaves near the tops of the haulms, but where the growth is dense (through close planting) disease may first occur on the leaves near the ground.

From the 8th to 15th of July is usually the most suitable time to give the first spraying in Warwickshire, but in some instances it may with advantage be done a week earlier. The second spraying should be done two or three weeks after the first.

Leaflets giving full particulars regarding the potato disease and spraying may be obtained on application to the Horticultural Organiser, 12 Northgate Street, Warwick.

BILTON.
WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Wednesday Mr B Morris, of Bilton Manor, celebrated his daughter’s birthday by entertaining about 200 wounded soldiers from the local Red Cross Hospitals. Owing to the unfavourable weather, the first part of the proceedings took place in the house, where enjoyable entertainments were given by the artistes appearing at the Empire and two entertainers from Leicester. Tea was provided in the garden, where a number of ladies and gentlemen assisted in waiting upon the guests. A gaily decorated stage had been erected on the lawn, and after tea a “ free and easy ” concert, in which several of the guests participated, was given. Several valuable presents were presented lo Miss Morris by the soldiers from the various hospitals.

NEW REGISTER ON OCTOBER 1ST.—The Local Government Board have issued an Order in Council which fixes June 29th as the date for the publication of the first list of electors and October 1st as the date when the new Register under the Franchise Act is to come into force. Naval and military voters can claim to be placed on the Absent Voters list up to July 31st. Registered civilians may be included in this list if they satisfy the Registration Officer that owing to the nature of their occupation they might not be able to vote in the ordinary way at a Parliamentary election.

THE INFLUENZA.—Owing to the widespread epidemic of influenza, all the schools in the town and New Bilton have been closed. In some cases nearly 50 per cent. of the scholars were affected. Hundreds of adults have also fallen victims, and a number of deaths from pneumonia following the influenza have been recorded.

DEATHS.

HANCOX.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, who died of wounds in France on June 5, 1918.—Deeply mourned by all who knew him.

HALE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. A. G. HALE, of Yelvertoft, who was killed in action, May 28th, 1918.
God took my loved one from my home,
But never from my heart.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.
—From his loving wife, Bernard, and all his friends.

RICHARDSON.—In loving memory of Sergt, L. RICHARDSON, of the 11th K.K.R., who was reported missing since Nov. 30th, and has now been reported killed on that date.
He marched away so bravely,
His young head bravely held ;
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed ;
But his unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever will know.
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing mother, sisters, brother, grandmother, and Nell, of “ The Banks,” Dunchurch.

IN MEMORIAM.

BENNETT.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. G. BENNETT, M.G.C, of Union Street, killed in action on July 14, 1917. Inserted by his loving brother and sister, Mr. & Mrs. T. Bennett, of Dublin.

CLARKE.—In loving memory of Gunner T. CLARKE, killed in action in France on July 11, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you :
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”

DEXTER.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son, GUNNER P J DEXTER, who died in France July 10, 1917.
We cannot forget him, we loved him too dearly
For his memory to fade away like a dream.
Our lips need not speak, though our hearts mourn him sincerely,
For grief often dwells where it seldom is seen.
—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

HIPWELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. ARTHUR HIPWELL, killed in action in France on July 14, 1916.
“ No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lent their loved and dearest,
Without saying farewell.”
—From his loving Father & Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

KENNEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. ROLAND ISAAC (1/7 R.W.R. Territorials), dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Kenney, Stretton-under-Fosse, who was killed in action on the Somme in France on July 14th, 1916 : and 23 years.
“ He fought for his country,
He answered Duty’s call ;
His home, his friends, his comforts,
He sacrificed them all ;
But he won admiration in Britain’s glorious name.”
—“ Peace, perfect peace.”—Never forgotten by his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

PAYNE.—In loving and affectionate remembrance of my dear son, LANCE-CORPL. E. PAYNE, killed in action at Verdun, July 15th, 1916.
A faithful son, a loving brother,
He bravely answered, Duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
Two years have passed, but still we miss him,
Some may think that we forget him
When at times they see a smile,
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.
—Gone, but never forgotten by his loving father, brothers and sisters.

PAYNE.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. E. PAYNE, who was killed in action, July 15th, 1916.
“ We do not forget him—nor do we intend,
We think of him daily—and will to the end ;
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—From his wife and children.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of our dear son, Sergt. B. PEARCE, 8th Bedfords, who was killed in action somewhere in France, July 12th, 1917.—From father, mother, brothers and sisters.
One year has passed since that sad day,
When our loved one passed away,
But the hardest part is yet to come,
When other lads return ;
When we shall miss amongst the cheering crowd,
The face of our dear son.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of our brother. Pte. A. H. THOMPSON, who died of wounds in France, July 17th, 1917.—Not forgotten by his brothers and sisters, Will, Tom, Emma, and Harry.

6th Jul 1918. Rugby Yeomen on Torpedoed Transport

RUGBY YEOMEN ON TORPEDOED TRANSPORT
There were six Rugby men—Lance-Corpl Cyril White, Troopers Ellis Reeve, Baker, Labraham, Cox, and Carew (R.T.H.), all of the Warwickshire Yeomanry on board the transport, Leasowe Castle, when she was torpedoed in the Mediterranean on May 27th. Lance-Corpl Cyril White, who is the son of Mr & Mrs Albert White, 155 Clifton Road, has this week returned home on leave, after an absence of three years and three months, having passed through many adventures, some very pleasant and others the reverse.
“ It was very early on Sunday morning—the Warwicks’ unlucky day,” he informed a representative of the Advertiser, “ that we were torpedoed. The sea was beautifully calm at the time, and the moon was shining brightly overhead. ‘ In the old days,’ he remarked, humorously, ‘ we often said, “ ‘What a glorious moon,’” “ but I can tell you we cursed it pretty well that morning after the ship was struck. At the time I was lying on the boat deck asleep. The force of the explosion threw me completely out of my bed, and the sudden rush of water swept my life-belt, equipment, &c, overboard. I was in charge of number 6 boat group, and after the explosion I got my crew together, and we managed to get three boats down. The spirit of the men was admirable, and as they were struggling in the water many of them sang, ‘ Swim, Sam, Swim,’ and other popular songs. While the men were being disembarked from the doomed vessel a Japanese destroyer circled round, throwing out a dense smoke screen, and at the moment when the bow of the vessel finally sank beneath the waves, dragging in her wake many brave fellows, the smoke obliterated the light of the moon, and the effect was most uncanny, the deathly stillness being broken only by the last despairing cries of some of the doomed men. The last I saw of our good old Colonel Col Cheape,” continued Corpl White, “ was just before the ship sank, when he was standing on the bridge talking to the Captain as calmly as if on parade. Sergt Viccars, whose wife lives in Wood Street, was unfortunately drowned. Together with another sergeant, he was attempting to carry an injured man to the side of the ship, when the vessel lurched forward, and he was swept away. The injured man and the sergeant were saved, but nothing more was seen or heard of Sergt Viccars, a very gallant N.C.O.—Corpl White added that the rescued men were taken on board a Japanese destroyer and very hospitably entertained. After a rest in Alexandria they embarked for Italy, and travelled overland to France, everywhere being most enthusiastically welcomed. While at Genoa Station he met a Rugby member of the Royal Warwicks, Mr J A Panther, of Little Church Street, who informed him that all the Rugby men in the R.W.R in Italy were quite well.”

FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT.
PILOT’S MIRACULOUS ESCAPE.

The story of a pilot’s miraculous escape from death was told at an inquest held on Monday to enquire into the death of Air Mechanic Richard Smith, R.A.F (23), son of Mrs Smith, 67 Sturgeon Street, Rishton, Lancs, which took place following an accident on Sunday morning last.

The pilot, Lieut John Joseph McDonald, stated that on the previous morning he decided to make a flight in a scout machine, and as the air mechanic in charge said it was working all right he took off straight away. The engine sounded in good condition in all the cylinders. Air Mechanic Smith asked witness to take him up, but he replied that he was not accustomed to taking passengers. Finally, however, he decided to take him. He started to fly towards the west, and when he was about 50 yards up the engine began to splutter. He tried to adjust matters, but as the engine did not pick up he pulled the throttle right off, and started to turn to the left. The machine began to nose dive ; and witness, seeing that a smash was inevitable, stood up in the seat behind Air Mechanic Smith, and caught hold of him with the intention of keeping him from falling forward on to the petrol tank. When the machine struck the ground witness was thrown clear of the machine, and the passenger was thrown against the petrol tank. Had the machine been 500ft up he would have been able to plane down all right, but there was insufficient depth at the time that he attempted to turn.

Second Air Mechanic James McCarron deposed that he examined the engine of the aeroplane before the flight, and it was then working satisfactorily. The aeroplane went up all right, but after she had been in the air a couple of minutes she began to choke and misfire owing to too much petrol passing into the engine. The pilot tried to turn as if he was returning to the Aerodrome, and the machine then crashed to earth.

Lieut Edward James Allman, R.A.F, corroborated this, and said when the pilot had half-turned the aeroplane the engine spluttered out as if it was choked. The aeroplane then spun round and nose dived to ground.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that when he was called to the scene of the accident deceased was sitting in the wrecked aeroplane. He was quite unconscious, and while they were extricating him he had a severe haemorrhage. He was suffering from a fracture of the front of the skull, his right eye was completely destroyed, and his brain injured. He also received other injuries. The cause of death was haemorrhage. Had it not been for this he might have lived for some time, in which case in all probability meningitis would have set in, as it had in other cases investigated locally where the injuries were similar. Death took place an hour and a-half after the accident. Had the pilot been able to hold deceased back as he tried to he would not have received the injuries to the front of his skull. Witness understood that Smith was up for a “ joy ride ” when the accident occurred.

Verdict : “ Accidental death.”

ACCIDENTS IN THE AIR FORCE.—Major Baird (secretary to the Air Ministry), replying to Mr Outhwaite in the House of Commons on Thursday last week, said it was not in the public interest to state how many officers and men of the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force had been killed by accident in this country during the past six months. There was no justification whatever for alarm on the ground that there was an undue number of accidents.

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT RUGBY STATION.

The inquest on the young Australian cadet, Walter Reginald Pick, aged 22, whose dead body (as we reported in our last issue) was found lying on the line at Rugby Station on Friday, June 28th, was conducted by Mr E F Hadow on Monday.

Lieut William Richard Bishop, Australian Flying Corps, deposed that deceased was a cadet in the 6th Officers’ Cadet Battalion, and was stationed at Oxford. He was preparing to take up a commission, and he left Australia in November, 1915.

Fred Percy Clare, 23 Essex Street, carriage shunter, employed by the L & N-W Railway Company, deposed that at about 3.20 a.m. on June 28th, he saw an object which he at first thought was a brown paper parcel, lying across the rails on the up line, but on a closer examination he found it was deceased, lying face downwards, with his head in the 4-foot way. The Preston train had shortly before gone over the rails, and the body could not have been lying there long, or it would have been seen, because a number of people crossed the rails at that spot. He informed the signalman of the discovery, and the train from Carlisle, which was then due, was stopped. With the help of the assistant stationmaster the body was removed. There was no sign of any struggle having taken place. A telephone message was sent through to London, and deceased’s stick and coat were found in a carriage in the Preston train at Euston.

Albert George Whiting, assistant stationmaster, deposed that the platform at Rugby was on the reverse side to that at most stations. After the discovery of the body he sent a message along the line, asking that the train should be searched. The first-class compartments were searched without success at Willesden, and deceased’s possessions were found in a 3rd-class carriage at Euston. No door was found open, and had there been any passengers in the carriage they could have left the train at Willesden. Deceased was travelling in a Caledonian coach, the doors of which shut automatically. There was no means of detecting whether such doors were shut deliberately, or whether they shut through the movement of the train. There was nothing to suggest that deceased fell out of the train ; but from the evidence witness was of opinion that he got out deliberately, and when the train moved off he tried to jump in again, and fell on to the line.

Ernest Wm Lines, 87 Abbey Street, carriage examiner, deposed that he examined the Preston train when it was in Rugby Station, and everything was then in order. No doors were open, and he saw no one outside. From the position of the body, he concluded that three vehicles passed over it.

The Coroner described the accident as a mystery, and said, in his opinion, the theory of Mr Whiting was borne out by the external evidence. It was for the jury to say how the accident occurred, for that it was an accident he thought they were all agreed.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned, the jury adding that there was no evidence to show how he got on to the line.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl C O Meates, Gloucester Regiment, of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte J E Hensman, R.W.R, of Rugby, is reported missing.

Pte A Moore, Leicestershire Regiment, Lutterworth, has been wounded.

Lieut T W Walding, Machine Gun Battalion, son of Mrs Walding, of “ The Limes,” who was recently reported missing, has written stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

Lance-Corpl Cox, of the Military Police, who before joining the Army was stationed at Dunchurch, has been awarded the Military Medal.

Mr J A Phillips, of St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, has received a letter, dated June 1st, from his son, Second-Lieut K Me N Phillips, 3rd Northumberland Fusiliers, attached 1/5 Durham Light Infantry, who was posted as missing on May 27th, stating that he is safe and well, but is a prisoner of war at Limburg, Nassau. He was in the 50th Division at Craonne.

Capt Rudolph Elwes (Coldstream Guards), second son of Mr Gervase and Lady Winefride Elwes, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was recently taken prisoner after taking part in the glorious 48 hours’ stand made by the Coldstreams from April 12th to the 14th. His company was eventually surrounded and cut off. Mr Gervase Elwes has sufficiently recovered from his recent operation to be able to return to Billing Hall.

We have received a letter from Corpl F Joyce, R.F.A, of Bilton, enclosing a copy of the “ Balkan News ” for June 15th, which contains the announcement that : “ An Old Rugbeian dinner will be held at the Officers’ Rest House, Salonica, on July 2nd. Hon Sec, Lieut W F Hawkins.” In his letter Corpl Joyce says he has been a constant reader of the Rugby Advertiser many years, and he always looks forward to it, as it keeps one “ in touch with things going on in the good old town of Rugby.”

