Hanwell, George Charles. Died 12th Aug 1917

George Charles HANWELL’s birth was registered in Q2 1881 in Rugby.   He was the son of William Hanwell, a railway fireman, and Sarah Maria née Wills. In 1882 they were living in Rugby where George had been born.

George was baptised at Crick on 3 September 1882, when his father was also recorded as a ‘fireman’. By 1891 the family were living at 15 Cambridge Street, Rugby.

In 1901, George was enumerated back in Crick, living with his grandfather, a retired plumber. His uncle was a ‘plumber and painter’ and George was listed similarly.   It seems he was learning the trade, and by 1911 he was enumerated as a house painter.

His marriage with Georgina Worthington, was registered in Rugby in Q3 1906, and by census night 1911 they were living at 1 Caldecott Street, Rugby with their son Henry W who was 7 months old – his birth was registered in Q3 1910. They later had a son, Jesse, whose birth was registered in Q1 1915, but who died very soon afterwards and whose death was registered in Q2 1915.

George enlisted at Rugby and joined up initially as Private No.267297 in the 1/5th Bn. Royal Warwickshire Rifles (RWR) and later at an unknown date was transferred as Private, No.235001 to the 1st Bn. Worcestershire Regiment.

The 1/5th Battalion of the RWR were formed in August 1914 in Thorp Street, Birmingham as part of Warwickshire Brigade, South Midland Division.   They landed at Le Havre on 22 March 1915 and on 13 May 1915 joined the 143rd Brigade, of the 48th (South Midland) Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including in 1916: The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre; and in 1917, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, and The Battle of Poelcapelle.

The 1st Battalion had been stationed in Cairo, Egypt at the outbreak of war, but by 16 October 1914 had returned to England from Alexandria and arrived at Liverpool to join the 24th Brigade of the 8th Division and moved to Hursley Park, Winchester. They landed at Le Havre in November 1914 for service on the Western Front. The 1st Battalion placed an important role at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle in March 1915 but by December it had lost half its strength due to frostbite as much as combat casualties as well as the commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel E. C. F. Wodehouse, who was killed-in-action.

It is unknown when George joined up or transferred to the 1st Bn., which having fought in the Battle of Aubers Ridge in May 1916, transferred with the 24th Brigade to the 23rd Division on 18 October 1915. During 1916 the Brigade helped to relieve the French 17th Division in the Carency sector and the attack on Contalmaison, and on 15 July 1916 transferred back to the 8th Division, with the Battalion taking over trenches at Cuinchy and then moving back to the front at Somme. During 1917 they were involved with the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Pilkem, The Battle of Langemarck, and the Third Battle of Ypres.

It was presumably during the first action of the Third Battle of Ypres that George was wounded.

The War Diary of the 1st Battalion Worcestershire Regiment provides information on their positions and actions in July and August 1917. Prior to George’s death on 12 August, the Battalion was in reserve and under training so it seems likely that he was wounded before August.

This would have been during the Battle of Pilckem Ridge, 31 July – 2 August 1917, which was the opening attack of the Third Battle of Ypres. On 31 July, the Anglo-French armies captured Pilckem Ridge and areas either side, the French attack being a great success. However, heavy rain fell during the afternoon of 31 July, just as German regiments from specialist counter-attack Eingreif divisions intervened. The reserve brigades were forced back and the German counter-attack was stopped by massed artillery and small-arms fire.

The Diary noted that they had made an extensive advance on 31 July near Hooge and onto the Bellewarde Ridge, toward Westhoek, in which action tanks were also used. However, in the later part of the action on 31 July, they experienced heavy shell fire and also machine gun and sniper fire. The description of the day in the War Diary runs to some four pages and although the Battalion captured 70 Germans, as well as inflicting losses on the enemy, they had three officers and 22 other ranks killed and five officers and 157 other ranks wounded, and one officer and 49 other ranks missing.

It is assumed that George Hanwell was among the 157 wounded and he was presumably taken back to an advanced dressing station or a casualty clearing station before being evacuated to one of the hospitals well behind the lines at Rouen, where he later died of his wounds on 12 August 1917.

