20th Jan 1917. No Grain for Pheasants

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

THE NEW FOOD ORDERS.
NO GRAIN FOR PHEASANTS.

An 81 per cent wheaten loaf will come into existence by order of Lord Davenport, the Food Controller, on January 29.

Unless the loaf be made of wheat milled to the extent of 81 per cent, the flour must be
mixed with oats, maize, barley, or rice up to that percentage.

Other Orders made by Lord Devonport on Thursday last week were :

Wheat must be used only for seed and floor.
No grain food must be given to pheasants or game birds.
Sweet-making must be reduced by half.
No chocolates may be sold dearer than 4s a lb, and no other sweets dearer than 2s 6d a lb.
No sugar-covered or chocolate-covered cakes must be made.
No milk must be used for milk chocolate before April 1st next.
Export of oats from Ireland is prohibited.
The wholesale price of 1916 potatoes (those now in use), will be £8 a ton—i.e, a shade less than [?] a pound.
Prices are fixed for seed potatoes to plant now.
Very soon Lord Devonport will issue Orders as to the control and distribution of bread, meat, sugar, and milk.

PIG KEEPING.

All pig-keepers, notwithstanding the present high price of feeding stuffs, are urged to make every possible effort to maintain the supply of pigs. Sows with access to shelter will pick up a considerable part of the food they require out of doors. Where grass is scarce, a few swedes or mangolds, together with a pound or two of beans or finely-ground palm kernel cake, will serve to carry most sows through till farrowing time. For fattening pigs, 8 pounds of swedes, boiled, are equivalent to one pound of cereal meals or offals. Small or blemished potatoes are twice as valuable as swedes for feeding purposes ; but these should be reserved for the later stages of fattening.

To supplement roots, the cheapest and most suitable foods at the present time are finely ground palm kernel cake, bean meal, maize gluten feed, and dried grain. Later on, clover, sainfoin, and lucerne, will be available in place of roots, and small holders should consider whether they can find space to add these to their crops.

Edible domestic refuse should be reserved as far as possible for pig-feeding. The pig pail should be kept free from brine, lemons, corks, tins, wire, and other injurious substance.

For fuller information and guidance the Board Leaflet No. 298, on Pig Keeping (free by poet on application), should be consulted.

THE L & N.W & ALLOTMENTS.—The L & N.W Railway Company announce that they will consider applications for the use during the present emergency of vacant land both inside and outside the railway fences, subject to a short agreement and the payment of a nominal rent of 1s per annum. Applicants should address their inquires to the nearest station-master.

LOCAL AID FOR ALLIES’ FARMERS.—According to the latest list issued by the Agricultural Relief of Allies Fund (16 Bedford Square, London, W.C) the central counties of England are credited with the following contributions to the fund :—Notts, £2,608 ; Shropshire, £2,581 ; Northants, £1,847 ; Warwickshire, £1,124 ; Leicestershire, £1,092 ; and Worcestershire, £189.

PRESENTATION.—On Friday evening last week, at the Peacock Hotel, Mr F T Lambert was presented with a gold watch, suitably inscribed, by the soldier munition workers (numbering over 100) employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Works, in recognition of services rendered. Gunner Townsend made the presentation, and the recipient suitably replied. The remainder of the evening was spent in harmony.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Among those mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches published was Lieut C H Shaw (Hussars), only son of Mr J F Shaw, of Bourton Hall.

Lieut R C Herron, M.T, A.S.C, son of Mr R Herron, of Great Bowden, and formerly of Rugby, was among the list of names mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s recent despatch.

PRISONERS OF WAR.

Two more local men have recently fallen into the hands of the Germans. Private A Goodwin, of Rugby, 1st South Staffordshire Regiment, has been interned at Dulmen, and Private E Rollins, of Newton, Oxford & Bucks L.I., is interned at Wahn. In both cases Mr Barker has made arrangements for the men to receive the regulation food parcels. Goodwin will be “ adopted ” by his Regimental Care Committee and Rollins by the Rugby Committee.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Lieut. Geoffery H. T. Wanstall, Dorset Regiment, brother of the Rev H C Wanstall, Vicar of Wollaston, Stourbridge, has been severely wounded in France, and is now in a Red Cross Hospital at Le Touquet.

MR J E COX’S SON WOUNDED

News was received from the War Office (Tuesday) morning that G H Cox, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of Mr and Mrs J E Cox, of Lodge Farm, Lawford, was wounded in Egypt on January 9th. Further particulars are not known.

ANOTHER B.T.H MAN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H this week that Pte C B Crossby, of the 11th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, died on November 16th from wounds received whilst acting as a stretcher-bearer. Before the War Pte Crossby was employed in the Carbon Lamp Department.

SOLDIERS’ GRAVES.

The Cemetery Committee had considered the question of setting apart a portion of the Burial Ground for the interment of Rugby soldiers dying through the war and brought home for interment. They recommended that, owing to the lack of room in the Cemetery, no portion be set apart for such interments, but that a selected grave be provided free in every case.

THE REV. C. T. BERNARD McNULTY ON HIS ARMY EXPERIENCE.
BROTHERHOOD IN THE RANKS.

The Rev C T Bernard McNulty, vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, and formerly vicar of Dunchurch, has returned to his parish, after an absence of two years and a half at the front as Territorial Army Chaplain.

Preaching on Sunday, he said that in the ranks there was real brotherhood. Men and officers were liable to the same fear, the same anxieties, and the same sorrows and the officers thought first of the men and the men first of the officers.

“ There is no brotherhood so wonderful as the brotherhood which exists in the Army, and once a man puts on khaki he is admitted into that brotherhood. I have learned this lesson in the last two and a half years : Whether you are rich or whether you are poor ; whether you are high or low Church; whether you are Church of England, Roman Catholic, or Nonconformist, or whether you are orthodox Christian or not, when you come to face death, when you come down to the bedrock of the real thing that matters there is nothing much to choose between any of us.”

“ THE EMPIRE’S FIGHTERS.”

This famous war film, for which Mr B Morris paying the largest fee ever paid by a Rugby Cinema proprietor, is being shown at the Empire this week and on Monday there were full “ houses ” at each show. The photographs were taken by Mr H D Girdwood, B.[?] F.R.G.S, geographer and historical photographer to the Indian Government, in many instances under hostile shell fire. The film gives a very vivid impression of life at the front, and of the excellent work which is being done by the gallant British regiments and their brothers-in-arms from India. English Lancers, Jacob’s Horse, Jodhpur Lancers, King’s Dragoon Guard, Gurkhas, Indian and English Artillery, are all shown together with the necessary but often underestimated work of the A.S.C and the R.A.M.C. Several actual incidents in the firing line are depicted, including capture of a German trench by the Gurkhas and the work of consolidating the position, which is shown to be not the simple process many have imagined. Another striking scene is a charge by the Leicesters, who are seen to fall in all directions, but who doggedly had their way through the barbed wire and capture the position. The film is accompanied by Mr Girdwood and his explanations of the incidents add greatly to the interest. Mr Morris has invited the soldiers at the local Red Cross Hospitals to visit the Empire free of charge, and arrangements have also been made for the children attending the Elementary Schools to see the film.

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