Mr & Mrs H Colston, 82 York Street, Rugby, have been notified that their elder son. Pte Ernest H Colston, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on June 19th. Pte Colston, who was only just 19 years of age, had been in France since last December. He was an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School, where he was very popular, and was head boy when he left to enter the L & N-W Railway offices at Coventry. He was a member of the St Matthew’s XV, which won the Schoolsa’ Union Shield in 1913. He had been in St Matthews’s Church Choir for eight years. In a letter of sympathy to his parents his officer speaks of him as a young soldier of the highest promise.

Mr & Mrs Alfred Eyden, “ Denaby,” St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, have been advised that their younger son, Lieut Maurice V Eyden, 2nd Northants Regiment, reported missing on May 27th, is a prisoner of war in Germany and quite well. His only brother (Royal Engineers) was killed in France on May 19, 1918.

Mrs Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received a letter from the Captain of the Company to which her son Leonard, who died from wounds on May 29th, belonged. The writer says : “ He was wounded on the 29th by a machine gun bullet in the right side under the ribs. . . Your son was a splendid fellow, the ‘ life and soul ‘ of my Company, and was always so cheerful and full of good humour under the most trying circumstances. He was a very gallant soldier, and in the heavy fighting we had here for the first three days—April 12, 13 & 14—he did most excellent work for me by taking urgent messages to the Battalion Commander, running through an absolute hell to deliver them. This he volunteered to do when I had lost my Company runners. His were deeds of gallantry I shall never forget.”

IN ENEMY HANDS.—Subscriptions to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund during the past week have shown a marked improvement, £120 being received from all sources. The knowledge that in the absence of local support the men would become a charge on the funds of the British Red Cross Society has, no doubt, stimulated interest. To continue to provide in full for the Rugby and district men in enemy hands £400 per month has now to be raised for this branch of Red Cross work. Fortunately no additional names have been reported to the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee this week. There are now 130 Rugby and district men prisoners of war in Germany.

WAR BONDS.—During the week ended June 29th, Rugby contributed £1,030 to National War Bonds. The weekly quota for the town is £10,870.

ON THURSDAY (Independence Day) the Stars and Stripes were flown from several buildings in the town.

INFLUENZA is now very prevalent in the town, several hundred cases having occurred.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS H WEBB, Coventry Road, has received news from the War Office that her husband, Pte H Webb, of the Warwicks, is missing.—Pte P Grant, Mill Street, has been wounded in the leg, and is at St John’s Hospital, Barby Road, Rugby.

MRS W RICHARDSON, The Banks, has received news that her second son, Sergt L Richardson, of the K.R.R, has been killed. This is the second son Mrs W Richardson has lost. Sergt Richardson was a member of the Dunchurch Brass Band, and one of the best performers. He was very much respected in the village, where the news of his death has caused deep regret

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
MISSING.—Mr F Isham has received official news that his son, Pte David Isham, of the Royal Devons, has been reported missing in France since May 26th. He has been previously reported missing, but proved to be away from his unit.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
GASSED.—Sergt C T Tiff, Royal Shropshire Light Infantry, is in a base hospital suffering from gas poisoning.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
WOUNDED.—Information has been received by Mrs Fell that her husband, Corpl E T Fell, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been wounded severely by a shell in the thigh. He is now progressing favourably in hospital in Italy. It is just twelve months ago since Corpl Fell had a narrow escape and received very bad shell shock in France.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOY LABOUR ON THE LAND.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,—A considerable number of boys of 14 and 15 are anxious to help on farms during the holidays. They are too young for the ordinary camps, but capable of doing very useful work locally. If local farmers will let me know of their requirements I shall be pleased to pick out suitable boys. Only one reply was made to my former letter, and there, I understand, the boys did valuable work.—Yours faithfully,
Lower School. Rugby,
S R HART.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving memory of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died from wounds received in action on June 29, 1915. “Gone, but not forgotten.”—From his sorrowing Mother.

BLAND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. C. BLAND, killed in action on July 1, 1916.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes.
But never from our hearts.”
—From his loving Mother and Father, Brothers and Sisters.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. H. E. COLLINS, who was killed in action in France on July 3, 1916.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow.
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters & Brother, of 45 New Street, New Bilton.

COOPER.—9178 Sergt, JOHN COOPER, Yorks & Lancs. Regt., killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From Mother, Sister and Brother.

EADON.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. GEORGE EADON, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Some where abroad our dear one sleeps,
A hero laid to rest.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters and Brother.

SEENEY.—In loving memory of Signaller BILLY SEENEY, killed in action on July 2, 1916 ; aged 18.
“ Sleep on, dear one, in your foreign grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We shall remember thee.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Sisters and Brother.

WATSON.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR JAMES (JIM), dearly beloved son of Thomas and the late Harriett Watson, 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was killed in action on July 2, 1916.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.”
—From his Father, Brothers and Sisters.

WHITE.—In loving memory of ALBERT JAMES, dearly beloved husband of Ethel Maud White, and eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. James White, of 70 Murray Road, who gave his life for his country on June 30, 1917.

29th Jun 1918. Rugby Aeroplane Week

RUGBY Aeroplane Week begins next MONDAY

 IF, during the week beginning next Monday, the subscriptions from Rugby for National War Bonds and War Savings Certificates reach the total of £50,000, the authorities will give to an Aeroplane the name of our town.

 Think of our civic pride if we read in an Official despatch that

 the Aeroplane “ RUGBY ”

 has carried the war into German territory and harried the lines of communication of the foe—perhaps that it has saved Rugby men from the deadly attack of the Hun, enabling them to return unharmed to their wives and children.

 Do your duty during Rugby Aeroplane Week

 Have your Money ready for Monday—ready to buy National War Bonds and War Savings Certificates— ready to help in making Rugby Aeroplane Week a triumphant, a record success.

 Get your Pass Book. See how much money you have in the Bank. Draw the cheque and have it ready to give Rugby’s effort a flying start on Monday morning.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The Order of the British Empire has been conferred upon Lieut-Col R Godfrey Aston, Royal Engineers, grandson of Mrs Aston, of St Matthew’s Vicarage.

Mr G H Simpson, assistant Master at Rugby School, and son of the late Dr Simpson, of Rugby, has been gazetted to a commission in the Grenadier Guards.

Second Lieut B V Bickmore, R.W.R., son of the late Mr A E Bickmore, of 25 Leicester Street, Leamington, is seconded for duty under the Forestry Directorate. He was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch of April 7th.

The following military appointment is announced: Territorial Force, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Lieut C W Iliffe to be Captain. Captain Ilife is the son of Dr C W Ilife, Coroner for North Warwickshire, and an alderman of Coventry City Council.

The Hon Mrs A V Baillie has been awarded the “ Medaille de la Reine Elizabeth ” by the King of Belgium in recognition of the kind help and valuable assistance she has personally given to the Belgian refugees and Belgian soldiers during the War.

Pte W White, 4th South Staffs, only son of Mr R White, 214 Lawford Road, New Bilton, has been wounded. He is 19 years of age, and has been in France four months.

Pte J W Purdy, Dorset Regiment, son of Mr J W Purdy, Craven Road, who was wounded in the thigh on June 11th, formerly worked for the L & N-W Railway Company as parcel porter.

