13th Oct 1917. War Prisoners’ Food Parcels – Serious Increase in Cost.

WAR PRISONERS’ FOOD PARCELS.
SERIOUS INCREASE IN COST.
NEED FOR FUNDS GREATER THAN EVER.

The standard parcels of food which are sent to the Rugby and district men who are prisoners of war in Germany have this week been increased in cost from 6s to 8s each owing to the continual rise in price of all commodities and materials. As six of these parcels are sent in the course of each month to every man, in addition to 26lbs of bread, costing 7s 6d, it will thus be seen that, instead of an expenditure of £2 3s 6d per man per month, the cost is now £2 15s 6d. There has been a further addition to the list this week, the total number of men in the care of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee being now 78. The cost to feed these men is, therefore, £216 9s per month. About one-third only of this amount is guaranteed, the remainder having to be met by general subscriptions. Without these parcels of food the prisoners of war would be in a perpetual state of semi-starvation, as the food supplied to them by the German authorities is not sufficient for their proper nourishment, as well as being unpalatable. More funds are, therefore, needed to enable the Rugby Committee to continue the regular supply of parcels so vitally necessary to our unfortunate countrymen. Practically all the parcels reach their destination, and are acknowledged with gratitude. One can help by sending a donation, becoming a regular subscriber, organising concerts, whist drives, &c, throughout the winter months, or “ adopting ” a prisoner.

The Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, will, gratefully acknowledge all contributions, which should be sent to him at the registered Office of the Committee, 9 Regent Street, Rugby.

“ FRANCE’S DAY ” AT RUGBY.

The flag day in aid of the French Red Cross, held at Rugby on Saturday last, was crowned with success ; and, in view of the fact that it was a town effort only, the financial result, which was in advance of past flag days confined to the town, was very gratifying. The weather in the early hours was very miserable for the first relay of workers ; and although the rest of the day was bright, it was very cold. There were several varieties of emblems, and these were sold by 150 fair helpers, some of whom, with a brief respite for meals, remained at their posts from 5.30 a.m till dark. The district superintendents were : Mrs A G Salter, Mrs J R Barker, Miss O’Beirne, Miss Hinks, Miss B Wood, Miss G Woods, Miss D Roberts, Miss Robbins, and Miss Baillie. Four of the sellers—Misses Jessie Mills, P Batchelor, P Hinks, and G Hinks—were attractively dressed in French national costume. The highest individual amount was yielded by Miss Priors box (£3 9s 2d), and Miss D Eadon was second with £3 0s 6½d.

Mr J J McKinnell (chairman of the Urban Council) was president of “ The Day,” the organisation of which was again in the hands of Mr J R Barker, and he was assisted at the supply depot, Bonn Buildings, by Mrs B B Dickinson, Mrs Barker, and Miss Robbins. The counting of the money was supervised by Mr R P Mason, manager of the London City and Midland Bank, and he was assisted by Mr J Ferry and the Hon Organiser.

The amount realised was £92 0s. 5d.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt A G Barford. M.G.C, has received the following from the Major-General Commanding his Division :— “ I have read with great pleasure the report of your Regimental Commander and Brigade Commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the field on August 10, 1917, during an attack on Westhoek Ridge.” Sergt A G Barford joined Kitcheners’s Army in August, 1914, and has been out in France just over two years. He is a son of the late Mr George Stops Barford, of Plumpton Manor, Northamptonshire, and of Mrs Wells, Claybrooke, and grandson of the late Mr George Eagles, of Little Lawford.

Lance-Corpl Bert Warden, R.W.R, has been posted as missing since August 27th. He was 20 years of age, a member of “ E ” Company, and had been in France 2½ years. For the last two years he acted as a Lewis gunner, and had been wounded four times. He fought on practically the whole length of line from Ypres to St Quentin, and participated in the Battle of Loos, the Somme offensive, and most this year’s fighting round Ypres. He was an Old Murrayian.

On October 4th Second-Lieut E W White, who at the time of joining up was a clerk in the National Provincial Bank, Rugby, was killed in action. He joined as a private, but he was soon picked out by his Colonel as a promising officer, and after training received his commission. His home was at Burton-on-Trent.

AN URBAN COUNCIL EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Mrs A M Thompson, of 49 Union Street, Rugby, has received official notification that her husband, Pte L Thompson, of the Yorkshire Regiment, was killed by a shell while in action on September 23rd. He would have been 33 years of age in November, and had been a number of years in the employ of the Urban Council as a dustman, in which capacity he was an excellent workman and much respected. He joined up in September, 1916, and had been abroad about four months. He leaves a widow and four little children. Mrs Thompson has received a sympathetic letter from the Major commanding, and the sad news has been also conveyed by Pte F C Walton, a comrade, who hails from Thurlaston, and has since writing been wounded.

PTE W HOUGHTON KILLED.

In a letter received this week by Mrs Houghton, the Chaplain of a clearing station in France communicates the sad information that her husband, Pte W Houghton, Machine Gun Corps, died on October 4th. When brought in he was suffering from a wound in the neck. He was in no pain, and quite conscious and cheerful, and in the ordinary way of things it did not appear to be a severe wound. Unfortunately he died in the operating theatre after an operation had been performed. Pte Houghton was 31 years of age, and was the youngest son of the late Mr Houghton and of Mrs Houghton, Queen Street, Rugby. For many years he had been employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society, and was manager successively of the branches at Kilsby, Hillmorton, and Bilton. He joined the Warwicks on November 7, 1916, and had been in France nine months. He leaves a widow and one child, now residing at Eastleigh, Southampton.

