19th May 1917. A Rugby Lady Honoured

A RUGBY LADY HONOURED.

For good work at Caterham and other places, the Royal Red Cross has been bestowed by the King upon Miss E C Ellis, who for several years before the War commenced had been living in Horton Crescent, Rugby. Miss Ellis went up for investiture last week, and was received by the King and Queen at Buckingham Palace, and subsequently by Queen Alexandra at Marlborough House.

OLD ST MATTHEW BOY HONOURED.—P.C Herbert Archer, of the Metropolitan Police Force, son of Mr T Archer, of 41 York Street, has recently received the King’s Medal in recognition of bravery he displayed in March last year, when he rescued a boy from drowning in a caisson chamber at Rosyth Dockyard. The depth of the water was 40ft, and the constable showed conspicuous heroism in effecting the rescue. It was dark at the time, and he incurred great personal risk in entering the water. He has been presented already with the Royal Humane Society’s Medal and honoured by the Carnegie Hero Fund Trustees. The King’s Police Medal is usually handed to the recipient by his Majesty in person ; but owing to the War the presentation ceremony took place at the Dockyard, and the medal was handed to P.C Archer by the Rear Admiral Superintendent, who pointed out that this medal was not easily gained, but was only bestowed in cases of exceptional gallantry. P.C Archer, who was an old St Matthew’s boy and played in the first team from that school to win the Rugby School Shield in 1904-5, suitably replied.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The name of Sec.Lt. M H House (Rifle Brigade) is amongst the latest published list of officer casualties. At Rugby School he was in Mr G F Bradby’s house and was a prominent member of the 1916 Cricket XI.

Capt and Adjt R M Gotch, Sherwood Foresters, wounded and missing on July 1, 1916, now believed killed, gained his football cap at Rugby School, and during the 1913-14 season played forward for the Harlequin.

Sergt P G Miles, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, for several years a constable in the County Police Force, has been wounded in France. Miles was formerly in the Rugby and Stratford-on-Avon Division.

Capt Percy H Hollick, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is the fifth Coventry solicitor who has died at the front. A son of the late Mr Alfred Hollick, an Allesley farmer, the young officer was articled to his profession in Coventry, and early in the War joined the Honourable Artillery Co., and subsequently obtained his commission. He was wounded more than once.

NEW BILTON MAN KILLED.
Mr J Young, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has received information that his only son, Pte W C Young, of the Worcester Regiment, was killed in action on April 24th. Pte Young, who was about 23 yearn of age, was employed at the B.T H Lamp Factory, and enlisted in March, 1916.

DEATH OF A FORMER B.T.H PUPIL IN FRANCE.
Members of the Rugby Men’s Adult School learnt with sincere regret on Sunday morning of the death of Mr Kenneth Smith, who until the War broke out was actively associated with the school, and was working as a student apprentice at the B.T.H Works. It was decided to ask Mr Herbert Edmundson, the school president, to send a communication to the bereaved relatives, indicating the sense of the loss sustained by the school, and expressing appreciation of the high character of the late Mr Smith.

SERGT-MAJOR CLEAVER DIES OF WOUNDS.
Company-Sergt-Major Cleaver, Royal Warwicks, was wounded in action on May 8th, and died the following day. He was a native of Stockton, and had served upwards of 21 years in the Army, during which period he saw much foreign service. He went all through the South African campaign, and gained the Queen’s Medal and six bars. He was also mentioned in despatches on September 4th, 1901. He had a medal for 19 years’ long service and good conduct. After a serious operation, he was appointed drill instructor to the 7th (T) Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and was two years at Coventry and five years with “ E ” Company at Rugby, residing at the Drill Hall Cottage. He was mobilised with the battalion on the outbreak of War ; and in June, 1915, was promoted warrant officer. Deceased who was 42 years of age, leaves a widow and five children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

Major Claude Seabroke, in a sympathetic letter to the widow, said the news came as a great blow to him, for he felt that he had lost one of his greatest and truest friends. It was difficult to realise all at once all that the regiment owed to her late husband ; but, without doubt, during all those years of devoted and loyal service he gave of this very best ungrudgingly. To all the members of “ E ” Company, whom he had trained and helped, he had left a memory of a splendid example of a zealous soldier, who had passed gloriously, as he would have wished. He was an example to them all of unflagging industry and of the highest integrity, and in all that he did ‘Honour was his guiding star.’