Among those on whom the Military Cross has been recently conferred are the following :—Second-Lieut, C G Darby, R.H.A, who for over a week displayed the greatest determination and capability in keeping the guns supplied with ammunition, though on several occasions he had to bring up his teams through a heavy barrage. He has at all times displayed the greatest coolness under fire. (Lieut Darby is the son of Mr John Darby, of Hillmorton.)—Lieut the Hon J H P Verney, Lancers (son and heir of Lord Willoughby de Broke), who, though heavily shelled and attacked from several directions and in imminent danger of being cut off, held a position against greatly superior numbers, and covered the withdrawal of other troops. He showed splendid coolness and determination.

The names of the following Rugby men have appeared in the recent casualty lists :—Killed : Corpl of Horse W H Waspe, Guards M.C.R. Trooper J Campbell. Wounded and missing : Pte C H Edmonds, Oxon and Bucks L.L. Missing : Lance-Sergt W Usher, Gloucester Regiment.

AUSTRALIAN CADET KILLED AT RUGBY STATION.

After the Preston to London express had left Rugby yesterday (Friday) morning at 2.40 the body of an Australian cadet was found on the line, with evidence of the wheels of the train having passed over him. The deceased had evidently travelled by the train, which had a stop of ten minutes at Rugby, for he was travelling from Llandudno to London. From the position of the body, he had got out on the opposite side of the train to the platform, and probably in endeavouring to re-enter the carriage he fell under the wheels. He had no hat or tunic on. From papers on him it was ascertained that his name was Pick. He joined up at the commencement of the war as a private, rising to the rank of sergeant, and had passed all his examinations for a commission.

DUNCHURCH.
ANOTHER son of Mr J Cleaver, postman, The Heath, Dunchurch, has joined up. All his three sons are now in the Army.

FATAL ACCIDENT TO A RUGBY FLYING OFFICER

Second-Lieut Douglas Lavington Little, R.A.F, eldest son of Mr & Mrs W G little, of 30 Vicarage Road, was unfortunately killed while flying near South Kilworth on Friday afternoon last week. From the evidence given at the inquest on Monday it appeared that Second-Lieut Little and three other officers were flying in two machines from one aerodrome to another one in the Eastern Counties, and lost their bearings.

When near South Kilworth two of the officers descended to ascertain their whereabouts, Lieut Little and another pilot meanwhile circling round. Suddenly, for some reason which could not be explained at the inquest, Lieut Little’s machine commenced to spin, and being too low down for the pilot to right it, it crashed to earth. Death was instantaneous. A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned.

Second-Lieut Little, who was 19 years of age, was educated at Rugby School. He entered the Royal Flying Corps as a cadet in September, 1917, and received his commission in February last.

The funeral took place with military honours in Rugby Cemetery on Thursday afternoon in the presence of a large number of sympathisers. The coffin, which was covered with the Union Jack, was conveyed on a gun carriage, drawn by six black horses, and was preceded by a firing party from the Rugby School O.T.C, under Capt C P Evers. A detachment from the Volunteer Corps, under Lieut C C Wharton, followed behind the mourners’ coaches. Six of deceased’s brother officers acted as bearers. The first part of the service was conducted by the Rev D E Shorto and the Rev C T Aston in the School Chapel. A large number of choice floral tributes were sent by : The family ; friends ; members of the Town House ; B.T.H Accountant Department ; brother officers, Staff, No. 1 T.D.S, R.A.F ; his Commanding Officer ; late colleagues in the B.T.H. Electrical Laboratory ; and shopmates at the B.T.H.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of this Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Monday evening, Mr Wm Flint, C.C, presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Wilson, Mr A E Donkin, J. P, Mr J H Mellor, Mr G W Walton, Mr F Pepper, and the Hon Organising Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker.

Mr Barker reported that during the past month the receipts from all sources amounted to £125 17s 6d, whilst the expenditure on food parcels was £264 16s 9d. The expenditure, large as it was, was not quite so heavy as he had anticipated, owing to a number of the new prisoners of war not becoming a charge upon the Committee until about the middle at the month. They would have to provide at least £350 for the July parcels, and by August it would cost £400 per month to feed the present number of prisoners, owing to the rise in the price at commodities and materials. There were now 128 local men in the care of the Rugby Committee, an increase of 35 men during the month, but unfortunately parcels could not be sent to several of these men as their addresses had not been definitely established.

Referring to the financial support, Mr Barker said the amount compared very favourably with the average in the past, but that, today, was quite inadequate, as they now had twice the number of prisoners to maintain, and greater support must be given to the fund in future. He said it could not be too fully known that the work of the Committee was in itself Red Cross work, and he hoped this would be borne in mind by everybody, so that the undertaking could be carried through successfully, not only for the credit of the town and district, but to prevent any of the men becoming a charge on the funds of the Red Cross Society. The abundant proofs received of the value of the food parcels emphasised over and over again the absolute necessity that they be regularly despatched to keep the men in physical and mental health, so that they would eventually return home fit to take their places as responsible members of the community.

The question at securing added and continued support to the fund was discussed at considerable length.

Mr Mellor argued that whilst fetes, dances, and concerts brought welcome addition to the funds, it must not be forgotten that to raise such a huge sum as £400 a month from their district was a very serious undertaking, and he felt it could only be done by people promising regular weekly or monthly contributions according to their means. He hoped some scheme could be devised whereby a canvass of the town could be made, to see what promises of regular support would be forthcoming.

Mr Barker said this was already being done in a number of the villages, and he had hopes that most of the districts would be able to raise sufficient money to provide for their own village men. He referred to the excellent support being given by Messrs Greaves, Bull, and Lakin, at Harbury, who were providing for four men ; the employees at Messrs Bluemel Bros, of Wolston, who were also providing for four of their men ; and the excellent support that was being given by the employees at the L & N.-W Railway in maintaining five of their former workmates. He should like to see similar enthusiasm from other sources, which would go far to relieving the strain on the fund. One or two of the people had undertaken to pay the full cost of their relatives’ food parcels, and others had promised varying amounts, but unfortunately there were many cases where the Committee could not expect any financial support.

Mr Pepper said there was some doubt as to the genuineness of certain persons collecting for the funds and in reply Mr Barker said that every collecting box issued bore the authorised label of the Committee and the name and address of the collector. The collecting cards were also specially printed and numbered, and had the name and address of the authorised collector. Any person collecting without the special box or card was unauthorised, and he would be glad to have particulars of any such cases that came to the knowledge of the members of the Committee or the public.

ROAD TRANSPORT BOARD.

A preliminary meeting of the Warwickshire County Area Road Transport Committee, which has recently been inaugurated by the Board of Trade, was held at the office of the area secretary, Mr S L Wansbrough, 33 Earl Street, Coventry, when duly appointed members from various parts of the county were in attendance. The committee’s operations practically cover the whole of the County of Warwickshire, excluding Birmingham.

Briefly, the main objects of this committee is to secure the strictest economy in the use of petrol and horse fodder. In order to effect this object all petrol-driven vehicles and all horse-driven good-carrying conveyances (carrying capacity over 15cwt) will be compulsorily registered and permits issued for their use. Very wide powers under the Defence of the Realm Act are vested in the Road Transport Board, and any breach of regulations issued by them will entail heavy penalties.