LOCAL FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEES.

Assisted by a capable and enthusiastic band of workers, Mr F M Burton, the executive officer for the Rugby Urban District, has made considerable progress with the organisation of the local food control machinery. So far 91 sugar retailers, 61 potato retailers, and seven wholesale dealers in potatoes have registered, and certificates authorising the purchase of sugar have been issued to caterers, institutions, and manufacturers.

The number of persons to be catered for under the householders’ rationing system is approximately 21,000, and the first batch of sugar cards was dispatched through the post on Wednesday. Unfortunately, however, the Executive Officer and his staff have been greatly handicapped by the careless manner in which some of the application forms have been filled in. In many instances—and these cases are, strangely enough, not confined to the least educated section of the community—the applicant has failed to fill in his or her address, while important details have been omitted from other forms. In those cases where children are attending school the address and other details can be easily ascertained, but in others the task of obtaining the particulars is a formidable one. In cases where the address has been given, but the form otherwise filled up inaccurately, the householders will be visited by canvassers, who have kindly volunteered their services. In some instances applicants have added particulars which are not required by the regulations. One person has written across his form an indignant protest, in which he asks : “ Are we living in Germany ?” and continues : “ Want of sugar will not make England give up its liberty. By what right should a man be required to give occupation ? Prussian ways and systems will not be tolerated in this country.” Another applicant has added to the particulars concerning her eight months old daughter the information, “ Bottle fed ” ; while in another case the early arrival of an increase in the family is clearly foreshadowed. A number of ladies and gentlemen have placed their services at the disposal of the Executive Officer, and the Assembly Room at the Benn Buildings presents the appearance of a hive of industry.

THE RURAL DISTRICT.

Mr F Fellows; executive officer for the Rural District Control Committee, and his assistants have also made satisfactory progress, and the task of issuing the sugar cards is now in hand. Fortunately the application forms in this district have, on the whole, been correctly filled in, and the number of incomplete forms has been negligible, although one applicant followed the instructions too literally, and addressed his application to the Paddington Committee, the name on the model form posted in the district for the guidance of householders. The approximate number of consumers in the district is 17,750. Sixty-six sugar retailers, 30 potato retailers, and 13 wholesale dealers in potatoes have been registered.

CHEESE MAKING.

The Agricultural Committee reported that the cheese making classes had been most successful. At Kineton 19 students attended, and 16 of these were now making cheese at home. At Pillerton 13 attended, of whom 12 are now regularly making cheese. They asked the Council to sanction cheese making classes for 1918-19 at a cost not exceeding £100.

DEATHS.

BRADSHAW.—Killed in action in France on September 24, 1917, Pte. ERNEST BRADSHAW, R.W.R., dearly beloved husband of Eilen Bradshaw, 39 Wood Street, and son of Mr. J. Bradshaw, 8 Newbold Road, Rugby; aged 37.

CUFAUDE.—In loving memory of 45459 EDWARD HENRY CUFAUDE, of the 9th Suffolk Regiment, son of the late John Cufaude, solicitor ; killed in action September 22, 1917, near Hill 70 ; aged 26.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of Gunner H. C. PEARCE, R.F.A., who fell in action on September 11, 1917.
“ Sleep on, loved one, in your far-off grave :
A grave I may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
You will be always dear to me.”
—Alice.

SAVILLE.—On September 28th, near Ypres, WALTER STANLEY SAVILLE, eldest son of the late Mr. Walter John & Mrs. Saville, 93 Clifton Rd., Rugby; aged 22.

TAYLOR.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. W. TAYLOR, aged 26 years, who was killed in France.—They miss him most who loved him best.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Brother and Sisters.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. L. THOMPSON, 49 Union Street, who was killed in action on September 23, 1917 : aged 33 years.—“God takes our loved one from our home, but never from our hearts.”—From his loving Wife & Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARBER.—In ever-loving memory of DAD, who passed away suddenly on June 26th, 1913, and of dear brother FRED, killed in action on September 25, 1915.—From Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

CHAMBERS.—Gunner E. CHAMBERS, son of Mr. & Mrs. E. Chambers, of Wolston, died of wounds, Oct. 11, 1915.
“ Rest on, dear brother, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But so long as life and memory lasts
We shall always remember thee.”
—Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

DYKE.—In loving memory of Corpl. OTHELLO DYKE, of the R.W.R., who was killed in action on October 12, 1916.—“ Peace, perfect peace,”—Not forgotten by his loving Sisters and Brothers.

WILKINS.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. R. G. WILKINS, killed in action on October 12, 1916.
“ Re-union is our abiding hope,
Only those who have loved and lost
Can know the bitterness of gone.”
—Sadly missed by EVELYN and WINIFRED.

WILKINS.—In loving memory of my deadly-beloved son, Pte. REGINALD GERALD WILKINS, R.W.R., late, of 32 Regent Street, previously reported missing, now believed killed ; aged 21 years.

 

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