George was buried in Plot P. II. D. 14B, in the St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen. His headstone reads ‘God grant him eternal life’.

The St. Sever Cemetery Extension is located within a large communal cemetery situated on the eastern edge of the southern Rouen suburbs. During the First World War, Commonwealth camps and hospitals were stationed on the southern outskirts of Rouen. Most of the hospitals at Rouen remained there for the whole of the war. They included eight general, five stationary, one British Red Cross and one labour hospital, and No.2 Convalescent Depot. The great majority of the dead were taken to the city cemetery of St. Sever. In September 1916, it was found necessary to begin an extension, where the last burial took place in April 1920.

The Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects, recorded a payment on 22 November 1917, to his widow, Georgina, of £3-1-5d and then a payment of a war gratuity of £4-0-0d on 10 November 1919.

George’s Medal Card and the Medal Roll entry showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. There was no 1914-1915 Star, which suggests that he did not go to France until at least 1916.

George Hanwell is commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

George’s son Henry Hanwell’s marriage with Phyllis A Mansfield was registered in Rugby in Q2 1936. They had a son, John H Hanwell whose birth was registered in Q2 1936.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on George Charles HANWELL was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, June 2017.

11th Aug 1917. War Anniversary Commemoration.

WAR ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION.

At the places of worship throughout the United Kingdom on Saturday and Sunday services of intercession for the victory of our arms this world tragedy were held.

At the churches in St Andrew’s parish, Rugby, on Saturday there were celebrations of the Holy Communion and a cycle of prayer throughout the day until Evensong.

On Sunday the form of services authorised by the Archbishops was used, and the charge read at Matins. After a shortened Evensong, the members of the various churches joined in procession in the following order :—Wardens, cross, priest, choir, and congregation. The members of the Parish Church, Holy Trinity, St Phillip’s, and St Andrew’s Mission met near the Hippodrome, and proceeded to the Lower School field, where they were joined by the members of St Peter’s Church. Altogether about 2,000 were in the imposing procession, and there was another 1,000 present at the short intercession service, conducted by the Rector (the Rev C M Blagden). On the platform were the clergy of the churches mentioned and Dr David. The massed choirs were conducted by Mr Hidden (Parish Church organist).

At St. Matthew’s Church on Sunday services were held in commemoration of the War anniversary. The Rev. T. Watson gave an address at early morning prayer meeting, and preached during the day. The collections amounted to nearly £50, and are to start a fund of about £140, which is being raised for a memorial window and tablet to those from the parish who have fallen in the War.

On Sunday last the Rev E Wyman conducted services at Cambridge Street Wesleyan Church in the morning, and at the Market Place Wesleyan Church in the evening. The special form of intercession was used at both places. Mr Wyman gave discourses on “ The Secret of Sustained Strength.” He said with every new problem came a feeling of uneasiness and a growing feeling of pessimism. Our enemies, knowing that anything like panic was impossible, had striven to create a feeling of uneasiness and depression that would reflect upon our Army abroad. But that endeavour had not been successful, as the morale of the British nation at home or abroad was unaffected. The time of waiting would prove a greater strength upon the nation. They needed a lofty vision, for the future spelt freedom. Their source of strength was waiting upon God, Who revealed the secret of strength and of radiant optimism.

Special reference was made to the third anniversary of the War at the Primitive Methodist Church, Railway Terrace, on Sunday evening. The Rev W Vaughan conducted the service. Taking for his text the “ Parable of the loaves,” he dealt with the unifying work of the Divine Spirit. From the process of transforming the separate grains of meal, which represented self centred individuals, into one mass of dough, he illustrated the work of God in the human race as bringing about a brotherhood not only of people within a nation, but a universal brotherhood, including all the nations of the earth, and referred to the progress of the War as a breaking down of the spirit of tyrannical rule as represented by the dynasties based on the so-called Divine right of kings. They looked forward to the triumph of the principles of brotherhood and freedom as the governing principles of the nations of the earth. This, and this only, would be a right ending of the War which, though not yet, was becoming more and more certain.

