1st Sep 1917. French Honour English Lady

FRENCH HONOUR ENGLISH LADY.—On Friday afternoon last week, M. Painleve, the French Minister of War, presented the Cross of the Legion of Honour to Dr Frances Ivens (formerly Harborough Parva), who has had charge of the Scottish Women’s Hospital at the Abbaye de Royaumont for nearly three years. Miss Ivens is also associated with Lady Michelham in the charge of the Michelham Foundation Hospital, Hotel Astoria, Paris, which M. Painleve attended to make the presentation.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Rifleman G Lorriman, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr J Lorriman, of 40 Essex Street, Rugby, was wounded in the head on August 19th. This is the second time he has been wounded, the previous occasion being on September, 1916, at Guillemont.

The friends of Sert-Major Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, will be pleased to hear that he has received the D.C.M. Sergt-Major Hopewell has been in the Battery since its formation and went out with it to France three years last March. During the time he has been there the Battery has taken part in a lot of fighting, and recently it has been very severe.

Mr J C Cowley, of Brackley (formerly of Kilsby), Northamptonshire, received on Saturday last a card dated July 15th (written with his left hand), from his son, Second-Lieut R L Cowley. Northampton Regt, who has been missing since the battle of “ The Dunes,” on July 10th. He is in a German hospital wounded in the right arm, and is going on nicely.

Lance-Corpl F H Hadfield, K.R.R, of 4 Charlotte Street, and Pte H A J Barnett, R W.R., of 174 Murray Road, have written home stating that they are prisoners of war in Germany. The news of Pte Barnett’s capture has only just reached his parents although he was taken prisoner on April 28th. Lance-Corpl Hadfield, who was formerly employed by Mr W Flint, wine merchant, was reported as missing five weeks ago.

OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, of the Murray School, has received information that Rifleman Leslie J Ensor, son Mr J C Ensor, Nottingham, formerly of Rugby, was killed in action on July 10th. Rifleman Ensor, who was 21 years age, enlisted in the King’s Royal Rifles with his brother Claude in September, 1914, and they were drafted to France in July, 1915. For eight months they were in the trenches near Ypres. They were in the second battle of Ypres, and were in reserve at the battle Loos. They were engaged in various “ scraps,” the battle of Arras, and also in a good deal of sanguinary fighting on the Somme, their Battalion being specially commended for the capture of Guillemont. In this battle Claude Ensor was severely wounded, and his brother was also slightly wounded twice, the first time near Trones Wood. He was also buried and slightly wounded near Combles, and after spending four months in England returned France in January last. He was at first sent to St Quinten, and was afterwards moved up to the coast, where he fought his last fight with the K.R.R.s and Northamptons at Lombartzyde. Rifleman Leslie Ensor was battalion bomber, and held the instructor’s certificate for Stoke’s Trench Mortars. His brother Claude has now recovered from his wounds but at present has only the partial use of the left arm. He was recently offered a commission, but declined it, as he preferred to go to Hythe for a course of musketry. He was successful in gaining the first-class certificate and was promoted Sergeant-Instructor in musketry. Both lads stood 6ft 2in and weighed 13 stones, and their fine, manly characters made them popular with all who knew them.

FLECKNOE.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another Flecknoe young man, Frederick Cox, lost his life through shell-shock on the 16th of August, in France. In a letter received by the young man’s sister, Miss E Cox, the Colonel of his Regiment—a Battalion of the Royal Warwicks—states that he will be sadly missed by the officers and men. The young man was 24 years of age, and had been in France about 12 months. Before joining the army he was in the employ of Mr Thompson, farmer, of Wolfhampcote Hall, and bore an excellent character.

WOLSTON.

PRIVATE READER MISSING.—Mrs Reader has received news both from the War Office and the Adjutant of his Company, that Private Gerald Reader, her husband, is missing. Before joining the army he was manager for Mr Udal at Wolston. He was one of a body of men who made a successful raid upon the enemy. He joined the 4th Royal Warwicks, but was afterwards transferred to the Welsh Fusiliers. Much sympathy is felt in the district for Mrs Reader, who has four children, several of whom are very delicate. The day on which he was missing was the 12th anniversary of his wedding day.

