22nd Jun 1918. Memorial Tablets in Churches.

MEMORIAL TABLETS IN CHURCHES.—The Bishop of Worcester, in this month’s Worcester Diocesan Magazine, writes :—“ I wish again to call the clergy’s attention to the growing number of large tablets which are being proposed in our churches. We have really no right to occupy the church wall space in this way. The best way to commemorate those who have died in the War is the brotherly way of one memorial for the whole parish, on which the name of comrades can be inserted. For rich persons to occupy the wall space with memorials which cannot be afforded by poorer parishioners is as objectionable as occupying the floor space by large private pews. I appeal to the church feeling of my diocese to consider this.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

CORRECTION.—In our last issue it was inadvertently stated that Lieut H N Salter, who had been awarded the Military Cross, was the son of Mr A G Salter. It should have been Mr H S Salter, of 3 Elborow Street, Rugby.

Mrs. F. Kirby, 15 Sun Street, Rugby, has been informed that her son, Pte A Kirby, R.W.F, had been wounded for the third time and brought to Southampton War Hospital. She has another son in France, and her husband is also serving in Palestine.

The following Rugby men have appeared in the casualty lists issued this week :—Killed, Rfn W Griffin, Rifle Brigade ; missing, Pte G W Wale, Border Regt, Pte J Harris (Royal Scots), and Pte B Lawley (R.W.R).

Mr and Mrs Bland have received news from the War Office that their son, Pte R G Bland, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action on June 4th. Also a letter from the Chaplain to say he had buried him in one of the Military Cemeteries, and the Battalion had erected a cross to his memory. He was 18 years of age, and was an Elborow old boy.

Mr and Mrs Pulham, of Barby, have received a letter from their son, Rfn H W Pulham, who has been missing since April 15th, 1918, saying he is a prisoner in Philippapalis, Bulgaria. He joined the colours at the outbreak of the war, and served 12 months in France, where he was wounded on July 1st, 1916. He was transferred to Salonica in November, 1916, where he served till reported missing. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. Machine Assembly Department.

Mr Doyle, of 71 Victoria Street, New Bilton, received news this week that his brother, Pte Thomas Doyle, had been killed in action in Palestine. This makes the third brother he has lost, Frank and Joseph Wilfred Doyle having been killed in France. They were the sons of the late Mr Joseph Doyle, and of Mrs Doyle, of Frankton.

Pte W H Fallon, Wiltshire Regt, son of Mr and Mrs Fallon, 7 Adam Street, New Bilton, who was previously reported missing, is a prisoner of war at Munster, and Pte A Backle, R.W.R., whose wife lives at 27 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, is a prisoner at Hamburg.

AWARDS FOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE.

The meritorious Service Medal in recognition of valuable service rendered in France has been awarded to :—
Sergt H E Gregory. A.S.C., Rugby.
L-Corpl S G Hall. R.W.R., Rugby.
Reg.Q.M.S. E L Hewitt, R.W.R., Rugby.
L-CorpI J W Hooper, R.W.R., Newbold-on-Avon.
Sapper A W Rathbone, R.E., Rugby.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.
ALL SOLDIERS TO BE BURIED FREE.

The Cemetery Committee reported that they had considered the question of the free interment of members of His Majesty’s Forces dying in Rugby and the neighbourhood, and recommended that in future the same facilities be granted as to Rugby men, and in case of any difficulty arising the matter should be referred to the discretion of the Chairman of the Council, Mr Stevenson, and the Clerk.—They had instructed the Clerk to allow the erection of a headstone or curbing over graves of men dying in His Majesty’s Forces and interred in the Cemetery, free of charge, where necessary.

The Public Health Committee reported that four cases of infectious disease had been noticed, of which two had been removed to the Hospital at Harborough Magna.

BRANDON.
HUNS BEHAVE DECENTLY TO SOME PRISONERS.—Mr and Mm L Ward have received a card from their son, Lance-Corpl J Ward, who is now a prisoner at Langensalza, in Germany. He informs them that his right arm was fractured just below the right shoulder. The wound is healing up finely and he can to use his fingers a little. He further states : “ We are being treated well, under the circumstances, and we have nothing to grumble about, so cheer up and do not worry.”