At the Congregational Church a special service was held in the morning, and was conducted by the Rev Peter Morrison, Kenilworth. There was a good congregation, and the form of service arranged by the National Free Church Council was used. The congregation stood during the reading of the roll of honour, containing the names of Church members who have joined the Army or Navy, and this was very impressive, especially when reference was made to those who have fallen. The sermon was most appropriate the occasion.

There was a good attendance at the open meeting of the Brotherhood, held in the Co-operative Hall on Sunday afternoon. The speaker was the Rev W Vaughan, who stepped into the breach at very short notice. His address was of a wartime character, and the subject was “ Freedom and Independence v Force and Tyranny.” Two solos, “ Just to-day ” and “ Nearer my God to Thee,” were nicely sung by Miss Phyllis Foxon.

At the Baptist Church on Sunday evening the Rev J H Lees (pastor) gave an address on “ The War,” and the American National Anthem was sung.

SUGAR CARDS TO BE ISSUED.

Lord Rhondda has asked the local authorities—namely, the Municipal Borough Councils and the Urban and Rural District Councils—to appoint Food Committees for administering a new scheme of sugar distribution, and later for dealing with other foodstuffs, including bread and meat. For all important foodstuffs the Food Controller will fix a general scale of prices based at each stage on the reasonable profits of traders. The committees will be entrusted with the enforcement of this scale, and will be asked to advise on any necessary modifications of it in their districts. The committees will consist of not more than twelve members ; some members may be co-opted. Each committee must include at least one woman and one representative of labour. The cost, including a special staff, will be a charge on the Exchequer. It will be the first duty of the committees to safeguard the interests of consumers. Immediately the local committees are constituted they will register grocers and other retailers of sugar, and after October 1st no retailer who remains unregistered will be allowed to deal in sugar.

THE HOUSEHOLDER’S DERBY.

The public will not be called upon to move until towards the end of September, when forms of application for sugar cards will be distributed by the Postal Authorities. These forms must be filled up by householders, and show the names, age, sex, and occupation of all members of their households. They must be posted to the Food Office not later than October 5th. The householder will receive from the Food Office a household sugar card, which must be taken to the tradesman from whom he desires to buy his sugar. The tradesman will retain one part. He will stamp the other part with his name or sign, and it must be kept by the customer, who must be prepared to produce it when making purchases. The grocer’s supplies will be authorised by the local food control office on the basis of the number of customers thus registered by him. The reorganisation of sugar distribution under the new scheme cannot be complete before December 30th. It will be the retailer’s duty, when the allowance is made regular, to see that no customer is supplied twice in one week. He may number the cards deposited with him, and keep them in order in a box ; when the purchase for the week is made he can transfer the card bearing the customer’s number to a second.

RUGBY SCHOOL NOTTING HILL CLUB.-During the past Rugby has been invaded a number of fair “ munitioneers ” from London. The girls, sixty in number, belong to the Notting Hill Club, which is supported by past and present members of Rugby School. Each year a camp is held in connection with the Club at Romney ; but this year, at the last moment, the camping ground was required by the Army, and the organisers were forced to seek “ fresh woods and pastures new.” Happily the School Authorities at once came to their assistance, and a hearty invitation was sent to the members to spend their holiday at Rugby—an offer which was gladly accepted. The spacious gymnasium has been fitted up as a dormitory, and the girls, many whom are engaged in high explosive factories, are thoroughly enjoying the quietude of Rugby and their open-air life under the shadow of the famous School, where the time passes only too quickly in cricket, fives, and other outdoor pastimes. The party is in charge of the Rev C S Donald, the head of the Mission, and the local arrangements were made by Mr C P Evers and Mr H C Bradby. On Saturday sixty boys connected with the Mission will arrive.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier G B Morgan, H.A.C, brother-in-law of Mr J M Squires, Rugby, has received a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.

Mrs Hipwell, 110 Oxford Street, has received official news that her husband, G W Hipwell, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in France on May 3rd. He was previously reported missing.

