28th Apr 1917. Eat Less Bread and Avoid Waste

EAT LESS BREAD AND AVOID WASTE.

The wheat crop of 1916 was a failure the world over. How intimately that shortage affects this country is obvious when we remember that before the War we imported four-fifths of our wheat supplies. Indeed of all the food we ate we brought three-fifths across the   seas. To-day we are short of food ships to bring our[?] wheat ; hundreds of the vessels which formerly carried food are plying purely in the interests of our Army, and those of our Allies. The keynote of the campaign must, therefore, be ; CONCENTRATE ON THE SAVING OF BREAD. That, first and foremost, is the necessity of the moment.

The mass of the population must have bread. To the poor it is the chief necessity of life, for it to cheap and needs no cooking. Not only people of means, but those who at present are earning high wages, can afford to buy and cook other foods. Let the cheaper foods—cheap rabbits, the cheaper cuts of meat, the more popular kinds of fish—be left for those who cannot afford to buy anything else. The rich can endure breadless days, but the poor cannot.

Another aspect of the campaign is TO CHECK WASTE. Waste of any kind of food is, under the present stress of war, not only selfish and disloyal, but criminal. Before the War, it has been said, the nation could have lived on the food it wasted, and the waste is still very great. Waste of meat, of vegetables, waste in over-cooking or in over-eating-the campaign aims at checking all the forms of helping Germany.

To bring home to the people the enormous losses in the food supply by the apparently trivial waste of food which goes on daily, the Food Controller has issued a series of leaflets, of which the following is an example :

MR SLICE-o’-BREAD.
“ I am a slice of Bread.
I measure three inches by two-and-half, and my thickness is half-an-inch.
My weight to exactly an ounce.
I am wasted once a day by 48,000,000 people in Britain.
I am the “ bit left over;” the slice eaten absent mindedly when really I wasn’t needed ; I am the waste crust.
If you collected me and my companions for a whole week you would find that we amounted to 9,380 tons of good bread—WASTED !
Two Shiploads of Good Bread !
Almost as much—striking an average—as two German submarines could sink—even if they had p[?] luck.
When you throw me away or waste me you are adding twenty submarines to the German Navy.”

TO UTILISE WASTE PAPER.
A LOCAL SCHEME.

Probably no result of the War has been brought home to the public generally more emphatically than shortage of paper, due to the great reduction in the quantity of pulp and other materials for making it being imported from abroad. There are, however, in the country vast accumulations of paper which might be used up and re-manufactured if it could only find its way to the mills. Any white paper, whether printed or written upon or not, such as newspapers, letters, old receipts, and other documents too numerous to describe, old account books, magazines, novels, &c, can be utilised ; and in order to facilitate the collection of these materials and have them forwarded to the proper quarters for re-manufacture, an organisation has been formed in Rugby, which, if adequately supported, cannot fail to have gratifying results. In conjunction with Mrs Blagden, of The Rectory, Mr J Reginald Barker has undertaken to receive all waste paper of the kind mentioned, and see that it is properly baled and sent off to certain mills, the owners of which will pay good price per ton for it—much higher than the rates which have usually been paid on waste paper.

All the proceeds will be devoted to Rugby charities, so that no one will make a personal profit, and all who help will know they are gaining a twofold advantage by helping to maintain the paper supply and assisting charity.

Mr W T C Hodges, headmaster of Murray School, and Mr W T Simmonds, headmaster of Elborow Schools, have made arrangements to collect the waste from people’s houses, and a postcard addressed to either of these gentlemen will receive prompt attention.

Those who turn out old letters, documents, account books, &c, are assured that they will be carefully baled, despatched, and destroyed without being subjected to the scrutiny of prying eyes.

All stiff covers should be removed from books before being handed over to the collectors. It is estimated that several tons per month can be collected in Rugby, and a very handsome sum may in due course be available for disposal in charitable objects.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Frank Leslie Hogg, second son of Mr and Mrs George Hogg, of the Eagle Hotel, has passed as a Second Air Mechanic into the Royal Flying Corps, and is now stationed at Farnham.

A PURE BRED BELGIAN HARE rabbit, belonging to Harry Redgrave Lovell, the infant son of P C Lovell, was sold by Mr W Wiggins in Rugby Cattle Market on Monday for the Red Cross Funds, £5 being realised.

Mr T Johnson, High Street, has received information that his son, 2nd-Lieut H T Johnson, of the 129th Field Company, Royal Engineers, was wounded in the shoulder last week in France. He has now been removed to a London hospital.

A letter has been received from Pte Huckle, R.A.M.C — a member of the Rugby St John Ambulance Brigade — whose home is at 14 Spring Street, Rugby, stating that he was on a hospital ship that was recently torpedoed.

Pte T Lane, Durham Light Infantry, of Bridget Street, formerly employed at the Newbold Road Co-operative Stores, has sustained a badly shattered arm and other wounds ; Corpl L G Archer, Bennett Street, has been severely wounded, and his right arm has been amputated ; and Lance-Corpl W Labraham, Little Pennington Street, has been wounded in Palestine. All three are Old St Matthew’s boys.