The Road Transport Board is anxious to avoid, wherever possible, putting their powers into force, but will not hesitate to do so in case of necessity. The Warwickshire County Area Road Transport Committee, therefore, invite traders to establish such co-ordination and co-operation in transport as will, if not entirely banish the considerable amount of overlapping and running empty which unfortunately now prevails, at least reduce it to the minimum possible. The powers of the Board will be used to enforce, it necessary, any scheme of co-operation for the economy of transport which has already been voluntarily adopted by the majority of members of any one trader or group of traders.

When it is thoroughly understood that this is a highly important war measure, aiming at a decreased consumption of petrol and the avoidance of the unnecessary use of fodder by reducing the number of horses on the road, there will, doubtless, be a ready desire by all traders to come into line and assist the committee and their secretary in every way possible.

Under the auspices of local tribunals various schemes are now being brought into existence with the object of preserving the businesses of those traders who have been, or may be, called to the Colours, and, inasmuch as delivery is often an essential part at such businesses, the Warwickshire County Area Committee will co-operate with all tribunals now engaged on similar work in order that traders may be spared from overlapping of authorities and that tribunals and the committee may join in exercising their powers for the general good.

THE “ RUGBY ADVERTISER.”

Readers of the Rugby Advertiser should place a regular order for the paper with their newsagent if they have not already done so, as newsagents will not now have supplies for chance customers. If any difficulty is experienced in obtaining the paper, kindly communicate with the Manager, Advertiser Office, Rugby.

DEATHS.

COLSTON.—In loving memory of Pte. ERNEST H. COLSTON, of the 5th Royal Berks Regiment, the very dearly beloved elder son of Mr. & Mrs. H. Colston. 82 York Street ; killed in action in France on June 20th, 1918 ; aged 19 years.
“ Greater love hath no man than this :
That a man lay down his life for his friends.”

LITTLE.—In loving memory of DOUGLAS LAVINGTON LITTLE, Second-Lieut., R.A.F., killed in a flying accident on June 21, 1918 ; eldest son of William Gibson and Laura Lavington Little ; aged 19 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

BIRD.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. BERT BIRD, 1/4 Lincolns, who died of wounds received in action in France on July 1, 1917.
“ We pictured his safe returning,
And longed to clasp his hand ;
But death hath postponed our meeting,
‘Twill be in a better land.”
—From loving Mother, Brother, Sisters and three Brothers in France (Leicester).

CHATER.—In affectionate remembrance of Rifleman W. H. CHATER, 12th Rifle Brigade, killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ To memory ever dear.” —From Ada.

CHATER.—In ever-loving memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. CHATER, 12th Rifle Brigade of Dunchurch, who was killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ To-day brings back our grief anew.””—Never forgotten by Father and Mother.

GREER.—In loving memory of Private R. GREER, 1st Royal Inniskillings, who was killed in action at the Dardanelles, on June 18th, 1915. Never forgotten by his friends at 12 Argyle Street. “ To live in hearts , we leave behind is not to die.”

 

Martin, John Joseph. Died 25th Jun 1918

John Joseph MARTIN’s birth was registered in Q3, 1890 in RugbyHe was the son of John Joseph Martin, who was born in about 1851 in Ireland, and Ellen, née Oldham, Martin, who was born in Long Lawford, in about 1860.  Their marriage was registered in Q4, 1888, in Rugby.

In 1891, the family was living at 18 Chapel Street, Rugby.  John’s father was a ‘groom, domestic servant’.  There were two children at that date – John, who was ‘10 months’ old, and had an elder brother George who was ‘23 months’ old.  The apparent reason for this ‘precision’ can be found in the biography of their younger brother, Lawrence Alfred Martin, who died on 12 September 1916.

It seems they returned to Ireland between about 1896 and 1899, as three of the children were born there in that period, however, by 1901, the family had moved back to Rugby to live at 39 School Street, Hillmorton.  John’s father was a ‘groom at a livery stable’.

By 1911, John, the eldest son, was 20, and already ‘In the army’ – his name had been crossed out by the enumerator as he wasn’t with the family that night!  He was enumerated at the Aliwal Military Barracks, South Tidworth, Hampshire, and was in the 18th Queen Mary’s Own (QMO) Hussars.

Meanwhile in 1911, the rest of the family were now living at 12, Jubilee Street, New Bilton, Rugby.  Also at home that night were John’s younger siblings: Lawrence Martin, 16, who was working in the lamp department at BTH, but who would later join up; Mary Ellen Martin, 14, a tailoress; and Christina A Martin, 12; and Wilfred E V Martin, 8, who were both still at school.  Their father, now 60, was a ‘Groom’, and he and his wife had been married for 23 years and had had seven children of whom five were still living.  They would live in Rugby for the rest of their lives.  John’s father died there aged 78, in about mid 1932; and his mother died there, aged 79, in about early 1939.

Unfortunately no Service Records have survived for John, but it seems that he joined up in Rugby, prior to 1911, and he served as either No: 5275, (on later CWGC records), or more probably as No: 5276 (as recorded on most earlier CWGC records; soldiers who died in the War; and his Medal Card) in the 10th (Prince of Wales’s Own Royal) Hussars in the Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line.  At some date he was promoted Sergeant.

The Regiment was based at Potchefstroom in South Africa at the start of the war, so John may have gone out to serve with them after being enumerated at Tidworth in 1911.  They returned to the UK and joined up with the 6th Cavalry Brigade in the 3rd Cavalry Division at Ludgershall, then on 8 October 1914 landed at Ostende as part of the British Expeditionary Force for service on the Western Front.  Soon afterwards, on 20 November 1914, in Belgium, they transferred to the 8th Cavalry Brigade in same Division, in order to bring that Brigade up to strength.

John’s Medal Card states that he went to France, on 6 October 1914, which fits with him serving in the 10th Hussars and going to France with them in 1914 – and he thus became eligible for the 1914 Star – and he would have then been involved in the various actions of the 8th Cavalry Brigade.

The 8th Cavalry Brigade served with the 3rd Cavalry Division on the Western Front until March 1918.  It joined the division too late to take part in any of the 1914 actions, but in 1915 the Division saw action in the Second Battle of Ypres (Battle of Frezenberg Ridge, 11-13 May) and the Battle of Loos (26-28 September).  1916 saw no notable actions, but in 1917 the Division took part in the Battle of Arras (First Battle of the Scarpe, 9-12 April).  At other times, the brigade formed a dismounted unit and served in the trenches (as a regiment under the command of the brigadier).

In March 1918, the Indian Cavalry elements were sent to Egypt.  The British and Canadian units remained in France and most were transferred to the 3rd Cavalry Division causing it to be extensively reorganized.  The yeomanry regiments were concentrated in the 8th Cavalry Brigade which left the 3rd Cavalry Division on the 12/14 March 1918 and transferred to the 6th Cavalry Brigade in same Division.

Whilst it was fairly quiet at the start of 1918, John would have continued to be involved in the daily routine of a Cavalry Regiment.  The front was comparatively quiet prior to 21 March.

