17th Feb 1917. Do not Worry too much about Submarines

Mr and Mrs C Chater, of 7 Plowman Street, Rugby, have received official notification that their son, Pte W T Chater, Royal Warwicks, has died from wounds received in action in Mesopotamia on January 23rd. He was 20 years of age, and at the time of joining up in September, 1915, was employed by Mr W Elliott, mineral water manufacturer. As a footballer, he used to play for St Matthew’s.

Mrs Satchell, 94 Park Road, Rugby, has received notice from the War Office that her son, Pte W F W Satchell, 1/6th Warwicks (Terr), was wounded on February 4th in France, and is now in the 1st Australian General Hospital, Rouen.

As showing the fine spirit of our boys at the front, a member of the R.A.C writes : “ One night we (a party of stretcher-bearers) were awaiting a convoy of wounded. It was raining terribly hard, and one of the boys suddenly started singing, ‘ Adieu, adieu, kind friends adieu,’ when a wag chimed in : ‘Call it a dew, do you ? I reckon it’s raining bally hard !’”

Much regret has been occasioned in Coventry by the news of the death in France, from bronchitis and asthma, of Lance-Corpl W J McGhie, of the Machine Gun Corps(Heavy Section). Born in Rugby and educated in Edinburgh, Mr McGhie went to Coventry 21 years ago on the editorial staff of the “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” and at the time of his enlistment in June last he was joint editor of that journal. An enthusiast in matters musical, his death is a real loss to the musical life of Coventry. He took a keen interest in Association footfall, and assisted to organise the Coventry City F.C when the club first launched out into high-class football. He went to France about three months after enlistment in the Army, and took part in the fighting during the succeeding months, being slightly wounded at Thiepval. He leaves a widow and two children. His mother was a daughter of the late Mr W I Tait, the founder of the Advertiser, and is noteworthy that the death of his cousin, Mr Roland Tait of Rugby, was recorded in the same week.

RAZORS WANTED FOR THE TROOPS.

A Post Office notice states that razors are urgently needed for troops, and will be thankfully received at the Post Office. The condition of the razor is not important so long as there is a blade which can be re-ground—the Cutlers’ Company, Sheffield, having undertaken to put them in proper order.

AIDED BY THE TRANSFUSION OF BLOOD.

Mrs J Dunn, 2 Round Street, Rugby, has received information that her husband, Pte J Dunn, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been admitted to a casualty hospital in France, suffering from severe wounds. In a letter to Mrs Dunne, a sister of the hospital says : “ Pte Dunn was seriously wounded in the leg, and suffered from shock and loss of blood.” She added, “ The surgeon specialist said it would be necessary to amputate the leg, but he was in such bad condition that he did not think he could live through the operation, so he tried to stimulate him instead, and to get him into better condition. He asked if someone would give their blood for him, and as usual with these brave men, several offered, and Pte T Carter, of the Royal Sussex, was chosen and his blood was transferred into your husband. After this he was able to stand the operation, and his leg was amputated.” The writer added that owing to the great amount of infection which had gone through the body Pte Dunn was still in a serious condition, but they hoped he would soon be returned back to health again.

SIR DOUGLAS HAIG’S PREDICTION.

In the French newspapers on Tuesday there appeared confident statements by Sir Douglas Haig on the prospects of the Allied offensive. There is no doubt, he says, that the German front in the West—which is, and Will remain, the principal front of operations—will be broken by the Franco-British Armies. This year will be decisive in the sense that it will see the war decided on the battlefield, an event after which Germany will appear defeated militarily. It may be that the year of decision will also be the year of peace, but if Germany cannot be entirely beaten this year we shall not hesitate to carry on the war.

“ DO NOT WORRY TOO MUCH ABOUT SUBMARINES.”

Speaking at Greenwich on Saturday, Captain Hamilton Benn, M.P, read the following message from Vice-Admiral Sir Reginald Bacon :-

“ Do not worry too much about submarines. The Navy will give all the worry they want. The splendid pluck of our merchant seamen will upset the German calculations at the end of the War.”

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