BRETFORD.
PTE JAMES CASTLE.—Pte James Castle, who was an Army Reserve man when the war commenced, has just received his discharge certificate. He joined the Leicester Regt in 1903, and was mobilised when war started. He went to France on the 20th of September, 1914, and was in the thick of the fighting until the 20th of January, 1915, when he was badly injured in the knee through a trench being blown in upon him. He was then sent to an English hospital. Although his knee never got thoroughly well he did a lot of useful work in assisting in the drilling of recruits and afterwards as a Military Policeman. The certificate, which speaks highly of him, says he was honourably discharged. Being the first received at Bretford during the war it is an object of interest to the inhabitants.

NAPTON.
P.C and Mrs Bradbury, of Napton, have recently received the news from their third son in France, Regt-Sergt-Major A H Bradbury, 2/6 R.W.R, that he has won the Military Cross. His Colonel, when wounded, handed over the command of the Regiment to him, although Bradbury himself was slightly wounded. Before joining the army Sergt-Major Bradbury was a member of the Warwickshire Constabulary, stationed at Warwick. Mr and Mrs Bradbury have three other sons in France—Corpl H Bradbury, of the Royal Engineers ; Corpl L Bradbury, of the: Army Service Corps ; and Pte M Bradbury, of the Suffolk Regiment. Mr Bradbury has served eight years in the Royal Rifle Corps, seven of which he was serving in India. He has been in the Police Force over 27 years.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

SIDNEY LANE HOME.—L-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), second son of Sergt and Mrs Frank Lane, has now been invalided home. He was severely wounded in France last November, and his left leg has been amputated above the knee.

WOUNDED.—Miss Ada Allen has received a notification that her brother, Pte Walter Allen (Cheshire Regt), was wounded by a bullet through his right arm during the advance on the 30th ult He joined up in September, 1914, and though he has been through some trying experiences since then, this is the first time he has been wounded.

DILUTION OF BREAD AND HEALTH.

We are asked to remind the public that bread should be kept in a cool place during warm weather. At temperatures above 60 degrees Fahrenheit bread made from the flour at present in use is apt to become “ ropey ”, and unsuitable for food, but at lower temperatures its keeping qualities are good. Complaints continue to be heard from time to time against the so-called war bread made from standard wheaten floor, with an admixture of flour obtained from other cereals. We are informed that the policy of raising the percentage of flour extracted from wheat and adding flour from other cereals was only adopted after the fullest scientific investigation both as to the digestibility and the nourishing qualities of the resulting product.

The present position of the cereal supplies completely vindicates the policy of dilution as applied to bread. It is authoritatively stated that no evidence whatever has been adduced that the health of the nation has generally suffered from the lowering of the quality of bread, and at the present time the stocks in the country are enough to enable the Royal Commission on Wheat Supplies to make the definite statement that the bread supply of the country is assured until the next harvest is gathered. The total saving effected up to the present is estimated as the equivalent of the cargoes of more than 400 steamers of average size, or nearly one-third of an average annual importation. It is held that such a saving could not have been effected by rationing without disastrous effects on the general national health. The outlook at the moment is distinctly promising.

SUGAR FOR JAM.

UNFAIR CRITICISM RESENTED BY RUGBY COMMITTEE.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week the Chairman (Mr T A Wise) referred to the dissatisfaction which has been caused by the refusal of permits to purchase sugar to people who had neglected to enclose a stamped addressed envelope with their application forma. Many people he said, thought that the committee of their own malicious stupidity made this regulation, but it was not so; it was a Government instruction, and the local officials did all they could by drawing the attention of the applicants to the regulation by placing a mark at each side of the paragraph relating to it. Any remarks about red tape had nothing to do with the Committee ; they should be addressed to the Government. Before any agitation arose over the matter he discussed the question with the Executive Officer, and they wrote to London to see if they could get some redress. They had no desire to be harsh or unfair, but when a regulation was printed on a form it saw not too much to expect that the people concerned would read it, particularly when their attention was especially attracted to it ; and the remarks which had been made concerning the committee and the officials were grossly unfair. He thought people should appreciate the difficulties under which the staff had worked.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) said with regard to the suggestion that letters should be sent to all persons who had received permits, asking them to return them for re-consideration if their fruit crop had not come up to expectation, this would have required 5,000 envelopes ; and, after consulting the Chairman and Vice-Chairman, he had placed an advertisement in the local Press, and had had some window bills printed to this effect.—This action was endorsed.