However, an attack by the Germans had been anticipated and on 21 March 1918, they launched a major offensive, Operation Michael, against the British Fifth Army and the right wing of the British Third Army.  The German artillery targeted command and communications; then, the destruction of artillery; and then the front-line infantry.  The artillery bombardment began at 4.40am on 21 March 1918, and hit targets over an area of 150 square miles, the biggest barrage of the entire war.  Over 1,100,000 shells were fired in five hours.

The War Diary of the 10th Hussars whilst serving with the 6th Cavalry Brigade is available and a summary of activities in the four months before John’s death is summarised below.[1]

At start of March 1918, they were at Tertry where on 9 March one of the huts was bombed, six were killed, 35 wounded, six of whom died in hospital.  On 13 March they moved to the Devise area, and from 18-20 March they found working parties and then on 21 March ‘Heavy enemy bombardment of the whole front line opposite started about 4.30am.  The Regiment was ordered to stand to, and moved out at 5pm and marched to Beaumont near Ham, where the Brigade bivouacked in a field.  The dismounted Brigade was ordered to be formed next morning.’  On 22 March ‘The dismounted Brigade left by bus early in the morning …’.

They moved to Pontoise and then Carlepont and later to Choisy where a bomb injured an officer on 28 March.  On 30 March they were at Airion and moved to Sains-en-Amienois and the next day – 31 March – to bivouacs at Racineuse Farm.  Another group had gone to Lagny and then on to Elincourt and Chevincourt in period 26 to 29 March, sustaining one killed, 15 wounded and four missing.  A third group was in Naureuil on 23 March, and then dug in at Abbecourt and later went to Les Bruyers.

On 1 April the Brigade moved to Gentelles Wood.  On 2 April they moved on to Fouilloy.  Then on 4 April they came under heavy fire at Bois de Hamel and lost about 50 horses.  They were shelled again on 5 April at Blagney-Tronville.  On 6 April they moved to Camon where they ‘reorganised’ on 7 April.   On 11 April they marched to Buire-au-Bois and then on 12 April to Hestrus and later to billets at Aumerval.  From 14-30 April, they stood to and saddled up each day and were ready at short notice.

May started in the same way until on 5 May they moved to Rougefay and the next day to Villers l’ Hopital and then to Contay where they stood to until 16 May.  On 17 May they moved to camp at Belloy-sur-Somme.  They were then cleaning and training until the end of the month when they moved to Behencourt, and bivouacked half a mile south west of the chateau.

The Brigade stood to each day until 14 June when they were relieved by the 7th Cavalry Brigade and moved back to Belloy-sur-Somme.  From 15 to 24 June there was training and a ‘scheme’ was carried out on 22 June, however, ‘owing to the large numbers of cases of influenza in the Brigade, it was decided to move the Brigade to another area.’  On 25 June the Brigade moved to the Soues area, and then billeted at Reincourt until the end of July.

It seems there was constant movement in response to the German advances, the Cavalry effectively being in place as a readily moved ‘backstop’.  They moved, sometimes on a daily basis, from some 30kms south of Arras, to an area, similarly distant, to the west and south-west of the town.  There was no obvious major enemy action in the period prior to John’s death, when he might have been wounded, however, the mention of the ‘large number of cases of influenza’ may suggest that John was affected badly and for that reason was evacuated to a Casualty Clearing Station.

Whether wounded in routine sniping or shelling, or suffering from influenza, John was evacuated for some considerable distance behind the lines, assuming that he was taken to the 21st Casualty Clearing Station at Wavens – some 50kms west of Arras – next to where he was later buried.

John Martin died, aged 28, on 25 June 1918.  He was buried in the Wavans British Cemetery in Grave Ref: B. 3.  This is a very small cemetery with only 44 graves and was made by the nearby 21st Casualty Clearing Station in May-September 1918.  The cemetery contains 43 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and one German war grave.  The flying ace Major J T B McCudden, VC, DSO and Bar, MC and Bar, MM, who died of wounds on 9 July 1918, some two weeks after John Martin, is buried in the same row as John Martin in Grave 10.

Later, when a gravestone replaced the temporary cross, probably in the 1920s, no additional family message was engraved upon it.  His parents were still at 12, Jubilee Street, New Bilton, Rugby.

John Joseph Martin is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates and also on the New Bilton War Memorial, by the chapel in Croop Hill Cemetery, Addison Road, which states ‘In the Great War these died for England 1914-1919’.  The family were Roman Catholic and John – and his brother, Lawrence – are remembered at St. Marie’s Church, Rugby, ‘To the Memory of the Men of this Congregation who Fell in the Great War 1914-1918 …’.

His Medal Card showed that he was awarded the British War Medal, the Victory Medal and the 1914 Star.

His mother received his outstanding pay of £13-15-2d on 13 March 1919 and his War Gratuity of £25-10s on 2 January 1920.

John Martin’s younger brother, Lawrence [or Lawrence] Alfred Martin, also served and was killed in action with the 6th Battalion, the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry.  He died on 12 September 1916.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on John Joseph MARTIN was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, February 2018.

[1]      WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-20, Household Cavalry and Cavalry of the Line, 3rd Cavalry Div., 6th Cavalry Brig., 10th Prince of Wales Hussars, March 1918 – March 1919, TNA ref: WO 95/1153.

[2]      https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2016/09/12/martin-lawrence-alfred-died-12th-sep-1916/.

 

Gardner, Arthur. Died 23rd Jun 1918

Arthur GARDNER was born in late 1878 in Brackley, Northamptonshire.  He was the son of Richard Gardner, who was born in about 1855 in Banbury, Oxfordshire, and Elizabeth, née Stevens, Gardner, who was born in about 1858 in Clifton, Warwickshire. They married in early 1878.

The family had moved to Brailes and then to Banbury, and sometime before 1901, moved again to live at 61 York Street, Rugby.  Arthur was now 22 and a ‘carpenter and joiner’, as was his father, and he was the eldest of five children.

His marriage with Agnes Jones, was registered in Q3, 1906.  She had been born in Rugby on 10 March 1876.  They lived later at 76, King Edward Road, Rugby.

In 1911, Arthur was 32, and was living with his wife at 30 King Edward Road, Rugby – he was a ‘carpenter & joiner’ for a builder.  His wife was now 35 and they had been married for four years but had no children.  It is possible that they later had two daughters: Marion E in Q4 1913, and Phyllis A in Q3 1916, however, with two fairly common surnames, the children could have related to another couple, although there are no obvious local marriages, and an on-line anonymous tree also shows two daughters.

In 1911, Arthur’s parents, and two of Arthur’s sisters were still living in Rugby at 27 Dale Street.

At some date Arthur joined up, and whilst there are no Service Records or Medal Card, it is known that he later became an Air Mechanic 2nd Class, No.126856, in the Royal Air Force, at the 1st Aeroplane Supply Depot.
In December 1915 it was decided to convert St Omer … into fixed supply and repair depots and to create three new air parks in the army rear areas to provide mobile support to the flying squadrons. St Omer was re-titled No 1 Aircraft Depot (AD)’. … In March 1918 [with the German advance of operation Michael] … 1AD was moved towards the coast.[1]

It is likely that Arthur was posted to No.1 AD and then stationed at St. Omer, because of his carpentry skills – aircraft were made largely of wood and there was a considerable amount of repair work to be carried out to help maintain supplies of aircraft.