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary, Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Regent Street, Rugby, who will gratefully acknowledge same.

RUGBY AND RUSSIA.

In connection with the recent Russian Flag Day, held in Rugby, the hon organiser, Mr J Reginald Barker, has received the following letter, dated May 11th :-

“ DEAR SIR,—May I, on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Russian Flag Day, express our deep gratitude for your invaluable aid to our Red Cross work ? We feel we owe a deep debt to everyone who has assisted us, to the local authorities for their patronage, to the organisers for their brilliant ability, to the sellers for their generous self-sacrifice, and to the residents for their warm-hearted support. I can assure you that we shall not forget, nor will Russia, what has been done, and in time to some we hope that your efforts will remain a pleasant and gratifying memory to yourselves, so it will be a sources of permanent indebtedness on our part.—Yours faithfully, CHARLES WATNEY, Hon Secretary, the Russian Flag Day.”

THE FOOD PROBLEM IN RUGBY.

There can no longer be any doubt that the food position in this country is serious. If scarcity, amounting to real want, is to be avoided, every class must practice the strictest economy in the consumption of all bread-stuffs. The German submarine campaign, coupled with a short wheat harvest last season throughout the world, has brought our surplus stocks of corn to danger point.

It should be clearly understood that the officials of the Food Ministry are watching carefully from day to day the danger-line below which the stocks of cereals in this country cannot be allowed to fall ; and although preparations are in progress to establish rationing machinery when the point of danger has been reached, it is hoped that the success of the voluntary campaign may avert the necessity for compulsion. The issue really rests with the people.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

WAR CHARITIES ACT.
The Rugby Waste Paper Committee was registered under the above Act.—The Chairman said it would be very interesting to Council to learn that Mr Barker had already collected something like 3 tons of waste paper.—Mr Evers congratulated the General Purposes on the arrangements made.—The Chairman : No thanks are due to the committee. The arrangements were made by Mr Barker and Mrs Blagden.—Mr Yates : Then congratulations are due to the committee for not stopping these people in any way (laughter).

THANKS FROM THE V.T.C.
A letter was read from Captain Fuller, thanking the Council for their kindly recognition of the V.T.C and the promise of financial support voted at the last meet of the Council. He assured them that their help and expression of goodwill would be of great assistance to them. The A and B men of the Battalion had been selected with similar men from one of the other battalions in the regiment to into the front line in the event of any invasion emergency arising, and they looked upon this as a compliment, and hoped it would be the means of more men joining the Corps, whose past excuse had been that them was no use for the force. He hoped the Local Government Board would raise no difficulty to the amount voted being handed over for purpose of Rugby Corps, and he added that he had noticed lately that where similar grant was made by a council the money was refunded by the Territorial Force Association to the Corps in consequence of the intention of the gift being expressed to be for the benefit solely of particular a corps. With reference to the last paragraph, the Council agreed with the Chairman that it was their wish that the grant should be applied solely for the use of the Rugby Corps.—Mr Wise said he was sorry that so few members of the general public were present at the inspection on Sunday. Anyone who was there must have been struck by the smart appearance the Corps made and the wonderfully efficient way in which they did their drill.

IN MEMORIAM.

PORTER.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, GEORGE RUPERT PORTER ; aged 21 years. Killed in action at St. Elia on May 8, 1915.

ROBINSON.-In ever-loving memory of FRED, who gave his life for his country on May 11, 1915.-“ Lost but never forgotten.”-BEATIE.

YOUNG.-In loving memory of PTE WILLIAM COTTERILL YOUNG, who was killed in action with the Forces in Salonika, on April 25th, 1917, the 25th year of his age. Deeply mourned.
Somewhere there is a nameless grave
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.
—From his FATHER and MOTHER and SISTERS, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Rugby.

 

 

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