6th Oct 1917. Successful Effort for Rugby Prisoners of War Fund

SUCCESSFUL EFFORT FOR RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
SHOW & SALE ON BENN FIELD.

Glorious weather and the prospect of performing a pleasing duty under pleasant conditions attracted a large crowd to Benn Field on Saturday afternoon, when a show and sale, arranged by the “ G.H.S ” Philanthropic Society on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held. The decision to hold the show was only reached about ten days previously, but so enthusiastically did all connected with the effort work, and so generously were they supported by the public, that the success of the undertaking was never in doubt, and this feeling of confidence was justified by the results.

The opening ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, who explained that the object of the effort was to raise as much money as possible to send parcels, of food to those “ poor chaps ” who had been taken prisoners by the unspeakable Hun, and who, as they knew well, were treated very badly indeed and were not properly fed. It was, therefore, up to the people of Rugby to see that enough money was raised, so that parcels of food could go to these men week by week, and so that they, when they were liberated after the end of the War, would be restored to their friends hale and hearty and able to take their place again in the life of the community. If they did not find the money, and if they left those poor fellows to the tender mercies of the Germans, some would never come back at all, and others would come back with their constitution devitalised by continual semi-starvation, and many, perhaps, would only come back to linger and to die. The Rugby Prisoners of War Committee was started two years ago by an energetic committee, of whom Mr J R Barker was the equally energetic secretary, and he had worked like a Trojan for it. The fund now supported 77 prisoners, all of whom were boys from Rugby or villages in the immediate neighbourhood. There was no doubt therefore, that there was a special call for them to look after these men. It cost £170 per month to send the requisite number of parcels, and of this £70 had already been guaranteed by certain kind and patriotic individuals, but the balance of £100 per month still had to be raised, and they were going to see that day if they could not realise at least several hundreds (a voice : “ Thousands ”). Thank God, Rugby, during this War had always come up to the scratch, and he had never known her let them down ; and he earnestly appealed to them to support the effort that day to the best of their ability. . .

A large number of attractions had been arranged by the committee, the principal of which was the vegetable show, where some exceptionally fine exhibits were staged and were much admired. Prizes were offered for the best exhibits, and these were divided into 27 classes, the winners being as follows :–

The judges were Messrs W Harmon (Newnham Paddox) and A Chandler (Coton House).

The Fire Brigade competitions were keenly contested. The prizes were given by the B.T.H Foremen’s and the Assistant Foremen’s Association. Mr W Spencer and Engineer Reece were the judges ; Messrs J Taylor and Cooke, timekeepers ; and Third Officer Fletcher (B.T.H) starter. . . .

A short concert was also given, the programme being arranged by Mr Charles T Mewis, and those who took part were Messrs H Phillips, W Jackson, J Farley and J Heap (Rugby Glee Party), Mr Geo Pratt, Coventry (humorist), Mr W C Sutton (ventriloquist), Mr Gough (conjuror). Mr J Littler was at the piano. A Punch and Judy show was also provided for the entertainment of the children. There was a musical chairs competition on bicycles, which was arranged for Boy Scouts, a number of whom from the Murray School Troop rendered valuable assistance during the afternoon. The competition was won by P Leader, G Day being second.

Various side-shows, skittles, “ Kaiser Bill and Little Willie,” guessing competitions, &c, were provided, and each of these did a good business.

A quantity of poultry and several sheep and lambs were sent by sympathisers for the benefit of the funds, and early in the evening the poultry were sold by Mr W Wiggins. Some very choice birds were offered, and in a number of cases they were sold over and over again. The prices, on the whole, were very satisfactory, the buyers sympathising with the genial auctioneer’s exhortation to “ Never mind the value of the things, but remember it is for a good cause.” A pet lamb was sold and re-sold ten times, realising £2 2s 6d.

The live stock having been disposed of the scene of interest shifted to the exhibition tents, where the produce was sold by Messrs W Wiggins, W Howkins, and F Frost. The visitors were in a generous mood, and, on the whole, very satisfactory prices were given. A small tan of petrol, containing about a gill of spirit, was sold and re-sold many times, the total realised being over £5 ; and by a similar method a toy motor-car realised about £7 10s. A potato, shaped like a bulldog’s head, also found many purchasers.

The sheep, lambs, and goat were sold in Rugby Market on Monday, and realised between £30 and £40.

Other diversions arranged for had to be omitted, as permission for extension and lighting could not be obtained. The proceeds will amount to well over £150.

The committee was assisted during the day by Messrs A Lord, G Vickery, G W Lawson, G Hansbury, G O Watson, W Henson, W Martin, H Clark, A C Bennett, A Allcutt, A Padbury, Mrs Barker, Misses R Palmer, Johnson, Ward, Kitchen, Twyford, Renshaw, Bromwick, Franklin, Prince, Owen, Spencer, Holyoake, Houghton, Fairfield, Walker, Cooke, and Gibbs.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R O Squarey, R.E, who has won the Military Cross, was captain of football at Rugby School.

Mrs Wakelin, of 15 Adam Street, New Bilton, has received news that her husband Pte L A Wakelin, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded by shrapnel.

Lieut Stanley Hidden, who has been serving for some considerable time with the Headquarters of a Mounted Division, has recently been promoted captain.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks, son of Mr & Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terrace, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th, after being twice previously wounded. He was 20 years of age, and had been in France two years. He had ten days’ leave at home in July. An elder brother, Pte F W Boyes, Berkshire Regiment, who was reported missing on July 1st, was subsequently reported killed.