Sapper A Findlay, R.E, of Mr & Mrs James Findlay, of 171 Clifton Road, Rugby, is in the Essex County Hospital, Colchester, suffering from shell wounds received in action after two years’ service in France.

Corpl F Rixom, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mrs Rixom, Claremont Road, was picked out with others to represent the Training School to which they are attached at an investiture by the King. Subsequently the King went over to inspect the unit, and as he was doing so his Majesty noticed the gold stripes on Corpl Rixom’s arm. He stopped and asked all particulars as to how, where and when the wounds indicated were received, and expressed the hope that he was getting on all right.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of Murray School, has received intimation from Mr John C Ensor, late of Rugby, now of Nottingham, that his son, John Leslie Ensor, was killed in action in a coast battle in Flanders. Deceased and his brother Claude, both Old Murrayians, joined at the outbreak of the War. The latter has recently been wounded. As showing how the boys in the trenches remember their old school, we might state that the Headmaster of Murray School has received a letter from an Old Murrayian congratulating the prize-winners at the recent distribution.

THE LATE LIEUT. HART-DAVIES.

At the inquest on Lieut Hart-Davis, whose death was recorded in our columns last week, evidence was given by officers who saw the accident to the effect that on the Friday evening the deceased was flying over the grounds. When, at a low altitude, he was about to land the machine, he probably turned the ’plane down too sharply, which caused it to give a nose dive, and dashed it to the ground. Lieut Hart-Davies was killed immediately, he being the pilot. It was stated that the machine had been in use during the day, and was in perfect condition to the time of the accident. Dr Hunt, R.A.M.C, who also saw the accident, examined the body, and considered that death was due to shock from the fall.—The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

A brother officer writes :—“ A gallant fellow whom we all liked immensely, and are deeply grieved that he should have been fatally injured when he so much wished to go to France, where, doubtless, he would have won honours.”

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

A BRAVE ELECTRICIAN.—The Officer commanding the unit in which Sergt C H Sylvester is serving—the Scots Fusiliers reports :— “ I beg to recommend Sergt C H Sylvester for an immediate award for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on the night of the —— inst-. When we were about to attack – he laid out a cable line right up to the enemy wire, only withdrawing when hotly fired on by the enemy. During our advance on – he was untiring in his efforts to keep up communication with the result that, no matter how quickly our troops advanced, there was always telephone communication to battalion headquarters. In -, where our lines were constantly under shell fire, he was always showing a marked disregard to personal danger by his example, encouraging others ; and although ill, he remained on duty till the battalion was relieved, doing excellent work. He remained with the incoming battalion till they were quite settled down, when eventually he did leave the signal office he was almost unable to walk, and had to helped to the ambulance.”

DEATHS.

HARRIS.—Killed in action in France on July 27th, Pte. J. Harris, 8th Gloucesters, youngest son of Mr. J. Harris, Harborough Magna. A devoted son and brother.

WILKINS.—On October 12th, 1916, Pte Reginald Gerald Wilkins, R.W.R., killed in action (previously reported missing), age 21 years ; the dearly-loved son of Mrs. Wilkins, 22 Cannon Street, St. Albans (late of 32 Regent Street, Rugby).

IN MEMORIAM.

OGBURN.—In loving memory of Pte H Ogburn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed some where in France, on July 30th, 1916.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those who loved him best,
IN a hero’s grave he lies.”
-From his loving wife and children.

Boyce, Arthur Cecil. Died 10th Aug 1917

Arthur Cecil Boyce was not a Rugby lad, although he appears on the Rugby Memorial Gates.

He was born June 1889 in London (Wandsworth), to Arthur and Isabel Boyce. He appears on the census for 1891 and 1901 living with his parents Arthur and Isabel Boyce. On the 1891 Census the family is living in 70 Bellevue Battersea London and in 1901 at 2 Henderson Road Wandsworth London. Arthur’s father was working for the Railways in 1891 as a clerk, in 1901 as an Assistant Railway Superintendent and in 1911 he is a Railway Manager, living at 2 Fitzroy Gardens, Rugby.