The Executive Officer read a letter from the Ministry on the subject, asking for particulars as to the number of late applications, and stating that if the number was not a large one permits could be issued. If this involved a large indent of sugar details should be sent to the Ministry before issuing the permits. As there were 685 applicants affected he had sent the details.—The Chairman said he hoped they would now get something from the London authorities.

Mr Griffin mentioned the case of a man who could not get his form when he applied for it, but left a penny for the stamp.—The Chairman : That was risky (laughter). I do not mean that as a reflection on the staff ; but if there were a number like that they could not possibly recollect all who left money.—The Executive Officer said they had quite a pile of money handed in, and every penny was used in stamps.

At a later stage of the meeting the Executive Officer stated that if people retained sugar, and had not sufficient fruit to utilise it, they would be liable to be prosecuted.—Mr Humphrey pointed out, however, that many people whose ordinary fruit crop had failed would grow marrows, and it would be impossible for them to say how many of these would be available for jam.—Mr Mellor enquired the position of a man who applied for 20lbs of sugar, and was allowed 10lbs if he had only sufficient fruit to use the 10lbs.—The Chairman : He would be perfectly right in keeping it.—Mr Appleby enquired whether the members of the committee who signed application forms as references were satisfied that the applicants had the fruit trees they claimed to have.—Mr Tarbox said he was satisfied that all those which he signed were in order ; and although many people had not got stone fruit, the vital point was to see that the sugar released was used for jam making.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
ALIEN’S MISUNDERSTANDING.— Ingrid S Andersson, tailoress, 18 Bath Street, Rugby, an alien, was summoned for failing to furnish the Registration Officer with the particulars required under the Aliens’ Restriction Order.—Charles G Youngmark, tailor, 18 Bath Street, was summoned for having an alien living as a member of his household and failing to furnish the Registration Officer with the particulars required under the Order, or to give notice to the Registration Officer of the presence of an alien.—Mr H W Worthington defended both, and pleaded guilty.—Detective Mighall deposed that on June 7th Miss Andersson visited the Police Station, and said she had read in the papers that all aliens over 18 years of age had to register. She added that she had been in England since 1903. Witness asked if she was aware that she should have registered two years ago and she replied in the negative. He registered her, and on the following day he interviewed Mr Youngmark, who said Miss Andersson was his niece, and had lived with him since 1903 as an adopted daughter. He was not aware that he ought to have notified the police that she was staying with him.—Supt Clarke said after such a registration a copy had to be sent to the Chief Registration Officer at Warwick, who had ordered the proceedings.—Mr Worthington said Mr Youngmark was a Swede, who came to England 41 years ago, and had been naturalised. Miss Andersson, his wife’s niece, was also born in Sweden, and on her mother’s death Mr & Mrs Youngmark brought her to England, where she had lived continuously. Miss Andersson was not aware that friendly aliens had to be registered until she read a paragraph in the newspapers.—Both cases were dismissed without conviction under the Probation of Offenders’ Act.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory of my dearest husband, Pte TOM DOYLE, of Borton, killed in action June 6th, 1916, with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call.
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his sorrowing wife and children, mother, sister, and brothers.

HICKINGBOTHAM.—On the 10th inst., WILLIAM (late Pioneer R.E.), eldest son of Mr. & Mrs Hickingbotham, 33 Cambridge Street, Rugby..—“ Thy will be done.”

LEVETT.—Killed in action, in Palestine, March 30th, 1918, Sergeant C. E. LEVETT, 16th N.Z.Coy., I.C.C., only son of Mr. C. A. J. and the late Mrs. Levett (nee Buchanan), Ratanui, Kiwitea, New Zealand ; and grandson of the late Captain C. R. Levett, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

HUGHES.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl (JACK) HUGHES, who was killed in action in France on June 18th, 1915.
“ A loved one gone, but not forgotten,
And as dawns another year,
In our lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of him are always dear.”
—Never forgotten by his father, mother, brothers, sister Edie, Kitty and Dick.

MULCASTER.—In proud and loving memory of Coy.-Sergt.-Major J. MULCASTER, who died from disease contracted while serving with his Majesty’s Forces on June 13, 1917.—Fondly remembered by his Wife and Children.

SANDS.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte H. SANDS (HARRY), who died on June 17th, 1917, at El-Arish, Egypt.
“ One year has passed since that sad day,
When our dear one was called away ;
Bravely he went to duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.”
—From his loving wife and children.

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