ANOTHER HONOUR FOR LANCE-CORPL J H ENTICOTT.

Lance-Corpl J H Enticott, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr J Enticott, of 60 Union Street, who has already won the Military Medal and bar, has now been awarded the D.C.M for gallantry. Before the War Lance-Corpl Enticott, who is an Old St Matthew’s boy, was employed at the B.T.H. He is the third “ old boy ” to win the D.C.M, three others have received the Military Cross, about half-a-dozen the Military Medal, and numerous others have been mentioned in despatches.

LIEUT BASIL PARKER MISSING.

News has been received that Lieut W Basil Parker, of the Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr E Parker, 85 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been missing since September 29th. He was a pupil, and afterwards a student teacher, at St Matthew’s School, from where he gained a candidate teachers’ scholarship to the Lower School. He completed his education at Saltley College, and when he enlisted he held a teaching appointment in Derbyshire. He was formerly a member of the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade, and had also played forward for Rugby Football Club.

PERSONAL.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, medical officer of the London (Queen’s) Regiment, has received the Order of St Sava of Serbia in recognition of his services in that country in 1914-15.

WAR HOSPITALS SUPPLY DEPOT.

Many workers have been obliged to give up coming to the depot in order to take up other war work. More workers are urgently needed and invited to come to 8 Market Place, which is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays each week from 10 to 1 in the mornings, and from 2.30 to 4.30 on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. M MICHELL.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

HIRE TRADERS AND THE WAR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–I notice that more people are required for the National Service, and I think it is a scandalous shame that hire traders are allowed to keep groups of able-bodied men and women going from door to door pestering people to buy their goods on weekly payments. Some of the men look fit to be in khaki, while the others might also be doing useful work at a time like this. They seem to make a special business of calling on soldiers’ wives and trying to induce them to buy goods and pay for them out of the separation allowances which the Government pays to maintain the women and children, and not for any other purpose. I don’t think it right that these agents should be allowed to go about persuading soldiers’ wives to incur this liability without the knowledge or consent of the husband, and it will be a great shame if anything happens to prevent the women keeping up their payments if the trader seizes the goods without the consent of the Court when there has been a considerable sum paid. I think the Government would be justified in passing legislation to protect these people, as it would put the hire trader on a level with other tradesmen and not leave the customer at their mercy.–I remain, yours truly.
FAIR PLAT.

FOOD PRICES.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–Can anyone explain why food prices are rising simultaneously with the multiplication of Control Committees ? Take the case of butter. Why is it put up 4d a pound as soon as Rugby has a Food Control Committee ? I have had to pay an extra 2d twice lately, and I suppose I shall have to help pay the expenses of the Food Controllers. Surely we consumers are being forced to pay all round. As for the bread, we shall have to pay for it in the taxes, even if we get it for 9d a 4lb loaf. And we shall be made to fork out the money for the salaries of the hundreds and thousands of officials of the Government from top to bottom.

It was said in the old time of some professing Christians, “ Ye do wrong and defraud, and that your brethren.” What would St Paul or Thomas Carlyle say now about the greed of gain ? And what are the ministers of religion saying and doing in the face of all the avarice prevalent among traders and workmen of almost every sort ? Are honesty and religion standing a tiptoe in our land, ready to pass–I know not where !–Yours sincerely, INQUIRER.
Rugby, September 26, 1917.

SEATS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,–If your correspondent, “ Visitor,” resided here he would know that Rugby does possess public seats, but for some pre-war abuse they were banished by the “ City Fathers ” to the “ Rec,” and the Park, and thither Tommy must go if he wants a rest. It is not want of thought on the part of townspeople, because the seats have been pleaded for in previous summers, but the said Fathers said, “ No,” and it is so. What little bit of life is in this small town Tommy wants to see it, but he must stand or hang on railings to do it now the Parks are too cool.–Yours, sir, very truly,
CITIZEN.

DEATHS.

PEARCE.–On September 11, 1917, HAROLD, the dearly beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, who was killed in action in France.
“ He marched away so bravely,
His young head bravely held ;
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed ;
There on the battlefield
He calmly took his place ;
He fought and died for Britain :
An honour to his race.”

RUSSELL.–Gunner Walter Russell, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Russell, Toft Farm, Dunchurch, died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917; aged 27.

RUSSELL.–In loving memory of my dear husband, Gunner WALTER RUSSELL, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917.–NELLIE RUSSELL, Whitehall Farm, Dunchurch, Rugby.

VEARS.–Killed in action in France September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest son of Harry and Nellie Vears, of Bedworth, late of Rugby ; aged 21 years.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of a dear son and soldier brave :
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better Land.”

VEARS.–Killed in action in France on September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest grandson of Mrs. F. Draper, Long Buckby ; aged 21 years.
“ Bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
–From Grandma, Aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

SALMON.–In loving memory of Rifleman J. R. SALMON, R.B., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. H. Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road, Rugby ; killed in action on the Somme Front, October 7, 1916.

TANSER.–In ever-loving memory of Lance-Corpl. T. TANSER, of South Kilworth, killed in action October 3rd, 1916.
“ Ever in our thoughts, but the hardest part still yet to come.
When the heroes all return and we miss among the cheering crowd the face of our dear boy.”
–Mother, Wife, Sister and Brothers.

 

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