Arthur Cecil is not with his parents on the 1911 Census but in at Birkenhead, Cheshire as an Engineering Student at University where he took a first class B.Eng. in 1912 and in the same year was awarded the Burroughs prize for drawing and design.

He went out to Canada as a civil engineer and returned at the outbreak of war as a sapper with the Canadian contingent. He served from February to September 1915 in France and Belgium – in April he was slightly gassed at Ypres, the first time gas was used by the Germans. He came home and was posted with the Royal Engineers at Netley

It was during this time, on 4th January 1916, that he married Kathleen Eve Limrick at St Margaret’s Church, Toxteth Park, in Liverpool. He gave his address as 283 Clifton Road, Rugby, his parents home.

2nd Lieutenant Boyce returned to France with the Royal Engineers and to the Front in July 1916.

He was invalided home from France suffering from an affliction of the throat, nose and teeth. He was on the hospital ship Gloucester Castle which was torpedoed on 31st March 1917 and spent three hours in an open boat.

He returned to Liverpool where he received treatment for his teeth and travelled to Maidenhead for the removal of two troublesome roots. The operation was successful but Arthur collapsed and the attending doctor could not revive him. A later post-mortem discovered his heart had been weakened by the gas and exposure on the open sea

Arthur Cecil Boyce, Lieutenant R.E. 397th Field Coy, died on August 10th 1917. His body was placed on a gun carriage and returned to his home.

The funeral, with full military honours took place at West Norwood Cemetery.

His parents Arthur and Isabel later lived at Malvern, and his wife in Camberwell London.

He left a will and probate was granted to Arthur Boyce, railway district manager at Oxford 29″` September 1917 leaving £47.

A daughter, Joan I K Boyce was born in Liverpool in the second quarter of 1917, She died in Croydon in 1924 at the age of seven. It is not known what happened to his wife.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

4th Aug 1917. A Trade Union Protest

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
RUGBY URBAN TRIBUNAL.

Of the nineteen cases for decision on Thursday evening in last week fourteen concerned local butchers. Mr J J McKinnell presided, and there were also present Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, L Loverock, W H Linnell, and H Yates. Mr H P Highton was the Military representative.

A TRADE UNION PROTEST.

A letter was read from the Rugby Branch of the National Union of Clerks drawing attention to the fact that during the last few months several military units who had been given exemption to find work of national importance had been sent by the officials of the Labour Exchange to fill clerical positions at a local factory, and several were so employed at present. The Union considered this practice reprehensible, unfair, and against the national interest. The case cited a coachbuilder who had been sent by the Labour Exchange to fill a position as material list clerk in the main drawing office of a local factory. This man was of military age, and was thought to a B1 man. This being so, the Union considered it unfair to the other clerks employed in the office that, whereas fully trained clerks in the lowest all medical categories were called to the Colours, they should be asked to train a man from an outside trade as a technical clerk on material list work. The N.U.C failed understand how a coach-builder could become sufficiently proficient under at least twelve months’ training to be of national importance as a clerk, while men of far greater clerical experience were declared to be non-essential. Then, too, if a B1 man (with no experience) was national importance as a clerk, why were trained clerks of all categories being called the Colours ? The clerks doing this particular class of work claimed to be specially trained as the result of experience and hard work, and if they were to train unskilled men sent to them they asked that these men should be ineligible for the Army. In conclusion, the writer said, in justice to themselves and those dependent upon them it was necessary to safeguard the conditions under which and by which they earned their living.—Mr Highton said in the case in question the man was sent to the works as a labourer, but was subsequently transferred to the offices because the other workmen made it “ too hot ” for him.—Mr Wise expressed the opinion that there was a great deal of justice in the complaint, and the Chairman concurred ; but it was pointed out that this matter was not within the purview of the Tribunal, and the Clerk was instructed to reply accordingly.

The case of the Secretary to the Rugby Trades and labour Council was again up for decision.-It was stated that this man had received exemption for a month to enable him to obtain work of national importance, and the Superintendent of the Labour Exchange had suggested that he should undertake the supervision of the structural alterations at the Trades Hall. The Tribunal had Agreed to this ; but the Advisory Committee were of opinion that the work was not of sufficient importance to justify exemption.—Temporary exemption till September was given for work of national importance to obtained.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL AT RUGBY.