ROLL OF HONOUR : MESSRS BLUEMEL’S WORKS LIST.—The above firm has given another proof of its sincere regard for men who have left their works to uphold the honour of their country. Through the instrumentality of Mr W R Glare, the genial works’ manager, who has continually had before him the welfare of not only the men but their dependants, two beautiful and expensive designs have been purchased. These have been mounted and placed in oak frames. The two rolls contain the names of 104 men from the works who have entered the Navy or Army. The records show that 16 have been killed, 27 wounded, two died from the effects of the war, three missing, whilst one is a prisoner of war and one is suffering from shell-shock. All the names have been beautifully inscribed on the two lists, and these are surrounded by artistic illuminations. Although they are not yet placed in a permanent position, a number of residents have viewed them and greatly admired their appearance. It is hoped by several who have had this privilege that it will be an incentive to the surrounding parishes to provide similar rolls of honour. There still remains plenty of space for the names of others who may yet join the forces.

BRANDON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Blackman has received news that her husband has been wounded in the head, shoulder, and right hand. He has been out at the front for nearly nine months. He belongs to the Hertfordshire Regiment, and is well known at Brandon, having been in the employ of Colonel R J Beech a few years ago. Although very deaf from the result of his wound, he is progressing favourably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs T Nicholas, Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their third son, Stewart, who was wounded and missing on September 29th, 1916, is now reported to have been killed on that date.

ACCEPTANCE OF LETTER BY THE POST OFFICE FOR URGENT CENSORSHIP.—The sender of a specially urgent letter for Portugal, Russia, the United States of America, or any neutral country in Europe or America, may secure its specially expeditious treatment by the Post Office and by the Military Censors, by posting it at the counter the Rugby Office, with a special fee of half-a-crown in stamps in addition to the full ordinary postage. No responsibility is taken for delay, but in general letters posted under the special conditions will be despatched appreciably sooner than those posted in the ordinary way.

SERIOUS HARVEST OUTLOOK.

The harvest prospects, which month ago were of a hopeful character all round, have gradually become less and less satisfactory owing to unfavourable weather conditions, and this week the situation has assumed a more serious aspect, in consequence of the exceptionally severe storms for the time of year. Reports from all parts of the country indicate that very boisterous, stormy weather became general in the course of Monday evening and night, the wind rising to the strength of a gale, accompanied by violent squalls in many districts—apparently the most widespread gale experienced for a long time past. In the Rugby district rain fell with little intermission from Sunday evening till Wednesday midday, and there were heavy downfalls on Thursday.

NO SUGAR FOR MARROW JAM.—The Ministry of Food has officially advised the Liverpool Corporation that vegetable marrows are not fruit within the meaning of the Sugar Domestic Preserving Order (1917) and people are not entitled to use sugar for making jam from marrows.

DEATHS.

GILLINGS.—In loving remembrance of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, R.B., of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action August 18th, 1917.—Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear.—From Annie.—Rest nobly won.

HOLLAND.—Fred (2nd Lieut. Sherwood Foresters), son of Supt. W HOLLAND, Lutterworth, died of wounds at the Liverpool Merchants’ Hospital, Etaples, France, on August, 22nd, 1917, aged 22 years.

IN MEMORIAM

OLDS.—In fond memory of Pte. G. Olds, R.W.R, of Gaydon, killed in action in France, Aug. 30, 1916.
“ There are two things death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—An Old Friend.

OLDS.—In loving memory of Pte. G. OLDS, Gaydon, killed in action Aug. 30, 1916. Never forgotten by his Mother, Father, Brothers, and Sister.

MASON.— In dearest, proudest memory of my darling husband, Sergt. ARTHUR MASON, Oxon & Bucks, killed in action August 31st, 1916.—Until we meet.

WHITEMAN.—In glorious remembrance of Lance-Corpl. T. WHITEMAN, R.W.R., killed in action in France, September 3rd, 1916.—From his loving wife, Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

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1 thought on “1st Sep 1917. French Honour English Lady

  1. Pingback: Barnett, Henry Alfred John. Died 21 May 1919 | Rugby Remembers

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