10th Feb 1917. Vicar of St Matthews not going to France

VICAR OF ST. MATTHEW’S NOT GOING TO FRANCE.

The Rev C T Aston, vicar of St Matthew’s, who had made full arrangements to work in France for four months under the auspices of the Soldiers’ Christian Association, was notified by the society last week that the Government had withdrawn all permits to civilian passengers to France, so that he will be unable to go, as anticipated. Mr Aston is naturally much disappointed, as he was looking forward to doing useful service at the Front. We understand that the Rev P E Warrington (curate at St Matthew’s), who will be leaving Rugby in a few weeks, had arranged with the Vicar and the Bishop of Worcester to stay in charge of the parish during Mr Aston’s absence.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Major J L Baird, M.P, C.M.G, D.G.O, is announced as Parliamentary Secretary of the Air Board.

Mr F J Paxton, formerly on the office staff of the Co-operative Society, has now been accepted in the Army Pay Corps, and is at present stationed at Warwick. He was organist at Lilbourne and Brownsover, and deputy choirmaster at Crick.

Mr Walter Howkins has received a letter from Sergt H K Marriott, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was formerly a pupil in his office. Writing from Palestine, he gives some interesting particulars of their mode of life, and, referring to some of his comrades, he says young Briscoe from Dunchurch has been badly wounded. Squadron Sergt-Major J Tait is very well, and an excellent soldier. Capt E G Pemberton, of Claybrooke, had been slightly wounded. He adds : “ I am trying to got a commission in the Northampton Yeomanry, and hoped to hear something about it before long.

ANOTHER ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY KILLED.

Information has come to hand that Pte T Chater, 9th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on January 24th. Pte Chater, whose home was at 7 Plowman Street, was an old scholar of St Matthew’s School, and enlisted early in the war.

VOLUNTEER FORCE.

The first medical inspection for the Rugby Volunteer Corps under the new regulations was held on Sunday afternoon last, when 92 members presented themselves with satisfactory results. Nearly the whole of the men signed on for service for the period of the War, and the recent letter of the King calling on men to join the Force who are over military ago or prevented from joining the Army should have the effect of considerable swelling the ranks of the Corps.

THE VICTORY WAR LOAN.

The indicator on the Clock Tower has commenced its second round, and yesterday (Friday) morning it showed that during the week a further sum of £6,500 had been subscribed to the new 5 per cent Loan or War Savings Certificates. The total, £14,600, represents small amounts from £50 down to 3d paid in either : through the Post Office, the Bureau at the Benn Buildings, or the War Savings Certificates Clubs.

Considerable further amounts have been invested through the local Banks.

Among the amounts published are : Bluemel Bros, Wolston, £40,000 ; Lodge Sparking Plug Co, Rugby, £25,000.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.—At the Coventry Tribunal on Monday, J T Lamb, employed at a Rugby factory, applied for a leaving certificate, which was refused. Lamb had refused to work on until his case was heard, and a month had already elapsed, so that only two weeks remained to complete his six weeks’ waiting time.

TANKS FILM AT THE EMPIRE.—Next week, thanks the enterprise of Mr B Morris, of the Empire, Rugby people will have the opportunity of seeing the Tanks as our brave soldiers saw them going into action against the enemy. The Tank film, which is even more enthralling in its illuminating detail than the Great Somme Film, shows every phase of the great Battle of the Ancre, including the thrilling moment of attack. The Tanks are shown from their start to their triumphant return, and the spectators are able to watch them creeping from their hiding-places and follow them till they cross the trenches and wonder over “ No Man’s Land,” and crush down the German wire entanglements. Everywhere the film has attracted large crowds, and there is no doubt that Rugby people will avail themselves of the privilege of gaining an impression of war conditions in France.

 

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