The first sitting of the Coventry Munitions Tribunal at Rugby was held at the Court House on Friday in last week. Mr E G M Carmichael presided, and the assessors present were : Mr T W Smith (employers), Mrs Griffiths (women), and Mr W H Dexter (men).

Ernest Albert Eyres Riley, Newbold Road, Rugby, applied for a leaving certificate. He stated that he was a night driver on the power and lighting plant. On one occasion he pointed out to a day charge-hand a fault on the engine, and this man accused him of neglecting his work. This was the only time that the charge-hand had complained to him, and he contended that he was not to blame, rather that the fault lay with the chargehand. Applicant had since left the firm, but they had refused to give him a leaving certificate.—The representative of the firm pointed out that the man worked nearly six weeks after the incident referred to ; but in reply to Mr Morris (General Workers’ Union), applicant stated that he only allowed one week to elapse before giving notice.—Refused.

Walter John Farn, borer, 19 Sun Street, also asked for a leaving certificate. He stated that was wounded at Mons, and had since been discharged from the Army as medically unfit. He had been taken from the machine he was accustomed to work and put on another one, which was obsolete and too hard for him.—The representative of the firm stated that the man’s average weekly earnings were £3 7a.-Farn asked that the machine should inspected by a member of the Tribunal.—Mr Carmichael said thought this was a case in which every consideration should be shown to the man.—The firm’s representative pointed out that the difficulty was that Farn refused to give the machine a trial. It was no harder to work than his present machine.—Sent to medical referee, and ordered to give the machine trial.

For failing to work on several dates, W J Price, 9 Holbrook Avenue, was fined £2.—It was slated that this was a case persistent bad time-keeping, but the respondent contended that on a number of occasions there was no work to in the shop.—Mr Carmichael pointed out that had he had no right to leave work without permission.—The representative of the firm stated that there was no shortage in the department where respondent was employed. If the men were temporarily out of a job they were paid day work rates.

H W Jarvis, 60 Victoria Street, who had been fined on three previous occasions for losing time, was fined for a similar offence.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has come to hand that Major Cecil Nickalls, Hillmorton, has been wounded in the face and arm. The injuries are, fortunately, not very serious.

Sergt E H Rixom, Suffolk Yeomanry, eldest son of Mrs Rixom, Claremont Road, Rugby, has been gazetted second-lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Bombardier C W Packwood. Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr C J Packwood. of 10 St Matthew’s Street, has been wounded in the chest in two places during the recent fighting.

Second-Lieut R L Cowley, Northants Regiment, son of Mr John Cowley, of Brackley, and formerly of Kilsby, has been missing since the historic Battle of the Dunes, and great anxiety is felt his parents, who will be glad of any news respecting him.

Bombardier Albert Goode, Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr A Goode, 78 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been severely wounded, and is now in a base hospital in France. Bombardier Goods is an old St Matthew’s boy, and was a member of the Football XV, which first won the Schools Union Football Shield in 1905. He was employed as an engineer at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s.

The Rev R W Dugdale (curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church) has been appointed chaplain of the Royal Flying Corps in France, and he is at present the only R.F.C chaplain in the Army.

Mr & Mrs Meadows, Inwood Cottage, near Rugby, have received information that their son, Gunner C H Meadows, was seriously wounded with gun-shot in the back on July 20th, and is lying at a casualty clearing station in France. Before joined up on November 1st, 1915, he was employed in the Telegraph Department at Rugby Station (L & N-W).

CORPL J C CHIRGWIN KILLED.