With crowded conditions, any disease could spread rapidly.  In mid-1918, the influenza epidemic was a growing problem.  It is suggested that the ‘disease’ that Arthur caught may well have been the ‘flu’ and that he was evacuated to a hospital – in his case probably to a base hospital near Boulogne.

Arthur Gardner is recorded as having ‘Died of Disease’,[2] on 23 June 1918, aged 40.  He was buried at the Terlincthun British Cemetery, Wimille, in Grave Ref: I. B. 16.

The Terlincthun British Cemetery is situated at Wimille, which is located on the northern outskirts of Boulogne.  The first rest camps for Commonwealth forces were established near Terlincthun in August 1914 and during the First World War, Boulogne and Wimereux housed numerous hospitals and other medical establishments.  The cemetery at Terlincthun was begun in June 1918 when the space available for service burials in the civil cemeteries of Boulogne and Wimereux was exhausted.  It was used chiefly for burials from the base hospitals, … for many years Terlincthun remained an ‘open’ cemetery and graves continued to be brought into it from isolated sites and other burials grounds throughout France where maintenance could not be assured.

Arthur Gardner is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates.

His wife, Agnes, lived until she was 100, and her death was registered in Rugby in Q3, 1976.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Arthur GARDNER was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, March 2018.

 

[1]      https://www.crossandcockade.com/StOmer/TheAircraftDepot.asp.

[2]      See: https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/4025402/gardner,-arthur/#&gid=null&pid=2.

22nd Jun 1918. Memorial Tablets in Churches.

MEMORIAL TABLETS IN CHURCHES.—The Bishop of Worcester, in this month’s Worcester Diocesan Magazine, writes :—“ I wish again to call the clergy’s attention to the growing number of large tablets which are being proposed in our churches. We have really no right to occupy the church wall space in this way. The best way to commemorate those who have died in the War is the brotherly way of one memorial for the whole parish, on which the name of comrades can be inserted. For rich persons to occupy the wall space with memorials which cannot be afforded by poorer parishioners is as objectionable as occupying the floor space by large private pews. I appeal to the church feeling of my diocese to consider this.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

CORRECTION.—In our last issue it was inadvertently stated that Lieut H N Salter, who had been awarded the Military Cross, was the son of Mr A G Salter. It should have been Mr H S Salter, of 3 Elborow Street, Rugby.

Mrs. F. Kirby, 15 Sun Street, Rugby, has been informed that her son, Pte A Kirby, R.W.F, had been wounded for the third time and brought to Southampton War Hospital. She has another son in France, and her husband is also serving in Palestine.

The following Rugby men have appeared in the casualty lists issued this week :—Killed, Rfn W Griffin, Rifle Brigade ; missing, Pte G W Wale, Border Regt, Pte J Harris (Royal Scots), and Pte B Lawley (R.W.R).

Mr and Mrs Bland have received news from the War Office that their son, Pte R G Bland, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action on June 4th. Also a letter from the Chaplain to say he had buried him in one of the Military Cemeteries, and the Battalion had erected a cross to his memory. He was 18 years of age, and was an Elborow old boy.

Mr and Mrs Pulham, of Barby, have received a letter from their son, Rfn H W Pulham, who has been missing since April 15th, 1918, saying he is a prisoner in Philippapalis, Bulgaria. He joined the colours at the outbreak of the war, and served 12 months in France, where he was wounded on July 1st, 1916. He was transferred to Salonica in November, 1916, where he served till reported missing. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. Machine Assembly Department.

Mr Doyle, of 71 Victoria Street, New Bilton, received news this week that his brother, Pte Thomas Doyle, had been killed in action in Palestine. This makes the third brother he has lost, Frank and Joseph Wilfred Doyle having been killed in France. They were the sons of the late Mr Joseph Doyle, and of Mrs Doyle, of Frankton.

Pte W H Fallon, Wiltshire Regt, son of Mr and Mrs Fallon, 7 Adam Street, New Bilton, who was previously reported missing, is a prisoner of war at Munster, and Pte A Backle, R.W.R., whose wife lives at 27 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, is a prisoner at Hamburg.

AWARDS FOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE.

The meritorious Service Medal in recognition of valuable service rendered in France has been awarded to :—
Sergt H E Gregory. A.S.C., Rugby.
L-Corpl S G Hall. R.W.R., Rugby.
Reg.Q.M.S. E L Hewitt, R.W.R., Rugby.
L-CorpI J W Hooper, R.W.R., Newbold-on-Avon.
Sapper A W Rathbone, R.E., Rugby.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.
ALL SOLDIERS TO BE BURIED FREE.

The Cemetery Committee reported that they had considered the question of the free interment of members of His Majesty’s Forces dying in Rugby and the neighbourhood, and recommended that in future the same facilities be granted as to Rugby men, and in case of any difficulty arising the matter should be referred to the discretion of the Chairman of the Council, Mr Stevenson, and the Clerk.—They had instructed the Clerk to allow the erection of a headstone or curbing over graves of men dying in His Majesty’s Forces and interred in the Cemetery, free of charge, where necessary.

The Public Health Committee reported that four cases of infectious disease had been noticed, of which two had been removed to the Hospital at Harborough Magna.

BRANDON.
HUNS BEHAVE DECENTLY TO SOME PRISONERS.—Mr and Mm L Ward have received a card from their son, Lance-Corpl J Ward, who is now a prisoner at Langensalza, in Germany. He informs them that his right arm was fractured just below the right shoulder. The wound is healing up finely and he can to use his fingers a little. He further states : “ We are being treated well, under the circumstances, and we have nothing to grumble about, so cheer up and do not worry.”

BRETFORD.
PTE JAMES CASTLE.—Pte James Castle, who was an Army Reserve man when the war commenced, has just received his discharge certificate. He joined the Leicester Regt in 1903, and was mobilised when war started. He went to France on the 20th of September, 1914, and was in the thick of the fighting until the 20th of January, 1915, when he was badly injured in the knee through a trench being blown in upon him. He was then sent to an English hospital. Although his knee never got thoroughly well he did a lot of useful work in assisting in the drilling of recruits and afterwards as a Military Policeman. The certificate, which speaks highly of him, says he was honourably discharged. Being the first received at Bretford during the war it is an object of interest to the inhabitants.

NAPTON.
P.C and Mrs Bradbury, of Napton, have recently received the news from their third son in France, Regt-Sergt-Major A H Bradbury, 2/6 R.W.R, that he has won the Military Cross. His Colonel, when wounded, handed over the command of the Regiment to him, although Bradbury himself was slightly wounded. Before joining the army Sergt-Major Bradbury was a member of the Warwickshire Constabulary, stationed at Warwick. Mr and Mrs Bradbury have three other sons in France—Corpl H Bradbury, of the Royal Engineers ; Corpl L Bradbury, of the: Army Service Corps ; and Pte M Bradbury, of the Suffolk Regiment. Mr Bradbury has served eight years in the Royal Rifle Corps, seven of which he was serving in India. He has been in the Police Force over 27 years.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

SIDNEY LANE HOME.—L-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), second son of Sergt and Mrs Frank Lane, has now been invalided home. He was severely wounded in France last November, and his left leg has been amputated above the knee.