Lieut R C Herron, of the Second Anzacs Supply Column (whose marriage with Miss Thompson, of Paradise Street, Rugby, we recently announced), has been promoted to the rank of captain and adjutant.

Corpl Bert Wilkins (bandsman), of the Rifle Brigade, was killed on the 4th inst. He was brought up from childhood by Mrs Kempton, 67 King Edward Road, and before joining Kitchener’s Army at the age of 16 was employed at the B.T.H Works, and was a drummer in the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade. Mrs Kempton’s eldest son has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the Battle of Mons. Her youngest son had been twice wounded, and went back to the front as recently as a month ago.

RUGBY PLATELAYER WINS D.C.M.

Corpl Ernest W Hallam of the Railway Section of the Royal Engineers, whose wife lives at the New Station, has won the D C M. Before joining the army he was a platelayer in Rugby Coal Yard.

LIEUT J J McKINNELL AGAIN WOUNDED.

Mr J J McKinnell has received news that his son, Lieut J J McKinnell, of the R.W.R, has been seriously wounded in the ankle. Some time ago Lieut McKinnell was wounded, and he had only returned to the front a fortnight when he received his present injury.

BRANDON.

PRIVATE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs T Ward have received news that their son, Pte J Ward, of the Warwicks, has been wounded in the left shoulder and face. ‘Mr and Mrs Ward’s four sons joined up—one, Charlie, has been killed ; Jack has lost the sight of one of his eyes from wounds, and the other son was invalided home. Much sympathy is felt for them in their trouble. Mr Ward himself has been ill for some length of time.

RUGBY WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, SATURDAY, JUNE 2.

WILL YOU HELP THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE TO MAKE THIS EFFORT A SUCCESS BY TAKING UP A COLLECTION IN YOUR OWN HOME EVERY WEEK UNTIL SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd ?

It is very necessary that Generous Support be given to ensure that the Men from Rugby and District who have fallen into the hands of the enemy shall not lack the Food necessary to keep them in Health and Strength.

ANOTHER RUGBY HOSPITAL.

Colonel and Mrs Mulliner recently offered to lend and to entirely equip Clifton Court as a hospital, and this generous offer has now been accepted by the Military Authorities, who will devote it to wounded officers of the Royal Flying Corps.

Mrs Mulliner will act as commandant, and the voluntary aid detachment will consist entirely of local ladies.

The charming situation and beautiful gardens of Clifton Court make it an ideal place for convalescent patients.

ONE MAN BUSINESSES.

Dear Mr Editor,-—A conference comprising committees appointed by the Urban and Rural District Councils of Rugby, and the Rugby Chamber of Trade, has been formed with a view to framing a scheme for assisting owners of one man businesses in Rugby, in the event of their being called up for military or national service. Will anyone interested in the scheme kindly communicate with the secretary, at the address given below, by Wednesday, the 2nd May ? Yours faithfully, T Wise, Chairman, H LUPTON REDDISH, Secretary, Market Place, Rugby.

DEATHS.

PYWELL.—Killed in action, on Easter Monday, Sergt. F. W. Pywell, of London (Middlesex) Regiment, youngest son of E. Pywell, 23 Sandown Road, Rugby ; aged 30.

THORNEY.—Died in France on April 10th of wounds received in action, ALFRED, the second and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Thorney, Rose and Crown, Basingstoke.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVIS.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private ROLAND DAVIS, of New Bilton, who was killed in action in France on April 27, 1916.-Not forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS.

GREEN.—In loving memory of Private JOHN GREEN, of Catthorpe, who died in Tidworth Military Hospital on April 16, 1914 ; aged 35 years.—“ His memory is as fresh to-day as the hour in which he passed away.” — Never forgotten by his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTER.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, HERBERT, who was killed in action at Ypres on April 27, 1915.
“ Two years have passed since Jesus called him ;
As time goes on we miss him more.
His loving smile, his kindly face,
No one can fill his vacant place.
Not dead to those who love him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory,
And will for ever more.”
—From PARENTS, SISTERS and BROTHER, Kilsby.

OGBURN.—In loving memory of my dear husband. Pte. CHARLES ROBERT OGBURN, who died April 26, 1916.—“ He is gone but not forgotten.”

OWEN.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother. GEO. ERNEST OWEN (TAS), Royal Warwicks., who fell in action at Ypres on April 25, 1915. — “ He nobly answered duty’s call, and gave his life for one and all.”—Never forgotten by DAD, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

ROBBINS.—In affectionate remembrance of Lance-Corpl. F. ROBBINS, Royal Warwicks., who was killed in action in France on April 30, 1916.
“ Sleep on, beloved, in a far-off grave :
A grave I may never see ;
But as long as life and memory last
I will remember thee.”
—From EM.

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2 thoughts on “28th Apr 1917. Eat Less Bread and Avoid Waste

  1. In Memoriam
    The article of John Green of Catthorpe . is the date correct ?
    In Newspaper index we find a John Green

    • Well spotted. Yes, the John Green referred to here is the the John Green who died in 1915. It is not our mistake, but that of the Rugby Advertiser of 100 years ago – it is clearly printed 1914. Perhaps there will be an apology next week.

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