Unofficial news has been received of the death in France of Corpl J C Chirgwin, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, an assistant master at St Matthew’s School. Corpl Chirgwin was 29 years of age and a native of Cornwall. He came to St.Matthew’s School about seven years ago, soon after leaving college. He attested in the early days of the Derby scheme, and was called up eighteen months ago, and proceeded to the front last Christmas. He had two hairbreadth escapes in the recent fighting, and was killed by a stray shell last week. Corpl Chirgwin, who was shortly taking up a commission, was very popular with the pupils and staff of the school, and the news of his death was received with deep regret.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

On Sunday last a memorial service was held at St Peter’s Church, Bourton, for the late Gunner Thomas Wilson, third son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Wilson, Gate Farm, Bourton, and who was killed in action in France on July 10th. He was a splendid specimen of manhood, and was a general favourite amongst the young people in the neighbourhood. Letters of sympathy have been received by his parents from the officers of the regiment, in which he is highly spoken of as being always cheerful, strong, and ever ready to do his duty, and his death will be a great loss to his regiment. Deep sympathy is felt throughout the village for Mr. & Mrs. Wilson and family.

MARRIAGE OF SECOND-LIEUT. L. J. HUNTER.

The marriage of Second-Lieut L J Hunter, Yeomanry, fourth son of Mr & Mrs T Hunter, Elmhurst, Rugby, to Gwenn, only daughter of Mr & Mrs S H Fraser, Kensington at St Andrew’s, Well Street, London, W, on Tuesday, July 31st. The ceremony was performed by the Rev H H Kemble, the uncle of the bride, assisted by the Rev S K Knight, Vicar of St Andrew’s. The service was fully choral, and the hymns, “ O Father all creating ” and “ O Perfect Love,” were sung. The Rev H H Kemble gave a short address. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a gown of white charmeuse and Georgette, with a ninon train embroidered in silver, and carried a sheaf of lilies. Lieut. J. Mitchell, R.F.C., acted as best man. As the bride and bridegroom left the church Mendelsohn’s “ Wedding March ” was played. few relations and friends returned afterwards to the Langham Hotel.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN.

A communication has been received from Headquarters advising the local Food Economy Campaign Committee to suspend its active stimulation of propaganda for a period ; but in order to avoid misapprehension the urgent necessity which still exists for the strictest economy in food consumption is urgently emphasised. The situation in regard to food supplies is still extremely grave. Meanwhile local committees may vigorously address themselves to their normal function of war savings.

DEATHS.

CRAWFORD.-In loving memory of Pte ERIC CLEMENT CRAWFORD, 18th Canadians, who died of wounds in University College Hospital, London, on July 23rd.-“ Greater love hath no man than that he gave his life for his friends.”-From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brother.

HART-DAVIES.-On July 27, 1917 (aeroplane accident) at Northolt, Middlesex), Lieut IVAN BEAUCLERK DAVIES, R.F.C., Rugby ; son of the late Rev John Hart-Davies and Mrs. Hart-Davies, of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire ; aged 39 years.

SPENCER.-Killed in action in France on July 22nd, Pte JAMES BARTLETT SPENCER, 11th R.W.R., son of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer, 94 Wood Street, Rugby.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for his country gave his all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

DUNCUFF.-In ever-loving memory of ARTHUR FRANCES DUNCUFF, dearly beloved husband of Mildred Grace Duncuff, who died of wounds on Aug. 8, 1916.

DUNCUFF.-In ever-loving memory of our son and brother, who died from wounds received in action in France on August 3, 1916 ; aged 22 years 11 months.
“ Death hides, but it cannot divide ;
Thou are but on Christs’s other side.
Thou with Christ and Christ with me,
And so together still are we.”

GOODMAN.-In loving memory of GUNNER FRED GOODMAN, R.F.A., who died from wounds received in action on August 3, 1916 ; aged 20 years. Also Pte W. G. GOODMAN, brother of the above, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, who was killed in action on August 27, 1914 ; aged 29 years.
“ Farewell, dear sons, in a soldiers grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
-From his loving Mother and Father.

GURNEY.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son, Pte HARRY GURNEY, of Church Lawford, who was killed in action on July 30, 1916 ; aged 21 years.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell.
The grief would not have been so hard
For those who loved him well.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think we could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘
Before he closed his eyes.”
-From Mother and Father, Brothers and Sister.