WOUNDED.—Miss Ada Allen has received a notification that her brother, Pte Walter Allen (Cheshire Regt), was wounded by a bullet through his right arm during the advance on the 30th ult He joined up in September, 1914, and though he has been through some trying experiences since then, this is the first time he has been wounded.

DILUTION OF BREAD AND HEALTH.

We are asked to remind the public that bread should be kept in a cool place during warm weather. At temperatures above 60 degrees Fahrenheit bread made from the flour at present in use is apt to become “ ropey ”, and unsuitable for food, but at lower temperatures its keeping qualities are good. Complaints continue to be heard from time to time against the so-called war bread made from standard wheaten floor, with an admixture of flour obtained from other cereals. We are informed that the policy of raising the percentage of flour extracted from wheat and adding flour from other cereals was only adopted after the fullest scientific investigation both as to the digestibility and the nourishing qualities of the resulting product.

The present position of the cereal supplies completely vindicates the policy of dilution as applied to bread. It is authoritatively stated that no evidence whatever has been adduced that the health of the nation has generally suffered from the lowering of the quality of bread, and at the present time the stocks in the country are enough to enable the Royal Commission on Wheat Supplies to make the definite statement that the bread supply of the country is assured until the next harvest is gathered. The total saving effected up to the present is estimated as the equivalent of the cargoes of more than 400 steamers of average size, or nearly one-third of an average annual importation. It is held that such a saving could not have been effected by rationing without disastrous effects on the general national health. The outlook at the moment is distinctly promising.

SUGAR FOR JAM.

UNFAIR CRITICISM RESENTED BY RUGBY COMMITTEE.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week the Chairman (Mr T A Wise) referred to the dissatisfaction which has been caused by the refusal of permits to purchase sugar to people who had neglected to enclose a stamped addressed envelope with their application forma. Many people he said, thought that the committee of their own malicious stupidity made this regulation, but it was not so; it was a Government instruction, and the local officials did all they could by drawing the attention of the applicants to the regulation by placing a mark at each side of the paragraph relating to it. Any remarks about red tape had nothing to do with the Committee ; they should be addressed to the Government. Before any agitation arose over the matter he discussed the question with the Executive Officer, and they wrote to London to see if they could get some redress. They had no desire to be harsh or unfair, but when a regulation was printed on a form it saw not too much to expect that the people concerned would read it, particularly when their attention was especially attracted to it ; and the remarks which had been made concerning the committee and the officials were grossly unfair. He thought people should appreciate the difficulties under which the staff had worked.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) said with regard to the suggestion that letters should be sent to all persons who had received permits, asking them to return them for re-consideration if their fruit crop had not come up to expectation, this would have required 5,000 envelopes ; and, after consulting the Chairman and Vice-Chairman, he had placed an advertisement in the local Press, and had had some window bills printed to this effect.—This action was endorsed.

The Executive Officer read a letter from the Ministry on the subject, asking for particulars as to the number of late applications, and stating that if the number was not a large one permits could be issued. If this involved a large indent of sugar details should be sent to the Ministry before issuing the permits. As there were 685 applicants affected he had sent the details.—The Chairman said he hoped they would now get something from the London authorities.

Mr Griffin mentioned the case of a man who could not get his form when he applied for it, but left a penny for the stamp.—The Chairman : That was risky (laughter). I do not mean that as a reflection on the staff ; but if there were a number like that they could not possibly recollect all who left money.—The Executive Officer said they had quite a pile of money handed in, and every penny was used in stamps.

At a later stage of the meeting the Executive Officer stated that if people retained sugar, and had not sufficient fruit to utilise it, they would be liable to be prosecuted.—Mr Humphrey pointed out, however, that many people whose ordinary fruit crop had failed would grow marrows, and it would be impossible for them to say how many of these would be available for jam.—Mr Mellor enquired the position of a man who applied for 20lbs of sugar, and was allowed 10lbs if he had only sufficient fruit to use the 10lbs.—The Chairman : He would be perfectly right in keeping it.—Mr Appleby enquired whether the members of the committee who signed application forms as references were satisfied that the applicants had the fruit trees they claimed to have.—Mr Tarbox said he was satisfied that all those which he signed were in order ; and although many people had not got stone fruit, the vital point was to see that the sugar released was used for jam making.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
ALIEN’S MISUNDERSTANDING.— Ingrid S Andersson, tailoress, 18 Bath Street, Rugby, an alien, was summoned for failing to furnish the Registration Officer with the particulars required under the Aliens’ Restriction Order.—Charles G Youngmark, tailor, 18 Bath Street, was summoned for having an alien living as a member of his household and failing to furnish the Registration Officer with the particulars required under the Order, or to give notice to the Registration Officer of the presence of an alien.—Mr H W Worthington defended both, and pleaded guilty.—Detective Mighall deposed that on June 7th Miss Andersson visited the Police Station, and said she had read in the papers that all aliens over 18 years of age had to register. She added that she had been in England since 1903. Witness asked if she was aware that she should have registered two years ago and she replied in the negative. He registered her, and on the following day he interviewed Mr Youngmark, who said Miss Andersson was his niece, and had lived with him since 1903 as an adopted daughter. He was not aware that he ought to have notified the police that she was staying with him.—Supt Clarke said after such a registration a copy had to be sent to the Chief Registration Officer at Warwick, who had ordered the proceedings.—Mr Worthington said Mr Youngmark was a Swede, who came to England 41 years ago, and had been naturalised. Miss Andersson, his wife’s niece, was also born in Sweden, and on her mother’s death Mr & Mrs Youngmark brought her to England, where she had lived continuously. Miss Andersson was not aware that friendly aliens had to be registered until she read a paragraph in the newspapers.—Both cases were dismissed without conviction under the Probation of Offenders’ Act.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory of my dearest husband, Pte TOM DOYLE, of Borton, killed in action June 6th, 1916, with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call.
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his sorrowing wife and children, mother, sister, and brothers.

HICKINGBOTHAM.—On the 10th inst., WILLIAM (late Pioneer R.E.), eldest son of Mr. & Mrs Hickingbotham, 33 Cambridge Street, Rugby..—“ Thy will be done.”

LEVETT.—Killed in action, in Palestine, March 30th, 1918, Sergeant C. E. LEVETT, 16th N.Z.Coy., I.C.C., only son of Mr. C. A. J. and the late Mrs. Levett (nee Buchanan), Ratanui, Kiwitea, New Zealand ; and grandson of the late Captain C. R. Levett, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

HUGHES.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl (JACK) HUGHES, who was killed in action in France on June 18th, 1915.
“ A loved one gone, but not forgotten,
And as dawns another year,
In our lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of him are always dear.”
—Never forgotten by his father, mother, brothers, sister Edie, Kitty and Dick.

MULCASTER.—In proud and loving memory of Coy.-Sergt.-Major J. MULCASTER, who died from disease contracted while serving with his Majesty’s Forces on June 13, 1917.—Fondly remembered by his Wife and Children.

SANDS.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte H. SANDS (HARRY), who died on June 17th, 1917, at El-Arish, Egypt.
“ One year has passed since that sad day,
When our dear one was called away ;
Bravely he went to duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.”
—From his loving wife and children.