HOWKINS.-In proud and loving memory of Lieut. MAURICE HOWKINS, W.R., R.H.A., elder son of William Howkins, Hillmorton Grounds, Rugby, who gave his life for his country at the Battle of Romani, Egypt, August 4, 1916 ; aged 22 years. Mentioned in despatches for valuable services in the field, F.C.C. “ A fine soldier. I never wish to see a better officer ” (his C.O.).-“ Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a Crown of Life.”

NEAL.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, WILLIAM NEAL, of the Berkshire Regt., who was killed in action on his 19th birthday, July 30, 1916.
“ One year has passed away
Since our great sorrow fell ;
Still in our hearts we mourn the loss
Of him we loved so well.”
-From Father and Mother, Sisters and Brother.

PURTON.-In loving memory of HARRY PURTON, be beloved husband of Sarah Purton, who fell asleep on December 3, 1912. Also Lance-Corpl G. H. PURTON, son of the above, who died of wounds in France on August 6, 1916 ; aged 24 years.
“ His country called, he answered with his life ;
Not gone from memory, not gone from love,
But gone to dwell with his dear father
In God’s bright home above.”
-From his loving Mother, Brother and Sisters.

 

Daniels, Leonard Gordon. Died 4th Aug 1917

Leonard Gordon Daniels was born in Rugby and baptised on 14th January 1898, together with his twin Joseph Henry. Their parents were Leonard Daniels and Annie Amelia (nee Bench) who had married on 28 March 1897 at St Marks Church, Coventry, although both came from Rugby. Annie gave her age as eighteen, but she had probably just turned sixteen. At the time of the twins’ baptism, their parents were living in Earl St, Rugby and Leonard was a bricklayer.

By 1901 they had moved to 57 Oxford Street and a third child, Robert Cecil, the survivor of another pair of twins born in mid 1900 in Birmingham. the other twin William Sidney died soon after birth. In 1911, when Leonard Gordon was 13, they lived at 9 New Street and his father was still working as a bricklayer.

After leaving Murray School, Leonard became a printing apprentice with Mr G E Over.

When the war started, Leonard Gordon Daniels enlisted immediately, on 19th August 1914. He was only 16, but gave his age as 21yr 1mth. He joined the Army Service Corps (driver T/2/14707). On 12 January 1915 he was discharged as unfit for further service; not because of his age, but on medical grounds – a hernia. His description on discharge was sallow complexion, grey eyes, brown hair. He was 5ft 11in tall.

After an operation he signed up again, this time with the 4th Bn, Grenadier Guards (no.23313) on 11th March 1915. This time he gave his age as 20 yr 1mth (he was actually 17)

For some reason (problems with his age?) the army was unable to find the documentation of his service with the A.S.C. His record contains a large collection of correspondence between different departments on the subject until, in January 1916, the Rugby recruiting office explained that “owing to the rush of recruits on outbreak of war, unable to state how documents were disposed of on enlistment”

It is not known if this delayed his deployment, but he arrived in France in February 1917. The Grenadier Guards had joined the 4th Guards Brigade of the 31st Division and at some point Leonard was promoted to Lance Corporal.

Leonard Gordon Daniels  was wounded on 31st July 1917, the first day of the Battle of Pilckem.

He died on the 4th August 1917 and was buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery.

Westvleteren was outside the front held by Commonwealth forces in Belgium during the First World War, but in July 1917, in readiness for the forthcoming offensive, groups of casualty clearing stations were placed at three positions called by the troops Mendinghem, Dozinghem and Bandaghem.

The 4th, 47th and 61st Casualty Clearing Stations were posted at Dozinghem and the military cemetery was used by them until early in 1918.

There are 3,174 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the cemetery and 65 German war graves from this period.

In a letter to his parents, reported in The Rugby Advertiser of 11th August, an officer of the Battalion wrote that

“Corpl Daniels was gallantly leading his Lewis Gun Section into action… I was by his side when he was hit, and I can assure you that everything possible was immediately done for him. I do not think he suffered any pain. I have been his platoon commander ever since he came to France. It was chiefly by my recommendation that he won his stripes, and he has always done his work to my entire satisfaction. He was a great favourite with all the platoon, and he leaves a gap which will, indeed, be hard to fill.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM